Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Geno Harmonic portions
Posted by: Serenity, Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 3:20am
Just wondering if anyone knows how many serves of the geno harmonic foods are recommended.  For example goat with white wine is a five star for me but I am sure I am not meant to have too many serves a week given red meat is usually an avoid (one serve per week of goat is neutral though)..... or is more better in this case??  Should I follow the amounts per week of the main food on the left to determine the frequency?  I really want to start focussing on this part of swami so any advice would be fantastic, thank you.
:)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 3:22am; Reply: 1
use those beginning of every food group ......I do not follow portions.....
meaning I also do not overdo portions either
eat pretty much same quantities daily
Posted by: Serenity, Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 3:35am; Reply: 2
Thank you Lola :)
Posted by: paul clucas, Friday, February 17, 2012, 8:50pm; Reply: 3
Genoharmonics are not governed under the same principle as the single-value-per-ingredient system for the main dietary advice in Swami.  It is possible that your GH can simply be added to what you would otherwise eat.

You could start by observing the ingredient  frequency limitations and then relaxing them a little each week.  If you are going to try this it might be a good idea to record a food diary to make sure you can connect what you eat to how you feel.
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, February 17, 2012, 9:29pm; Reply: 4
A thread right down my own alley.... :)

I have lots of foods on my GH list that aren't mentioned in my SWAMI..... where would one get pumpkin flowers???? Didn't know they were edible :-/

Can someone explain 'horseradish' - is it meant to be the condiment or the 'vegetable' (it starts out as a root, can be grated, steamed and seasoned- eaten as a side). It seams to harmonise with EVERYTHING! But- very, very hard to get, so back to the original question....if one had to make a special effort to make a GH combination happen, how often per week should one aim to eat such a combination?

Thanks!
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, February 17, 2012, 9:50pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from yvonneb
where would one get pumpkin flowers????

the only way I have seen pumpkin flowers is when we were growing pumpkins.  We could take some of the male flowers from the vine for salad or ???.

Quoted from yvonneb
Can someone explain 'horseradish' - is it meant to be the condiment or the 'vegetable' (it starts out as a root, can be grated, steamed and seasoned- eaten as a side). It seams to harmonise with EVERYTHING! But- very, very hard to get, so back to the original question....if one had to make a special effort to make a GH combination happen, how often per week should one aim to eat such a combination?

I can buy horseradish root in the grocery, but it can also be grown pretty far north - at least in the USA...

I guess horseradish root could be cooked and eaten...  I have only thought of it as a condiment because I have never been a fan of really hot foods - as in hot peppers...  I know the horseradish heat continues after being cooked...

As far as frequency, start with up to the max. number of times for a food group listed and adjust from there...  As Paul suggested, a food diary is helpful to gather data and watch progress...

Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, February 18, 2012, 1:57am; Reply: 6
Quoted from yvonneb

I have lots of foods on my GH list that aren't mentioned in my SWAMI..... where would one get pumpkin flowers????


This time of year you are not likely to find them as they do not ship well.

When pumpkin/squash are being grown they are probably available if you ask around. Stores are unlikely to stock them because they do not hold up for very long.

Around here you can get them at farmer's markets. Sometimes you have to actually ask, since most growers do not have a lot and may hold them back (or keep them in someplace cool to slow down the wilting).  Other farmers only bring them when they  know someone will want them.

This time of year sometimes Mexican products have the flowers in other things (canned soups, for instance).



Posted by: Serenity, Monday, February 20, 2012, 12:41am; Reply: 7
Does anyone know if zucchini flowers an ok substitute for pumpkin flowers?
(as they are genoharmonic with ghee and white wine & I have a stack of male zucchini flowers but out of pumpkin flowers for now)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, February 20, 2012, 1:01am; Reply: 8
I treat zucchini and pumpkin flowers the same.
Posted by: Serenity, Monday, February 20, 2012, 1:21am; Reply: 9
Thank you C_sharp, I will do the same.
I thought so too given they are both cucurbitaceae :)  
Do you wilt them in ghee or just add raw to salad?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, February 20, 2012, 1:41am; Reply: 10
I do add them to salads,
but I also include them in stir fries and soups.
Posted by: Spring, Monday, February 20, 2012, 6:03am; Reply: 11
Speaking of flowers, I think the flower heads of collards are the absolutely best part of the whole plant! And we never used to eat them when I was growing up!
Posted by: yaeli, Monday, February 20, 2012, 7:49am; Reply: 12
Quoted from yvonneb
Can someone explain 'horseradish' - is it meant to be the condiment or the 'vegetable'
In the Jewish kitchen it's obviously a condiment, the root being ground together with beetroot and served as a side dish with the 'Gefilte Fisch' (Yiddish) carp cotlettes, enhancing them tremendously. Here is a horseradish and beets recipe. The recipe is not compliant, but it is very simple and you get the idea. Horseradish is the hottest root ever, and is most aggresive in this respect, so please beware.

Posted by: paul clucas, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 5:58am; Reply: 13
Quoted from yvonneb
A thread right down my own alley.... :)

I have lots of foods on my GH list that aren't mentioned in my SWAMI..... where would one get pumpkin flowers???? Didn't know they were edible :-/

Can someone explain 'horseradish' - is it meant to be the condiment or the 'vegetable' (it starts out as a root, can be grated, steamed and seasoned- eaten as a side). It seams to harmonise with EVERYTHING! But- very, very hard to get, so back to the original question....if one had to make a special effort to make a GH combination happen, how often per week should one aim to eat such a combination?

Thanks!
I eat lots of onions and radishes - a pan full of them almost every day.  Possibily the cheapest Geno Harmonic on the planet.  Makes a great base for a stir-fry, and I go through about 15 to 20 lbs of onions per week.

Life is good when the "medicine" that reverses your health issues are this cheap and this delicious!   ;D
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 6:30am; Reply: 14
That's a boat load of onions!!!!  Wow!
Posted by: paul clucas, Friday, February 24, 2012, 5:48am; Reply: 15
I have to dress and slice my onions outside or in the basement.

My next "birthday gift" from my immediate family might be an extractor fan installed over the stove.  
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, February 24, 2012, 8:58pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from yaeli
In the Jewish kitchen it's obviously a condiment, the root being ground together with beetroot and served as a side dish with the 'Gefilte Fisch' (Yiddish) carp cotlettes, enhancing them tremendously. Here is a horseradish and beets recipe. The recipe is not compliant, but it is very simple and you get the idea. Horseradish is the hottest root ever, and is most aggresive in this respect, so please beware.



Hmmm that sounds yummy!! I love red beet salad- I make it with lemon juice instead of the vinegar and it is delicious- especially on the second day ;D
Looking forward to making it with horseradish, that should give it a bit of a kick! Thank you for the recipe :)

PS: apparently it is 'most aggresive' as a garden plant as well- tends to invade ;D
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, February 24, 2012, 9:06pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from paul clucas
I eat lots of onions and radishes - a pan full of them almost every day.  Possibily the cheapest Geno Harmonic on the planet.  Makes a great base for a stir-fry, and I go through about 15 to 20 lbs of onions per week.


That's about 400 gr per meal every meal, based on 3 meals per day!! :o :o :o
Dude, that's way too much of one good thing!!

Can't wait to see Policy Checker posting on this...onions are fodmap baddies big time!!

You should consider a more balanced approach- you are supposed to eat many different kinds of foods including neutral ones as per Dr.D's recommendation.

Good luck!

Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Friday, February 24, 2012, 9:21pm; Reply: 18
Having more servings of an avoid just causes the symptoms to increase.  Go with your common sense and watch how you react to foods.
Print page generated: Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 1:20pm