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BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  Doing the diet on a small budget
Posted by: Mickey, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 3:41am
I'm just wondering how people who are on a tight budget make this diet work for them?.

I'm getting food stamps and having a hard time stretching my food out for the whole month.  Anyone have any tips that can help me make my food last all month?.

Thanks!
Mickey  ;)
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 3:58am; Reply: 1
I don't know how many vegetables you are allowed, but they are very inexpensive and filling! Maybe you can have some type of beans for protein, and they are inexpensive too. Some of these O-types will be glad to help you sooner or later!
Posted by: C_Sharp, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 4:27am; Reply: 2
Buy in bulk

come late to farmer's market and offer to take food that did not sell.

Trader joe's have reasonable prices on some items.

Sometimes you can locate good deals in China Town.

Duc Loi Supermarket has reasonable prices on some items and a good selection.

Evergreen Super Market is another option.

Black beans are neutral for O and dried black beans are inexpensive.

Whole turkeys can be used for a lot of meals.

Collards and Kale can be economical.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 4:45am; Reply: 3
One of our better natural food stores puts day-old produce in a 1/2 price bin.  That's where I shopped for veggies for a few years.

Buy less expensive cuts of meat, such as ground.

Don't waste your money on any empty food.  Make every dollar count toward your health.

Focus on fresh foods - shop around the perimeter of a grocery store.

Soups and stews are good ways to stretch a small amount of meat with a lot of veggies.  Use bones to slow-cook all day and make a bone stock as a nutritious
base for soup, stew and sauce.

When you see a good sale on frozen vegetables, stock up.
Posted by: Mickey, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 6:24am; Reply: 4
Thanks for the great ideas!!!!

I should mention that i just did my swami and i swamied a gatherer.  But i know that doesn't tell you the whole story since each swami is so individual.  I'm looking for more general tips.  I know that i probably need to spend more time prepping my food ahead of time and freezing it.
Posted by: chrissyA, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 3:25pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Mickey
I know that i probably need to spend more time prepping my food ahead of time and freezing it.

Yes!!!  The freezer is a godsend. And by preparing ahead and freezing you have so much more control of what you are eating, especially when you're in a hurry or it's late and you don't feel like cooking. My Hubs is a Type O and I like to make him beef stews, chili, pot roast, etc., portion it out and freeze - this type of food freezes beautifully  :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 5:40pm; Reply: 6
You need to make some compromises. Eating well isn't cheap, and comments like "but think of all the money you save by not paying the doctor!" are incredibly out of touch! If you qualify for food stamps, you probably also qualify for Medicaid, so paying for doctor visits or medicines are a moot point. There are valid reasons to avoid getting sick or using pharmaceuticals, but saving money isn't one of them!

Don't worry about buying organic- the focus needs to be on "buying enough food." Make sure you're eating enough total animal protein, even if that means eating more eggs and less beef than reccomended. I've found that I can be satisfied with smaller amounts of meat if I mix it with vegetable protein. This may mean eating more beans than reccomended. I also need to make sure I eat beef at least twice a week, although ideally I should be eating it 5X a week. I'm not able to manage that every week.

Also make sure you're not eating more meat than you absolutely need. Extra meat won't hurt my body, but it will hurt my food  budget. I make sure to fill up on lots of veggies, plus some beans and grains, so I don't over-do the meat and then run out of money at the end of the month. I don't buy chicken because I have a type B son, but if you're only buying for yourself you can buy whichever compliant meats are cheapest. I buy meats on the bone and use the bones for soup. An exception is beef, which is half the price if I buy it ground in family  packs. I then repackage and freeze what I won't be using right away.

I don't buy out-of-season produce except for very special occasions. My staples are fresh carrots, sweet potatoes, onions, and frozen spinach, broccolli, and green beans. Most other foods vary with the season- more winter squashes now, more summer squashes and greens in the summer.

I also figure out which items are cheapest at which stores. The day I get food stamps, or maybe that day and the day after, I'm going to 4-5 different stores to stock up my house with all the foods my family needs, at the best possible prices.

Of course, it goes without saying that I'm not buying any packaged foods and I spend a lot of time in the kitchen preparing foods. I usually have broccolli and/or spinach quiche in the fridge and a pot of veggie soup on the stove.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 5:45pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Mickey
  I know that i probably need to spend more time prepping my food ahead of time and freezing it.

I keep plenty of some type of cooked fish and/or meat in the freezer all the time that I can just pull out and have ready in minutes. You can throw a few veggies in the pot, and it is amazing how many unusual things can go into soup, and pretty soon you have a meal! Some people throw in peanut butter as thickening, for instance, and just about any vegetable under the sun! You can use three or four or fifteen! Can you tell that I love soup!?!(smile)
Posted by: geminisue, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 5:56pm; Reply: 8
Do you have a BIG LOTS, I buy most of my fish for the month there, at 64 cents a can, which is at least 1 serving or more.  They also usually have Bob
s Old Mill pkg. at a good price, oat bran, bean mixes. many choices.  I cook the whole pkg, and freeze in serving size (I leave one week supply out, that way I know I'm eating what I need to)

I use coupons, also, and watch Giant Eagle adds, recently had 10 for $10 even had dried beans at that price.

If you have a printer you can get many coupons you need for food, cleaning, apparel and shoes.

I just bought a beautiful cammisol, priced at $26.originally, marked 6.50 with 33% off and I had a 25% off coupon, so I paid $3.54 including tax, for it.
Posted by: Goldie, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 7:16pm; Reply: 9
as gatherer, i advise to eat according the swami, as it will keep you healthy and diabetes at bay .. that long term is more important.

my town has a food pantry, in fact several.. the foods there are mostly canned but still at least not costing anything..

If you are not eligable for medicaid, check out if you are eligable for State sponcored medicine help.. its worth asking..

the Womans World magazine This week has great tips on getting other things for les..

It pays to ask.. for bargains in the vegetable lines - keeping track of what things are on sale when at what time of month.. shopping right after everyone gets their food stamps is a bad time for meat.. later in the month the meats are cheaper.. keep your eyes peeled..

make use of soup kitchens.. and look for churches that pass on food from all kinds of places.. sometimes it pays to volunteer there.. while getting free meals there and take home..

these are hard times, but I found that I can manage much better when I eat 3 oz 3 small slices of top round quick steamed or heated to medium with vegetables 3 times aday is better then trying to eat more once a day..

eggs are less money.. learn to make them in many ways or add them to other foods ..

never throw food out , you can always freeze some leftover and have it later.. dont forget what you have in the freezer.. if the freezer is big and empty add waterbottles to fill it to cost less electric.. (even if you do not pay for it) .. I recycle them from time when the freezer is more full or empty..mostly empty for me as I am alone..---- by comparison the refrigerator should be as empty as possible..

when the freezer is full try to mkeep it  in some order so you don't loose sight of what is there.. I hate messy freezers..makes me wonder how old things are..

keep a good food use list for a month so you don't overshop, early and waist foods, and have less later on..

I never buy other then store brands of anything .. Shoprite is as good as most brand items and cost less..

Go on line and see if there are specials available.. or coupons  but only for fresh items as I find allllll processesd foods to be a waist.. and costly and not on Swami..

making teas is cheaper then soda stuff and healthier.. all the best..


  

  
Posted by: DoS, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 7:55pm; Reply: 10
Buy expensive things like meat first. Make sure you get the allotment you will need for the month. Then bulk grains. Then spend the rest on vegetables, eggs, and whatever else you need. That way you can be sure you don't run out of money for the key things.
Posted by: deblynn3, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 8:22pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Mickey
Thanks for the great ideas!!!!

I should mention that i just did my swami and i swamied a gatherer.  But i know that doesn't tell you the whole story since each swami is so individual.  I'm looking for more general tips.  I know that i probably need to spend more time prepping my food ahead of time and freezing it.


I'm also a gatherer,  I look for sales on my meat. I than freeze it for later use, I also buy family size packages and then divided into the proper sized and freeze. Can salmon is less expensive unless I get to a larger town where the Kroger's has frozen at a reasonable price. I must say I do make good use of a freezer.  Doesn't have to be a large one.

I freeze or can fruit. Every year someone has given me pears, or peaches.  

I usually buy fresh fruit and vegetables when they are in season, other wise I get frozen, which ever size is the cheapest.

I have a garden, but I've used the farmers market.  Some say go late in the day, when they are want to leave.

I spend between 60-80 dollars aweek for food, (family of two) I don't by milk, eggs (I have chickens)  soda's, chips etc. Once we stopped buying those I had money for the nuts and items which I get online..but which I could get it I was closer to a larger town.

Oh, one help is often I can get the large sizes and split it with my daughter, perhaps you could find a friend that would go in halfs with for stuff.  
Posted by: Mickey, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 8:57pm; Reply: 12
Wow! Thanks again for all the wonderful ideas!!!  ;D

Chrissy,
I'm not much into freezing foods, but i think that may be the key in getting my food to last all month.  

RuthieGirl,
You have so many great ideas!.  I usually only buy organic if the food is on the "dirty dozen" list, i buy big packs of organic spinach and celery at costco.  I tend to go for fresh food over frozen or canned, though i know i probably need to be more open to buying more frozen food or buying in bulk and then freezing it.  I tend to eat more eggs than i should, but they are an inexpensive protein and i tend to do better on protein for breakfast (not into having leftovers for breakfast).  I also end up running around to several stores to get the best prices, though these days it's alittle more difficult since my car is out of commission.  It looks like i need to think ahead and buy bulk.  I also need to spend more time in the kitchen prepping my food for future use.

Quoted Text
I keep plenty of some type of cooked fish and/or meat in the freezer all the time that I can just pull out and have ready in minutes.

Spring,
I never thought about cooking my meat/fish and then freezing it.  Does it still taste pretty good after it's been frozen?.

Geminisue,
I have a big lots, i'm assuming when you say fish, you mean canned fish?.  I don't think they have a frozen section there.  I usually go through my weekly food ads and circle the best deals, i wish i had a printer (one that's up and running anyways) i probably would be able to save more money.

Goldie,
I have medical coverage from the state.  Though my goal is to not have to go to the doctor, i do have to for certain things that are out my hands.
Quoted Text
shopping right after everyone gets their food stamps is a bad time for meat.. later in the month the meats are cheaper.. keep your eyes peeled..

Thanks for this great tip, i had no idea!!!  You have so many great tips!  I rarely buy any processed food, thing is that i notice the better quality food i eat the less food i need.  You've given me alot of ideas to ponder on.

DoS,
I like your tip about buying meat first, i seem to have the most problem with having my meats last until the end of the month.
Posted by: Mickey, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 9:04pm; Reply: 13
Deblynn,
I guess i'm alittle slow at typing my posts (distractions got in the way).  
Quoted Text
I have a garden, but I've used the farmers market.  Some say go late in the day, when they are want to leave.

I used to grow some of my own vegetables, but i'm not set up right now for that.  I would love to go to farmer's markets but most don't except food stamps.  I've thought about splitting some of my food that i get at costco with people, but don't know to many that are into the same foods.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 9:09pm; Reply: 14
How many people are you feeding? I shop at Costco every week, and there are certain items that I buy more than one package of at a time because we use that much in a week (lettuce and mozzarella cheese.)

Even if you're only shopping for one, you can make good use of Costco by eating less variety. This week you've bought brocolli; next week you'll have green beans.

GTG. DS needs me.
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 9:35pm; Reply: 15
Pick up sardines from Wal-Mart.  Blueberries also.  
Posted by: C_Sharp, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 9:38pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Mickey
i wish i had a printer (one that's up and running anyways) i probably would be able to save more money.


You may just want to keep your eyes and ears open for one someone is giving away.

I have been giving them away as I switch to different print technologies and I try to get myself and my students to print less.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 9:55pm; Reply: 17
Quoted Text
I never thought about cooking my meat/fish and then freezing it.  Does it still taste pretty good after it's been frozen?.

The only thing I've cooked that doesn't taste as well later is turkey unless I use sauces etc. on it. I pan-grilled some fish last week dusted in millet, and it was actually better when we ate some of it later in the week from the freezer. I have never found that to be true using cornmeal because it gets so soggy. Of course, I haven't used any cornmeal in years! I make lamb stew to freeze, and it is delicious. And, of course, I always have some veggie soup and a few cartons of lightly stir fried or roasted veggies in the freezer too. I always have some well-seasoned cooked ground turkey burgers frozen too. All of these different foods are comfort food in the first degree when you come in tired and hungry!! It feels and tastes like the king's version of fast food!! Years ago when we were still eating beef, I froze any left-overs when we grilled steak, and we thoroughly enjoyed it later.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 10:11pm; Reply: 18
Mickey, it takes some planning, but I hate to think of you worrying about running out of food before the end of the month. A few cans of fish, some dried beans and some items in your freezer stored away for the month will take away a lot of anxiety. My brother told a horror story about when they first married and he was in the Navy stationed across the country from both their families. He said that every one just takes for granted that you have a few condiments, etc., in the fridge at any given time, but he remembered when they had a single bottle of catsup in there and that was it! Of course, he soon got paid, and all was well, but it was scary and a lesson they didn't soon forget. (Both of them had mothers who kept loaded fridges and gigantic freezers full all the time!)
Posted by: paul clucas, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 2:36am; Reply: 19
If you can eat them buy onions!  Buy the 10 Lb bag and save.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 3:22am; Reply: 20
Quoted from Mickey
I would love to go to farmer's markets but most don't except food stamps.


The following Farmer's Market in San Francisco accept CalFresh Cards (Food Stamps):

Tuesdays
Ferry Plaza Farmers Market
The Ferry Building (Embarcadero at Market Street)
10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
(415) 291-3276

Wednesdays
Heart of the City Farmers Market
United Nations Plaza (Market Street between 7th and 8th Streets)
7:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
(415) 558-9455

Kaiser Hospital (San Francisco)
Geary St at St. Joseph's Street (Kaiser Commons Area)
10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
(925) 825-9090

Bayview Hunters Point Farmers Market
Mendell Plaza
4705 3rd Street (near Oakdale Avenue)
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
(415) 355-3700

Saturdays
Alemany Farmers Market
100 Alemany Farmers Market (Hwy 101 and 280)
5:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
(415) 647-9423

Ferry Plaza Farmers Market
The Ferry Building (Embarcadero at Market Street)
8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
(415) 291-3276

Fillmore Farmers Market
O'Farrell Street & Fillmore Street (Fillmore Center)
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
(925) 825-9090

Sundays
Heart of the City Farmers Market
United Nations Plaza (Market Street between 7th & 8th Streets)
7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
(415) 558-9455
Posted by: purlgirl, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 9:21pm; Reply: 21
If your north of the Golden Gate:

Markets north of Golden Gate bridge  


Solano county “events” (this grouping looks more expensive)  
http://dixon.patch.com/articles/solano-grown-pushes-local-produce

Larry’s Produce, Fairfield, Solano County (a wonderful market but not year round)
http://www.yelp.com/biz/larrys-produce-fairfield  

Here is another great idea if you need a place to grow veggies. I looked into the one in our town. People pay for the use of a plot of land for the season. Water and some tools are provided. Plus I believe there is an arrangement to share excesses among themselves.  Looks like a cool thing - plus having access to other experienced gardeners to encourage you and give advice on what works locally.
What is Community Gardening  
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 9:51pm; Reply: 22
one  thing to do is make small frozen portions in that way you can count the days and not over feed the food to you or others.. so sorry that people need sometimes to go hungry ..

I wonder what do people freeze things in ?? plastic, dishes, alluminum, wax paper/

also.. to save all your  money also learn to wash and clean things in new ways..

like also make do with clothing by changing the looks with a belt or a good hair cut.. seems men are more interested in nice hair,, not sexy clothes..

a belt can go a long way, a new hem length is another from the same old skirt of yesterday..  

shoes for a appointment or on interview might not need to be worn on other days.. when walking to certain places take a shoe bag with you to change..

I am so pleased with anyone who is learning to accomodate by using less, and be happy with true needs, not all the want's.. congrats to you..  
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 10:15pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from purlgirl


You may need to work on these URLs
Posted by: yvonneb, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 11:09pm; Reply: 24
This is a little far out there... :)


There are foods in the wild that will cost you nothing.
A lot of them are considered 'weeds' or are abundant in a plot, so there is the possibility to weed someones plot/ garden and come home with 'food'  ;D
Just make sure they DIDN'T SPRAY!

You can start getting used to these foods by adding only a little at the start to your stews/ soups/ salads/ baked stuff.

I haven't tried all of them, but I have plans for this summer...the ones I did try, it did take some inner push to put something in the pot, that I only ever knew as weeds and tried to kill!

- White Mustard (Synapsis alba)- young leaves & flowers, peppery, tasty cooked
- Shepherds Purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris)-young leaves, cabbage like when cooked
- Primroses (Primula)- all parts, young leaves are best
- Dandelions (Taraxacum) & Chicory (Cichorium intybus)- young leaves raw
- Wild Sorrel (Rumex acetosa)- young leaves, sharp taste
- Curled Dock (Rumex crispus)- boil tenderest leaves, change water to remove bitterness
- Good King Henry (Chenopodium bonus-henricus)- leaves&young shoots raw or boiled like spinach (peel shoots to remove stringy part)
- Fat Hen (Chenopodium album)- cook leaves like spinach
- Chickweed (Stellaria media)- boil tender leaves, delicious (apparently :))
- Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)- young leaves, flowers, stems- boiled
- Dead Nettles (Lamium)- boil like Chickweed
- Stinging Nettles (Urtica)- wear gloves for harvesting!- young growth/plants, boil for min 6 min to destroy the formic acid in the hairs. Good like spinach or as soup.
- Plantain (Plantago & P. coronopus & P. major)- young leaves, cook like spinach, bit bitter
- Hops (Humulus)- peel, slice & boil young shoots
- Thistles (Cirsium)- remove prickles & boil young leaves. Peel tender shoots- eat raw or boiled. Base of each flowerhead contains 'nut' which can be eaten raw.
- Field Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense)- leaves, raw or boiled
- Clovers (Trifolium)- leaves, raw but better boiled
- Violets (Viola)- cook young leaves
- Ox-eye Daisy (Leucanthemum)- eat young leaves raw
- Cuckoo Flower (Cardamine pratensis)- young leaves tasty raw, older ones peppery
- Nasturtium- leaves & flower raw, peppery taste
- Gout Weed (Aegopodium podagraria)- young leaves, like spinach


Depending on where in California you live would you consider this as an option???
Posted by: yvonneb, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 11:19pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Goldie

I wonder what do people freeze things in ?? plastic, dishes, alluminum, wax paper/


Anything that's squishy I put in a plastic freezer bag and than in a square box until it's frozen, then take it out of the box.
That way I end up with uniform rectangles that stack real neat inside the freezer.

Soups, I freeze in a round bowl, so the frozen 'round' fits easy into the pot when defrosting.

Fish/ berries I freeze in as big a bag as I have and in as thin a layer as possible, so when the single fish/ berries are frozen I can shake them together (similar to the way you'd buy frozen peas). They are very easy to defrost in single portions this way  :)

Have never thought about alternatives instead of the plastic bags- will be following this thread to get ideas  ;D
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 11:43pm; Reply: 26
British chef Gordon Ramsay features his home garden snails in one of his "F word" programs. He finds that the free British ones are even better than the pricey French ones he'd been enjoying.He shows how to prepare them for use in the kitchen.
He also has a segment on crayfish, which are apparently infesting British waterways: He advocates folks' going in there and catching them and eating them: More free food!
So, thinking outside the box, not only wild plants can be sources of free food!  :D
(Thanks for the offbeat idea, yvonneb)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 11:49pm; Reply: 27
If you know a boat launch where recreational fishermen come and go try there. A lot of people enjoy catching fish but not cleaning them or strangely enough even eating them. They might give away some of their excess or less desired fish. I know i've given some away back when I had a boat.
Posted by: Mickey, Friday, March 2, 2012, 7:03am; Reply: 28
Thanks again for all the great tips, you all have been soo helpful!!!  :K)

CSharp,
I have been on the lookout for a free printer via craigslist, i have a printer but don't have the money to buy all the ink cartridges.

Can you give me a website link for the farmer's markets, unfortunately the one's you've listed are to far away for me since i live in San Jose.  ;)

Thanks!
Mickey
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, March 2, 2012, 1:35pm; Reply: 29
Farmers Maarket location list, not all of which accept food stamps

http://www.mercurynews.com/foodheadlines/ci_5852501

http://www.ecovian.com/s/sanjose/farmers-markets

Downtown San Jose does accept:

Friday     10:00 AM to 2:00 PM     May 4, 2012 to November 16, 2012
at San Pedro Square between Santa Clara St & John Street, San Jose

The following Farmer's Market not only accepts food stamps, but sometimes give an additional 50% of free food when you use food stamps:

•     Fillmore Farmers’ Market
•     Divisadero Farmers’ Market
•     Downtown San Jose Farmers’ Market
•     Alum Rock Farmers’ Market
•     Jack London Square Farmers’ Market
•     Alameda Farmers’ Market
•     San Leandro Farmers’ Market
•     San Lorenzo Farmers’ Market
•     Union City Farmers’ Market
•     Fremont’s Irvington Farmers’ Market
•     Pleasanton Farmers’ Market
•     Livermore Farmers’ Market
•     Concord Farmers’ Market
•     Pittsburg Farmers’ Market
•     25th Avenue Farmers’ Market in San Mateo
•     Belmont Farmers’ Market
•      San Bruno Farmers’ Market
•     San Carlos Farmers’ Market
•     San Mateo Farmers’ Market
•     South San Francisco Farmers’ Market
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, March 2, 2012, 1:58pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from san j
(Thanks for the offbeat idea, yvonneb)


You should see this guys website where he advocates eating roadkill!
With recipes and all!

An eyeopener :o

Posted by: Spring, Friday, March 2, 2012, 2:54pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from yvonneb


You should see this guys website where he advocates eating roadkill!
With recipes and all! An eyeopener :o

A mouth opener too --- as in scream! LOL
Posted by: marjorie, Friday, March 2, 2012, 3:49pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Goldie
one  thing to do is make small frozen portions in that way you can count the days and not over feed the food to you or others.. so sorry that people need sometimes to go hungry ..

I wonder what do people freeze things in ?? plastic, dishes, alluminum, wax paper/

also.. to save all your  money also learn to wash and clean things in new ways..

like also make do with clothing by changing the looks with a belt or a good hair cut.. seems men are more interested in nice hair,, not sexy clothes..

a belt can go a long way, a new hem length is another from the same old skirt of yesterday..  

shoes for a appointment or on interview might not need to be worn on other days.. when walking to certain places take a shoe bag with you to change..

I am so pleased with anyone who is learning to accomodate by using less, and be happy with true needs, not all the want's.. congrats to you..  


Great ideas Goldie-- thank you for sharing.

I am a true minimalist, myself and this feels good. Some think I may deprive myself, but I feel more confident with less and focusing on helping others instead of vanity.

You are wise:)
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, March 2, 2012, 8:12pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from yvonneb
You should see this guys website where he advocates eating roadkill!
With recipes and all!

If it is fresh (and something you'd want to eat, there isn't a problem! ;)

I've eaten roadkill before and it was good!  What I ate was "normal" game food and we knew it was fresh.  Small consolation for the damage done to the vehicles...
Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, March 2, 2012, 10:28pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from Mickey
Wow! Thanks again for all the wonderful ideas!!!  ;D

Spring,
I never thought about cooking my meat/fish and then freezing it.  Does it still taste pretty good after it's been frozen?

I have frozen sliced roast beef when I bought it on sale.  It tends to "bleed" after thawing, but it was fine otherwise.  By "sliced roast beef" I'm referring to minimally processed roast beef that I purchase thinly sliced at the deli counter of the supermarket.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, March 5, 2012, 6:04am; Reply: 35
Quoted from C_Sharp


You may need to work on these URLs



fixed some......

Posted by: Goldie, Monday, March 5, 2012, 1:35pm; Reply: 36
yvonneb   wow what a post..
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, March 5, 2012, 1:57pm; Reply: 37
Brilliant ideas YvonneB on freezing in the right shapes and everyone!

Not sure if this is allowed in your gatherer diet but tinned tuna or salmon is great as a meal with pasta as in a tuna pasta bake.  You can fry some onion and / or garlic.  Then make your own white sauce with an allowable flour (rice?, arrowroot?) and oil (use the drained oil from the fish), add in the vegetables and fish and pour over cooked pasta (e.g. rice pasta?) Top with allowable cheese.  Bake until brown on top.

Sorry can't look up your diet I've lent my GTD book to someone!  Sorry if that's not applicable at all maybe too carby?  You may want to add two tins of fish.  You'd be amazed how many filling meals it can make.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, March 5, 2012, 4:22pm; Reply: 38
Rice pasta isn't cheap and grains really aren't all that "filling" for O's. Too many carbs in a meal lead to cravings 2 hours later- which means I eat more food, not less, and don't save food money. If you're going to do some kind of creamy fish casserole, fill it up with lots of veggies and only a small amount of rice or pasta mixed in.

Cooked brown rice is an inexpensive sub for cooked pasta in any recipe- sure, the texture won't  be exactly  the same, and you don't  get that feel of "having variety" by having differently shaped pastas, but it's just as filling and just as tasty.

I can get brown rice pasta at Trader Joe's for $1.99 a pound, which is way cheaper than buying Tinkayada pasta at the health food store. But I can get Shoprite's own brand of brown or white rice for $1.79 for a 2 pound bag, or as little as $1 for that bag if I stock up when they're on sale. That's anywhere from 1/3 to 1/4 the price of the rice pasta.
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