Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Supp Right For Your Type  /  Streptococcus thermophilus: Probiotic or Not?
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 12:46am
I would appreciate input from any type Os (or others) that have researched this.

Streptococcus thermophilus is a component of Polyflora O, but I recently read that Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus (previously Streptococcus thermophilus) is not considered a probiotic per se, i.e., it does not survive the stomach acid in healthy humans. Anyone know if this is so and, if so, what is its purpose in Polyflora O? There has been some study of two strains (RD102 and RD104) isolated from Indian fermented milk products that were able to survive at pH 2.5 and 2-percent bile, but I don't know if they're even in commercial production yet. Are the capsules used in the Polyflora O enteric-coated so as to bypass stomach acid and bile in the duodenum and, thus, allow the Streptococcus thermophilus transit to the rest of the intestinal tract?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 1:15am; Reply: 1
I believe Dr D of all people has in fact done our gut math for us all ;D
http://www.4yourtype.com/probiotic.asp

http://www.4yourtype.com/herbs_biofilm.asp


on a Mexican radio?
which is it?
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 6:08am; Reply: 2
Quoted from Lola
I believe Dr D of all people has in fact done our gut math for us all ... on a Mexican radio? which is it?


Thanks, however, I'd already read the content contained within both of those linked pages and neither one was specific to the information I'm trying to ascertain.



Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 6:18am; Reply: 3
Quoted Text
neither one was specific to the information I'm trying to ascertain.


you might need to do a more profound search then

try the window here above........

my advice is, if ST is contained in Dr D s probiotic formula, it certainly is doing its thing......

and thanks for answering my question as well!
on the M radio  :)
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 1:01pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Conor


Thanks, however, I'd already read the content contained within both of those linked pages and neither one was specific to the information I'm trying to ascertain.



I don't know the answer, but you could start looking here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Streptococcus%20thermophilus
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 3:42pm; Reply: 5
and here   :)
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?462
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, May 16, 2012, 6:45pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Lloyd
I don't know the answer, but you could start looking here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Streptococcus%20thermophilus

Quoted from Lola


Thank you both for the feedback links. Especially with your link though, Lola, this question is temporarily getting murkier than clearer. Reason being, the bacterial strain in question is a standard strain in the production of commerical yoghurt. However, yoghurt is a definite avoid both for my BT and GT.

On one hand, I'm thinking it's actually the milk solids which comprise the yoghurt that causes it to be an avoid for me (I don't know this for a fact, though). On the other hand, is it actualy another strain of bacteria within yoghurt that causes it to flocculate serum or precipitate serum proteins for my type(s)?

At any rate, I'm still left wondering: if Streptococcus thermophilus truly doesn't survive stomach acids/bile, what is the basis of its inclusion in Polyflora O? Oh well, as Socrates, by way of Plato, said, the life which is unexamined is not worth living.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 17, 2012, 3:24am; Reply: 7
no, the whey might be the issue

so find out how paneer rates for you or other type dairy, running a swami

draining that whey renders it less inflammatory

Quoted Text
if Streptococcus thermophilus truly doesn't survive stomach acids/bile, what is the basis of its inclusion in Polyflora O?


you might be repeating a one size fit all expert advice somewhere on the net......do not believe everything you read ;D
Posted by: yaeli, Thursday, May 17, 2012, 5:05am; Reply: 8
Streptococcus thermophilus is contained also in other probiotic preparations.

I've used 2 of them:

Co-Biotic
NOW probiotics

I chose them according to the Polyflora O strains, when I needed mega-doses.

I imagine that as per (at least) relatively new researches, S. thermophilus is contained in every state-of-the-art probiotics.
Posted by: Conor, Friday, May 18, 2012, 6:27pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Lola
you might be repeating a one size fit all expert advice somewhere on the net......do not believe everything you read ;D


Lola, my information came from Todar's Textbook of Bacteriology, i.e.:

Quoted Text
Streptococcus thermophilus is an alpha-hemolytic species of the viridans group. The bacterium is found in milk and milk products. It is not a probiotic (it does not survive the stomach) and generally is used in the production of yogurt and the manufacture of several types of cheese, especially Italian and Swiss cheeses. The organism is a moderate thermophile with an optimal growth rate at 45 °C. Although S. thermophilus is closely related to other pathogenic streptococci (such as S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes), S. thermophilus is classified as a non-pathogenic, alpha-hemolytic species that is part of the viridan's group. It is closely related to S. salivarius in the oral cavity.


You're probably right about the whey, which I stay away from, because if it were the milk solids themselves that caused yoghurt to be an avoid, it would make sense that all dairy products would be verboten. However, various cheeses and butter/ghee are either superfoods or neutrals (all dairy products which have had the whey drained to a large degree).

Interestingly, even before I was aware of BTD/GTD, I always strained my yoghurt (kefir, too) for a couple of days with a very fine-mesh strainer to remove as much of the whey liquid as possible, and the result would be a soft cheese that could be used as a spread in place of cream cheese or a sour cream replacement on baked yams ... and I'd still obtain the probiotic benefits of the fermented dairy milk.

Anyhow, I remain curious about my original question. While I've come across some research that indicates S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus is a model "oral" probiotic, Polyflora O is encapsulated so, unless one takes the capsules apart and sprinkles the contents on the tongue, that seems to rule out its inclusion for that purpose. Thus, I'm still looking for information that supports its ability to survive gastric acidic conditions and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells.

Thanks for the input, and links, from everyone thus far. (:
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, May 18, 2012, 7:01pm; Reply: 10
Have you gone thru any of the NIH stuff yet? Did you notice that S. Ther...  is used in some bacteria combinations to provide folic acid?

I found that interesting. I still don't claim any knowledge on why it is specifically in the O polyflora.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, May 18, 2012, 7:11pm; Reply: 11
so far no one has studied the link of IAP content in the different Abo physiologies......there might lie your answer.....do the other polyfloras contain that S T strain?
Posted by: Conor, Friday, May 18, 2012, 7:45pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Lloyd
Have you gone thru any of the NIH stuff yet? Did you notice that S. Ther...  is used in some bacteria combinations to provide folic acid? I found that interesting.

Lloyd, thanks, I have looked through some of them and, yes, I also noticed the folic acid link to the bacterium. Quite interesting, but it seems that the process works in solution, i.e., during the fermentation stage of whatever matrix is being used, so it's definitely beneficial in that respect. Actually, this ties in to one of the reasons I'm so intrigued by bacterial fermentation. In most food stuffs, the process seems to universally boost certain vitamins in foods, including biotin, cobalamin, nicotinic acid, riboflavin and thiamine.

Not to get sidetracked from this thread, but I find the yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae very interesting, as well.
Posted by: Conor, Friday, May 18, 2012, 7:49pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Lola
so far no one has studied the link of IAP content in the different Abo physiologies......there might lie your answer.....do the other polyfloras contain that S T strain?


Lola, I should have mentioned in my first post that I'd looked at the entire Polyflora line, and that even kind of sparked my question about the bacterium in question ... no, it's not included in any of the other BT Polyflora formulations. It's only included in Polyflora O. (:
Posted by: Conor, Saturday, May 19, 2012, 9:40pm; Reply: 14
Further information (that doesn't seem to bode well for S. thermophilus' probiotic status) ...

Full Text: Scarce Evidence of Yogurt Lactic Acid Bacteria in Human Feces after Daily Yogurt Consumption by Healthy Volunteers

Quoted Text
"Despite the widely held assumptions about the probiotic properties of classic lactic acid bacteria in yogurt, L. delbrueckii and S. thermophilus, data about the function of these organisms in the human intestine remain scarce at best and unconvincing where they exist at all (16). The new molecular techniques provide a much greater opportunity to examine this important research question. In the carefully controlled experiments reported in this paper, we were consistently unable to detect viable yogurt lactic acid bacteria in fecal samples after repeated yogurt consumption by healthy volunteers. L. delbrueckii and/or S. thermophilus DNA remains were detected by hybridization assays in only 10% of volunteers who had ingested fresh yogurt ...."

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 January; 71(1): 547–549.

Abstract: Probiotics: facts and myths

Quoted Text
"There is scientific evidence that specific strains of probiotic microorganisms confer health benefits on the host and are safe for human use. However, this evidence cannot be extrapolated to other strains, as these effects are strain-specific ...."

Clin Microbiol Infect. 2005 Dec;11(12):958-66.

Full Text: Survival of Yogurt Bacteria in the Human Gut

Quoted Text
"In our study, S. thermophilus was retrieved from only one volunteer on day 7, but we cannot exclude the possibility that a prolonged ingestion period or a larger amount of ingested yogurt, as described by Mater et al. (22), could positively affect the rate of S. thermophilus recovery from fecal samples. However, several authors have shown that S. thermophilus suffers from the environmentally adverse gastric conditions (9, 26) ...."

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 July; 72(7): 5113–5117.

Full Text: Molecular Analysis of Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in Human Intestinal Microbiota

Quoted Text
"The DGGE analysis showed that the individual composition of intestinal microbiota remained stable during the study period, and no significant differences were observed after the exposure to either type of yogurt. The DGGE analysis corroborated previous results indicating that classic bacteria used for yogurt fermentation were unable either to survive after ingestion or to colonize the intestinal tract (9). DGGE experiments using universal primers allowed us to identify particular band patterns among the different individuals, although we consider that the low number of bands detected with these primers hinders the precise analysis of qualitative changes ...."

Am J Clin Nutr January 2008 vol. 87 no. 1 91-96.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, May 21, 2012, 5:00am; Reply: 15
Conor, read this real carefully

Quoted Text
Polyflora   (reply)       Posted by: Dr. D

Almost all probiotics are in spore formation (since bacteria go into
spore mode when dessicated).

Spores would survive a nuclear detonation.

How long the capsule takes to dissolve is immaterial.

Enteric coating is a good thing for aspirin, but a marketing gimmick for probiotics.
http://www.connecticutcenterforhealth.com/acidophilus.html
Posted by: Lloyd, Monday, May 21, 2012, 12:43pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Conor


Full Text: Survival of Yogurt Bacteria in the Human Gut
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1489325/




This is the only reference I have reviewed so far. It contains the following passage:

Quoted Text
On the other hand, Brigidi et al. (4) reported that for 6 days after the end of treatment, they recovered S. thermophilus from fecal samples from 10 healthy subjects who had ingested a pharmaceutical preparation orally for 3 days.


Which, if all excerpts are taken at face value, implies that probiotic supplements may be superior to yogurt. At least for some organisms.

Keep reading. Look at the study design and what, if anything, the study was designed for.

Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, 3:11am; Reply: 17
Quoted from Lloyd
Have you gone thru any of the NIH stuff yet? .... I found that interesting. I still don't claim any knowledge on why it is specifically in the O polyflora.

Hi Lloyd, I recently received a white paper from a Streptococcus thermophilus manufacturer. It has some interesting information and provides data regarding the bacterium's ability to survive stomach acid/bile. The document's in PDF format, which is why I can't post it here. If you'd like to have a look at it, let me know and I can email it to you. (Or, is there a way to attach a file to a forum post and I've overlooked it?)
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, 5:35am; Reply: 18
Quoted from Conor

Hi Lloyd, I recently received a white paper from a Streptococcus thermophilus manufacturer. It has some interesting information and provides data regarding the bacterium's ability to survive stomach acid/bile. The document's in PDF format, which is why I can't post it here. If you'd like to have a look at it, let me know and I can email it to you. (Or, is there a way to attach a file to a forum post and I've overlooked it?)
Is a program like this useful?  :-/

Posted by: Lloyd, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, 1:10pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Conor

If you'd like to have a look at it, let me know and I can email it to you.


Sure, check your PM box. Thanks!

Posted by: Lloyd, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, 1:38pm; Reply: 20
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16099606

Quoted Text
To date, there is significant controversy as to the survival of yogurt bacteria (namely, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) after passage through the human gastrointestinal tract. Survival of both bacterial species in human feces was investigated by culture on selective media. Out of 39 samples recovered from 13 healthy subjects over a 12-day period of fresh yogurt intake, 32 and 37 samples contained viable S. thermophilus (median value of 6.3 x 10(4) CFU g(-1) of feces) and L. delbrueckii (median value of 7.2 x 10(4)CFU g(-1) of feces), respectively. The results of the present study indicate that substantial numbers of yogurt bacteria can survive human gastrointestinal transit.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, 1:42pm; Reply: 21
This discussion is very interesting. I just saw this while I was doing a search: Whether Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus can be recovered after passage through the human gut was tested by feeding 20 healthy volunteers commercial yogurt. Yogurt bacteria were found in human feces, suggesting that they can survive transit in the gastrointestinal tract.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1489325/
Makes me wish I could eat yogurt!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, 5:30pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Conor
Further information (that doesn't seem to bode well for S. thermophilus' probiotic status) ...

Full Text: Scarce Evidence of Yogurt Lactic Acid Bacteria in Human Feces after Daily Yogurt Consumption by Healthy Volunteers
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC544258/

.


My first thought on this is: how much yogurt are the participants eating, and what kinds of yogurt? If they're eating sugar-laden varieties with low levels of probiotics, I'm not surprised it's not helping them.  
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 2:53pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Lloyd
Sure, check your PM box. Thanks!

Sent it.
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 3:02pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from yaeli
Is a program like this useful?  :-/

Hi yaeli, thanks for the link. I have a program that works similarly, but the PDF document from the manufacturer contained graphics, table charts, et cetera, that don't always convert well to MS Word, OO Writer or other word processors. Wish there was a way to post files in a local dropbox-type area on the forum and provide links to them in posts (of course, this is already a very useful gratis service provided by Doctor D'Adamo so no complaints here). (:
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 3:17pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Spring
Makes me wish I could eat yogurt!

Hi Spring, I know. Yoghurt is a full-on avoid for me, too. However, some of the newer research that I've read, as well as something Lloyd pointed out, seems to indicate that probiotic supplementation (i.e., bolus administration) in some instances increased probiotic levels even better than did yoghurt consumption.

Another way I've been maintaining my probiotic intake, now that yoghurt is verboten, is to drink water kefir. It actually has more inherent strains of gut-friendly bacteria than even the best commercial yoghurt available.
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, June 1, 2012, 8:59pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from Conor

Sent it.


I've had a look. Fairly interesting.

In vitro studies are useful as predictive tools. They have benefits and drawbacks. The studies that used human volunteers also have benefits and drawbacks, the biggest of which is controls although other things come to mind.

For this particular data set the survival rate is still an open question but it looks safe to assume that there is some level of survival that is large enough to be beneficial without megadosing.

I was particularly interested in the resistance to some antibiotics of ST. Good to know.

Naturally by now it should be apparent that since ST does not form spores, that portion of the Dr. D quote above does not apply to ST, which does say "Almost all". It would apply to various other probiotics in NAP formulations.

Dr D has also commented on other probiotics and their consumptive value. Part of the commentary had to do with the ability to populate the gut, implied in the analysis of ST in that report. There were also other factors but rather than rely on memory someone should do a search. There was something dealing with "too many strains" if memory serves, but the quote would need to be found.
Posted by: Conor, Saturday, June 2, 2012, 12:45am; Reply: 27
Quoted from Lloyd
For this particular data set the survival rate is still an open question but it looks safe to assume that there is some level of survival that is large enough to be beneficial without megadosing.

I agree, although I'd think the results they're concerned with documenting would be specific to their particular strain, i.e., St-21. Which makes me curious about how many strains of S. thermophilus are actually in commercial production. I found another study on PubMed concerning two distinctive strains of S. thermophilus which had been extracted from Indian water buffalo yoghurt. The researchers were interested because the strains were showing a markedly increased survival rate against stomach acid and bile salts.

Quoted from Lloyd
I was particularly interested in the resistance to some antibiotics of ST. Good to know.

Defintely, and it begs the question of why drug-resistant probiotics aren't more often paired with the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics by allopaths (okay, that was somewhat rhetorical, but still valid). One example in which this could be very useful comes to mind: Clindamycin. This antibiotic can frequently cause pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes even months after the course of medication has been completed. However, L. casei, L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus have all been studied and shown to be relatively efficacious in the control of C. difficile.


Quoted from Lloyd
Naturally by now it should be apparent that since ST does not form spores, that portion of the Dr. D quote above does not apply to ST, which does say "Almost all". It would apply to various other probiotics in NAP formulations.

I caught that, too. At any rate, it made me do some review on endospores and exospores and, I have to say, it's an aspect of species survival that's just fascinating in and of itself. I mean, the fact that 40 million year-old spores have been discovered here on earth, that are still viable(*), is incredible. Between them and the cockroaches, I think the key to longevity is contained somewhere within. (:


Quoted from Lloyd
Dr D has also commented on other probiotics and their consumptive value. Part of the commentary had to do with the ability to populate the gut, implied in the analysis of ST in that report. There were also other factors but rather than rely on memory someone should do a search. There was something dealing with "too many strains" if memory serves, but the quote would need to be found.

I'm going to look into this because I recall reading in one of the R4YT books (think it was the reference-type one) something about the Basques having more in common with the inhabitants of some area of the Caucasus Mountains than their immediate neighbors in Europe. Let me see if a search turns up anything .... okay, back, found it. This is what I remembered:

Quoted from Doctor D'Adamo | http://www.dadamo.com/science_anthro.htm
The Basques are an ancient people whose origins are still a mystery. The Basque language, the only western European language not connected by Indo-European roots, appears to be related to several dialects found in small isolated populations in the valleys of the Caucasus Mountains. Although they look much like their French and Spanish neighbors, Basques possess the lowest frequency of blood group B---originally having no group B at all---and the highest frequencies of blood group O in Europe. Cattle, abundant on the European plains, and fresh water fish seem to have been the staples of their early existence, as evidenced by the extraordinary renderings of the famous cave paintings found in the Basque country.

More than fifty percent of the Basque population is Rh negative, as opposed to sixteen percent for the rest of Europe. Like the gene for group O, the genetic mechanism for the Rh negative blood type is simpler, hence undoubtedly older, than the gene for Rh positive.

I know this is kind of an esoteric connection but, in relation to what you said about "too many strains," the Basque memory provided the connection to the Caucasus Mountains. If the Basques did originate from that area, they would likely have been exposed to milk kefir as a staple dietary food item (it seems most people agree that kefir originated with the native people of the Caucasus Mountain region). The reason I want to further look into what you mentioned, and why it's such a dichotomy for me, is that if there is a negative to be found in the consumption of multiple strains of probiotics, why are the peoples of the Caucasus Mountains--the birthplace of kefir--some of the longest lived individuals on earth? ... having more documented centenarians per capita than anywhere else on the planet? Because kefir has more symbiotic strains of gut-griendly bacteria than any other fermented foodstuff of which I'm aware. I think, on average, there's somewhere in the ballpark of 30 viable bacterial strains in non-commercial kefir.

Anyhow, thanks for helping me brainstorm all of this. I really appreciate your input.
Posted by: yaeli, Saturday, June 2, 2012, 6:09am; Reply: 28
Quoted from Conor
Defintely, and it begs the question of why drug-resistant probiotics aren't more often paired with the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics by allopaths (okay, that was somewhat rhetorical, but still valid). One example in which this could be very useful comes to mind: Clindamycin. This antibiotic can frequently cause pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes even months after the course of medication has been completed. However, L. casei, L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus have all been studied and shown to be relatively efficacious in the control of C. difficile.

This paragraph and the link are being emailed right away to my former boss, the head of the internal medicine depts and the former head of the infectious disease unit in a Jerusalem hospital.

Posted by: Lloyd, Saturday, June 2, 2012, 12:29pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from Conor

The reason I want to further look into what you mentioned, and why it's such a dichotomy for me, is that if there is a negative to be found in the consumption of multiple strains of probiotics, why are the peoples of the Caucasus Mountains--the birthplace of kefir--some of the longest lived individuals on earth? ... having more documented centenarians per capita than anywhere else on the planet?

Anyhow, thanks for helping me brainstorm all of this. I really appreciate your input.


First, the question of specific strain of ST is something I noticed as well. You can see why designing studies and interpreting results has so many potential pitfalls. One would think that it would be simple to design a inclusive study but in fact, it is not. That is why considering the study design is important when looking at study results and conclusions. In biologics and biochemistry this is particularly true, wheras for some things it is of a lower concern.

There can be many reasons for the longevity of the Basque peoples and it seems likely that there are a number of contributing factors. Kefir may be one. Is it a major factor? A minor factor? Relevant? Irrelevant? Off hand I have no intuitive feel. Be careful not to find the answers that you are looking for!

Thanks for the intellectual intercourse. I wish I had more time to pursue some of these interesting questions.
Posted by: Conor, Saturday, June 2, 2012, 8:00pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Lloyd

I wish I had more time to pursue some of these interesting questions.

I hear you. I have to be careful even when I do have time because, if I let myself, I can go off on a tangent exploring logical, and not so logical, corollary relationships between dependent and independent variables ... and then someone (most often one of those annoying people that keeps reminding me we're descendants of a common progenitor) points out that I haven't communicated via anything other than monosyllabic grunts for three days. <~;

Just from what little we've been discussing, however, I can see why some people devote their entire lives to only researching bacteria. Very interesting on many different levels.

Also, I understand what you're saying about not interpreting data so as to find the answer(s) one wants to find. I have no dog in this hunt per se, as I was initially only curious about the probiotic status of S. thermophilus. In puzzling that through, though, I became even more curious about probiotics in general (especially the premise that bacterial strains can be blood type specific). Too, I'd think that trying to put together a comprehensive clinical trial (i.e., relevant to a very broad segment of the population) is somewhat analogous to writing a new computer OS release/version; having to deal with so much legacy hardware and software makes it flat-out impossible to release something for millions of users which is entirely bug-free (and that doesn't simply crash/lock-up some of their systems).

Lastly, I'm including a link below which contains an abstract (577 An assay system for probiotic lactic acid bacteria recognizing human blood type A-antigen that competitively excludes harmful intestinal bacteria) that I'm going to look into further. Thought you might be interested, as well.

Posted by: Conor, Saturday, June 2, 2012, 8:03pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from yaeli
This paragraph and the link are being emailed right away to my former boss, the head of the internal medicine depts and the former head of the infectious disease unit in a Jerusalem hospital.

Thanks for the update, yaeli. It will be equally interesting to hear from you this person's reply.

P.S. I did see the PM and, yes, I will email it today. (:
Posted by: Lloyd, Saturday, June 2, 2012, 10:54pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Conor


Lastly, I'm including a link below which contains an abstract (577 An assay system for probiotic lactic acid bacteria recognizing human blood type A-antigen that competitively excludes harmful intestinal bacteria) that I'm going to look into further. Thought you might be interested, as well.



Thanks! Looks promising.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, June 3, 2012, 5:30am; Reply: 33
listen to this conor
http://www.aboessentials.com/servlet/the-template/newsletter/Page#audio
Posted by: yaeli, Sunday, June 3, 2012, 8:16am; Reply: 34
Quoted from Lola
This is what I need. Nothing else and nobody else can do this for me. I'll listen to this every morning - part 1 before breakfast.

Health Only!!!  :'( :K)
Posted by: yaeli, Sunday, June 3, 2012, 9:16am; Reply: 35
Quoted from Conor
Thanks for the update, yaeli. It will be equally interesting to hear from you this person's reply.
He replied briefly with a thank you, and that he and his team are of course very familiar with the subject. Quite dismissive.

In such cases I repeat, mainly to myself, King Solomon's words: "Send your bread (=let it float) upon the water (of the stream, I presume), for in time (lit. after many days) you will find it" (Ecclesiastes, 11, 1).

Actually, I just utter the shortened version: "Send", and people know the rest.

Posted by: Karma, Sunday, June 3, 2012, 7:13pm; Reply: 36
Thank you Lola!!!!!!!!
Posted by: yaeli, Monday, June 4, 2012, 4:39am; Reply: 37
Quoted from yaeli
This is what I need. Nothing else and nobody else can do this for me. I'll listen to this every morning - part 1 before breakfast
Once daily. (book2)

By the time part 1 is over, I can already have cranberry juice and maitake extract (sunny)
Posted by: Conor, Monday, June 4, 2012, 8:07pm; Reply: 38
Quoted from Lola
listen to this conor ...

Thank you, Lola, I appreciate it. (:
Posted by: Conor, Monday, June 4, 2012, 8:20pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from yaeli
He replied briefly with a thank you, and that he and his team are of course very familiar with the subject. Quite dismissive .... Actually, I just utter the shortened version: "Send", and people know the rest.

Exactly. (:

However, it does occur to me that maybe more Israeli allopathic doctors are better versed in protocols such as this than their U.S. counterparts (e.g., how I've found that, in Europe, allopathy and naturopathy can co-exist less antagonistically than is so often the case in the U.S.).
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, June 5, 2012, 5:55am; Reply: 40
Quoted from Conor
However, it does occur to me that maybe more Israeli allopathic doctors are better versed in protocols such as this than their U.S. counterparts (e.g., how I've found that, in Europe, allopathy and naturopathy can co-exist less antagonistically than is so often the case in the U.S.).
(pray)(pray)(pray)

(pray)
Print page generated: Friday, July 25, 2014, 4:12am