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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Mom has dementia
Posted by: SandrAruba, Friday, May 18, 2012, 9:05pm
What type of dementia, we don't know yet, but probably not Alzheimer. Her short term memory is completely gone. She came to visit in December and still hasn't left, yet she has no idea she is here for almost 6 months now. It looks like a form of dementia limited to the frontal part of her brain. They are suspecting she had some sort of stroke (very light) possibly due to her high bloodpressure, but I doubt we will ever find out what caused it.

My question, I just ran my Swami with and without "dementia in family" and there are some differences in food ratings, like Ostrich meat going from beneficial to neutral and yoghurt no longer being a diamond food. Since she is the first and the only one in my family to ever have this and seeing how we have no way of knowing what caused it, do I mark it in my family history or not?


Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, May 18, 2012, 9:55pm; Reply: 1
I would.


Because if there was only one thing I could prevent with diet, I would probably choose dementia.

For me this is extremely important.




In general in SWAMI you want to avoid checking every possible condition for treatment, because the selection start canceling each other out.

If there are other conditions that are more strongly in your family you may choose to include these instead, but I consider mother to a pretty direct relation to you. I am not looking at literature at moment, but as I recall studies show a fairly strong link of dementia between parents and child.
Posted by: Goldie, Friday, May 18, 2012, 10:09pm; Reply: 2
yes I might include strokes and whatever, but moving a food from one to a neighboring list is not a total wipe out in my book.. but maybe make yogurt a less often food..  

and get the Trehalose Complex and see what it might do for you and mom..

for you for energy.. a spoon full in AM and before night work..

for mom 1/4 8 times a day.. unless she sleeps to much then I would do 1/2  4x times .. test as you go..  

Sandra I feel for you.. you where so looking forward to going home.. but mom needed to be with you and you are there.. nice! all the best..
Posted by: Goldie, Friday, May 18, 2012, 10:12pm; Reply: 3
another thing.. if mom is aware enough to THINK of what might have shoked her emotionally, maybe she could heal some.. if you want to discuss that more, pm your phone number.. I will call you.
Posted by: Lin, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 12:10am; Reply: 4
SandraArub,
You have my sympathy, very tough to see this with the parents. My father has vascular dementia but it came on very slowly.  What you describe sounds very abrupt.

C-Sharp,
Could you clarify, on your comment " In general in SWAMI you want to avoid checking every possible condition for treatment, because the selection start canceling each other out.:.
Are you referring to where you check your own history or do you also include in that statement, the illness of grandparents?

thanks Lin
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 12:54am; Reply: 5
I am referring to both.

In general it is simplest and best to be honest and provide the answers SWAMI asks for.



But in some cases people seem to tick off they have a history of every ailment listed.

Not only they had every ailment, but some family also had every ailment.

They also think at some point every lab test was high


This causes SWAMI to try to address everything at once.  It cannot effectively treat everything at once.

In those situations it is best just to check the conditions you want SWAMI to customize a diet for.  It can than focus on those specific conditions.
Posted by: Spring, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 2:13am; Reply: 6
Quoted from C_Sharp
I would.
Because if there was only one thing I could prevent with diet, I would probably choose dementia.
For me this is extremely important.


I certainly agree with that. I don't know anything that drains a family any more than a parent with dementia. I have seen too many families decimated by it - physically and mentally.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 5:32am; Reply: 7
have you tried having her listen to music?

tunes from her past....whatever makes her smile and vibrate positively

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKDXuCE7LeQ
Posted by: Spring, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 12:03pm; Reply: 8
I have seen people with dementia respond very well to high amounts of the B-vitamins.
Posted by: Lin, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 12:52pm; Reply: 9
C-Sharp, thanks that is helpful as there is a lot of different things in my family and I may have checked off rather a lot myself.

SandraAruba, What Lola says about music is so true.  My Dad used to play the keyboard and I find when I am talking to him (usually on the phone as he is in the UK and I am in the US) if he is confused I can talk about songs he likes, and sing a bar and it helps him enormously and his mood will lift with it.  In the UK they are doing studies on using music therapy (listening and singing) on patients with a variety of issues and have been having successful results in terms of health improvement and mood improvement.  
As Spring says, the B vitamins are very important, especially B12 which is harder to absorb as we age.  
Lin
Lin
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, May 20, 2012, 3:31am; Reply: 10
Quoted from Lin
C-Sharp, thanks that is helpful as there is a lot of different things in my family and I may have checked off rather a lot myself.

SandraAruba, What Lola says about music is so true.  My Dad used to play the keyboard and I find when I am talking to him (usually on the phone as he is in the UK and I am in the US) if he is confused I can talk about songs he likes, and sing a bar and it helps him enormously and his mood will lift with it.  In the UK they are doing studies on using music therapy (listening and singing) on patients with a variety of issues and have been having successful results in terms of health improvement and mood improvement.  
As Spring says, the B vitamins are very important, especially B12 which is harder to absorb as we age.  
Lin
Lin



I agree; although, my mom will not play any music in the house now.
Posted by: jeanb, Sunday, May 20, 2012, 12:05pm; Reply: 11
My mother is in one of the late stages of Alzheimer's, if I knew then what I know now, I would do the following;

1.  Get a baseline cognitive Alzheimer's test earlier rather than later.  My mother's IQ was extremely high, so even when we knew she was in the initial stages of Alzheimer's she tested really well and couldn't get on Aracept, a med that can keep one stable longer. My FIL got on Aracept earlier and didn't progress through the disease as fast as my mother.

2. Catastrophic reactions happen without warning and are complex and are not a reflection of care and rational thinking.  

3. Homes are used to families who do not want to face the reality of the disease so they tend to sugar coat the progression.  We don't want sugar coating and the home has difficulties in not being "nice."  They were relieved when we told them we understand their difficulties, but it was really important to keep us informed, no matter how painful.

4.  Drugs don't work.  When parts of the brain are being lost, many drugs are contraindicated and may do the exact opposite of what is expected.

5.  Pain management is really important.

6.  When the patient starts to lose interest in food, have them eat strongly flavored foods, my mother is only willing to eat chocolate, pickles and chips.  She says everything else tastes bad.

7.  This disease is "atypical" no matter what.  No one follows the same progression.

8.  Check your loved ones' body at least every  week.  They will tell you they know how to take care of themselves, but they can't.  Check for sores, toenails that need care.  Often they will obsessively pick at sores until they get infected.

9.  They do not get better, all you can do is keep them safe, in my mother's case, as she is violent now, keep others safe from her.
Posted by: Lin, Sunday, May 20, 2012, 2:21pm; Reply: 12
JeanB,  great advice.  
Posted by: SandrAruba, Sunday, May 20, 2012, 4:33pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from jeanb
My mother is in one of the late stages of Alzheimer's, if I knew then what I know now, I would do the following;

1.  Get a baseline cognitive Alzheimer's test earlier rather than later.  My mother's IQ was extremely high, so even when we knew she was in the initial stages of Alzheimer's she tested really well and couldn't get on Aracept, a med that can keep one stable longer. My FIL got on Aracept earlier and didn't progress through the disease as fast as my mother.

2. Catastrophic reactions happen without warning and are complex and are not a reflection of care and rational thinking.  

3. Homes are used to families who do not want to face the reality of the disease so they tend to sugar coat the progression.  We don't want sugar coating and the home has difficulties in not being "nice."  They were relieved when we told them we understand their difficulties, but it was really important to keep us informed, no matter how painful.

4.  Drugs don't work.  When parts of the brain are being lost, many drugs are contraindicated and may do the exact opposite of what is expected.

5.  Pain management is really important.

6.  When the patient starts to lose interest in food, have them eat strongly flavored foods, my mother is only willing to eat chocolate, pickles and chips.  She says everything else tastes bad.

7.  This disease is "atypical" no matter what.  No one follows the same progression.

8.  Check your loved ones' body at least every  week.  They will tell you they know how to take care of themselves, but they can't.  Check for sores, toenails that need care.  Often they will obsessively pick at sores until they get infected.

9.  They do not get better, all you can do is keep them safe, in my mother's case, as she is violent now, keep others safe from her.


Thanks all, for the input. The reason I am asking if I should check is that I get the impression that her dementia is caused by an outside factor rather then her lifestyle. I don't know if she bumped her head really hard at some point. Last year she was here with me on vacation, but while she was forgetful it wasn't very alarming. But ever since I went back to Aruba (May last year) it has been getting worse. We did go to a specialist here because her blood sugar (she is type 2 diabetic) was too high and he concluded that her blood sugar did not cause the dementia, but the dementia caused the high blood sugar because she was forgetting to take her pills. He also mentioned that perhaps she had some small stroke due to high blood pressure but her blood pressure is 160/80 which is not abnormal for someone in her 70ties. So we ruled out that possible cause, which remains us guessing to the cause.

Jean, your points are great. I find that people will easily tell you want not to do rather then tell what you should do. So your points are great.
1. I had her take a neurological test and it seems only her cognitive function (memory) is affected. With Alzheimer everything else is also affected, so the conclusion of the test was that it's another type of dementia and not Alzheimer. Problem with my mother is that she is convinced there is nothing wrong with her.
4. I am also having my doubts about drugs for her don't see how it can heal the part of her brain that is damaged.
5. She's not in pain but I am paying close attention to any ailments she may have/get.
6. Mom is never hungry, but whatever we give her she finishes it off completely. And we make sure she gets three good healthy meals per day. She's a hungerwinter survivor and will never leave any food on her plate.
9. Yes, trying to keep her safe, just because she has no idea what is going on with her.

Spring, I have her on B12 for over 4 months now. She was very depressed when she got here so I started her on that quite soon after she got here.
Posted by: Goldie, Sunday, May 20, 2012, 11:05pm; Reply: 14
I feel for all you out there fighting so much .. Angels that are there on stand by and do the best you can.. what more would anyone want..

Has anyone tried TC yet? and maybe really tracked it?
Posted by: SandrAruba, Sunday, May 20, 2012, 11:16pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Goldie
I feel for all you out there fighting so much .. Angels that are there on stand by and do the best you can.. what more would anyone want..

Has anyone tried TC yet? and maybe really tracked it?


Goldie, I would love to get the TC, but the shipping costs are way too expensive for me to be able to order anything from the NAP site.

Posted by: jeanb, Monday, May 21, 2012, 11:49am; Reply: 16
Hi Sandra:

My Mom's progression started as vascular dementia (I truly believe however, the medical community is only just starting to sort out these diseases) and has finally presented as full blown Alzheimer's.  My doctor now believes this is a genetic Alzheimer's.

At the beginning she was pleasantly confused with high blood pressure (190/120).  She wasn't taking her meds and she wasn't eating properly.  I would leave simple food in the fridge to prepare and she couldn't do that.  

For the past 5 years, she has progressively become worse on a seasonal basis.  She stays on a plateau, then markedly declines during the change of seasons.  For the initial 4 years, after diagnosis, she stayed pleasantly confused, but the past year has been very difficult, paranoia, violence, total incontinence and not allowing care givers near her.  Last week she took a cane to my sister and then scratched her quite badly while attempting to pull out her hair.  

Her symptoms are clustering up right now...it seems like every advanced symptom of Alzheimer's is crowding in right now, even though the official diagnosis from 5 years ago was vascular dementia.

All I can say at this point, is depending on how the laws are structured, ensure you have a power of attorney, don't feel bad if a home is what she needs for care and structure.
Posted by: Lin, Monday, May 21, 2012, 1:03pm; Reply: 17
Jeanb,
That sounds really tough. I imagine the vascular dementia and alzheimers might be both possible with my father also.
Such a tough situation.  
Lin
Posted by: Goldie, Monday, May 21, 2012, 2:17pm; Reply: 18
Quoted Text
Goldie, I would love to get the TC, but the shipping costs are way too expensive for me to be able to order anything from the NAP site.


It was on sale.. might still be .. but if not as DrD's medicine would plain trehalose work???? I have been wondering about that.. Research it on google and see if it might apply .. there 2 pounds are 25.-

BUT still ..  send on email to Dr D's clinic --or to Lola --- she might get on answer -- and ASK if the TC might really do something for mom or not?   I would also ask IF OTHER sups HE has that might be even better.. and WHY?    

and maybe think of getting either for your own health TOO.

Here is what Dr D said.. http://n-equals-one.com/blogs/2011/12/22/1851/  

I just wish there was help  .. for all you care givers..    
Posted by: Jane, Monday, May 21, 2012, 2:35pm; Reply: 19
My mother died a year ago this coming Friday - it was finally a fall that did her in.  She was diagnosed with dementia in the late 90s.  They called it Alzheimer's but I was never really sure.  She never exhibited the violence and the only times she was difficult was when she was in the hospital or if someone she didn't know was trying to treat her.  She had some TIAs a few years before she was diagnosed so that was probably a contributing factor.  Every once in a while she had short periods of some clarity but she was almost "manic" during those periods - high energy.  

Short term memory was almost completely gone but she could still read although I didn't know if she was really processing what she read.  Sometimes I think she recognized me but she was smart and would often skirt a conversation to make it seem like she knew who you were.  

I like what Jean said about the necessity of caretakers sharing everything.  My father used to coach her before she went to visit the neurologist on things like "who's the President, President's wife's name, etc."  It was his form of denial.

It's a difficult road and you need to make sure that you get time for yourself.....it's exhausting bothe physically and emotionally.
Jane
Posted by: SandrAruba, Monday, May 21, 2012, 4:20pm; Reply: 20
Thanks Jean and Jane,

Mom doesn't read anymore. She either forgets which book she was reading, or starts the same one she just finished. She still does her puzzles. That keeps her busy. My husband is starting on taking on our garden (huge!) and he is having her help him. That keeps her busy and she feels useful.

It breaks my heart when she talks about how she has to take on her own garden back home in Holland when she gets back. She really has no idea how bad she is, because in her memory she is taking care of herself. She forgets, she forgets.
When she just got her she did have terrible moodswings and was just plain nasty at times, but ever since she's been on the B12 that has subsided significantly.

I will be sure to get help when it really gets necessary. I know I can't do it all by myself.

Still not sure if I should mark this in my Swami since I already marked diabetic and vascular problems (dad died of a heart attack). Since I am overweight, diabetic is a very possible threath for me. But then again, if it only means yoghurt is no longer a diamond (but still a beneficial), it's not really that big of a change. (still have to check other differences). Granddad died of kidney stones and other granddad had parkinson. How much info do you put into Swami?

Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, May 21, 2012, 4:51pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from SandrAruba
  other granddad had parkinson.



I would have checked "Do you have a family history of dementia:" for Parkinson's.
Posted by: 18545 (Guest), Monday, May 21, 2012, 4:56pm; Reply: 22
My mother died of RA and dementia.  I struggled and tried everyway I could think of to help her.  I'm not sure if anything I did actually made her life any better.  In retrospect, to do it all over again, I think I would just chill a lot more and love her, enjoying the moments we could share.  I'm sorry you are having to face this, it's a big one in life's design.

My father's mother had alheimers.  She was in a nursing home and I went with him on one of his visits.  He had a new beard he was very proud of, though we had all told him to please shave it off we didn't care for it lol.  When his mother saw him she gave out a cry of glee, hugged him hard and took off with him to the nurses station where she called everyone around her and said, "Everyone, come here!  I want you to meet my father!"  My dad's face was crestfallen.  The next morning at breakfast my father sat there...beardless.  ;)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, May 21, 2012, 9:17pm; Reply: 23
I'm so sorry. I can only imagine what it must be like to see somebody you love decline like that. I'm very thankful that my Dad had heart problems but his mind was there up until the very end.
Posted by: jeanb, Monday, May 21, 2012, 11:46pm; Reply: 24
Thank you to all for your kind words.

I should have specified that anti psychotics, anti depressants, anti aggression meds seem to be contraindicated for many with Alzheimer's, the anti-psychotics make them more psychotic and aggressive. She is refusing all meds including her pain meds, but her osteo is so advanced, she is literally in pain all over.  She is only getting pain meds when she is willing to take them, otherwise, all meds have been stopped.  

A week ago, my sister and I found my mother soaked in urine on her couch screaming at her care givers.  She became psychotic when she saw my sister, she has lost over 8 lbs in the past month and now weighs about 80.  We were able to lift her into a wheel chair and my sister performed some nursing ninja moves to strip her.  We coaxed her into the shower with the promise she could have a stuffed dog and that I would be calling her mother and letting her know about K's behavior.  

She somehow recognized me, but I look very much like my mom and her sister, and she responded to me.  

My sister, brother and I all wonder whose Karma is that we are working on.  When we left my mother that evening, I shut off the lights and she said everything was looking so beautiful, maybe she was on a beach with a rum and coke and feeling content.

We all work at very full time jobs and have families, I don't sleep at night and have not been eating properly.  At soon to be 52, I have a nasty case of cystic acne on my neck.  My brother looks like he has aged 15 years through this.  My sister is an ICU nurse and always looks she has been ridden hard and put away wet.  

A few weeks ago she decided to stop eating and I received a phone call from the home.  I suggested to my brother to give her some chocolate and coke, which she ate.  I then received a phone call from the nutritionist at the home saying the chocolate and coke were interfering with her nutrition.  I let her know that my mom wasn't eating their nutritious product, so perhaps their food was interfering with her nutrition.  My sister had to put my choke chain on me so I could walk away without losing it.  This is a real study in patience for me.

Posted by: SandrAruba, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 12:55am; Reply: 25
Quoted from C_Sharp


I would have checked "Do you have a family history of dementia:" for Parkinson's.


I checked both parents and grandparents in that category. Will print out my new Swami tomorrow and compare it to my current one.

If not just for me not getting dementia, then at least to save my husband going through this with me. Dementia really is a horrible disease, the more I hear and read about it, the more I wish I could take it all away and heal my mother and anyone else who has it.
Posted by: SandrAruba, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 1:01am; Reply: 26
Quoted from jeanb


A few weeks ago she decided to stop eating and I received a phone call from the home.  I suggested to my brother to give her some chocolate and coke, which she ate.  I then received a phone call from the nutritionist at the home saying the chocolate and coke were interfering with her nutrition.  I let her know that my mom wasn't eating their nutritious product, so perhaps their food was interfering with her nutrition.  My sister had to put my choke chain on me so I could walk away without losing it.  This is a real study in patience for me.



The balls on that nutritionist.. :o . I admire your restraint even if it was with the help of a choke chain, I would have gone completely ballistic.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 1:21am; Reply: 27
Quoted from 18545
When his mother saw him she gave out a cry of glee, hugged him hard and took off with him to the nurses station where she called everyone around her and said, "Everyone, come here!  I want you to meet my father!"  My dad's face was crestfallen.  The next morning at breakfast my father sat there...beardless.  ;)

I howled laughing when I read this, Kibble! Thankfully, even in the hardest times, sometimes there are humorous things that happen! Your grandmother got such intense joy from that, and the rest of you got what you wanted too! I can't even imagine how your father felt though! Hopefully, he was just happy for her! (smile)
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 1:31am; Reply: 28
Quoted from SandrAruba
I checked both parents and grandparents in that category. Will print out my new Swami tomorrow and compare it to my current one.

If not just for me not getting dementia, then at least to save my husband going through this with me. Dementia really is a horrible disease, the more I hear and read about it, the more I wish I could take it all away and heal my mother and anyone else who has it.

Having to deal with arrogant "caretakers" is awful when I think of what you are going through. Are these people sadistic or what??!!

We have a friend, a surgeon (she's retired now), whose mother had Parkinson's really bad for over twenty years before she finally succumbed to Alzheimer's, and it was pure agony seeing that family go through that after all the years she had already suffered. She had a brilliant mind......... I really feel for you and hope you can see to your own needs in this terrible situation.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 5:19am; Reply: 29
Quoted Text
since I already marked diabetic and vascular problems (dad died of a heart attack). Since I am overweight, diabetic is a very possible threath for me..........How much info do you put into Swami?


check only what is, not what you believe might be......swami does the computing, given your hx and your family hx etc.....
Posted by: NancyEllen, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 9:48pm; Reply: 30
I certainly empathize with all of you who are going through this difficult time taking care of parents.  I,too, am taking care of a parent with vascular dementia.  She is still at home at this point but will soon be moved to assisted living for memory loss.  I have a question about Aricept.  We were told Mom had vascular dementia in 2010 but she showed signs of it years before.  A quarterly visit from the nurse practitioner prompted her to prescribe, with the PCP's permission, Aricept for Mom.  She started taking it on Sunday and the Patient Care Technician who cares for my Mom said her appetite is off which is the opposite of what we want and she is extra tired.  Should Mom be taking this medication at this point?  I am not an advocate of prescription medications unless necessary and if this is not necessary, I don't want her taking it.
Posted by: jeanb, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 11:59pm; Reply: 31
My sister ICU nurse, my cousin geriatric nurse, all told us to give 3 weeks for medication to kick in.  It is very difficult to know if it is the medication or if it is another stage of the disease.  It took about 1 month for my FIL to show a steadying effect with Aracept.
Posted by: NancyEllen, Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 12:34am; Reply: 32
Thanks for that info Jeanb!
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 1:34am; Reply: 33
Quoted from NancyEllen
I have a question about Aricept.  We were told Mom had vascular dementia in 2010 but she showed signs of it years before.  A quarterly visit from the nurse practitioner prompted her to prescribe, with the PCP's permission, Aricept for Mom.  She started taking it on Sunday and the Patient Care Technician who cares for my Mom said her appetite is off which is the opposite of what we want and she is extra tired.  Should Mom be taking this medication at this point?  


My father is on Aricept.

As noted above its psychological/nervous system affects take several weeks/months to be realized.

On appetite: I think with my father it may have increased appetite. At this point I do not remember how long that took to take affect.

My father is very sensitive to dose and it took 6-8 weeks to realize the effect of dose change.

Too little and he is listless has no energy and sleeps rests for 20+ hours a day.

Too much and he is standing up in church talking about how God has revealed to him how they all could become rich on the Internet. He has fliers which he tries to distribute, but the minister confiscates them.   Other things as well.
Posted by: Goldie, Thursday, May 24, 2012, 1:17am; Reply: 34
Moms are a whole different thing..

I am suggesting that all you people enjoy much more about what you can with mom or even without..   You need that peace time to make it through the day.. I did .. I needed all time spent on good things and all time wasted on stupid this or that..  

Even with 10 years of time with mom, who was mentally well until her last, I still miss the questions I now think of asking..  what was great-great grandmothers name?  what was your first big love? what do you miss the most? who do you miss and why?  I had taken mom to all places she wanted to go, and still, I swish for more.  Never enough time.. to late..  

The same for dad.. he was ill but I had not been well informed and was 3000 miles away.. next time I would call his Doctor and get info first hand.. I would have so many questions.. so much to share, even if it was only a piece of pastry, a glass of wine or some old photographs.  

And then oh boy.. inheritances.. another whole issue never to be anticipated.    
Posted by: BHealthy, Monday, December 10, 2012, 8:49am; Reply: 35
My mother was diagnosed with dementia in 2005.  We found out about it in 2007 and I have been managing her care ever since.  She's 92 now and, though frail, she's tough.  She walks, sees, hears, rides an exercise bike, and she's continent.  She did a face plant last month and didn't break anything.

The average lifespan after diagnosis is supposedly 5 years and she is now in her eighth.

She was on Aricept and Namenda when she was first diagnosed but refuses to take any drugs now.

I just found this: http://www.coconutketones.com/whatifcure.pdf and this http://healthimpactnews.com/2012/coconut-oil-and-alzheimer%E2%80%99s-disease-the-news-is-spreading/ wanted to share them.

This paper was written in 2008, the article in December of 2012.  Have follow-up studies been suppressed?  Dementia is a billion-dollar business and the powers that be wouldn't want to cure/prevent it unless they could make millions selling a drug.  

Snopes.com has this to say about it: http://www.snopes.com/medical/disease/coconutoil.asp
Quoted Text
"Some people with Alzheimer's and their caregivers have turned to coconut oil...a few people have reported that coconut oil helped but there has never been any clinical testing done."
This is probably because drug companies can't make big money selling coconut oil and coconut oil producers can't afford the studies.

Not only will I be giving this to Mom, coconut oil is a beneficial for me, so I will be raising my consumption, too.  I'd rather have a rotten liver than a rotten brain.  Honestly, I would rather die of liver disease than live with dementia.

As hard as it has been to care for Mom what concerns me most is inflicting the same hardship on my family.  I follow my SWAMI but do not eat every listed beneficial; I doubt anyone could.  So, how do I know I am doing everything possible to avoid getting dementia myself?  My SWAMI does not change when I check/uncheck the dementia boxes even if they are the only boxes checked.  Does anyone else's?
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Monday, December 10, 2012, 12:20pm; Reply: 36
ALzheimer v dementia http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2010/06/whats-difference-between-alzheimers-and.html
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Monday, December 10, 2012, 12:28pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from jeanb
My mother is in one of the late stages of Alzheimer's, if I knew then what I know now, I would do the following;

1.  Get a baseline cognitive Alzheimer's test earlier rather than later.  My mother's IQ was extremely high, so even when we knew she was in the initial stages of Alzheimer's she tested really well and couldn't get on Aracept, a med that can keep one stable longer. My FIL got on Aracept earlier and didn't progress through the disease as fast as my mother.

2. Catastrophic reactions happen without warning and are complex and are not a reflection of care and rational thinking.  

3. Homes are used to families who do not want to face the reality of the disease so they tend to sugar coat the progression.  We don't want sugar coating and the home has difficulties in not being "nice."  They were relieved when we told them we understand their difficulties, but it was really important to keep us informed, no matter how painful.

4.  Drugs don't work.  When parts of the brain are being lost, many drugs are contraindicated and may do the exact opposite of what is expected.

5.  Pain management is really important.

6.  When the patient starts to lose interest in food, have them eat strongly flavored foods, my mother is only willing to eat chocolate, pickles and chips.  She says everything else tastes bad.

7.  This disease is "atypical" no matter what.  No one follows the same progression.

8.  Check your loved ones' body at least every  week.  They will tell you they know how to take care of themselves, but they can't.  Check for sores, toenails that need care.  Often they will obsessively pick at sores until they get infected.

9.  They do not get better, all you can do is keep them safe, in my mother's case, as she is violent now, keep others safe from her.


I would add that from what I have read I would initiate a low methanol diet. especially stopping things like Aspartame which is deadly for these types of illness.
Posted by: jeanb, Monday, December 10, 2012, 12:49pm; Reply: 38
My mother never had aspartame in her whole life.  She was however, a heavy smoker but never ate out.  I don't think I had a meal in a restaurant until I was about 15.  Everything came out of a garden or my dad butchered it himself.

My mother and I both have the APOE e4 gene which is a 50% indicator of Alzheimer's that is onset in ones' 80's.  I think glycation is a huge issue as indicated by Dr. D.  

My mother has become less violent, she cannot string words together in a sentence.  She has no other health concerns whatsoever.
Posted by: Amazone I., Monday, December 10, 2012, 12:59pm; Reply: 39
BHealthy... bravooo you hit the nail  ;)(clap)(ok)(smarty) here in CH-land we got to know from our health departement that nothing at those times really works for any kind of dementia... incl. Alzheimers' but ok they all aren't informed about natural products in higher dosages.... and they do work!!! But no-one want's to know..it's too simple and then the question of avarice appears immediately... better to go and save a bit of money and looking for intake of prescribed and payed medication from the swiss healthcare system... but that those  often don't do the expected results... who cares .....(shrug)(mad)(dissappointed)...all the rest means to pay attention of a lot of things in our lives.... no, we do need others to cope with those issues... amazing...amazing....all those blo...excuses for not acting adequately.... :-/
Posted by: AKArtlover, Monday, December 10, 2012, 1:20pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from Spring
I have seen people with dementia respond very well to high amounts of the B-vitamins.


:)
Posted by: AKArtlover, Monday, December 10, 2012, 1:21pm; Reply: 41
http://www.ultramind.com
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, December 10, 2012, 5:53pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from BHealthy
Honestly, I would rather die of liver disease than live with dementia.

As hard as it has been to care for Mom what concerns me most is inflicting the same hardship on my family.  I follow my SWAMI but do not eat every listed beneficial; I doubt anyone could.  So, how do I know I am doing everything possible to avoid getting dementia myself?

From my understanding, these disease are largely caused by deposits of "junk" or un-removed cellular waste building up and causing sluggish or impaired neuro-function within the brain.  To reduce this, eating a low-toxin diet and working to keep the liver / kidney function high, as well as stimulating autophagy should keep the "garbage" content down and allow the highest functional level possible.

Action plan:  
Eat per SWAMI.  
Supplement to assist digestive / eliminative function, if NEEDED!  
Take Trehalose Complex to stimulate autophagy (for adults).
Obviously, treat any other conditions as they develop, but don't sweat (worry about) the rest - as there isn't any assurance that we won't get any specific condition.  We do the best we know and pray for the best!
Posted by: Averno, Monday, December 10, 2012, 7:20pm; Reply: 43
My mother died from Alzheimer's, and behaved much as has been reported here. She was diagnosed within 2 years of my father's passing. He was the cook, and when her diet became her responsibility, she ate poorly and went downhill quickly. I think the diet should be the primary focus for anyone suffering any degree of dementia.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Monday, December 10, 2012, 7:40pm; Reply: 44
Quoted from jeanb
My mother never had aspartame in her whole life.  She was however, a heavy smoker but never ate out.  I don't think I had a meal in a restaurant until I was about 15.  Everything came out of a garden or my dad butchered it himself.

My mother and I both have the APOE e4 gene which is a 50% indicator of Alzheimer's that is onset in ones' 80's.  I think glycation is a huge issue as indicated by Dr. D.  

My mother has become less violent, she cannot string words together in a sentence.  She has no other health concerns whatsoever.


Smoking would be an even higher cause of AD due to methanol (think smoked meats fish) all avoids.

and I mention Aspartame because a lot of people take it when they are ill to avoid sugar, not knowing it is worse than sugar because it is 12 % methanol by weight. and form formaldehyde in the body which does the damage. it will speed up the disease whereas not taking any more methanol of any kind will not stop but it it will slow down the rate of decline. imo

Posted by: jeanb, Monday, December 10, 2012, 10:33pm; Reply: 45
My Grandmother also had AD, never smoked, had an excellent diet, exercised, but had a stressful life.  Like Dr. D says, none of us are getting out of here alive, we will all die.  Hopefully we can mitigate how genes express themselves with prescribed diet.
Posted by: SandrAruba, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 1:26am; Reply: 46
How ironic that this thread is revived today.

I sent mom back to Holland in June where she went through all the testing and probing and more testing. She has Alzheimer, second stage and they put her on some medication that slows the disease down. Don't know the which. My brother moved her to a apartment near his house, so he can check in on her every day and she has day activities couple of times per week, she has a daily service that brings her her food. Home care comes by to make sure she takes her all her meds. So we were hoping that she would be able to live reasonably independent for a while still.

However, today he called to say that he is going to have her committed to an closed retirement institution, against her will if necessary. Turns out she has been going out for walks and getting lost for quite a few times now. My brother put a GPS tracker on her key chain, she turned it off! (he has no idea how she managed that). She has started smoking again and they have been finding cigarette butts in her pillow case as well as a lighter. And everytime they remove it, she goes out and gets new ones. There is a supermarket near by and she knows how to get there, but then can't always find her way back.

I called her today and she asked me when I was coming back. Apparently she thinks that the apartment where she is now living is mine and she is looking after it for me. She only wonders where the cats are (she used to look after my cats when I would go on vacation). And the day activities she goes to, she doesn't like it there because there are only old demented people there... (okay, that made me smile). Of course she is neither old nor demented. I said to my brother that those other people are probably all saying the same thing.
But mostly what I sensed from her was deep deep loneliness. She misses dad, so awfully much and it makes my heart ache.

I told my brother that she doesn't have to take that inhibitory medication if I have a say about it. Why would you want to extend someone's suffering? For your own satisfaction? Besides that, it is obvious that it is not helping. From the moment that she left here she has been getting obviously worse.

BTW, my mother does smoke, and took splenda when they diagnosed her with diabetes. I don't know if she got it because of that. I think that at a certain moment she stopped taking good care of herself, even though she denies that categorically.
Posted by: md, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 1:55am; Reply: 47
Quoted from SandrAruba
How ironic that this thread is revived today.

I sent mom back to Holland in June where she went through all the testing and probing and more testing. She has Alzheimer, second stage and they put her on some medication that slows the disease down. Don't know the which. My brother moved her to a apartment near his house, so he can check in on her every day and she has day activities couple of times per week, she has a daily service that brings her her food. Home care comes by to make sure she takes her all her meds. So we were hoping that she would be able to live reasonably independent for a while still.

However, today he called to say that he is going to have her committed to an closed retirement institution, against her will if necessary. Turns out she has been going out for walks and getting lost for quite a few times now. My brother put a GPS tracker on her key chain, she turned it off! (he has no idea how she managed that). She has started smoking again and they have been finding cigarette butts in her pillow case as well as a lighter. And everytime they remove it, she goes out and gets new ones. There is a supermarket near by and she knows how to get there, but then can't always find her way back.

I called her today and she asked me when I was coming back. Apparently she thinks that the apartment where she is now living is mine and she is looking after it for me. She only wonders where the cats are (she used to look after my cats when I would go on vacation). And the day activities she goes to, she doesn't like it there because there are only old demented people there... (okay, that made me smile). Of course she is neither old nor demented. I said to my brother that those other people are probably all saying the same thing.
But mostly what I sensed from her was deep deep loneliness. She misses dad, so awfully much and it makes my heart ache.

I told my brother that she doesn't have to take that inhibitory medication if I have a say about it. Why would you want to extend someone's suffering? For your own satisfaction? Besides that, it is obvious that it is not helping. From the moment that she left here she has been getting obviously worse.

BTW, my mother does smoke, and took splenda when they diagnosed her with diabetes. I don't know if she got it because of that. I think that at a certain moment she stopped taking good care of herself, even though she denies that categorically.


I can relate to alot of what you say about your Mom. My dad passed away in 2004, and Mom went downhill after that. Sadly, she passed away on November 9.

Posted by: BHealthy, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 8:07am; Reply: 48
Quoted from jeanb
My mother never had aspartame in her whole life.  
My mother had lots of aspartame, she was always trying to loose weight, and I've always suspected that is what caused her condition.  I could never stand the taste, thank goodness.

Quoted from jeanb
My mother and I both have the APOE e4 gene which is a 50% indicator of Alzheimer's that is onset in ones' 80's.  
How does one get tested for this gene?
  
Quoted from jeanb
I think glycation is a huge issue as indicated by Dr. D.
Will have to research this...
Posted by: BHealthy, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 8:13am; Reply: 49
Quoted from ABJoe

From my understanding, these disease are largely caused by deposits of "junk" or un-removed cellular waste building up and causing sluggish or impaired neuro-function within the brain.  To reduce this, eating a low-toxin diet and working to keep the liver / kidney function high, as well as stimulating autophagy should keep the "garbage" content down and allow the highest functional level possible.

Action plan:  
Eat per SWAMI.  
Supplement to assist digestive / eliminative function, if NEEDED!  
Take Trehalose Complex to stimulate autophagy (for adults).
Obviously, treat any other conditions as they develop, but don't sweat (worry about) the rest - as there isn't any assurance that we won't get any specific condition.  We do the best we know and pray for the best!
Thank you.

Posted by: Amazone I., Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 8:21am; Reply: 50
I once wrote about the experiment done with nuns in Germany... they observed their behaviuours and attitudes for a longer time (all were in her upper 80ties... ) und they gave the committment to get dissected after her deaths and the oldest (about 103 years old) was one of the fittest all time long in her attitudes... never showed any signs of any dementia but after her death she showed up the most of plaques in her brain and the reseachers didn't expected such a result ... you see... it's also here a question of mental attitude  ;) :D....and yup a healthy lifestyle and foodintake is in my oppinion the response to a lot of diseases......
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 12:07pm; Reply: 51
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2245970/Feeling-lonely-double-risk-Alzheimers--lots-friends.html
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 5:08pm; Reply: 52
My mother had some TIAs in the early 90s.  What percipated full blown dementia was a double surgery (both neuro and ortho) on her back in the late 90s.  She was out for about 6 hours and was never the same after that.  She was diagnosed at a rehab where she went for 6 weeks after her back surgery. She was put on Aricept and she stayed the same for a lot of years.  She did have some incidents of wandering.  Once she walked out of their room at the Assisted Living and right out the emergency exit in her nightgown.  My father had to put a lock up high that she couldn't reach.  After he died, I had to put her in an Alzheimers' unit.  She was there until her death last year.  It's so sad to watch someone who was so bright and so vibrant decline like that.

Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 6:14pm; Reply: 53
Very sad.
Posted by: Amazone I., Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 8:43am; Reply: 54
amazing amazing PC...your article about AZ is some lines long but the *comparisons articles about *females today* nearly kilometers ;) ;D.....(dizzy)
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 1:11pm; Reply: 55
Perhaps the study should read, is an Extrovert feeling lonely, even though they have friends, a first sign of Alzheimer's? My mother had lots of friends, never felt lonely, was always involved in her community.  

When she showed the first signs of AD, she started to become increasingly suspicious of her friends and she slowly became more introverted, refusing contact with others.  She would then say she is lonely and I would point out that she wasn't making or keeping friends.  This started about 7-8 years ago.
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 1:22pm; Reply: 56
I am constantly being bombarded with, if you give your mother xxx, she will improve.  I know/don't think there is a magic bullet to cure/control her AD and I am becoming increasingly frustrated with this type of theory.  

It also drives me crazy to hear stories like, xxx found the cure to AD and governments and drug companies suppress the information.  My mother's gerontologist has her on fish oil, all different sorts of B's, different mixtures of cal, mag, D etc.  They have tried all types of things, until we decided only pain meds and thyroid.  I can tell you, the provincial government is pouring about $7000 per month into my mother's care, if there was a cure, they would be using it right now.  

The issue is the brain, once damaged does not recover, the damage to my mother's brain started when she was born with the APOEe4 gene, was expressed when she lighted that first cigarette over 70 years ago and accelerated when she couldn't walk because of a congenital hip dislocation, and was finalized when her sister died from AD.  
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 1:30pm; Reply: 57
Quoted Text
Action plan:  
Eat per SWAMI.  
Supplement to assist digestive / eliminative function, if NEEDED!  
Take Trehalose Complex to stimulate autophagy (for adults).
Obviously, treat any other conditions as they develop, but don't sweat (worry about) the rest - as there isn't any assurance that we won't get any specific condition.  We do the best we know and pray for the best!


Yes to the above.. thanks.. good for all of us..  

Quoted Text
My mother and I both have the APOE e4 gene which is a 50% indicator of Alzheimer's that is onset in ones' 80's.  


How much is this test and how to get it? how is it done?

Trehalose I am certain is great stuff.. I am taking it .. again after a break.. I take it with lemon juice during the night.. I think it does wonders for me... my tongue again is much clearer..and has healed.. over time after damage from teeth for 10 years..!!

I have a wondering mind about this BRAIN stuff.. I am finding that sometimes I can not think of words I darn well know.. I can not recollect what I was just talking about.. and I am much less able to recall what I darn well know or knew..

I do not have dementia yet.. I darn well do not want to have it, I wish to die much sooner than the day when I have to admit that something is wrong.. This feeling of not having recall of things I used to have stored in some place in my head is darn scary.. I feel already as if I have much less to contribute during conversations.. I feel more inadequate than ever.. Its like typing and momentarily not knowing how to find a certain key.. or find a word I know!  

I do not have Alzheimer's.. AS FAR AS I KNOW.. but I am near certain I need to be tested for the possibility.. I AM diabetic and therefore 50% more prone to this illness.. a prospect I cam across about a year or two ago, and mentioned it here..  

I am however not certain that anything I do or do not do will make a darn difference.. I will get this NO matter my efforts to eat right.. I COME BACK to saying that I eat WAY better even on a bad day than, others on standard diets-- and have done so for several decades!.. I am healthy and feel great when 'compliant'.. a word I could not spell yesterday for the life if me.. and all here who know me, know that I know that word..

Typing I also think just slows down, like more choppy, not flowing.. I do not have this damm thing, I am not worried, I am just saying IF I do have it.. darn well it has started already.. I am 69 and have no idea how to stop this.. I have even less of on idea how to live with it and finally be released from it IF I have it.. how does one get out of this world without becoming a burden, and losing all dignity?   there was a play: STOP THE WORLD I want to get off... and this is not my fault for anything!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have never done anything wrong other than Tylenol for pain for about 15 years.. Oh well.. my kidneys will give out first.. I WONDER if they have already started.. (I void much less powerful for the last few years.. since my hip replacement)  

I am not worried YET, but how to deal with fining out? and then what?  I mean it.. there is help needed here.. we need another serious thread about it.. but this one is more than good ! thanks all .... I needed this ...

I am going to make on appointment in the Amen clinic at a few thousand $  for a brain scan if they do that work.. I will find out more and report here.. They are doing interesting work with brain scans..

Sandra.. I am not taking over this thread.. it is not about me here.. I love the way you allowed your brother to stop the meds.. I think along the same lines.. IT is such a dread illness, I love you for posting here.. All the best.. all and more than that ..     
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 1:47pm; Reply: 58
The APOE e4 gene (and other variations) can be tested through 23 and me.  The company has a sale on right now for $99.00.  There is another thread on this.  

This is a great price for the testing.

Goldie, I don't think it is a burden taking care of my mother, I know my sister and brother think the same way, in a way it is a privilege to be her advocate when she gave so much to us.

I think this disease has made my siblings and I better adults.  For many years my brother and I were estranged from my sister.  My sister has become far less hostile because of my mother and her disease and my brother and I have found "a new, competent" sister through this all.  

My cousins were torn apart by their mother's disease, they have not talked in the 3 years since she passed away.  The total burden for my aunt's care went to my female cousin and I think there is a lot of resentment between them because of the stress of the disease.  
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 1:57pm; Reply: 59
Here is a link to a good article on APOE e4 gene and the pathways of AD.

http://www.memory-key.com/research/topic/genes
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 2:09pm; Reply: 60
I read that many people are having both breasts removed following testing by this type of company, which seems ridiculous to me (although I am a man).

Why wouldn't they try something else or look into it properly. good it may only effect some of them, albeit you don't know who but they could get knocked down by a bus!

If they all ate correctly (for their type)and didn't smoke etc.

I think there is some sort of connection with all this extreme reaction and current toxicity or something. loads of suicides over what appears to be silly things etc.. (don't mean to down play depression of course) but you know what I mean. madness!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 2:19pm; Reply: 61
Information is a double-edged sword. What you DO with the information is important. If you think there's nothing to be done, that you're doomed to a painful death, then the suicides make more sense. If you see this information as a wake-up call, think "Wow, I'm prone to this horrible  disease so I really can't afford to ignore my health" and then get a SWAMI, follow it 100%, exercise properly, etc, then the information is being used for good.

I happen to agree with you on the ridiculousness of prophylactic mastectomies. Yet the women who have that surgery feel like they're taking charge of their health and using the information pro-actively to prevent cancer.

When my aunt was diagnosed with breast cancer a few years ago, both she and my mother (her sister) got tested for the breast cancer gene. Fortunately, both tested negative, so I and my cousin don't need to test for it. Had mom's been positive, I would have had the testing too, for her peace of mind if nothing else. But I'm not sure what I would have done had it been positive, and I'm glad I don't have to make that decision.

Jeanb- I can only imagine what it must be like to deal with your mom's illness plus the unwanted advice from all these well-wishers. I think the best thing you can do is support her in whatever way SHE wants to be supported, plus take charge of your own health to minimize your chances of getting dementia when you're older.
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 3:19pm; Reply: 62
Hi Ruthie;

Thanks for the support.  

My mom is now to the point when she looks at me, she thinks either I am her or I am her mother.  She honestly doesn't know who she is anymore.  She loves chocolate and can eat it because it melts in her mouth. She doesn't have very many wants anymore, but she needs someone to tell her what she needs.  

I have never smoked (not even a puff!!), I get vigorous exercise everyday, I try to eat the Gatherer diet, I use my mind every day whether it is in accounting or solving IT issues or reading, and I have lots of connections with my family and community. But I have worked in chemical, welding and other types of "dirty" mfg businesses which may or may not contribute to the expression of genes.

I hope to continue this regimen as long as I possibly can to stave off the disease. My goal is to be able to ski the Rockies even into my 80's, but I am fully aware my family history contains AD and I might not be able to keep it at bay.  The scarier one in my family is my husband who has sustained many blacking out concussions from sports and whose father died of dementia.  My husband's childhood memories have been wiped out as a result of the hits.  We joke about who is going to get dementia/AD and when....  
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 5:35pm; Reply: 63
B12

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4hzhdREDng
Posted by: Lin, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 10:07pm; Reply: 64
Heard about something Doctors mistake for Alzheimers could be worth checking out. It is called NPH
normal pressure hydrocelphalus.  If you google, there is information on the web about it.
Lin
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 10:18pm; Reply: 65
normal pressure hydrocephalus
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 10:43pm; Reply: 66
Quoted Text
Here is a link to a good article on APOE e4 gene and the pathways of AD.

http://www.memory-key.com/research/topic/genes

THANKS>>

The burden I speak of is as much MY burden to carry on with my health.. I took care of mom for 10 years and love the memories of it.. even the hard days..

Burdens is what we experience, some are real other' s transitory and stem form being tired.. fear is a burden I wish to put down.. lay my head on my pillow and sleep..

If I developed infirmities that I have no say over, I would want to have someone come here and tell you all .. most likely I would just fade away..

I would want someone to continue my treatments for neropathy, no matter what my care givers would think about..

I would want to have 6 pillow's on all sides of me when in bed.. and STAY ON BTD for O's ....

I would want to get only sups from Nap or Standard Process..

So much to ask for and yet so little..

I need to make a list... eventually...  :X


I am still wanting to look at the scan stuff to see if it will tell me more about me in general..

and all the wile Swami is the key.. that I know!

Maybe I should input mental issues to my Swami??  and see what come up.
Posted by: aussielady582, Thursday, December 13, 2012, 4:19am; Reply: 67
this is interesting topic, must re-read another time. I suspect we all need lots of antioxidant-high foods, green tea, ginger tea, tumeric, berries.  and exercise to keep toxic wastes out of cells and nutrition in cells.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Thursday, December 13, 2012, 5:57pm; Reply: 68
I was researching something a while back which I just went over again for you - It related to seizures but there may be a link this related to a young child so dose will be different.

The remedy was 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid and 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda, and some magnesium citrate supplements, about 100-150 mg.

An epileptic seizures at least on my observations were at least a couple things (but more) as the cause that can be considered in a home remedy: A heavy metal toxicity and hence magnesium reduces this problem.

An alkalization increases oxygen and the brain can heal itself. (of small problems at least.

A lecithin supplements for a child, for example might be 1/2 tablespoon a day. The lecithin promotes myelin sheath.

Both the myelin sheaths if insufficient the brain short circuits as there is no insulation to protect electrical neural travelling. The lecithin promotes myelin sheaths. Heavy metals are electrically conductive and causes the brain to short circuit.


Oh yes, and one more thing, vitamin C sodium ascorbate vitamin C is important as the brain has large stores of them necessary to protect against oxidants.
Posted by: BHealthy, Friday, December 14, 2012, 7:36pm; Reply: 69
Quoted from jeanb
I am constantly being bombarded with, if you give your mother xxx, she will improve.  I know/don't think there is a magic bullet to cure/control her AD and I am becoming increasingly frustrated with this type of theory.

The issue is the brain, once damaged does not recover, the damage to my mother's brain started when she was born with the APOEe4 gene....  
When my mother was first diagnosed, if there had been a way to arrest the progression of the disease, I would have done anything and everything to help her.  I wish I had known about BTD 7 years ago.  Now that most of Mom's memories are gone, I hope she dies peacefully in her sleep before she gets to the point where she has to go to a home.

Posted by: BHealthy, Friday, December 14, 2012, 7:41pm; Reply: 70
Quoted from jeanb
Here is a link to a good article on APOE e4 gene and the pathways of AD.

http://www.memory-key.com/research/topic/genes
What a GREAT resource!  Thank you for posting this.  It will take some time to read and digest all of it but I will do it.

Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 2:20pm; Reply: 71
Thank you Sandra for this thread and my heart goes out to all of you who are dealing with and who have dealt with loved ones with dementia/alzheimers etc.   You are all amazing.   As caregivers, I have something that will help you to help yourself when dealing with these dis-eases.    It is called 'cortices' from BodyTalk.   This quick technique helps the brain to connect the left and right hemisphere's of the brain.   We live such stressed lives that we tend to live in the left brain (logic, masculine, analytical) and the right brain (creative, intuitive, feminine) gets left behind and not connected.  What this technique does is to reconnect the two hemisphere's so that the brain can heal the body and leave it feeling less stressed.   I have one client who has Parkinson's that I have been working with and he is finding some improvements.   Sleeping better, not as agitated and his eating habits have improved.  

Sandra... I am not sure if there are any BodyTalkers in your area, but there are some of us who can  do it distantly.  jeanb...Calgary has many BodyTalkers in your area...that is where it mostly got started in Canada.   Please have a look into this and see what you think.   To find one in your area...just go to the top of the page and click on practitioners and go from there.  

http://www.bodytalksystem.com/learn/access/cortices.cfm

Have a wonderful day.  (((((Big hugs)))))

Debra :-)  
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 3:11pm; Reply: 72
PC.. I loved your post.. I will send to someone afflicted..

Quoted Text


Thanks for that .. looks interesting.. I have seen it done in places but never asked about..

do you have the book?  I may look to buy it..
Posted by: BHealthy, Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 3:35pm; Reply: 73
Quoted from Debra+
Thanks, Debra!  I just tried it and it's really easy but...he doesn't say how many times to tap for each position.  I did 5 taps in each location for each hand position.  Is that enough?  Too much?

Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 4:07pm; Reply: 74
Goldie...there is no such book perse unless you take the courses.  ACCESS course is the everyday maintenance course that I do everyday and it is awesome.   Not sure if there are any courses in your area, but you can look at the top of the page and look under seminars for your area.  This course is basically all you need for basic personal health care.   Even a fast aid technique that is awesome.

BHealthy...you did good.  That is about how many times I tap on head and heart.  You can tap as many times as you feel comfortable.  It is the hand position that is on the head that needs to be focused on.  Two breaths in and out for each hand placement.  

I love this stuff and BTD.  I am BT squared...Blood Type Diet and BodyTalk.   So blessed to have found both of these.

Have a wonderful day.

(((((Big hugs)))))

Debra :-)
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 5:42pm; Reply: 75
http://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-07-2010/vitamin_d_deficiency_linked_to_dementia.html?CMP=KNC-360I-GOOGLE-HEA-CTR&HBX_PK=vitamin_d_and_memory&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=vitamin%2Bd%2Band%2Bmemory&utm_campaign=G_Health&360cid=SI_157601500_10055956021_1

http://www.naturalnews.com/029190_vitamin_D_brain_function.html

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitamin-d-linked-to-womens-cognitive-health/



Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 7:00pm; Reply: 76
Hey BC;

There is a lady I see in Cochrane that does Bodytalk, I go to her for a tune up a couple of times a year.  Our kids go to school together, we weren't the "mothers of the year" at field trips, so we would sit together on the bus and she did a lot of intuitive medicine on me.  Very interesting stuff.  
Posted by: Debra+, Friday, December 21, 2012, 2:23pm; Reply: 77
jeanb...wonderful that you are seeing a BodyTalk Practitioner in Cochrane.   When was the last time you saw her?  Has she shown you how to do cortices everyday for stress?   There is soooo much to this health care system that incorporates all health issues.  

Have a great day.

Debra +
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, December 21, 2012, 3:49pm; Reply: 78
Quoted from Debra+
Thank you Sandra for this thread and my heart goes out to all of you who are dealing with and who have dealt with loved ones with dementia/alzheimers etc.   You are all amazing.   As caregivers, I have something that will help you to help yourself when dealing with these dis-eases.    It is called 'cortices' from BodyTalk.   This quick technique helps the brain to connect the left and right hemisphere's of the brain.   We live such stressed lives that we tend to live in the left brain (logic, masculine, analytical) and the right brain (creative, intuitive, feminine) gets left behind and not connected.  What this technique does is to reconnect the two hemisphere's so that the brain can heal the body and leave it feeling less stressed.   I have one client who has Parkinson's that I have been working with and he is finding some improvements.   Sleeping better, not as agitated and his eating habits have improved.  

Sandra... I am not sure if there are any BodyTalkers in your area, but there are some of us who can  do it distantly.  jeanb...Calgary has many BodyTalkers in your area...that is where it mostly got started in Canada.   Please have a look into this and see what you think.   To find one in your area...just go to the top of the page and click on practitioners and go from there.  

http://www.bodytalksystem.com/learn/access/cortices.cfm

Have a wonderful day.  (((((Big hugs)))))

Debra :-)  


Definitely something that works this....
Posted by: Debra+, Friday, December 21, 2012, 5:56pm; Reply: 79
policychecker...how is your shoulder doing|?

Debra :-)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, December 21, 2012, 6:21pm; Reply: 80
no pain unless I aggravate it, pretty remarkable change actually.

My body, deflect, bromelain, magnesium, and your body balancing. something worked.

do you have an exercise for prostate / kidney health ;) that is my current battle lol not an ideal time of year for that,

fell of the wagon down a mien today, pizza, bread, chicken, dipps tortilla, but saved the day with a green tea ;) port sausages, couldn't have been worse although i took a bunch of deflect thank god for them and Dr D of course ;)

how quickly an addicton makes yo forget lol
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