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BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  My hands are craking and painful, anyone have any
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 4:48am
suggestions on how to help this problem?  It's from doing the dishes and washing my hands too much.  But it happens in the winter.  Not so much in the summer.  I guess because it's less humid out.  

I don't really want to put garbage on my hands, but I've admittedly put triple antibiotic on them twice now in the last month.  The first time it helped.  I did it last night and slept with rubber gloves on to keep the moisture in.  They felt better in the morning, but they're already hurting and dry and cracking again.  

Help??  Any healthy ways to combat this?
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 5:18am; Reply: 1
wear gloves when doing the dishes
Posted by: honeybee, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 5:24am; Reply: 2
..and use soap free liquids - you can add some oil to the dishwashing liquid bottle if you really want to. I add castor oil to soap-and-detergent-free bodywash - very gentle. Hemp oil is amazing for cracked skin too.

ps. not suggesting you use bodywash to clean your dishes, just saying how effective oil is added to many types of liquid cleansing agents ;)
Posted by: Amazone I., Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 5:47am; Reply: 3
omega 3-6-9 ;) B-complex, Mg, Silicea, amino acid complexes....(pray)(happy)
wish you all the best ..... greetings from Switzerland
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:05am; Reply: 4
Lola, yeah, I need to start doing that.  I feel like I'll be wearing gloves all day.  The dishes are in constant motion.  

Amazone, I'm taking all of those right now.  hehehehe.

Honeybee, thanks.  Hemp oil.  Hmmmmm....  I've never seen any anywhere.
Posted by: BTypeAUS, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:01am; Reply: 5
I use virgin coconut oil on my hands at night, it's great
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:11am; Reply: 6
If I am using oil in the kitchen & accidentally get some on my fingers, I always always rub it into my hands...
I also eat plenty of butter & don't suffer at all from dry skin anymore...despite rarely using even face cream & never using handcream...
Do you have enough oil/ghee/butter in your diet? Hope they feel/are better soon!!
Posted by: Goldie, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 12:42pm; Reply: 7
not much prevention, but where they are split use crazy glue.. instant pain relieve.
Posted by: EquiPro, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 1:43pm; Reply: 8
I like the idea of using gloves, but never do it!   :-/

Try to find a natural cream with lanolin in it.  Lanolin works extremely well for this sort of thing.   You can even use 100% lanolin - it's natural and not expensive, but it's very messy.  Beware - a little goes a LONG way!

Do a little test first...I've heard of some people being allergic.  It is made from wool, btw and is a great skin protectant as well as moisturizer.  You could even put a little on your hands before you get them wet and it will help.

I have a problem with the skin on my feet and I was prescribed a 40% urea cream.  You can now buy this over the counter, but it's hard to find.  This works very well for my feet - amazing really - it keeps them from getting hard, thick skin that cracks, but I'm not sure about hands.  You might look into it.  What I do is put some on my feet, while I'm still wet, after a shower.  Once I started to do this regularly (it took about 2-3 weeks of regular use), my feet no longer needed to be pedi-egg'd every week and the skin stopped cracking and peeling.  Here's what I use (it's sort of expensive, but you use VERY little of it - read the customer review) - this is a good price, btw:

http://www.lovelyskin.com/details.asp?PID=118584

Good luck!
Posted by: NewHampshireGirl, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 1:57pm; Reply: 9
I'm one of those who can't use lanolin on my hands on a daily basis.  The coconut oil sounds really good and the hemp oil, too.  After years of trying out various other methods I always return to Eucerin original as it does the best job for me.
Posted by: amyflood, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 2:35pm; Reply: 10
Bath and Body works has a line called CO Bigelow. they have some great chapped hand creams. they are thick, so i usually only use it at night, but it does work.
Posted by: chrissyA, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 3:54pm; Reply: 11
Unrefined shea butter , but make sure it is 100% shea butter with nothing added. It's a miracle treatment, I use it for everything  :K)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 4:17pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from JJR
I don't really want to put garbage on my hands, but I've admittedly put triple antibiotic on them twice now in the last month.  


perhaps you should include your antibiotic stuff in your garbage column lol

gloves, or rinse hands and apply an oil like olive and or grape seed.

a quick question re omega oils  - as they attract wtaer  (go rancid quickly) is that not counter intuitive?

I used to use linseed oil on my cricket bat so perhaps your right. :)
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 4:59pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from JJR
suggestions on how to help this problem?  It's from doing the dishes and washing my hands too much.  But it happens in the winter.  Not so much in the summer.  I guess because it's less humid out.  

I don't really want to put garbage on my hands, but I've admittedly put triple antibiotic on them twice now in the last month.  The first time it helped.  I did it last night and slept with rubber gloves on to keep the moisture in.  They felt better in the morning, but they're already hurting and dry and cracking again.  

Help??  Any healthy ways to combat this?

The absolute best product for this that I have ever used is "Bag Balm".  We used it on the milk animal udders to keep them from cracking and chapping during the winter, and when finished applying to the animals, rubbed the remainder (or a little more) into our hands.  Kept them very healthy.
http://bagbalm.com/
Posted by: EquiPro, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 5:36pm; Reply: 14
I don't like bag balm, myself.  It's really just lanolin mixed with petroleum jelly (which I try to avoid) and some other stuff:

"The active ingredients of Bag Balm are 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate 0.3% (antiseptic) in a petroleum jelly USP and lanolin base"

I'd rather use the plain lanolin....
Posted by: Louise, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 5:46pm; Reply: 15
I have recommended this lotion to many people who have found it to be the one that works after they've tried many others.  Renew Lotion from Melaluca.  http://www.melaleuca.com/ProductStore/Product.aspx?sku=6600    I have found a link on ebay for you too that has many different sizes so you can try a little container to see if it works. Hope it helps - for myself I turned to it one winter in an attempt to avert the extreme itchy dry skin that would always come in the winter and I've used it 6 years running with no itching my skin until it's raw anymore! hope it helps.  here's the ebay link: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=renew+lotion
Posted by: EquiPro, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:03pm; Reply: 16
Not too thrilled with the ingredients in Renew - in fact, it's hard to find the correct ingredient list (which makes me suspicious).  I found two:

1:  Deionized Water, glycerine USP, petrolatum USP, distearyldimonium chloride, isopropyl palmitate, cetyl alcohol, dimethicone, allantoin, Benzyl alcohol, fragrance, meleleuca oil.

2:  Water, glycerine, petrolatum, distearyldimonium chloride, isopropyl palmitate, cetyl alcohol, dimethicone, allantion, methylparaben, fragrance, propylparaben, meleleuca altemifolia oil.

Basically, the main ingredients are water, glycerine (which I, personally, HATE in my lotions), a petroleum product (baby oil or vaseline), a silicone product and a tiny amount of tea tree oil.

Make your own decisions....!
Posted by: nowishow, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:14pm; Reply: 17
My hands were horrible for years (due to Lyme disease). I'm pretty sure the things that helped were

Hemp Oil capsules http://www.iherb.com/Manitoba-Harvest-Hemp-Seed-Oil-Capsules-60-Capsules/11171?at=0
Pregnenolone http://www.iherb.com/Life-Extension-Pregnenolone-50-mg-100-Capsules/4380?at=0
DHEA http://www.iherb.com/Country-Life-Gluten-Free-DHEA-10-mg-50-Veggie-Caps/1676?at=0

Lymies adrenal glands and endocrine systems are completely trashed so we need all the help we can get. I also take Progesterone and Estrogen, but I get them from my ND.

Before I knew I had Lyme I found shea butter (100% unrefined) to work well and GLOVES!!!
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:28pm; Reply: 18
I changed the way I do dishes - no more dishpan with my hands immersed in the water.  I bought a long-handled brush with soft bristles.  One of those little 'mops' with a long handle (like a bottle brush) is also good for dishes.  I rinse everything immediately under hot running water, as I cook, and as soon as plates and bowls are emptied.  Then when it's time to wash them, a few drops of liquid soap on the brush, swish all over the dishes and rinse.  My hands hardly get wet.  Even the pots and pans get washed that way.  There are little scrubbies on the end of sticks which clean pots well.

I haven't bought dish soap in a decade.  My favorite is Dr. Bronner's, diluted 1/2 and 1/2 with water in a pump bottle on the sink.  

As soon as dishes are done, or everytime hands are washed, something goes on the hands immediately to moisturize and seal in the moisture.  Lots of good suggestions here on the thread.  My latest favorite is Awakening Hands.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:32pm; Reply: 19
policychecker, I know.  It worked once, but it's not really something I want to use on a continual basis.  That's why I'm asking.  

We have eucerin, and it worked really well on my son's eczema.  And it was the LEAST full of junk we could find that actually helped.  None of the normal oils helped, plus he's allergic to so many things.  He does really well on goat things, milk, etc, I wish they would've had goat fat or lard for him.  That probably would've been a miracle thing for him.  

I wonder if oat oil would work.  But yeah, rancid.  I'm kind of anti coconut oil right now.  But it works on my daughters chapped spots real good.  She's got a few on her legs.
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:41pm; Reply: 20
Try slathering your hands down with olive oil or an olive oil based product called Egyptian Magic:
http://www.egyptianmagic.com/
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 6:52pm; Reply: 21
I know we have spoken about skin problems before sounds to me that the washing up is the last thing is a long list of things and therefore you need to go back to basics, you and your children.


I'm more experienced with BT O's of course but low sugar foods, zero coffee, no sunflower oil, change salt to sea salt, food combine, fruit only on an empty stoach and limit (limit means one, tow or three bits of fruit separated by at least 4 hours and always on empty stomach or a long time after other food. minimal; grain, flour, cakes or what ever. no sweets (sugar effects on skin can take 72 hours in my expericnec. and can take a further week to correct.

I realise tha AB's are different and that perhaps tehre are pther issue, however the basics are the same i think.

also chlorine and perhaps taking a break from soaps etcs every other day exce for the pits, grain, and bum of course ;) also no working with any grain, (bakers hands) we just use castill soap, chlorine shower filter etc.

I don't have a problems with Emily needing any oils on her skin as she now has no spots, pimples or anything. so low fodmap does help. her skin is beautifully smooth now - who would have thought. if you want dry skin and sugar basically.

I would like to disclaim any hormonal issues as Emily is only 5 so this may interfere later, maybe not.

food dairy, food dairy, food dairy lol

immune system immune system immune system . tk counts etc
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:22pm; Reply: 22
Policy checker, I don't eat sweets, I don't eat refined flours, I don't eat any of that stuff you're talking about.  The only problem I have is on my hands.  My skin is nice and oily other places.  So is my hair.  When I shower, it's olive oil soap.  That's it.  I don't need to go back to the basics.  I have to admit, your posts have this aire of "you're doing this wrong" kind of a thing.  And I think because you've dealt with some issues with your daughter, and have overcome, you think you have it all figured out for everyone else.  You have obviously not taken the time to check out the posts I had on facebook about my son, how he's overcome his awful eczema, and what not.  And it wasn't the same way you have.  Everyone has their own road.  

My HANDS are cracking.  From washing the dishes too much.  Too much hot water and too many times.  Plus, I'm probably not completely assimilating my oils, and to further that, I was for a long time barely eating any oils, but I'm now learning to up that.  

The only thing I do that you and I don't agree with is the fruit thing.  I eat protein with every meal.  Including fruits.  And I don't really give a rip if you think that's wrong or not.  It's not what's causing my hands to mess up because my hands are fine in the summer.  

And no, I'm not going to quit eating rice or oatmeal.  It helps fuel my body and keep weight on.  

I'm sorry if I seem irritated, but to be quite frank.  I am.  This is not the first time I've felt this way about your posts and I'm taking the opportunity to tell you this now.  I think it's fair, because I'm calling you out with your attitude.  I do like the help and even value your opinion.  I'm just not very good at accepting opinions when they have a "know it all ish" feel to them.  In which case, I think yours do.  Regardless of all that, I hope you don't hate me for saying so, I'm just being honest, just like I'm sure you feel like you're being honest by telling me I need to "Go back to the basics".   :o ;D :K) ;) :)
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:25pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from 14442
Try slathering your hands down with olive oil or an olive oil based product called Egyptian Magic:
http://www.egyptianmagic.com/


Well dang, if all the stars are using it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!    ;) ;D  I was thinking about using just olive oil on them and seeing.
Posted by: deblynn3, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:33pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from chrissyA
Unrefined shea butter , but make sure it is 100% shea butter with nothing added. It's a miracle treatment, I use it for everything  :K)


As lola pointed out you need to work from the inside.  While your doing that I second the 100% shea butter.  My feet where really bad this summer, up to the point of bleeding.  This butter is great. Yes it is a miracle treatment.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:49pm; Reply: 25
Yeah, I need to get back on a probiotic regularly.  I know my gut still needs some helaing.  I'm not saying it doesn't I also have coinfections from lymes disease that are mucking it up I'm sure.  I'm getting there.  My gut is working so much better than it used to be.  It's just taking time.  God is good.  All is well.  But I'm trying to deal with my hands in the meantime.  :)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 7:52pm; Reply: 26
Little point in me replying in future then. hope you get lucky
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 8:00pm; Reply: 27
Quoted from EquiPro
Try to find a natural cream with lanolin in it.  Lanolin works extremely well for this sort of thing.   You can even use 100% lanolin - it's natural and not expensive, but it's very messy.  Beware - a little goes a LONG way!

Do a little test first...I've heard of some people being allergic.  It is made from wool, btw and is a great skin protectant as well as moisturizer.  You could even put a little on your hands before you get them wet and it will help.
Ummm absolutely no offence & not trying to be knowitall, but can I point out a couple of things - lanolin is IN wool naturally, not "made from wool" :-/ ;)
& I'm not sure of the process used in extraction, but perhaps the problem some ppl have with lanolin (unless it is 100% pure & organically raised), may have to do with the fact that as sheep wool is commonly drenched with chemicals, they may be included in the lanolin cream (& possibly with other ingredients?) :-/ ??)


Posted by: deblynn3, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 8:02pm; Reply: 28
then get the shea butter. I can't believe how much good it is doing in less than two month my feet went from bleeding to all but healed.  I but it on my feet first thing in morning and again at night cover with cotton socks. It's not greasy, more like butter out of the refrigerator, it will soften once on the skin.
Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 8:23pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from deblynn3


As lola pointed out you need to work from the inside.  While your doing that I second the 100% shea butter.  My feet where really bad this summer, up to the point of bleeding.  This butter is great. Yes it is a miracle treatment.


I also would like to ditto the shea butter suggestion. I tried it on the advice of Victoria and really like the results... especially coupled with increasing my intake of EFA (I use high potency fish oil).

Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 8:30pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
Little point in me replying in future then. hope you get lucky


I got something better than luck.  God's provision.   ;)

I'm sorry that I vented.  But I urge you to consider my points.  Like I said, you know a lot and I like your input.  But it just kind of hit me the wrong way, and they have in the past too.  I know you've done a great deal of work with Emily.  And you should be proud.  You're a great Dad.  For sure.  I'm just sensitive.  I admit it.   :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 9:55pm; Reply: 31
Put on oil or lotion, then gloves, before washing dishes. Then put on a fresh layer of oil or lotion after you're done with the dishes and the gloves come off.

Yeah, you need to work on internal healing so your skin is stronger, but in the short term you need to keep the skin protected while you work. It would be best (for your hands) if you could get somebody else to wash the dishes and not worry about gloves or constantly re-applying lotion, but if your life is anything like mine, the  dishes will get moldy if you don't personally wash them.
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 10:07pm; Reply: 32
I suffer from this as well. I have been using a scrub brush with a long handle to wash dishes and my hands have not been quite so dry but I didnt' realize that was probably the reason until Victoria mentioned it!

I know how you feel doing so many dishes and always having to put the gloves on. I forget half the time and it seems my hands are always in water. I haven't found any miracle creams, although I have tried many, more natural types. The shea butter sounds like a good suggestion.

Hope you find relief soon! This post is a good reminder for me to be more diligent about the gloves before the cracking starts.

Lisa
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 29, 2011, 10:47pm; Reply: 33
Wow whole foodie, we're just having all kinds of similarities!!!  Interesting.  Ruthie, good advice.  
Posted by: SandrAruba, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 1:50am; Reply: 34
I don't think you could get your hands on some aloe? The inside of an Aloe leaf is great for skin conditions. And no not Aloe that has been processed into some cream. That doesn't work.

Otherwise I also would go with the shea butter. Put it on before going to bed.

And... this may sound crazy, but every now and then I get a manicure and they also do a hand mask. They put a really nice moisturizer on your hands and then you put your hands in some warm paraffin. It seals off the hand and together with the warmth makes your skin really absorb the moisturizer. Afterwards you can just peel off the paraffin. Maybe you can think off some way to do that with the shea butter.
Posted by: 17017 (Guest), Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 2:47am; Reply: 35
People have commented on Nightshade vegetables causing cracking dry painful skin conditions.  Also Ive used Lubriderm and Aquaphor for similar conditions.  Good luck and God bless you.
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 4:02am; Reply: 36
I don't think it's a nightshade, because I avoid them, except white potatoes.  I have to admit, I've been eating more lately, so I suppose there could be a connection.  However, I eat them all year round and this only flairs up in the winter.   I personally thinks it's because I use too much hot water, too freqently, and not wearing gloves.  I did wear glove a lot more today, and it helped.  But it didn't take it away completely of course.
Posted by: cindyt, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 4:11am; Reply: 37
For those who use shea butter - I got some and it's so hard I can barely scrape a little bit out of the jar with my fingernails.
How do you use it?
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 5:01am; Reply: 38
Quoted from cindyt
For those who use shea butter - I got some and it's so hard I can barely scrape a little bit out of the jar with my fingernails.
How do you use it?


Put the jar in a warm spot, or put the jar in some hot water (making sure the lid is on securely ;)).

I used some coconut oil on my hands tonight, and they are much better than before I did it. Frodo (puppy) licked a lot of it off, but my hands appreciated the moisture.
Posted by: chrissyA, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 3:22pm; Reply: 39
Quoted Text
For those who use shea butter - I got some and it's so hard I can barely scrape a little bit out of the jar with my fingernails.
How do you use it?

West African shea butter can be pretty firm. I scrape it out with the back of my nail as well and then rub briskly between my palms. Shea butter from East Africa is much softer.  :)
Posted by: deblynn3, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 3:32pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from chrissyA

West African shea butter can be pretty firm. I scrape it out with the back of my nail as well and then rub briskly between my palms. Shea butter from East Africa is much softer.  :)


This is what I do it's from Ghana. West Africa, I just peel it off in thin layers.
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 8:09pm; Reply: 41
Quoted from Drea
I used some coconut oil on my hands tonight, and they are much better than before I did it. Frodo (puppy) licked a lot of it off, but my hands appreciated the moisture.
Maybe the puppy saliva helped :D Isn't there supposed to be something healing in that?  :-/ ;)


Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 8:19pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from JJR
I don't think it's a nightshade, because I avoid them, except white potatoes.  I have to admit, I've been eating more lately, so I suppose there could be a connection.  However, I eat them all year round and this only flairs up in the winter.
I know nothing about nightshades & your BT (effect/tolerance etc) but here's a thought - maybe the fact that your body copes with white potatoes all year, is that there are no other environmental factors adding to their effect? ie the colder (drier?) weather conditions as well as the hot water combined in winter...??!!
As I referred to in "Gatherers & perfume fragrance" my skin (face) is not only improving daily (now I am not being constantly exposed to whatever was in those essential oils) but I can eat things that would tip me over the edge on a day/week when I was working... Hence my confusion re never fully knowing that it was the essential oils that were the main protagonist in my dilemma ::)
Obviously if I eat an outright avoid, I would have a problem, but I am talking about things I "should have been able to eat"...

Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 10:02pm; Reply: 43
white potatoes are neutral for me.  I suppose I could skip them.  And focus more on sweet potatoes.  But I doubt I'm going to.  I need the calories right now.  I've lost too much weight, and they seem to be helping me combat that.  And they taste great.  I would rather deal with my hands than stop eating a food that is very satisfying and calorie building right now.  


Last night I wore some rubber gloves to bed, with no lotions, and they kind of sweat at night.  And they aren't healed,  but they sweat seems to make them a little better today.  I'll just repeat that for a while.  My wife says you can buy these gloves that they use at spas or something.  But she hasn't found any yet.  Plus, I'm wearing gloves doing the dishes.  Hopefully that will help too.  I do have to wash my hands after going to the bathroom and what not.  So I can't get away from warm water and soap completely.  Hehehhee
Posted by: PrincessMia, Thursday, December 1, 2011, 2:08pm; Reply: 44
Mine would crack to the point of bleeding till I discovered a natural remedy. I spray my hands with rose water then apply glycerine and a pair of cotton gloves before bed. Good luck.
Posted by: chrissyA, Thursday, December 1, 2011, 4:12pm; Reply: 45
Quoted from cindyt
For those who use shea butter - I got some and it's so hard I can barely scrape a little bit out of the jar with my fingernails.
How do you use it?

Another thing I like to do to soften the shea butter is to melt it on a little hot plate and add some oil to it. Whatever oil I'm in the mood for and have on hand - olive, jojoba, grapeseed, whatever. This way you can make it as soft as you like.  ;)
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, December 1, 2011, 5:01pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from PrincessMia
Mine would crack to the point of bleeding till I discovered a natural remedy. I spray my hands with rose water then apply glycerine and a pair of cotton gloves before bed. Good luck.


Rose water, eh?  Interesting. Where do you get that?

What is glycerin?  I was thinking about regular ole vasoline.  But I'm not really sure if I want "petroletum" on my hands.  
Posted by: PrincessMia, Thursday, December 1, 2011, 11:04pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from JJR


Rose water, eh?  Interesting. Where do you get that?

What is glycerin?  I was thinking about regular ole vasoline.  But I'm not really sure if I want "petroletum" on my hands.  


You can get both at a pharmacy or health food stores.
Posted by: EquiPro, Friday, December 2, 2011, 3:53am; Reply: 48
Glycerin grosses me out and I avoid it in all of my toiletries.  You can get 100% glycerin (I think) in a lot of drugstores on the bottom of the "lotions" aisle, called, "Corn Husker's Lotion".
Posted by: JJR, Friday, December 2, 2011, 5:10am; Reply: 49
So what say you all about vaseline?  Bad?  
Posted by: Drea, Friday, December 2, 2011, 3:26pm; Reply: 50
Quoted from JJR
So what say you all about vaseline?  Bad?  

B-a-d.

Got any coconut oil?
Posted by: JJR, Friday, December 2, 2011, 3:55pm; Reply: 51
Yes, but I'm anti coconut oil right now.  That's why I was looking for something else.  
Posted by: Spring, Friday, December 2, 2011, 4:18pm; Reply: 52
http://www.lovelyskin.com/details.asp?PID=118584
From EquiPro

I just ordered this product and will let you know how it works for me! A great sale going on too! Thanks for posting.
Posted by: deblynn3, Friday, December 2, 2011, 4:36pm; Reply: 53
Quoted from JJR
So what say you all about vaseline?  Bad?  


:X

I still say try the shea butter. It was under $8 and will last me a year. I use it twice a day on my feet and hands

I like coconut oil for my face, neck.
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, December 2, 2011, 4:56pm; Reply: 54
Quoted from JJR
So what say you all about vaseline?  Bad?  

I would choose to use something else, if possible.

I don't live in the cold climate anymore, so don't have this issue very much, but I just put some oil on the hands and in the body to solve the problem.  On the hands helps soften and moisturize right away, and in the body helps sustain - as long as you are digesting it.  

Oil mixed with some glycerin may be best, as the oil softens and the glycerin will draw moisture in the form of water into the hand.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, December 2, 2011, 7:08pm; Reply: 55
Gycerin seems to be a common theme.  I just remember I have some D'Adamo face stuff too.  I could try that on my hands.  Although I don't know if it's too old.  I've had it for a while.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, December 2, 2011, 7:27pm; Reply: 56
I would not use petroleum on my skin!

Shea butter
Emu Oil
Castor oil

There are some good herbal salves (calendula, for example) available through a natural food store.  I've asked this before, do you have a good natural food store nearby?  ;)
Posted by: JJR, Friday, December 2, 2011, 10:05pm; Reply: 57
Not real close.  That's the problem.  We'll have to see.  There's one somewhat near but it's by where we never go and we'd have to go out of our way.  For some reason there isn't one in the normal routes we drive.  Grrrrrrr....
Posted by: Possum, Friday, December 2, 2011, 10:10pm; Reply: 58
Quoted from JJR
Not real close.  That's the problem.  We'll have to see.  There's one somewhat near but it's by where we never go and we'd have to go out of our way.  For some reason there isn't one in the normal routes we drive.  Grrrrrrr....
I understand that/makes perfect sense!! The very next suburb 5-7 minutes drive north of us, I very very rarely go to as I am always going south!! To work & to the city & there are plenty of places to visit & shop in, heading that way...;)
Was the grrr because you feel you are not being made a priority of? Btw after what I posted re my experience with nightshades I tried tomato twice, which I have rarely indulged in... After the second time I got two distinct dry patches on my face?! & remember I keep well hydrated & lubricated by several means...
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Friday, December 2, 2011, 10:23pm; Reply: 59
I order may items from http://www.vitacost.com

They carry almost everything (including flour, nuts, seeds, supps, beauty supplies), one fixed shipping charge and in comes in a few days so I wait until I need a few things.

Here is the shea butter I just bought (I was able to get it locally) and I love the scent and the way it feels.

http://www.vitacost.com/Nubian-Heritage-Raw-Shea-Butter-Infused-With-Frankincense-And-Myrrh/?pd_section=pr

Lisa
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, 7:33am; Reply: 60
Quoted from Victoria
I haven't bought dish soap in a decade.  My favorite is Dr. Bronner's, diluted 1/2 and 1/2 with water in a pump bottle on the sink.
Soon after I read this, I bought a new Bronner's 944 ml. liquid soap bottle - lavender is my favourite - and my life has changed! Absolutely upgraded! It's much much better and friendlier than the friendly Ecover dish liquid I've been using for years, eradicates easily the most obstinate food smells (= sardines, lamb fat). I use it for dishes and hands and I am happy. The kitchen is upgraded, nice and cozy.  Thanks!    :)  8)

Posted by: Marc121, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, 1:36pm; Reply: 61
Try to buy gloves. Washing gloves :)
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, 4:10pm; Reply: 62
Have a small bottle of almond oil at the front of the fridge and use it all day long! Incredible! Absolutely incredible!
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, 6:39pm; Reply: 63
Quoted from yaeli
Soon after I read this, I bought a new Bronner's 944 ml. liquid soap bottle - lavender is my favourite - and my life has changed! Absolutely upgraded! It's much much better and friendlier than the friendly Ecover dish liquid I've been using for years, eradicates easily the most obstinate food smells (= sardines, lamb fat). I use it for dishes and hands and I am happy. The kitchen is upgraded, nice and cozy.  Thanks!    :)  8)



You're welcome, Yaeli.  :)  I like lavender on the bathroom sink and peppermint on the kitchen sink.  I've started buying it in gallon jugs and diluting it into my own pretty glass pump bottles.  Wonderful stuff.  I like Ecover brand toilet cleaner but that's all.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, 7:19pm; Reply: 64
Almond oil sounds like a good idea.  I have a bottle, but it's been opened a long time and I probably don't want to use it now.  And my son is highly allergic to nuts, and if I'm cooking for him, that would not be good.
Posted by: Joyce, Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 1:31pm; Reply: 65
I think this is the handcream that I wouldn't be without... though seems to be called by another name in UK, or that might be because it is a very long time since I stocked up!

http://shop.avon.com/shop/product.aspx?pf_id=41894

or this

http://avonshop.co.uk/shop/product.asp?pf_id=35557&from=search&find_spec=hand%20cream&pagenum=1

It definitely has glycerine and silicon in it - I hate wearing gloves also!
Posted by: yaeli, Thursday, January 12, 2012, 12:41pm; Reply: 66
Quoted from Marc121
Try to buy gloves. Washing gloves :)
The tactile sense is of highest importance in cleaning dishes. When I wear gloves, I miss many little/tiny spots and bumps that stick to the dishes and these remained uncleaned.  

Posted by: JJR, Thursday, January 12, 2012, 8:29pm; Reply: 67
I've been using gloves to wash my dishes, most of the time.  I do use a dishwasher for most things, but I have to rinse them and I use them for that too.
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Thursday, January 12, 2012, 9:17pm; Reply: 68
Quoted Text
And my son is highly allergic to nuts, and if I'm cooking for him, that would not be good.


Even if you are not cooking for him, it wouldn't be a good idea to use any product made from nuts. My son, also highly allergic (we just have more in common every time!) has had reactions from smelling nuts. Very scary.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, January 13, 2012, 6:15am; Reply: 69
Well, I eat lots of nuts, so, I just don't cross contaminate.  He is fine.  Well, for the most part.  I'll tell you a story though.  One time I was eating walnuts.  And then I rubbed his back without washing my hands.  You know, he was just sitting next to me and with one hand I was massaging his neck.  And his neck got all bumpy and crazy and itchy within minutes.  Pretty wild.  He's more allergic to fish than nuts.  And it depends on the nut.  He can get away eating peanut butter and not having huge reactions.  Because before we knew, he'd eat it.  But other nuts like walnuts or pecans, they're much worse.  One time my Mom gave him some kind of baked item with slivered almonds on top, without thinking about it and within 2 minutes of eating it he puked it back up.  It's crazy.
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, January 13, 2012, 5:13pm; Reply: 70
It sounds like he is more sensitive to tree nuts, less to legumes...
Posted by: JJR, Friday, January 13, 2012, 5:54pm; Reply: 71
That is probably so.  
Posted by: yvonneb, Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 12:15am; Reply: 72
Quoted from PrincessMia
Mine would crack to the point of bleeding till I discovered a natural remedy. I spray my hands with rose water then apply glycerine and a pair of cotton gloves before bed. Good luck.


Cream/ lotion/ oil/ butter of choice and cotton gloves in bed sorts out the messy side of some of these  :) The thicker, the better for quick relief.

While everyone that made the point of 'fixing from the inside out' is absolutely right, it sounds to me that your body isn't making oil quick enough to keep up with all the washing up, hence you need outside help too!

I think that maybe in the summer your skin dries off quicker and therefore for longer periods, because the air is warmer & drier.
My hands react very quick to winter coldness and wind with rough skin, burning sensation etc and I am speculating that it is linked to the temperature.

Would it be worth trying body powder to get them dry? Is that 'bad' stuff?? I have no idea- don't use it myself...
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, February 21, 2012, 8:48pm; Reply: 73
yvonne, I think you have it backwards with the humidity.  Right now in winter the humidity has been around 30-35% in our house.  In the summer it can get as high as 70% in the house.  And more outside of course.  It's much more moist here in the summer.  There are periods in mid summer where it gets a little bit drier than that, but it would be weird for it to drop below 50% in the house in the summer.  And outside too.  I'm not sure what it is outside now, but when it's real cold out, it's dry.  I'm not sure where you are from, but that's how it works around here.  Wisconsin.

OH WOW YOU ARE FROM IRELAND!!!!!  I am so wanting to learn more about my Heritage and take the time to look into it.  We have a lot of Irish in us.  My kids have it too because my wife's family has it also.  I have a Great Grandpa who was McDowell and I have his tree back to "The Black Gaels" or something like that.  His wife was an O'Neal.  Which was Irish too I guess.  Then my wives Grandpa was Irish.  My son is a Red headed green eyed kid. It's kind of a dark red but it's red.  And his eyes are kind of a green/grey/with a hint of light brown (weird), but they're definitely not very blue.  My daughter and I have blue.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 21, 2012, 8:54pm; Reply: 74
Quoted from JJR
yvonne, I think you have it backwards with the humidity.  Right now in winter the humidity has been around 30-35% in our house.  


The humidity was 11% outside about a week ago here. I didn't check the inside. But I have to admit that I always thought that the humidity was higher in the winter, too, until I started noticing it about a year ago. I have never seen it lower than 25% in the summer.
Posted by: GillianR, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 5:26am; Reply: 75
Unscented Badger Balm is good on my psoriasis. I , also, use vitamin D3 liquid drops on it. Those  2 things and olive oil seem to keep the cracking , bleeding thing at bay. :)

http://www.badgerbalm.com/p-369-badger-balm-unscented.aspx
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 6:11am; Reply: 76
Ooooh, that badger balm looks really good. Thank you for the link!!! I think I'll buy some of that.  We also got some stuff from Burt's Bee's and it seems pretty good too.  But I've yet to use it in large quantities yet.
Posted by: krisaf, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 4:07pm; Reply: 77
Whatever preparation you decide to apply to your hands- apply a generous amount, put on the rubber gloves and then do the dishes.  The heat from the warm water will help what you use to absorb into your sore hands and make them feel much better! Sometimes I save up dishes throughout the day so I can apply the lotion and spend a longer amt of time late afternoon with the "treatment."  I must say that with the milder winter we are having in NJ this year, I have only had one episode of the dry cracking skin on my hands, so the cold dry air does affect it.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 4:27pm; Reply: 78
Quoted from Victoria
I haven't bought dish soap in a decade.  My favorite is Dr. Bronner's, diluted 1/2 and 1/2 with water in a pump bottle on the sink.


Which one do you like, Victoria? Vitacost has a zillion different ones ??) They have a great sale going on today - in fact you can hardly get on their site!! Spend $22 no shipping!!
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 4:59pm; Reply: 79
http://www.vitacost.com/Dr-Bronners-Pure-Castile-Liquid-Soap-Lavender/?pd_section=pr#productDetails
Is this the one you like in the lavender?
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 9:06pm; Reply: 80
Hi Spring,
Yes, my favorite of Dr. Bronner is probably the Lavender liquid soap for hand washing.  I dilute it 1/2 with filtered water because I find that it works just as well.  I use a much richer soap for showers, but Bronner is my sink soap and more sanitary than the bars anyway.

I recently picked up a gallon of the Peppermint (which I used to use a long time ago and got tired of) for variety.  I'm using that for dishes, also diluted 1/2 with water.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, February 23, 2012, 1:23am; Reply: 81
Thanks, Victoria! I'm going to order some tonight before this sale ends at Vitacost. Of course, once I get started, I will probably buy $49 worth and would have gotten free shipping anyway! (smile) I wonder if I won't like this to shower with too because my skin does not like anything at all that is rich/heavy for some reason. It is almost like it needs to breathe or something if I use heavy creams, etc..
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, February 23, 2012, 3:21am; Reply: 82
Dr. Bronner's was my only soap for probably 20 years, so you may love it for bathing.  My skin has a need of more moisture in recent years ;) thus my switch to a Shea Butter/Castor Oil, etc. soap for my showers.
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