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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Almond Powder vs. Almond Milk
Posted by: balletomane, Friday, January 20, 2012, 2:47am
It is extremely difficult for me to get almond milk without avoid ingredients and it is such a hassle to make my own. So yesterday I bought a can of pure almond powder (sort of like finely ground almond meal), which can be dissolved in warm water.

Alas, when I checked my SWAMI, almond milk is an avoid! Almond and almond butter, on the other hand, are superfood for me. So I'm wondering if the avoid status for almond milk is due to the avoid contents of commercial almond milk or something inherent in any form of almond milk itself. Does anyone know?
Posted by: Drea, Friday, January 20, 2012, 2:50am; Reply: 1
Can you get almond butter where you live? I make almond butter milk using almond butter and water and a hand-held immersion blender. I don't strain it, as I like the bits.
Posted by: balletomane, Friday, January 20, 2012, 2:53am; Reply: 2
Yes, Drea, I do have almond butter... I have to import it. Very expensive stuff it I buy it from the specialty grocery stores here. But I like the convenience of being able to make the milk quickly and it is also very smooth in texture. Was thinking of using it for some baking projects when the recipes call for milk.
Posted by: Possum, Friday, January 20, 2012, 3:06am; Reply: 3
I would think that almond milk being an avoid, is to do with the avoid ingredients in the commercial one Ballet... :-/
I have mixed ground almonds in water myself to make almond milk - you might be best to let it soak for some hours & then leave it o/night to drain to get all the goodness out
Alternatively, you could make almond butter yourself (real easy & relatively cheap if you can get reasonably priced almonds) & then just stir some into water as suggested... ;)
Posted by: balletomane, Friday, January 20, 2012, 4:12am; Reply: 4
Thanks, Possum. The trouble is, almonds are very expensive to buy... so I'd rather save myself the trouble of making the milk myself from scratch, if someone else could do the job for me  ;D
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, January 20, 2012, 4:40am; Reply: 5
Does the almond powder dissolve completely (as powdered milk) or does it remain somewhat gritty, like when we make homemade almond milk and have to strain it?

If it dissolves completely, just make sure of what other ingredients may be in it.
Posted by: balletomane, Friday, January 20, 2012, 2:17pm; Reply: 6
Victoria, the powder does leave some gritty residue behind, very little but it's there at the bottom of my cup, which convinces me that this is pure almond meal, just very finely ground. There are no other ingredients listed on the bottle and the store owner assured me of that. I found some other brands of almond milk powder in the store but they have corn-derived ingredients so I didn't buy them.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, January 20, 2012, 3:10pm; Reply: 7
We've puzzled over this numerous times, and we have yet to get any clarity from Dr D. I'm even more confused about rice milk than I am about almond milk (specifically how my homemade rice milk rates.)

It can't just be about the additives in commercial products, because then nobody would have rice milk or almond milk as a beneficial. I get almond milk as an avoid, and rice milk as beneficial. DD1 gets rice milk as a black dot, and almond milk as neutral. I make both, for things like her pouring on cereal or either of us in hot cocoa. But then what do I use if I want to make pumpkin pie for the family?

My personal understanding is that there's something about the processing of almonds into almond milk that changes how it reacts in the body. For some this makes it better, for others this procesing makes it worse. I'm not sure if it's the "diluting" process that causes the change, or the "filtering" process. I'm not sure if almond butter blended with water (and not filtered) would count as "almond butter and water" or as "almond milk."

You should contact the company that makes the almond powder and ask about their process. Is it just finely ground almonds (which would make the resultant beverage more like almond butter and water) or do they make almond milk (blend whole almonds then strain) and then freeze-dry the almond milk? Since the result is  gritty, not smooth, I'd guess it's finely  ground almonds and not freeze-dried almond milk,  but it's best to contact the company to verify.

I'd probably go ahead and finish up the package you just bought- do the research about the product to decide whether or not to buy it again.

And keep your SWAMI wallet card with you at all times, and double-check new products against the card before buying them! Yesterday in Costco, I accepted a free sample of dried figs (after checking the package to make sure there were no avoid additives or chemicals) and THEN I dug out the SWAMI wallet cards for myself and DD1, double checked that we can eat figs (diamond for me and neutral for her) and then put a package in my shopping cart. Had the fig  been a  black dot or even an avoid, I would have still eaten a single fig in the store, but I wouldn't have the package sitting in my pantry calling to me.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, January 20, 2012, 7:21pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from ruthiegirl
We've puzzled over this numerous times, and we have yet to get any clarity from Dr D. I'm even more confused about rice milk than I am about almond milk (specifically how my homemade rice milk rates.)

It can't just be about the additives in commercial products, because then nobody would have rice milk or almond milk as a beneficial. I get almond milk as an avoid, and rice milk as beneficial. DD1 gets rice milk as a black dot, and almond milk as neutral.

My personal understanding is that there's something about the processing of almonds into almond milk that changes how it reacts in the body. For some this makes it better, for others this procesing makes it worse. I'm not sure if it's the "diluting" process that causes the change, or the "filtering" process. I'm not sure if almond butter blended with water (and not filtered) would count as "almond butter and water" or as "almond milk."


My guess is that by filtering out the almond meal, we are reducing the fiber and protein content.  Therefore if we use a cup of almond milk, we are getting more of some aspect of almonds and less of others, compared to eating the nuts.

'Milk' made from almond butter would just be diluted almond butter.  It is higher in oil content than almond milk, as well as higher in fiber and protein.
Posted by: cajun, Saturday, January 21, 2012, 1:04am; Reply: 9
Balletomane,
My swami gives me almonds, almond butter and almond milk as neutrals but almond oil as a superfood! ??) I admit, I eat almonds and almond butter several times a week. I use almond milk as a regular milk replacement in cereal/baking/cooking. Love them all!
I use the almond meal for anything and everything! ;)
I also use the oil as a moisturizer.
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