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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Xanthan gum
Posted by: purlgirl, Saturday, March 31, 2012, 9:20pm
Ok - most Gluten Free bread recipes call for Xanthan gum or some other Gums bc there is no gluten to help  the bread rise - I get that.  

Two questions:
1.  Why do so many Quick Breads recipes that use Baking Powder call for Xanthan Gum?  

2.  Would Guar Gum work as well both with yeast and baking powder recipes?


   I want to reducing the amount of wheat in my  husbands diet.  To do this I'll need to bake for him. He won't really care what is in it as long as he likes it. But he is picky.  Bread especially  has to be soft and not dry. I want him to enjoy his food.

I suppose making bread that is part wheat would still be moving forward for now.

Love my  Swami program and I have especially improved since I got completely off wheat. My stomach is so much flatter and even my rings & shoes are looser - I had no idea I was so bloated.  :D

I want my husband to feel better too.  He is not the least bit interested in persueing these issues for himself.  Like I said he doesn't care what is in food as long as he likes it.  He is A+ secretor with a lot of belly fat and terrible acid reflux  but he is not overweight.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, March 31, 2012, 9:38pm; Reply: 1
Quoted from purlgirl
1.  Why do so many Quick Breads recipes that use Baking Powder call for Xanthan Gum?  

2.  Would Guar Gum work as well both with yeast and baking powder recipes?


What the gum does is capture gas bubble and holds them in the baked product. Does not matter whether the gas is created by yeast or by sodium bicarbonate reacting with cream of tarter.

If nothing traps the gas bubbles they just escape into the air and you get a heavy dense product with lousy texture.

What one wants is dough that is elastic and stretchy (from gums or gluten), and that trap gas within baked goods, providing a light, airy structure.

Xanthan and guar are different and have different properties in baking as well as how they affect people's digestion. You may have to experiment with what works for you.

For my health, I seem to do better with locust bean gum.
Posted by: purlgirl, Saturday, March 31, 2012, 11:19pm; Reply: 2
Locust Bean Gum - is that the same as Carob powder?   How do you use it "trap the gas" in baking?

I've used Carob powder for flavor - it's a Diamond for me.
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, March 31, 2012, 11:22pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from purlgirl
How do you use it "trap the gas" in baking?


It is my understanding that the gum does this naturally, as it replaces some of the "stretchiness" of gluten in the dough / batter.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, April 1, 2012, 12:29am; Reply: 4
I only use baking soda, cream of tartar and lemon juice for leavening.....

that works for me

Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, April 1, 2012, 1:43am; Reply: 5
Quoted from purlgirl
Locust Bean Gum - is that the same as Carob powder?   How do you use it "trap the gas" in baking?

I've used Carob powder for flavor - it's a Diamond for me.


1) Carob powder is made from grinding up pods of the locust tree. Locust bean gum is mad from grinding up the endosperm of locust tree seeds. The endosperm is very small portion of the seed.  The gum and the flour are not the same thing!  They behave differently when you cook with them.

2) Trapping gas-Think of blowing bubbles with bubble gum. That is how gums work.
Posted by: purlgirl, Sunday, April 1, 2012, 2:30am; Reply: 6
I'm guessing you ment to say they are not the same thing as they behave dif.

Thank you all for helping me. If I try to make a yeast bread I'll look for 'Locust Bean Gum' and think of Balloones  :D

Thanks Lola - nice to know it can be done w/o the gummy stuff.

Posted by: Lola, Sunday, April 1, 2012, 4:32am; Reply: 7
binding can be done using ground linseed, chia and arrowroot....

actually all of my sprouted bean flours are pretty cool binding agents....haha
Posted by: cowgirlmama04, Tuesday, April 3, 2012, 3:52am; Reply: 8
Something else that I have learned and am  playing with at the moment is to add moisture to baked goods with Hemp heart flour or even just use the hearts. It works especially great in cakes. I will be trying a bread recipe using hemp hearts tomorrow to see how it works.
Posted by: purlgirl, Tuesday, April 3, 2012, 5:02am; Reply: 9
Let us know what you do and how it turns out.   :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, April 3, 2012, 1:53pm; Reply: 10
Your husband may benefit from a wheat-free diet, even without cutting out all gluten. Spelt flour may  be a good choice for baking for your husband; it's far healthier and more digestable than wheat but bakes up with a very similar texture. It's more delicate than wheat flour, but it bakes up with the same taste and texture as wheat if you don't over-knead the dough and watch it to make sure it doesn't over-rise (less gluten in the bread means it will fall sooner than wheat dough.)

Spelt is less tricky to work with than any gluten-free recipes. I prefer to use a mixture of white and whole grain spelt flours for optimal texture in the loaf.

I don't know if you personally will do well on spelt flour or not; you may be sensitive to gluten as well as to the wheat germ lectin. But it's certainly a better choice for your husband than the wheat he's been eating, and may possible be a better choice than a gluten-free loaf with gums in it.
Posted by: cowgirlmama04, Tuesday, April 3, 2012, 6:11pm; Reply: 11
OK, I tried bread with help hearts and I must say that considering that I made this recipe up from the top of my head this morning, I am very encouraged.
This is the recipe I created

2/3 cup of warm water
1 1/2 tbsp of yeast
2 tbsp agave
let sit together while you mix the rest

1/2 cp ground flax
1/4 cp hemp seeds
1 cp Buckwheat flour
3/4 cup brown rice flour
Mix together then add:
3 eggs
1/4 cup oil
and yeast mixture

Mix together well, it will be a sticky dough. I put it in a parchment lined bread pan and let it rise for 2 hours, then baked it at 350 F for about 35 mins

It turned out pretty good but I think that I will cut the rice flour down and add more flax to help hold it together a little better. I will be playing with this recipe to see if I can master a bread the resembles that gloopified stuff that is found on store isles. But it tastes devine and the hemp definately helped hold in more moisture.

My kids actually ate it!!!!! Now to see if my bread loving honey will eat it tonight, that is if I don't eat it all by then  ;D

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