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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  What is the red jelly in venison?
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, March 2, 2012, 2:26pm
Hello there,

Quick question....I got a present of a cooked venison joint (lucky lucky me  ;D).
I carved it up and froze half of it, because there's so much meat on it (even luckier me, and one very lucky dog getting the bone  ;D)

The question I have is this...there was a bright red jelly (clear like a raspberry jelly) around the joints and as a layer between some layers of muscle. It was tasteless. What is this jelly??

Since this joint came from a wild dear, is any of the cartilage and clearish brown areas (quite hard, but chewable, similar to cartilage) within the muscle fibres edible or even especially good for me?

Thanks guys!
Posted by: Lola, Friday, March 2, 2012, 4:03pm; Reply: 1
crock pot is what you need and forget about it for hours!!!

spice it right

if need be, marinate it for a day

check out recipes for venison and choose wisely according to your type

once cooked thoroughly, there should be no red jelly present.....

lucky dog!!!! haha
Posted by: O in Virginia, Friday, March 2, 2012, 4:12pm; Reply: 2
Gross.   :X  But I'm sure very good for you.  I'm envious too!  I'd take Lola's advice and use that bone for crock pot broth.  Give the dog another bone.  :)
Posted by: san j, Friday, March 2, 2012, 6:24pm; Reply: 3
Mmmmm.
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, March 2, 2012, 7:54pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from O in Virginia
Give the dog another bone.  :)


Too late  ;D :) ;D!!

She loved it- never thought of stock....ah well  :) I love ma doggie.....

Posted by: grey rabbit, Friday, March 2, 2012, 9:54pm; Reply: 5
the "jelly" is probably gelatin from the tissues and bones, a naturally occurring substance found in meat.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 2, 2012, 10:24pm; Reply: 6
I'd consider it good for me - gelatin or collagen.
Posted by: cowgirlmama04, Saturday, March 3, 2012, 5:17am; Reply: 7
I am not exactly sure what the substance is that you are asking about, But as a hunter I can tell you that venison is different from beef, as they rely on more cartilage and fascia tissue, due to a different bone structure. Deer do not have a shoulder joint, the front legs are only attached to the body by strong fascia and muscles. I have also found that if the game is de-boned and all fat trimmed before cutting and packaging it takes much less gamey and is much tastier.

I was very excited went I first started the BTD and realized that one of my favorite meats is a beneficial. We eat more venison then we do any other meat. I only wish I knew how elk and moose would fit into the BTD.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, March 3, 2012, 6:07am; Reply: 8
GenoType and SWAMI rate:

Bear (SWAMI only)
Caribou
Moose
Opossum
Rabbit
Squirrel (SWAMI only)
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, March 8, 2012, 9:20pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from cowgirlmama04
I am not exactly sure what the substance is that you are asking about, But as a hunter I can tell you that venison is different from beef, as they rely on more cartilage and fascia tissue, due to a different bone structure. Deer do not have a shoulder joint, the front legs are only attached to the body by strong fascia and muscles. I have also found that if the game is de-boned and all fat trimmed before cutting and packaging it takes much less gamey and is much tastier.

I was very excited went I first started the BTD and realized that one of my favorite meats is a beneficial. We eat more venison then we do any other meat. I only wish I knew how elk and moose would fit into the BTD.


The front shoulder joint thing always amazed me when we used to skin and quarter our deer from hunting.  It's like, how can that be?  No shoulder joint.  Like you say, strong ligaments.  They are amazing creatures.  So beautiful yet tough all at the same time.  
Posted by: cowgirlmama04, Tuesday, April 3, 2012, 5:03am; Reply: 10
I think I may have found the red gel issue out :) I believe that what you are finding is blood that is trapped in some of the connective tissue. Deer have many different types from the extremely strong tissue to the stretchy slimey type. I had to think about this one about when we butcher our deer, but we quite often find it and I usually clean it all off before I freeze it so I have never seen it cooked.  


JJR   I completely agree with you, they are one of the most amazing creatures, I have 8 that regularly visit my yard, and we just sit and watch them is awe. Makes hunting them easier for us too, as we have found one of them to be pretty lame with a knee issue, we will be putting her out of her missery this fall. Help keep the herds healthy and us healthy with the wonderful meat she will provide
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