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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Wondering how far to take my meals.....
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 1:30am
On a couple different of levels.  

First off, I'd like to ask how many calories is a typical meal for people here.  I have been blessed with being able to eat more at one sitting than I have been able to in a long time.  And I am curious as to how many calories a "normal" meal is for people.  I know there is no such thing as "normal", but if you know what your calorie intake is and would like to share, it can give me an idea.  I've been trying to hit somewhere around 500 calories at the main meals.  Breakfast, lunch, dinner and then after dinner.  And then I have snacks in between lunch and dinner and a late night snack (those are of course nowhere near 500.  Maybe a couple hundred, depending).  I will say I find it hard to get 500 at dinner time for some reason.  Except I typically will wait a while after supper and eat some kind of fruit with.  So, it's almost another snack before my after dinner meal.  But it's almost more like dessert.  That's usually some frozen fruit with a small piece of meat or something.  And that gets me closer to 500.  Breakfast and lunch and the after dinner meal I'm always adding nuts, and they help the calories along.  But I don't eat nuts at dinner time.  

So, what's your main meals like calorie wise.  I know some of you might not count them.  For me it has helped me a TON to make sure I'm getting enough.  Because as most of you know, I wasn't.  FWIW, I'm up to 122.5 lbs.  And when I started the whole "counting calorie" thing, I was around 114.  I think one day I was in fact 112, but for some reason I'm not completely sure if that was early in the day or what.  I always weigh myself at night, after I've had my fill all day long.  Hehhehehe.  I'm always lighter in the morning as I have reason to be.  If you know what I mean.  

Now secondly, lately I've had days where I'll eat, a good amount, and I'll just be hungry hungry still.  I won't get this if I eat potatoes with my meal, which I'm doing a lot of.  Or parsnips or some kind of high calorie veggie along with my other veggie.  And one that sticks to your bones.  Now I've been following the typical deal for AB's to not mix grains with my main meals.  I eat them separate.  But I find myself wondering if I shouldn't try to add that back in at times.  Maybe if I'm not having potatoes or high calorie veggie.  If it would behoove me to add a little bit of rice or something.  I do crave a good piece of bread or dinner roll.  But of course I haven't partaken in any wheat products.  Funny thing is, all wheat is a black dot for me, and I wonder if I might not get away with it from time to time.  Now, I refuse to eat cake or ice cream for a dessert.  Because sugar just makes me feel really lousy.  Well it has for a long time.  I suppose some day I might try an occasional sweet to see if it doesn't mess me up, but in the past, it has and I've been just better off to stay away.  But I have in the past ate croutons on a salad and not felt any lousy reactions.  And what I wouldn't give for a biscuit or piece of sourdough bread or anything like that.  I haven't been good at making baked goods myself.  I always seem to be too busy making the regular foods.  My grains come from oatmeal and rice every night.  One or the other.  But like I said, it's a meal all on it's own with some nuts and flavorings like cinnamon and salt.  I don't even put fruits in it at this point.  So, if I'm hungry, would it hurt an AB to add some grains with my meal from time to time?

And is 500 a meal sound like a lot or a little to you all.  I know some people eat a whole lot more than 500 at one meal.  And before I had gut issues, I know I did too.  I still was never a huge huge, buffet goer type eater.  But before I had gut issues, I could eat a lot more at one sitting.  I'm slowly getting this back and I'm totally thanking God for being hungry and the better digestion.  And I'm assuming this diet has played a huge role in it.

What I don't want to do is undo all the work I've done.  But part of me wonders if I'm not truly missing out on something that may help me.  I don't know.  And, if I did these things (like adding a grain with my meals sometimes), would I be able to go for longer stretches without being hungry right away again.  Which can get kind of tiresome making myself food every 2 hours.  

Any thoughts and advice is welcomed.  It's all an exercise in theory.  

And to help give background, I don't eat dairy either.  No dairy, no wheat, and no mixing grains with main meals.  And of course no foods that are avoid on my lists.  Except I do get some avoid oils in some potato chips from panera when we go.  And to that I say, I don't care.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 1:48am; Reply: 1
Sounds like you've been doing awesome :)

Everyone's "normal" is different.  I just eat what I feel like I need, but I'd consider somewhere between 500-600 normal.  Less than 500 and I'd probably be hungry right away again.
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 2:01am; Reply: 2
Oh I'm so glad to hear from YOU!  OK, so I'm on track with what you're saying.  You're smaller than I though, no?  I'm 5'8", but an ectomorph.  Meaning I'm thin boned.  Always have been thin to a degree.  I forget how tall you said you were.  But I remember you saying you were pretty light at one point.

And Briny, I thank you so much for your guidance through this.  It helped me a bunch.  Do you mix your grains with your meals sometimes?


I don't know about "awesome" but I'm doing better and thanking God all the time for it.  Thank GOD!!!


Yeah, that's another issue.  Yeast.  Will the yeast in breads create a yeast overgrowth if eaten?  Or what is the deal with that.  Because some yeast, kills the bad yeast.  So I just don't get that whole thing.  Could I make some yeasted bread with compliant grain flowers and have the yeast mess with me?  I suppose nobody knows until you try.  But I don't understand the theory of it all.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 2:57am; Reply: 3
Thank God, indeed!  I totally know what you mean - after weighing 75 pounds, I'm back at 110 (5'4")  :)

Since you're not losing weight (and are gaining!), I wouldn't worry too much about exact calories.  If you want to gain more weight or gain faster, you'll obviously have to consume more calories.  If you google "calorie requirements" there are lots of calculators to roughly figure out daily calorie requirements to lose, maintain, or gain weight based on age, weight, height, and activity level (I like the one at hpathy.com)

I can't comment on the grain thing because I don't eat any grains at all...

I remember something in one of Dr D's books about baker's yeast not being a problem for candida since they're different of yeasts.  I know a lot of people disagree with that, but there are benificial yeasts so...???

Luck and prayers :)    
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 3:06am; Reply: 4
JJ,

I have no idea how many calories my meals are...  I can most often start serving and just "know" how much I want to eat...

I do at times still have grain (quinoa, rice) with a meat meal, but it is generally when I make turkey and rice, with vegetables...

I also eat oatmeal and an omelette together when I need a big breakfast...

Yeast will not feed yeast, although, the starches/sugars in the bread will feed other yeasts.
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 3:19am; Reply: 5
I just can't do the "I know how much to eat" thing.  Because I've proven to myself that I can't do that.  I have at least stopped putting every detail into a computer and I'm going by more of a general run down in my mind.  But I need to maintain it.  I may put it in again on random days to stay on track.  Or if I try a new food and I'm not sure how may calories it has.  Just to stay on track.  

I was thinking of starting with my egg meal to add grains, because I think it might be the easiest protein to digest with a grain.  

I don't completely understand the whole "yeast" thing.  Lola says the good yeasties eat the bad yeasties.  I was thinking of making bread with spelt, or even oat flour.  And spelt is a neutral.  Oat flour would be a superfood.  I think.  I know oats are.  But if you're saying that the sugars in the flours are what feed the yeast, wouldn't that be the case with any grain.  Like rice?  Or oatmeal?  Or even quinoa?
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 12:58pm; Reply: 6
Good yeast does kill off bad yeast, and it's sugars (carbs) in the diet that promote bad yeast proliferation because that's what they feed off of.  If you're already eating grains and are planning to continue eating them then I wouldn't worry about adding baker's yeast to your diet.  It's not really the baker's yeast that's the issue but the breads etc. that it's in.  Are you positive you have a candida problem, and does it seem any worse eating grains (or have you never tried an "anticandida diet")?
Posted by: deblynn3, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 2:47pm; Reply: 7
Your 500 a meal sounds right for a male. That's giving you 2000 (4meals) plus cals from your snacks. I should think between 22-25000 cals a day would do well for a small boned male-person.

Over heard a gal says Weight Watcher wanted her to eat only 2100 pr day. (She had that at breakfast alone)  :o  



Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 5:35pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from JJR
I don't completely understand the whole "yeast" thing.  Lola says the good yeasties eat the bad yeasties.  I was thinking of making bread with spelt, or even oat flour.  And spelt is a neutral.  Oat flour would be a superfood.  I think.  I know oats are.  But if you're saying that the sugars in the flours are what feed the yeast, wouldn't that be the case with any grain.  Like rice?  Or oatmeal?  Or even quinoa?

I don't understand it fully either...  What I do understand from comparing my experience to reading is:
1) Yeast(bad) is a fungus.  While you don't really want any living fungus in the body.  There are times when it is helpful to have it present.
2) If you have a fungal infection, sugar will feed it, but nutritional yeast or baker's yeast in bread that has been fully baked will provide nutrients to the body to help kill any "bad" invader or help with whatever other body function it helps...
3) Yeast can be helpful to capture metal toxicity to reduce the poisonous effect on the body.  Therefore, killing yeast too rapidly may cause other problems that are ?worse? than the infection.
4) Following an anti-candida diet may be too carb. restrictive and cause more problems (cellular energy starvation, etc.) than it helps.
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Thursday, February 9, 2012, 7:54pm; Reply: 9
I do intermittent fasting and eat about 1500-1800 calories per day but my secret is I eat only one meal per day, and not the same calories every day.  Seems fine for my Hunter genetics but might not work for you.
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, February 9, 2012, 10:45pm; Reply: 10
So your one meal is 1500 to 1800 calories?  Wow.  

1800 doesn't seem like a lot of calories for an adult.  I'm not sure what your size is.  
Posted by: brinyskysail, Friday, February 10, 2012, 12:56pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from JJR
I just can't do the "I know how much to eat" thing.  Because I've proven to myself that I can't do that.  I have at least stopped putting every detail into a computer and I'm going by more of a general run down in my mind.  But I need to maintain it.  I may put it in again on random days to stay on track.  Or if I try a new food and I'm not sure how may calories it has.  Just to stay on track.  


I understand what you mean about this.  Now that I'm back at a healthy weight I do "just know" how much my body wants, but for some reason when I was underweight I had absolutely no idea.  Sometimes I wouldn't feel very hungry at all, and then I'd end up eating half my kitchen while other times I felt ravenous but after a few bites wasn't hungry any more.  Sometimes I'd eat and be satisfied or even think I'd eaten way too much, but few minutes later I'd be really hungry again.  I was so confused.  Anyway I tracked everything, and it definitely helped.  One thing that also really helped me was to always serve myself a lot of food.  Even if some of it became leftovers, it was much better for me to assume I would eat it all rather than try to listen to my body as to how much I wanted because my body didn't seem to know.  The whole thing was really frustrating so I'm sure you're frustrated too, but you have made progress so just keep pushing forward and experimenting.  "Messing up" once in a while can be worth the risk.
Posted by: Spring, Friday, February 10, 2012, 3:22pm; Reply: 12
Even if some of it became leftovers, it was much better for me to assume I would eat it all rather than try to listen to my body as to how much I wanted because my body didn't seem to know.
I wonder if some kind of distraction would work while you eat, after you have loaded a big plate. I know if I am reading something funny or interesting while I am eating, all of a sudden I realize that my plate is empty! Needless to say, I don't have the problem you two have with not eating enough so I really need to make sure I enjoy every bite, :)  but I just wondered if your stomach's might relax and be able to take in more food if you were somewhat distracted. It seems the key is to have a big plate of food! That way you would know exactly how much is on there ahead of time. I can somewhat relate to your problem because I got to the point I couldn't swallow any liquids for a long time. I'm a lot better now but still have that problem now and then. It got so bad at one point that a friend was wanting to stick a hose down my throat I was so parched. I was going through a terrible trauma at the time, and it seemed like my body was burning up inside. The only way I could get any water down was to swallow ice. My doctor didn't have a clue about how dehydrated I was getting. I was losing weight like crazy.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, February 10, 2012, 6:24pm; Reply: 13
I'm doing a lot better at loading up my plate to begin with. Before I started all this, my portions were pitiful.   And yeah, sometimes I wish I had taken more.  So, I'm learning to eat bigger portions at one sitting.  And it's totally helping.  Because it happened to me this morning even.  I ate a really good breakfast and I thought for sure I overstuffed myself.  It was 470 calories total but I had a real good amount of pineapple.  And it filled me up.  But it was very temporary.  Because now I'm ravenous.  And I have about an hour before I usually eat lunch.  So....  I gotta go make lunch now.   ;D     I've got acorn squash on the mind to help fill me up!!!!  Plus other things.  But those starchy veggies really do me well.  They're not as high calorie as some other starchy veggies, but it'll be good.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, February 10, 2012, 7:44pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from JJR

I was thinking of starting with my egg meal to add grains, because I think it might be the easiest protein to digest with a grain.  


This is true for me.  Grains with egg seem to digest fine.  Grains with fish are next easiest.  Grains with red meat just sit in my stomach and ferment.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, February 10, 2012, 8:27pm; Reply: 15
That's kind of interesting Victoria, because I think that's what I've figured out, at least in the past.  One of the few restaurants we go to I would get their Salmon quite a bit, and it always came with rice.  And there were times where I felt like I could eat some of it and it didn't make me feel lousy.  And then I remember this one time I had some lamb and some rice with it and I was like woe is me for about 2 hours after that.  It was on Easter with my parents.  I've yet to try eggs with grain though.  Lately.  I did used to have shrimp fried rice at a restaurant a long long time ago and it had little bits of egg in it.  It was really good.  But that was before my problems.  I might have to try this combo again sometime without the little shrimps of course.  hehehehe


Spring, another thing about what you said is that I actually do better if I concentrate on my food, because I'll chew better.  If I'm doing something else, I think, dang, I didn't chew all that as good as I should.  And it has made a difference.  The better I feel the less goofed up it makes me if I don't, but I think it's a good thing to make sure I chew real well.  But I can see your point about relaxing while eating and figuring out how to do that would be a great benefit too.  I'm getting better.  I struggle with being anxious about if everything is cooked right etc etc (dealing with Germaphobic issues).  But that's getting better.  
Posted by: Spring, Friday, February 10, 2012, 8:52pm; Reply: 16
Spring, another thing about what you said is that I actually do better if I concentrate on my food, because I'll chew better.  If I'm doing something else, I think, dang, I didn't chew all that as good as I should.  And it has made a difference.  The better I feel the less goofed up it makes me if I don't, but I think it's a good thing to make sure I chew real well.  But I can see your point about relaxing while eating and figuring out how to do that would be a great benefit too.  I'm getting better.  I struggle with being anxious about if everything is cooked right etc etc (dealing with Germaphobic issues).  But that's getting better.
I think you just need a little pat on the back to tell you not to worry so much! My mother-in-law was a very laid-back type person, and she served whatever came off the stove whatever shape it was in! We all loved her to death, and always enjoyed her meals. Sometimes things, "fell," sometimes they fell apart and sometimes they just burned, but we ate it anyway! One day when she was younger, she spent the morning preparing some kind of fruit to make jam. She loaded up a big pot, poured in the sugar, turned on the burner and promptly forgot about it! She and her boys went to town, and when they were a ways down the street coming home they could smell the "jam" burning. She had to throw the pot away because it was impossible to clean. The "jam" was welded to the pot!! That was the only thing she ever cooked, I think, that no one was able to eat. I loved her sense of humor. She and I would laugh about things until we would cry. I still miss her very much.
Posted by: JJR, Sunday, February 12, 2012, 12:55am; Reply: 17
Spring, before I had gut problems, I did not fret about anything having to do with food.  I ate like a horse and pig, loved it all, whether it was perfectly clean or whatever, and didn't have nary a stomach issue.   Getting real sick has a way of making you leary about things.  Pain and misery can do that.  Now I'm the exact opposite and working on it.   It is a challenge, and one I'm dealing with the best I can.  I think there has something to do with certain nutrients being off kilter makes it harder for your neurotransmitters to work well too.  
Posted by: Spring, Sunday, February 12, 2012, 3:05am; Reply: 18
Quoted from JJR
Spring, before I had gut problems, I did not fret about anything having to do with food.  I ate like a horse and pig, loved it all, whether it was perfectly clean or whatever, and didn't have nary a stomach issue.   Getting real sick has a way of making you leary about things.  Pain and misery can do that.  Now I'm the exact opposite and working on it.   It is a challenge, and one I'm dealing with the best I can.  I think there has something to do with certain nutrients being off kilter makes it harder for your neurotransmitters to work well too.  

Believe me, JJR, I know what it is like to walk the floor trying to figure out something I could eat that wouldn't make me sick, make me hurt, make me horribly depressed --- ANYTHING. Sometimes I just drank water because I figured it was safe. A kitchen full of food, and scared to death of all of it and what it would do to me. Besides, I couldn't think anyway. That was a long time before BTD was born.  I was into all of Adele Davis's books. Cooking from her recipe book, etc.. Then, later, I heard about the devastation that candida "on steroids" could cause, so I went on that diet and got a tremendous amount of help. The funny thing is, the first thing I changed about my supplements and food was that I started taking probiotics! For the first few days it felt like I had a steel band getting tighter and tighter around my head!! I could NOT think! But I didn't quit!! My adrenals were absolutely exhausted so I began to take everything known to man that was supposed to help that. I was still following pretty closely to Adele Davis's beliefs at that time, and between these two diets, I was pretty much on the diet I am now except I was eating beef then, but no milk products. I did eventually engage the help of the GYN I was seeing at that time because I had gone as far as I could go with dieting, as I knew it, and he prescribed a medication that I took for two years. After that I had no more candida overgrowth. A little over ten years later, I found the BTD. So off went the beef, the corn, the wheat and a few other things. That is part of my story.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Sunday, February 12, 2012, 10:10am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Spring

Believe me, JJR, I know what it is like to walk the floor trying to figure out something I could eat that wouldn't make me sick, make me hurt, make me horribly depressed --- ANYTHING. Sometimes I just drank water because I figured it was safe. A kitchen full of food, and scared to death of all of it and what it would do to me. Besides, I couldn't think anyway. That was a long time before BTD was born.  I was into all of Adele Davis's books. Cooking from her recipe book, etc.. Then, later, I heard about the devastation that candida "on steroids" could cause, so I went on that diet and got a tremendous amount of help. The funny thing is, the first thing I changed about my supplements and food was that I started taking probiotics! For the first few days it felt like I had a steel band getting tighter and tighter around my head!! I could NOT think! But I didn't quit!! My adrenals were absolutely exhausted so I began to take everything known to man that was supposed to help that. I was still following pretty closely to Adele Davis's beliefs at that time, and between these two diets, I was pretty much on the diet I am now except I was eating beef then, but no milk products. I did eventually engage the help of the GYN I was seeing at that time because I had gone as far as I could go with dieting, as I knew it, and he prescribed a medication that I took for two years. After that I had no more candida overgrowth. A little over ten years later, I found the BTD. So off went the beef, the corn, the wheat and a few other things. That is part of my story.


It's sad that anyone has to go through this; I wouldn't wish it upon anyone, but at the same time, I'm comforted when I hear other people's stories and know that I'm not alone in my experiences.  Thanks for sharing :K)
Posted by: Spring, Monday, February 13, 2012, 6:51am; Reply: 20
Quoted from brinyskysail


It's sad that anyone has to go through this; I wouldn't wish it upon anyone, but at the same time, I'm comforted when I hear other people's stories and know that I'm not alone in my experiences.  Thanks for sharing :K)


You're welcome! It is sad to think of others going through something like that. I remember when I was in the middle of the candida overgrowth period, (I didn't know yet that I had it) a doctor asked me what I wanted help with, and I told him I wanted to see the sun shine again. Of course, the sun was shining nearly every day, but he knew what I meant. The nearest thing I could relate to in the way I felt was like a slug that had just crawled out from under a rock. Outwardly, I looked just fine. I was not overweight at all. There was nothing that would indicate how I was feeling inside. My GYN had to read the books I had bought about systemic candidiasis to know how to treat me. He never charged me a dime because of that. He realized after he read the books that he had about twenty patients with the same problem! Some of them were able to be helped somewhat, but theirs was the same problem that many people have - they were not willing to stick to the diet over the long haul. He told me a few years afterwards that I was the only one willing to do that to get the problem completely resolved! It was worth every single bit of the effort! My only regret is that I didn't know about the dangers of systemic candidiasis years earlier and the myriad symptoms that it has.
Posted by: JJR, Monday, February 13, 2012, 5:56pm; Reply: 21
Yeah, there are many people unwilling to change their dietary habits, regardless of their health.  And for that, we should be proud of ourselves.  I don't really take credit for that.  For me it was more a survival instinct and God working in me than anything else.  And maybe some good teaching from my Mother growing up.  I've had the tenancy to be too proud of my own strength at times, and I don't want to do that.  I believe I'm led by someone much better than I.  

And yeah, I agree.  I take HUGE comfort in knowing I'm not alone in my struggles.  That has been a big part of the mental journey, because I felt alone for a long time in my struggles.  But it's been clear there are others that struggle with the same things.  Some worse, some better, but many have similar experiences.  This has been a very refreshing group of people to lean on and learn from.

I do think we need to be careful to not be overly anal in our examination of everything we eat.  I think that's been my lesson lately.  I think there are times where I needed to give my diet a hard look.  Now I need to let go and let the food do what it's supposed to do, without getting crazy about if it's an avoid, not an avoid.  How it's going to make me feel.  I don't really eat avoids and make it a point.  But also stressing about if I might ingest a little black pepper on some steak, or things like that, are really not going to help either.  Stress is probably just as bad the little bit of avoids I might eat.  And on top of that, I believe that God put food on this earth for us to eat.  Yes, staying away from certain foods might totally help us get better when our systems aren't working well.  Or help our systems work better overall.  But I think in Dr.D's GTD book he even says it's more about focusing on eating the right foods, more than focusing on avoiding the wrong ones.  And all I'm trying to say to myself and right now is that "Food is good".  "Food is Good".  Because for so long it looked like the enemy.  I'm repeating myself now probably.  I don't remember if I said that in this thread but it's just something I've been dealing with.
Posted by: Spring, Monday, February 13, 2012, 7:27pm; Reply: 22
Another thing about your situation, JJR, is that it seems to be your job to be thinking about the dietary needs of the others in your family. In my case, my husband and children were healthy as horses and only needed good food on the table. No serious allergies or anything of that sort. Hardly ever sick. Most of the rampant childhood problems that are so prevalent now were unheard of when they were growing up. Of course, when I made brownies, etc.,  I snuck everything under the sun in them that was "good stuff!" I was using carob powder forty years ago! The boys and their friends used to laugh about all the stuff I could pile up on a pizza! They were always hanging around wanting more though! Those neighborhood kids had no idea had healthy those brownies were they were eating all the time!(smile)
Posted by: JJR, Monday, February 13, 2012, 9:34pm; Reply: 23
Yes, that has definitely compounded the load on my brain.  My son has quite a few allergies and had lots of problems.  And then cooking for 3 different blood types, plus one with crazy allergies has been a challenge.  It has taken a lot of mind power and it gets to me sometimes.  And yeah, it just makes it all the more like "concerned" about what is going into our bodies.  All of us.  My wife isn't so much of a problem.  But it's kind of funny.  We did a flip flop.  When we first got married she was always having tummy aches, low energy, etc etc.  Now, she is the strong one.  I think eating healthy has helped her a great deal.  She'll still eat other things a little bit that the rest of us don't.  Fast food every once in a while.  Soda every once in a while.  Etc etc.  But she's still pretty darn good compared to how we used to be.  And I think she feels it when she eats junkie food and it makes her not want to eat it all that much.  But to indulge here and there for her isn't a big deal.  And I'm thankful that she doesn't do it more, or get upset about not being able to eat it more often because of Jack and my problems.  Eva, my daughter isn't all that bad off either.  But she's a B so we don't feed her chicken, corn and my doctor wanted her to stay away from dairy for a while.  I'm starting to give her goat dairy now though.  She has a few skin issues, but nothing like my sons.  She's super allergic to cats.  Real bad.  But that has nothing to do with food, from what I can tell.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 14, 2012, 12:29am; Reply: 24
Well, JJR, considering all you have been through, I think you have done really, really well with this full-time job. Most people have a chance to escape the kitchen now and then with no real problems, and the down time is really beneficial, but you seem to be over the stove or the sink a good part of your life. And even sitting down to eat seems to be a major ordeal sometimes. Or most of the time. I hate to think of all the effort you are putting into getting better, and not having anymore down time than you do to regroup. It is heartening to know that I have seen children miraculously outgrow some awful allergies and manage to become more or less "normal" in their eating habits. I hope this happens for your family! I saw one child I've known since he was born have a terrible reaction simply because he got too close to an open freezer in an ice cream shop! Just breathing the air coming out of there made his throat start closing up immediately! He had an awful allergy to milk products. (They served other things besides ice cream.) He is doing much better now, a thriving teenager! His mother is an RN so he has been well-taken care of since he was born, but that didn't mean he didn't get rushed to the ER many times before they got it all sorted out.
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