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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  British Cuisine
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:53am
Do you like it?
Have you any cool recipes for your type?
Have you adapted any traditional British dishes for BTD or GTD?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:28am; Reply: 1
is there such a thing???? ;D
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:41am; Reply: 2
British cuisine has been described as "unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it."
They love sauces, for sure. And custards.....boiled, that is. We had a friend from over there, and everyone was learning how to make that "perfect" boiled custard they loved so much! I decided I liked it pretty well myself! Now, Americans, in general, they just pile on ice cream!! Who wants boiled custard when you have ice cream!
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:53am; Reply: 3
Quoted from Spring
British cuisine has been described as "unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it."


It has also been characterized as majoring in "Comfort Food".
And, yes, the "quality local ingredients" are sources of very great pride there.

I daresay that the older we get, the less fancy/busy we generally like our dishes -- the more we demand or appreciate superb ingredients whose innate flavors really shine through. And this is where British cuisine is poised to excel: In simplicity. Insofar as the ingredients are the Very Best, it's a real winner.

Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:12am; Reply: 4
imo NZ cuisine is even better ;) Great fresh ingredients, world renowned quality meats & no need to disguise anything really with sauces ;)
Quoted from Spring
Now, Americans, in general, they just pile on ice cream!! Who wants boiled custard when you have ice cream!
lol my husband, when asked by my English mother whether he wanted custard, cream or icecream on his Christmas pudding, cheekily said "all three thanks" ;)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:20am; Reply: 5
It is a decent approach, to let quality ingredients stand on their own. I;m sure my Scottish ancestors ate something besides haggis.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:23am; Reply: 6
Quoted from Possum
)
lol my husband, when asked by my English mother whether he wanted custard, cream or icecream on his Christmas pudding, cheekily said "all three thanks" ;)

Hilarious! :D
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:24am; Reply: 7
I'm sure they ate oats gcg ;) My 1st generation Dad (of Scots parents) used to live on oats if you let him... ::) ;)
Posted by: honeybee, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:50am; Reply: 8
I follow @jamieoliver for great favorites & adaptations

archived here : http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/lamb-recipes
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 6:06am; Reply: 9
my dad married a Brit.......

she must have been a lousy cook then!!! ;D
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 9:46am; Reply: 10
Well I can say that British cousine has improved a lot the last years.

I looove Nigella
Jamie Oliver
and River cottages Hugh FW

I find it fairly easy to adapt their food.
I use spelt flour when they use wheat
I can have cream and butter so no :( faces for me  ;D
The only hard thing to avoid is sugar and bacon  :B

I went to London last month
we had amazing good food ( sure it was a Weston A Price thing but still :-/)
What I loved going out to eat was that most places used free range eggs.

I had lovely food at a Pub- yes it was not 100 % BTD
I had an amazing tender pork belly, with cidergravy, mashed potatoes with kale and baked pears- it was a amazing  8)

Another day at the same pub I had potatoes in garlic cream sauce with minted peas and lovey tender lamb.



Posted by: paul clucas, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 10:10am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Possum
I'm sure they ate oats gcg ;) My 1st generation Dad (of Scots parents) used to live on oats if you let him... ::) ;)
Even if it was three days old and served cold.

Oats were a major part of my very successful weightloss health kick.  I have been thinking of recreating that way of eating, because I could "afford" two meals a week of anything and everthing I craved.

I would replace oats with Quinoa, however.

Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 10:19am; Reply: 12
Quoted from paul clucas
Even if it was three days old and served cold.
Isn't that peas porridge :D in the pot 9 days old?
Posted by: shoulderblade, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:04pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Possum
Isn't that peas porridge :D in the pot 9 days old?


That is correct. Paul seems to be talking fast food, Scots style, here.  ;D

Posted by: deblynn3, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:28pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
It is a decent approach, to let quality ingredients stand on their own. I;m sure my Scottish ancestors ate something besides haggis.


Roast Grouse, shortbread,scones,blackberry crumble, lemon sponge and lemon Curd

The crumble is easy to make BT friendly

Posted by: NewHampshireGirl, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:53pm; Reply: 15
I'm not certain I know what boiled custard is.
I do make my English grandmother's recipe for plum pudding and I haven't changed the ingredients one bit since we eat it only once a year.  I also make the sauce for it which is not hard sauce but pourable sweetened white sauce with nutmeg.........the best thing in this whole world!! (dance)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:53pm; Reply: 16
Bouiled custard is a custard made wit eggyolks, sugar and cream
;D

Lemon curd is amazing egg yolks, sugar, lemonjuice and butter - what not to like ;D
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:04pm; Reply: 17
[quote=1130]I'm not certain I know what boiled custard is. /quote]

It is very much like egg custard except it is liquid enough so you can pour it out of a pitcher. The trick is getting the "liquid" just right and not scorching it in the process - with NO lumps, of course! I really like it. (smile)
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:06pm; Reply: 18
Quoted Text
Lemon curd is amazing egg yolks, sugar, lemonjuice and butter - what not to like

It is delicious!!!
Posted by: Lin, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 5:04pm; Reply: 19
When I was growing up my mother made the best custard, and in the winter hot custard over apple pie was the best.  I don't think it is called boiled custard, but the milk is boiled to make the custard, and then some poor kid (me back then) stood stirring the custard so it would not get a skin on the top!
Possume,
I am married to a New Yorker, and he would probably respond like your husbandif asked did he wanted custard, cream or icecream on his Christmas pudding!  Us Brits tend to be too polite and miss out :)
Lin
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 6:56pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Henriette Bsec
Another day at the same pub I had potatoes in garlic cream sauce with minted peas and lovey tender lamb.


See? They know just what they're doing. Yum.
But, yes, their cuisine has definitely much improved over the decades.
Posted by: cajun, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 9:00pm; Reply: 21
Possum, I agree with your DH! I want a little of everything, too! ;D
Honeybee, love Jaime Oliver!
HB, my Mom makes the best lemon curd, I can't stand how long it takes..stirring forever..so I try to sneak a taste while she is at the stove..hot and yummy..oh my! :D

I've only been to London to fly in or out but did have a 3 day stay once in 2006.
In my opinion, hop over to Ireland for a good meal! I've had 2 long vacations there about 4 years apart, stayed in hotels and bed and breakfasts and one private home all over the country, and enjoyed every meal!   :)
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 11:30pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from NewHampshireGirl
I do make my English grandmother's recipe for plum pudding and I haven't changed the ingredients one bit since we eat it only once a year.

I LOVE the flavor of grandma's plum pudding, but I can't eat enough of it to make it even once a year...

I did make a steamed lemon pudding from an International cookbook when in college that I really liked...  Hmmm...  I need to dig out that cookbook and see how to make it compliant for us.  It wasn't very sweet, so it shouldn't be a problem for my sweet sensitive Explorer...

My WW is English, but her family has been in the US since the Revolution, so most of their recipes have been "Americanized" through the years...
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 19, 2012, 1:12pm; Reply: 23
Yes, it is called boiled custard. Maybe there are other names for it too.

http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,boiled_custard,FF.html
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, April 19, 2012, 1:54pm; Reply: 24
Fantastic recipes here:

http://www.amazon.com/Ploughmans-Lunch-Misers-Feast-Restaurant/dp/1558324135/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1334843575&sr=1-1

Not a clinker in the bunch. With a little tweaking, most of them can be made type-friendly.
Posted by: Possum, Friday, April 20, 2012, 12:56am; Reply: 25
Tbh Lin & Cajun I'd do the same, perhaps with less of the icecream :D Often with the difference in each of those three "toppings" they are a nice blend together... Didn't have to be a huge serving of each ;)
She didn't mind - she always liked his honesty & the fact that she could then do the same without feeling guilty & having to "keep up appearances" (a very English preoccupation) :D
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, April 22, 2012, 4:05am; Reply: 26
Quoted from Spring
British cuisine has been described as "unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it."
They love sauces, for sure. And custards.....boiled, that is. We had a friend from over there, and everyone was learning how to make that "perfect" boiled custard they loved so much! I decided I liked it pretty well myself! Now, Americans, in general, they just pile on ice cream!! Who wants boiled custard when you have ice cream!


I've never heard of that description of British food before in my entire life. Welsh farmhouse food YES - but not British. "Stodgy" is the keyword.
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, April 22, 2012, 4:13am; Reply: 27
Quoted from san j
Do you like it?
Have you any cool recipes for your type?
Have you adapted any traditional British dishes for BTD or GTD?


Yes, I adapt them; many Brits are "A's". And I will continue to adapt them for my true love, who is a B-type over in Britain. It's all about the preparation and presentation; not about worcestershire sauce and Byrd's custard and
"mushy peas." Everyone can live without worcestershire sauce; lots of things can be made custard-y, and all you need for peas or beans for "mash" is a blender.

Let's face it: Brits like "baby food consistency" of foods because they drink so much at the pub that they don't want to chew anything afterwards......(Irish are different, however). Use mashed cauliflower instead of potatoes on top of the shepherd's pie, find compliant flours, etc etc

Posted by: Possum, Sunday, April 22, 2012, 4:47am; Reply: 28
Quoted from Seraffa
Use mashed cauliflower instead of potatoes on top of the shepherd's pie
I just discovered a great alternative for mashed potatoes ;) I cook yellow split peas with plenty of water, till they have soaked it up & are really mushy, (by which stage they are no longer yellow, incidentally) then add butter... They resemble as close to the taste & consistency of good old mash as I have found - much more than anything else I have ever used - including mashed cauliflower:) Not sure they  reheat that well, but great to serve as is & make a terrific base for "cream of..." soups ;)
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, April 22, 2012, 9:19pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from Possum
I just discovered a great alternative for mashed potatoes ;) I cook yellow split peas with plenty of water, till they have soaked it up & are really mushy, (by which stage they are no longer yellow, incidentally) then add butter... They resemble as close to the taste & consistency of good old mash as I have found - much more than anything else I have ever used - including mashed cauliflower:) Not sure they  reheat that well, but great to serve as is & make a terrific base for "cream of..." soups ;)


I have to try that. Peas are a diamond, over here!  :)
If you can make em taste like whipped cream someday - CONTACT ME......
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, April 22, 2012, 10:01pm; Reply: 30
;) :D
Posted by: shoulderblade, Monday, April 23, 2012, 6:28pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Seraffa

I have to try that. Peas are a diamond, over here!  :)
If you can make em taste like whipped cream someday - CONTACT ME......

Possums idea sounds good though I have not tried it out yet. I think you may be able to get to whipped cream by simply adding oil and doing it up in a blender of some sort.

As far as I know the basic difference between milk and cream is the fat content. Might have to add a little sugar for a more 'genuine' result. Anyone who could pull this off will become a culture hero.  ;D

Posted by: Spring, Monday, April 23, 2012, 7:18pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Seraffa
I've never heard of that description of British food before in my entire life. Welsh farmhouse food YES - but not British. "Stodgy" is the keyword.


Maybe you have missed something then! I didn't notice "stodgy" as being in the description!  :D
Posted by: Spring, Monday, April 23, 2012, 7:20pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from Seraffa
Let's face it: Brits like "baby food consistency" of foods because they drink so much at the pub that they don't want to chew anything afterwards......(Irish are different, however). Use mashed cauliflower instead of potatoes on top of the shepherd's pie, find compliant flours, etc etc

Maybe it has more to do with their self-described bad teeth  - false teeth don't quite "cut" it sometimes!!! (hugegrin) Just teasing, of course. On the other hand, maybe their taste buds simply haven't been over-worked wading through screaming spices and such! I know that I just love their boiled custard! One friend said their mother used to start cooking lunch right after breakfast. He thought that was great! What? I want my food either raw or cooked and plopped right onto my plate immediately - steaming hot!
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