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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Celtic salt
Posted by: Jumari, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 10:54am
I used to think that all sea salts were the same  but my attention has now been drawn to unrefined sea salt being better for you than refined sea salt. More electrolytes so iI add a pinch to my gym water and richer in other minerals. Plus it is not bleached or altered in any way. I use Celtic sea salt but I hear that the  Himalayan kind is even better. Anyone else use unrefined sea salt? i used to cramp a lot after or during excercise and now I don't.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 11:20am; Reply: 1
Lola I think puts it in her water--
Posted by: AKArtlover, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 1:54pm; Reply: 2
refined isn't usually a useful term in foods. a few exceptions... ;)
Posted by: geminisue, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 1:54pm; Reply: 3
1/4 teaspoon to 8 oz. of water works well.
Posted by: Green Root, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 6:08pm; Reply: 4
Jumari, I think you've used very healthful salt. Unrefined sea salt is rich in minerals, more than halites.

Himalayan salt is not bad, but its NaCl-percentage is quite high, therefore other minerals appear in smaller amounts.
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 7:25pm; Reply: 5
I've been adding 3 Tablespoons of Himalayan salt to one gallon of water. Shake it up.

When I pour a glass of it, I squeeze some lime in it. It's like a virgin margarita!
Really quite tasty and it kills hunger pangs.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 7:48pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from geminisue
1/4 teaspoon to 8 oz. of water works well.
I think that concentration of salt is good for saline nasal rinse.  About half that into 24oz (at least six times more dilute) works better for me as a drink.  IMO, it should soften the water without making it taste salty.

Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 8:18pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from SquarePeg
I think that concentration of salt is good for saline nasal rinse.  About half that into 24oz (at least six times more dilute) works better for me as a drink.  IMO, it should soften the water without making it taste salty.



I use 1/2 tsp Himalayan or Celtic (the only kinds of salts I buy) per 8 oz of warm water for a saline rinse.

I like both varieties of salt and rotate them.
Posted by: Louise, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 8:38pm; Reply: 8
is anyone doing this Sole Therapy solution?  http://www.himalayancrystalsalt.com/sole-recipe.html  
I've been trying different things to assist with the cramps i get at times with yoga/pilates. Given a prior comment it sounds like the Himalayan may be giving me more NaCl that the other minerals I'm trying to get. I'm also adding Molasses to see if that helps.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 10:29pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Victoria


I use 1/2 tsp Himalayan or Celtic (the only kinds of salts I buy) per 8 oz of warm water for a saline rinse.

I like both varieties of salt and rotate them.


I use more salt than that, but mine is just organic sea-salt/ about a tablespoon per 250 ml, which I use to rinse my mouth before and after brushing teeth. last about a week.

I also put apinch in a 8 oz glass of sparkling water, with a squeeze of lemon with my live cell and polyflora every other day.
Posted by: Jumari, Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 10:46pm; Reply: 10
Aside from a pinch of Celtic salt and lemon I crush some mint leaves, that way it feels like I'm having a mojito without sugar and rum ofcourse...thats for later.
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 9:25pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Jumari
Aside from a pinch of Celtic salt and lemon I crush some mint leaves, that way it feels like I'm having a mojito without sugar and rum ofcourse...thats for later.


That sounds good!
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 11:16pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Green Root
Jumari, I think you've used very healthful salt. Unrefined sea salt is rich in minerals, more than halites.

Himalayan salt is not bad, but its NaCl-percentage is quite high, therefore other minerals appear in smaller amounts.
So is NaCl the sodium chloride? I failed that part of science due to having an alcoholic teacher ::)

Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, March 15, 2012, 12:31am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Possum
So is NaCl the sodium chloride?

Correct.  Na = Sodium, Cl = Clorine...
Posted by: grey rabbit, Thursday, March 15, 2012, 2:23am; Reply: 14
From what I've learned in Physiology and Exercise Physiology, it is extremely rare that anyone needs to add salt to their water, maybe marathon runners, you just don't need more NaCl than what you are getting in food. If you are keeping track and you are getting less than 2400 milligrams per day, then I'd go ahead add some, otherwise your body is just working overtime to get rid of it :-/.  Better to just add salt to your food, and good salt of course, I've been using Hawai'ian Bamboo Jade sea salt.
Posted by: Jumari, Thursday, March 15, 2012, 8:52am; Reply: 15
Hey Grey Rabbit...thanks for your input it was my trainer who recommended adding salt to the water while training. My current training routine involves circuit training with no rest between excercises. It helps to replenish the electrolytes and minerals I am losing while pushing, I wouldn't use Celtic salt if I were just jogging for an hour. At the same time I do take your point about the body working harder to get rid of salt. Salt is a superfood for me so I hope I'm not ODing on it. Are there any symptoms to NaCl overconsumption?
Posted by: Damon, Thursday, March 15, 2012, 9:09am; Reply: 16
Quoted from grey rabbit
From what I've learned in Physiology and Exercise Physiology, it is extremely rare that anyone needs to add salt to their water, maybe marathon runners, you just don't need more NaCl than what you are getting in food. If you are keeping track and you are getting less than 2400 milligrams per day, then I'd go ahead add some, otherwise your body is just working overtime to get rid of it :-/.  Better to just add salt to your food, and good salt of course, I've been using Hawai'ian Bamboo Jade sea salt.


People who monitor their diet as closely as the people here are extremely rare.

If you don't eat processed/prepacked foods, and no bread(s), you are ingesting considerably less sodium than the average westerner.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Thursday, March 15, 2012, 7:21pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from SquarePeg
I think that concentration of salt [1/4 teaspoon to 8 oz] is good for saline nasal rinse.  About half that into 24oz (at least six times more dilute) works better for me as a drink.  IMO, it should soften the water without making it taste salty.

I'd like to clarify that I only add salt to distilled water and to water from certain "pure water" dispensers.  I don't tamper with my well water, although I might add a pinch of salt to savory tea to improve its "mouth feel."

Posted by: grey rabbit, Friday, March 16, 2012, 2:05am; Reply: 18
Quoted from Damon

People who monitor their diet as closely as the people here are extremely rare.

If you don't eat processed/prepacked foods, and no bread(s), you are ingesting considerably less sodium than the average westerner.


This is true, but many people are dehydrated and don't even realize it.


Too much NaCl is likely to show up as hypernatremia, or dehydration which is dangerous and causes irritability, muscle cramps and confusion. You might also see some bloating as your body will try to retain as much water as possible to counteract hypernatremia.

One tsp. of salt (NaCl) contains 2,300 mg of sodium (Na) and that is about all you need in a day, and that is including, not in addition to, what is in your food.

Jumari, what is you trainer's education? Is he/she simply repeating something they heard? How do you feel?

Just make sure you keep track of how you feel and maybe count how many mg of salt/day you consume. I agree that when it is hot and humid and you are exercising you can loose sodium, but you are much more likely to be consuming too much than too little.
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, March 16, 2012, 9:22am; Reply: 19
Grey Rabbit....He was trained by the Australian Institute of Sport which has trained all of our Olympic medalists. But that doesn't mean that everything he says is right, I'm an open minded kind of guy.

When I mentioned that I drank soy he just said throw it away its not good for you. He gave me a whole bunch of reasons to give it up. I mentioned the blood type diet and he didn't seem to impressed with it, he recommends the metabolic diet. I did mention that the blood type diet had evolved since the institute of sports evaluated it many years ago. He is the one that recomended Celtic salt and to throw away my generic sea salt brand.

I definitely don't feel dehydrated. Just happy that I am not cramping. I have heard that cramping can be due to either to much or too little salt, it seems to be working for me.

Thanks so much for all your input.

One other thing he mentioned is that you should only train for 1 hour a day and if you are not losing weight than you have not trained had enough. And to take 1 day off a week. Would you agree with this advise?
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