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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  IgG Food Antibody Results do not match my SWAMI *
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 8:18pm
I just received my IgG Food Antibody results and I am amazed.  The ONLY food I have a moderate intolerance to are kidney beans.  I have a low intolerance to string beans, oysters, sardines & herring (both of which I never ate before the GTD), corn and pinto beans.  I have very low intolereance to Lactalbumin, alfalfa, asparagus, cod, crab, lobster, salmon, shrimp, sole, tuna, egg yolk, buckwheat, corn gluten, oats, peanuts, rice, sesame and wheat.

I have no intolerance whatsoever to dairy, cane sugar, coffee.

However, in reading the results, the foods considered very low are still allowed to be eaten, as ther response was barely measurable, which means the foods on my allowed list are, wheat, goats milk, yogurt, cheddar cheese, cottage cheese, gluten (no response detected!!!), cow's milk, soy, apples . . .  I had no high reactions to any foods.

This makes sense to me.  I have long wondered why so many people on this forum complain of the issues they have with avoids, yet I don't have nor have I ever had, ANY of those types of reactions.  I have often wondered if my rare blood antigen is more protective when it comes to food intolerances.  Maybe it is something else, but I do not seem to be a typical O in any way, given my genetic inability to break down dietary fiber and my lack of food intolerance to commonly accepted BTD/GTD avoids.

I have been advised to avoid kidney beans, corn, string beans, oysters, pinto beans, sardines and herring for six months.  All other foods are safe to consume.

Certainly, I am experiencing some confusion here  ??)
Posted by: Green Root, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 8:43pm; Reply: 1
COULD the tolerance of wheat and dairies be a result from not consuming them in a long time? I don't remember whether you have been them recently are not, I'm just guessing...
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 8:53pm; Reply: 2
the more your gut needs healing the less you will be in tuned with your beneficials

so concentrate on your gut first
how?

by eating only those diamonds and Sfs in your list, add these slowly and gradually
and follow the stomach health protocols in parallel

write a food log to help
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 8:55pm; Reply: 3
allergy testing naet/alcat
http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archive5/config.pl?read=15141
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 9:15pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Green Root
COULD the tolerance of wheat and dairies be a result from not consuming them in a long time? I don't remember whether you have been them recently are not, I'm just guessing...


I was instructed to consume wheat and dairy prior to testing, which I did in great quantities.  The funny thing is, I am mildly intolerant of kidney beans.  Can't remember the last time I had a kidney bean . . .
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 9:17pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Lola


I did not have ALCAT testing.  I had IgG testing.  They tested my blood against the differernt foods.
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 9:19pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Lola
the more your gut needs healing the less you will be in tuned with your beneficials

so concentrate on your gut first
how?

by eating only those diamonds and Sfs in your list, add these slowly and gradually
and follow the stomach health protocols in parallel

write a food log to help


But my gut has never bothered me.  Ever!  I have always boasted that I have a cast iron stomach.  I don't seem to have all the stomach issues that most others on the forum complain about.

Could it be that I am different?  I also don't metabolize fat, which is not typical for an O.  Certainly my family history of early heart disease would not make this revelation surprising.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 9:34pm; Reply: 7
remember Os have no antigen......thus our distinction, type O for non
......no antigen what so ever
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 9:35pm; Reply: 8
Then your flora is probably not completely right, if you're not digesting your fats.  But what I do, is I stay away from the IGg's that I have, and just follow my diet.  It's just that simple.  But just because your test is showing you don't have an intolerance to certain foods, doesn't mean that they are really all that great for you.  On the other hand, all of us are individuals, and it might be that you're an O that doesn't have problems with wheat.  I'm sure it's possible.  But it the problems might manifest them in different ways, that might not show up on the IGg test.  Like joint pain, stuffy head, feeding bad gut flora, etc etc.
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 10:29pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from JJR
Then your flora is probably not completely right, if you're not digesting your fats.  But what I do, is I stay away from the IGg's that I have, and just follow my diet.  It's just that simple.  But just because your test is showing you don't have an intolerance to certain foods, doesn't mean that they are really all that great for you.  On the other hand, all of us are individuals, and it might be that you're an O that doesn't have problems with wheat.  I'm sure it's possible.  But it the problems might manifest them in different ways, that might not show up on the IGg test.  Like joint pain, stuffy head, feeding bad gut flora, etc etc.


JJR, it is not my gut flora that impairs my ability to digest fat.  I have a polymorphism on the genes that control cholesterol metabolism.

You can see, this along with my food intolerance panel, makes my profile somewhat unique.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 11:20pm; Reply: 10
Patty Would you be up for emailing me a copy of your report so i can analysis it. pm me if you would and i'll give you my email address Ta.

by theway one important thing is the lenghth of time you ate aviods for, how long did they recomend?

Posted by: KimonoKat, Friday, October 28, 2011, 1:26am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Patty H


But my gut has never bothered me.  Ever!  I have always boasted that I have a cast iron stomach.  I don't seem to have all the stomach issues that most others on the forum complain about.

Could it be that I am different?  I also don't metabolize fat, which is not typical for an O.  Certainly my family history of early heart disease would not make this revelation surprising.


Never anything with your intestines (not stomach).  Maybe you have damage but you don't have the pain receptors to register it. ???
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 2:18am; Reply: 12
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
Patty Would you be up for emailing me a copy of your report so i can analysis it. pm me if you would and i'll give you my email address Ta.

by theway one important thing is the lenghth of time you ate aviods for, how long did they recomend?



I ate all of those avoids for about 2 weeks before I had the test.  I cannot remember the last time I ate kidney beans and yet they reacted.  I also ate the avoids quite often in those two weeks, as my doctor told me to add them back in to my daily diet.  No reactions whatsoever.

Here is the thing - I have other issues that have been identified with the different testing she has done, but food intolerance does not appear to be an issue for me.  I have never experienced food intolerances - ever - in the past or present.

I had birthday cake the other day and wasn't sure because I had diarrhea the day after, but then I went back and looked and I had taken double the dose of magnesium.  Magnesium definitely gives me diarrhea if I take too much.  The symptoms were the same as those I have when I take too much magnesium.




Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 2:30am; Reply: 13
Quoted from KimonoKat


Never anything with your intestines (not stomach).  Maybe you have damage but you don't have the pain receptors to register it. ???


I don't think so, KK.  I mean most people with either intestinal issues or stomach issues have other problems such as diarrhea.  I believe I have the pain receptors to register stomach problems.  For instance, if I eat too much garlic, it upsets my stomach and I have a difficult time sleeping.  I feel like my food just sits in my stomach and does not digest.  I can eat some garlic, just not too much.  Onions used to bother me a lot too.  Now I can eat them with no problem.  

My rare blood antigen is considered "abundant and potent" according to the study done on my family.  I think it may have some impact on my food tolerances/intolerances.  In fact, this was the very first question I asked when I joined this forum.  I do not have the same issues with food that most of the people here have.  I am here because I want to minimize my risk for heart disease.  No food issues - EVER - except as mentioned above.  My IgG report confirms this.

Personally, I think that minimizing wheat is not the worst thing I can do.  I believe it adds excess weight.  I don't plan to eat it daily, but I don't think occasional wheat will be a problem for me.  My doctor ran a celiac panel.  I am not intolerant to wheat or gluten.

I actually see this as a blessing in some ways.  Oatmeal is something that can help reduce cholesterol, along with apples.  Since neither of these are problems for me and I need to watch my diet relative to my fat intake and keep my cholesterol down, these two foods can go a long way to help me towards my ultimate goal of minimizing my risk for cardiovascular disease!

Posted by: KimonoKat, Friday, October 28, 2011, 2:33am; Reply: 14
I am really out of the element here with your unique blood type. But I do support you on your journey to reduce your heart disease risk.
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 2:36am; Reply: 15
Quoted from KimonoKat
I am really out of the element her with your unique blood type. But I do support you on your journey to reduce your heart disease risk.


Thanks, KK.  I LOVE your beating heart!   :K)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, October 28, 2011, 2:50am; Reply: 16
Emily's Gastroenterologist suggested she eat gluten for several months he might even have mentions 3 months, before it would show up, perhaps he meant for a biopsy.

I would have though that two weeks was not long enough myself but i don't know for sure.

anyway are you going to continue to stop eating wheat or start eating it?

i'd leave it.

also just read the following

How To Perform a Gluten Challenge

A gluten challenge involves eating gluten only after you've been gluten-free for a while. But how much gluten do you need to eat, and for how long?

Unfortunately, there are no established medical guidelines for performing a gluten challenge, although the little research there is on this subject indicates that more gluten for a longer time period will give you better odds of accurate test results.

A few doctors say that eating a little gluten each day (a slice of regular bread or two) for a week or 10 days will be enough to spur your body to produce antibodies and create the type of intestinal damage that your doctor will look for in an endoscopy. Unfortunately, studies show that almost certainly won't be long enough for damage to occur.

Research has shown that three-week-long gluten challenges involving the equivalent of one to three slices of bread a day are not enough to generate antibodies and intestinal damage in known celiacs who have been following the gluten-free diet.

Many physicians recommend a six- to eight-week gluten challenge, in which you'll need to eat two slices of gluten-filled bread each day. But there's no real research showing that's enough, either.
Posted by: Green Root, Friday, October 28, 2011, 11:00am; Reply: 17
Patty,

Ok, good. So the "dairy / cereal diet" before testing was two weeks? I think it's not a long time, but maybe that's enough to get some damage if they really weren't suiting to your body. And yeah, occasional wheat might suit to you moderately. Personally I don't want to touch it anymore.

The kidney bean thing was quite funny! Now you know yet better to stay away from them ;D

So your cholesterol is a kind of problem. The following can be just very familiar to you, but I want to write it here anyway. Maybe I'll study some more things :)  :
I don't remember if you had also high blood pressure? I met a guy yesterday who told me that if you blood pressure is normal, high cholesterol is not harmful.

I know many O type persons who can eat dairies and cereals and drink coffee without any seeable problems. YET... Good for them if they tolerate that foods...

Finally, I agree with KimonoKat. :) :)
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 11:39am; Reply: 18
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
Emily's Gastroenterologist suggested she eat gluten for several months he might even have mentions 3 months, before it would show up, perhaps he meant for a biopsy.

I would have though that two weeks was not long enough myself but i don't know for sure.

anyway are you going to continue to stop eating wheat or start eating it?

i'd leave it.

also just read the following

How To Perform a Gluten Challenge

A gluten challenge involves eating gluten only after you've been gluten-free for a while. But how much gluten do you need to eat, and for how long?

Unfortunately, there are no established medical guidelines for performing a gluten challenge, although the little research there is on this subject indicates that more gluten for a longer time period will give you better odds of accurate test results.

A few doctors say that eating a little gluten each day (a slice of regular bread or two) for a week or 10 days will be enough to spur your body to produce antibodies and create the type of intestinal damage that your doctor will look for in an endoscopy. Unfortunately, studies show that almost certainly won't be long enough for damage to occur.

Research has shown that three-week-long gluten challenges involving the equivalent of one to three slices of bread a day are not enough to generate antibodies and intestinal damage in known celiacs who have been following the gluten-free diet.

Many physicians recommend a six- to eight-week gluten challenge, in which you'll need to eat two slices of gluten-filled bread each day. But there's no real research showing that's enough, either.


No biopsy was performed.  The testing was the IgG testing, which is a simple blood draw.  If your theory about wheat and gluten were correct, why would I react to kidney beans?  I can't remember the last time I ate kidney beans.  They are an avoid for me, but I never eat beans anyway, unless I have a Mexican meal, very rarely for me, and then it would be black beans.  Same with pinto beans.  I wouldn't know a pinto bean if it hit me in the face.  They are neutral for me.  Corn is an avoid on my SWAMI and a low reactive food for me.  I had corn the night before the test and one or two other times over the summer, yet I reacted to it.  String beans are a low reactive food for me but a SF on my SWAMI.  Can't remember the last time I had string beans either.  My Total IgE is only 46.9.  Anything less than 87 is great.  I don't have food intolerances and this seems to confirm my personal experience.  After all, aren't we supposed to listen to our bodies?

I have been thinking that maybe my rare blood antigen makes me a "newer model" anthropologically.  Obviously, I am just guessing here, but it is extremely rare and first discovered in the late 1950's in my uncle who needed a blood transfusion.  Maybe it was an adaptive  response to some environmental stressor.  Also, the wisdom of the body is pretty amazing.  I am an O who can't break down dietary cholesterol.  Maybe my body, in its infinite wisdom, has instead been made to process most grains.  Again, this is all speculation, but one cannot deny that I have tendencies that make me unique as an O.  I have a rare blood antigen which is so potent that a blood to blood transfusion (not serum) of O+ blood would actually kill me.  I have a difficult time breaking down dietary fat and I seem to be able to process most grains, with the exception of corn.  I would say those factors make me unique as an O.

Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 11:41am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Green Root
Patty,

Ok, good. So the "dairy / cereal diet" before testing was two weeks? I think it's not a long time, but maybe that's enough to get some damage if they really weren't suiting to your body. And yeah, occasional wheat might suit to you moderately. Personally I don't want to touch it anymore.

The kidney bean thing was quite funny! Now you know yet better to stay away from them ;D

So your cholesterol is a kind of problem. The following can be just very familiar to you, but I want to write it here anyway. Maybe I'll study some more things :)  :
I don't remember if you had also high blood pressure? I met a guy yesterday who told me that if you blood pressure is normal, high cholesterol is not harmful.

I know many O type persons who can eat dairies and cereals and drink coffee without any seeable problems. YET... Good for them if they tolerate that foods...

Finally, I agree with KimonoKat. :) :)


I do have high blood pressure but was finally able to bring it down with strenuous exercise.  I just came off my blood pressure medication about a month ago.  I will need to continue to exercise to keep my blood pressure in check.  Thanks for your good thoughts!
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 12:31pm; Reply: 20
I had a chance to go through the report in more detail this morning.  I just got it yesterday.  Not only did it test IgG food and spice antibodies, but also IgE food antibodies, IgE antibodies to trees, grasses, weeds, molds and miscellaneous, which includes dogs, cats, cockroaches and three types of mites, IgE mold antibodies, and finally IgA, which encompasses four markers for gluten and celiac.

Curry is the only thing to which I had a high response.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, October 28, 2011, 12:43pm; Reply: 21
patty It's not my theory it the accepted theory for IGg test,

I know about the IGg testing I have done quiet a few for other people, The mention of a biopsy was for Emily, which we declined and was purely for your info and not related to IGg testing, perhaps i should have made that more clear but it was very late in the morning 4-5 hours after I should have gone to bed.

If your blood is that rare and it does perhaps you should make it clear in your signature on your profile in order not to confuse us meer mortals and newbies ;)


Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 12:48pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
patty It's not my theory it the accepted theory for IGg test,

I know about the IGg testing I have done quiet a few for other people, The mention of a biopsy was for Emily, which we declined and was purely for your info and not related to IGg testing, perhaps i should have made that more clear but it was very late in the morning 4-5 hours after I should have gone to bed.

If your blood is that rare and it does perhaps you should make it clear in your signature on your profile in order not to confuse us meer mortals and newbies ;)




Hi PC, I know you are versed in the IgG testing, as I recall I asked you about it's accuracy just after I had it done.  Thanks for the clarification on the biopsy.

I do have my rare blood antigen listed in my signature, but some might not recognize it because, well . . . it is rare  ;)  While you, I see are NN, I am NMg, which means I am N positive, M negative and Mg positive.

BTW, I PM'd you.  Check your inbox!

Posted by: jayneeo, Friday, October 28, 2011, 2:39pm; Reply: 23
Patty,
You are indeed unique. Embrace it! ;)
Posted by: gardengirl, Friday, October 28, 2011, 4:23pm; Reply: 24
Another thing about FST I believe it really emphasizes rotating your foods. Something to keep in mind. So eat one thing and then avoid for four days. This supposedly lessens intolerance from the good foods to happen.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Friday, October 28, 2011, 5:34pm; Reply: 25
http://www.wellsphere.com/lupus-article/understanding-your-igg-food-allergens-by-steve-nenninger-nd/1348472


Dr. Steve Nenninger wrote this book about Igg testing, you can down load it here.

He is a good friend of Dr. D'Adamo.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, October 28, 2011, 5:37pm; Reply: 26
You know, Policy Checker, you made me think about something.  When I was at Mayo clinic last year, they checked me with a blood test and biopsy for celiacs.  Problem is, I barely ever ate wheat before hand.  I would sometimes eat the croutons on a salad from Panera, but if I did, it would've been once a week, or so.  And I would never eat them all, it was more like a treat.  So, I probably didn't have enough wheat in my system for them to have a proper diagnosis.  Because they said I wasn't celiac.  Also, my IGg showed no reaction to wheat.  But I sure get it when I eat cake.  It might be the sugar more than the wheat though.  I don't really eat bread any more.
Posted by: AKArtlover, Friday, October 28, 2011, 5:46pm; Reply: 27
I thought the main wheat issue for O's was binding to the insulin receptor.

Not reacting to a bunch of foods is a good thing. You may be digesting your food thoroughly and not leaking it into the blood (maybe you are blessed with a great gut) and/or you are getting the variety of good foods you need to maintain health. I think VARIETY of good foods must be a big key. :)

The immune response being balanced means the body doesn't get overly reactive to things. Don't know much about the testing. Downloaded that ebook for later. Thanks Andrea.

Maybe you do have a protective type genetic component.  8)
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 11:54pm; Reply: 28
Quoted from jayneeo
Patty,
You are indeed unique. Embrace it! ;)


Thank you, Jayneeo!   ;D  I am learning to understand and embrace my unique me!
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, October 28, 2011, 11:56pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
http://www.wellsphere.com/lupus-article/understanding-your-igg-food-allergens-by-steve-nenninger-nd/1348472


Dr. Steve Nenninger wrote this book about Igg testing, you can down load it here.

He is a good friend of Dr. D'Adamo.


Andrea, thank you very much for sharing this link.  I will be out of touch for a bit as I have a very busy weekend.  I will read this and respond at my earliest possible convenience.  I appreciate all this wonderful support as I try to grasp all of this.  :o
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, October 29, 2011, 4:49pm; Reply: 30
I haven't read all the responses to this thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating something.  Remember that blood tests aren't always accurate.  Remember that even if you "test" fine for something, it doesn't mean it's okay--it means you don't make antibodies against it. You can still be intolerant. And even if you "test" poorly for something, it doesn't mean it's bad--it just means you were sensitive to it that day.  Lay off a while and test again and it'll be different.  I would trust the GTD list over ELISA tests and even over SWAMI. SWAMI changes depending on the info you fill in, right?  I need to have it redone myself, but that's beside the point.  My husband and oldest daughter got the ELISA tests done a few years ago (pre-BTD) and while they did shed some light at the time, this diet is better.  Of course if you have a problem with a food that's recommended for you, lay off for a while and then try it again.
Posted by: Patty H, Saturday, October 29, 2011, 8:04pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Ribbit
I haven't read all the responses to this thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating something.  Remember that blood tests aren't always accurate.  Remember that even if you "test" fine for something, it doesn't mean it's okay--it means you don't make antibodies against it. You can still be intolerant. And even if you "test" poorly for something, it doesn't mean it's bad--it just means you were sensitive to it that day.  Lay off a while and test again and it'll be different.  I would trust the GTD list over ELISA tests and even over SWAMI. SWAMI changes depending on the info you fill in, right?  I need to have it redone myself, but that's beside the point.  My husband and oldest daughter got the ELISA tests done a few years ago (pre-BTD) and while they did shed some light at the time, this diet is better.  Of course if you have a problem with a food that's recommended for you, lay off for a while and then try it again.


It was not ELISA testing.  It was IgG.  According to Andrea, Dr. D's colleague thinks this testing is valid and uses it for his patients.
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, October 29, 2011, 8:19pm; Reply: 32
Gotcha.  Okay.
Posted by: Chloe, Saturday, October 29, 2011, 8:55pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from Patty H


It was not ELISA testing.  It was IgG.  According to Andrea, Dr. D's colleague thinks this testing is valid and uses it for his patients.


Good to know this...because once I eliminated all my highly reactive IgG results from my SWAMI I started feeling a lot better! (wheat, gluten, eggs, dairy).  This pretty much returned me to the basic BTD for A which is fine. I followed the BTD for 20 years without problems.

What was confusing is that in prior forum discussions of allergy testing, the implication was that we had to heal our guts and then we'd be tolerant of our known allergens. Cheese was supposed
to be low overgrowth and therefore helpful for a Teacher's digestion. Dairy broke out my skin,
made me itch and gave me digestive problems...so I'm obviously not a typical Teacher or else
required a Professional SWAMI and I finally just eliminated foods I knew would never work.  I'm sorry I wasted so much time trying to tolerate Teacher cheeses sorry that I took advice from anyone other than my own gut instincts....because after 3 years on my SWAMI my white lines are still very obvious. I might have made faster progress had I kept away from all known allergens
from the start.  

Posted by: cajun, Saturday, October 29, 2011, 11:33pm; Reply: 34
Patty,
Congrats on the exercise and lower bp so no meds!!!! :D

Garden girl,
I had this test done over a year ago and learned food rotation is very important! ;)  
I was a perfect example of why its not a good idea to go years eating the exact same breakfast (not just one item but the whole meal)!  
Posted by: JJR, Sunday, October 30, 2011, 12:07am; Reply: 35
Dairy, wheat and sugar.  Corn too.  I think all 4 of those are suspect, if your gut isn't working properly.  I had been eating dairy for a long time too, following the diet, and I cut it out this spring.  I find that I just have much less congestion and don't get stopped up without dairy.  Now, maybe when my gut is healed, I'll be able to go back on it.   But it's just not worth it now.  And then there is the whole "wheat" thing.  To me, it's so complex.  First off, practically nobody eats wheat in it's purest, most healthiest form.  Any kind of breads, pastas, and flours are refined to some point, missing the good stuff.  Yet it's so ubiquitous that even people that know they shouldn't be eating it, just do.  Because it's "Too hard for them" to stay away from it.  And then, there's the problem where no matter how good it is, the gluten is going to be bad for you.  I suspect that the refining process is more to blame than eating pure wheat berries, or sprouted wheat.  Because it takes away a lot of good nutrients, plus using chemicals to refine doesn't help either.  And using subpar wheat.  Which happens with soy.  And then there's corn.........  Which they turn into everything.  Pretty soon people will be sleeping on corn, if were not already.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Sunday, October 30, 2011, 1:02am; Reply: 36
Quoted from Patty H


It was not ELISA testing.  It was IgG.  According to Andrea, Dr. D's colleague thinks this testing is valid and uses it for his patients.



But Dr. D does not use it-- that I have ever seen. He uses breath hydrogen for gut health, healthy gut healthy body.

  Dr D was tested by Dr. Nenninger I think it was over the summer and he had nothing show up-- proves to me that his diet ( genotype and blood type) is far superior to anything that an IGg test will show.

Quite an expensive test as well that IGg.. Dr. D is very frugal and if he can get results without an expensive test he is much happier. :)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Sunday, October 30, 2011, 1:27am; Reply: 37
Yeah i have read Steve stuff very good, The IGg test are good for newbies i think, if your a real BT or GENO fan and are compliant you don't need them so much.

video link mentions IGg test at 19 minutes on the video. good comment "if your sensitive to corn you have to get off high fructose CORN syrup

If you don't smoke, the single most important thing you can do to prevent cancer is to keep your weight under control.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v.....p;feature=plpp_video
Posted by: Dr. D, Sunday, October 30, 2011, 5:06pm; Reply: 38
IgG/IgE Food Allergy tests: antibody based reaction.

Pros: reliable procedure
Cons: false positive and negatives due to fact that antibodies to foods are often engendered by gut bacteria and other non-food origins.

Lectins/ Blood Groups: food intolerance/ agglutination reaction

Pros: predicts reactions not discernible by antibody testing
Cons: variations in degree of reaction between individuals*

* modulated in part by adding secretor type and in large part by GenoType/SWAMI additions.
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, October 30, 2011, 5:10pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Andrea AWsec



But Dr. D does not use it-- that I have ever seen. He uses breath hydrogen for gut health, healthy gut healthy body.

  Dr D was tested by Dr. Nenninger I think it was over the summer and he had nothing show up-- proves to me that his diet ( genotype and blood type) is far superior to anything that an IGg test will show.

Quite an expensive test as well that IGg.. Dr. D is very frugal and if he can get results without an expensive test he is much happier. :)



Andrea, my testing was not that expensive, as my insurance picked up most of it.  I think I paid about $160, which amounts to about a week and a half of groceries for us, so I figure it was money well spent.
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Sunday, October 30, 2011, 5:29pm; Reply: 40
Well I'll just throw my 2 cents in having not done the test at all.  :)  I have dabbled with the diet for over a decade plus the years before I did the diet and all the problems I had as a teen & child etc........ I just agree with the avoids list.... and do my best to avoid them.  I have all kinds of symptoms from the avoids, and not always the same but of what seems to be general celiac or IBS plus inflammation problems, maybe MS or some kind of autoimmune problem, water retention, mood swings etc......

So for example I have pinto beans once a week because it's in the chili at the restaurant I go to.  It's not a bad avoid generally...  I had polenta this week and was definitely bloated the next day.  I had goat milk later in  the week and was constipated 48+ hours.  Goat cheese is OK but not in large/regular amounts.  I had diarrhea earlier last week from either gluten free products or parmesan cheese.  Wheat constipates me for days and causes depression, etc.........

You're lucky if you really can tolerate the avoids but I bet the longer you do the diet you might notice that you don't really tolerate them as well as you think.  But if you do that's great.  ;D
Posted by: AKArtlover, Sunday, October 30, 2011, 6:02pm; Reply: 41
This is so random, but gluten and dairy intolerance, I just read in this book, tend to accompany electrosensitivity as do changes in flora and IBS, ringing in the ears. http://www.earthing.com
I think this concept of "grounding" saved my life. Long story... but grounding seems to modulate inflammation in a profound way.
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Sunday, October 30, 2011, 6:17pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from AKArtlover
This is so random, but gluten and dairy intolerance, I just read in this book, tend to accompany electrosensitivity as do changes in flora and IBS, ringing in the ears. http://www.earthing.com
I think this concept of "grounding" saved my life. Long story... but grounding seems to modulate inflammation in a profound way.


Yes very interesting and something I know I want to do.  I definitely want to run barefoot, am convinced it is a a healthy thing to do likely.

But no I can't tolerate chips and salsa even if the indican thing or whatever said I could.  Not gonna take that test in all likelihood.
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, October 31, 2011, 1:25am; Reply: 43
Quoted from Dr. D
IgG/IgE Food Allergy tests: antibody based reaction.

Pros: reliable procedure
Cons: false positive and negatives due to fact that antibodies to foods are often engendered by gut bacteria and other non-food origins.

Lectins/ Blood Groups: food intolerance/ agglutination reaction

Pros: predicts reactions not discernible by antibody testing
Cons: variations in degree of reaction between individuals*

* modulated in part by adding secretor type and in large part by GenoType/SWAMI additions.


Dr D, thank you for your response. I guess your response still leaves me guessing as to how to meld my IgG, IgE and IgA testing with my SWAMI, as the results of the testing are in direct contradiction to my SWAMI.  I understand that nothing is perfect and we are all individuals, but I am confused since the testing indicates I can tolerate wheat and dairy among other things.  I reacted to almost nothing on the testing.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Monday, October 31, 2011, 1:45am; Reply: 44
Fix the gut and work on your SWAMI.

Posted by: Patty H, Monday, October 31, 2011, 2:26pm; Reply: 45
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Fix the gut and work on your SWAMI.



Andrea, if my gut is messed up, wouldn't I react to more foods?  I thought I read that the more you heal your gut, the less you react to foods.  I did have some other testing that looked at malabsorption, yeast/fungal markers, dysbiosis markers and digestive support and my gut is in pretty good shape - not perfect but pretty darn good.
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, October 31, 2011, 2:44pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from Andrea AWsec

Dr D was tested by Dr. Nenninger I think it was over the summer and he had nothing show up-- proves to me that his diet ( genotype and blood type) is far superior to anything that an IGg test will show.


Andrea, this is what I am driving at here!  I was tested and basically nothing showed up - so that must indicate that my gut is in good health, yes?
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, October 31, 2011, 2:48pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from Dr. D
IgG/IgE Food Allergy tests: antibody based reaction.

Pros: reliable procedure
Cons: false positive and negatives due to fact that antibodies to foods are often engendered by gut bacteria and other non-food origins.

Lectins/ Blood Groups: food intolerance/ agglutination reaction

Pros: predicts reactions not discernible by antibody testing
Cons: variations in degree of reaction between individuals*

* modulated in part by adding secretor type and in large part by GenoType/SWAMI additions.


Dr. D's response brings up another question.  How do IgG/IgE Food Allergy tests: antibody based reaction and Lectins/ Blood Groups: food intolerance/ agglutination reaction differ from one another?  If someone could respond in laymens terms, I would be very appreciative.  ;)
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, October 31, 2011, 3:46pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from Patty H
Dr. D's response brings up another question.  How do IgG/IgE Food Allergy tests: antibody based reaction and Lectins/ Blood Groups: food intolerance/ agglutination reaction differ from one another?  If someone could respond in laymens terms, I would be very appreciative.  ;)

From reading the description of both tests, my guess is that the IgG/IgE tests are looking for antibodies in the blood sample, where the Lectins / Blood Groups intolerance / agglutination reaction is from data that pertains to the specific blood type.

Lectin information is based on solid science, so once testing is complete for a blood type, it is applicable to all with that type.  Therefore, this testing doesn't need to be performed for each individual.

IgG/IgE testing is variable and even changes per the individual over time.  Not all individuals build antibodies at the same rate, etc., so it is would need to be performed.  I'm also not sure that people build antibodies to lectins.
Posted by: DoS, Monday, October 31, 2011, 4:17pm; Reply: 49
Quoted from Dr. D
IgG/IgE Food Allergy tests: antibody based reaction.

Pros: reliable procedure
Cons: false positive and negatives due to fact that antibodies to foods are often engendered by gut bacteria and other non-food origins.

Lectins/ Blood Groups: food intolerance/ agglutination reaction

Pros: predicts reactions not discernible by antibody testing
Cons: variations in degree of reaction between individuals*

* modulated in part by adding secretor type and in large part by GenoType/SWAMI additions.


Does this have to do with why Explorers bounce around on foods they seem to consider themselves tolerant too?

My brother had IgG testing done, the works. He now eats way less things but his esophagus stopped hardening and he stopped throwing up in the mornings.
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, October 31, 2011, 5:22pm; Reply: 50
Quoted from ABJoe

From reading the description of both tests, my guess is that the IgG/IgE tests are looking for antibodies in the blood sample, where the Lectins / Blood Groups intolerance / agglutination reaction is from data that pertains to the specific blood type.

Lectin information is based on solid science, so once testing is complete for a blood type, it is applicable to all with that type.  Therefore, this testing doesn't need to be performed for each individual.IgG/IgE testing is variable and even changes per the individual over time.  Not all individuals build antibodies at the same rate, etc., so it is would need to be performed.  I'm also not sure that people build antibodies to lectins.


Ah, but what about the fact that I have a rare blood antigen that was discovered in my paternal uncle back in the 1950's.  He needed a blood transfusion and they tested his blood before giving him the whole blood transfusion.  A seemingly compatible match made his blood agglutinate.  My blood, even though I am an O+ would not be compatible with another O+ unless the donor had the Mg antigen.  Now-a-days it is not an issue because transfusion technology has changed.  This is why I have wondered about lectins and foods that cause agglutination.  It stand to reason if I cannot receive the whole blood of what is considered the universal donor, that my food lectin profile  and foods that agglutinate my blood may be different as well.
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, October 31, 2011, 5:28pm; Reply: 51
Quoted from Patty H
Ah, but what about the fact that I have a rare blood antigen that was discovered in my paternal uncle back in the 1950's.  He needed a blood transfusion and they tested his blood before giving him the whole blood transfusion.  A seemingly compatible match made his blood agglutinate.  My blood, even though I am an O+ would not be compatible with another O+ unless the donor had the Mg antigen.  Now-a-days it is not an issue because transfusion technology has changed.  This is why I have wondered about lectins and foods that cause agglutination.  It stand to reason if I cannot receive the whole blood of what is considered the universal donor, that my food lectin profile  and foods that agglutinate my blood may be different as well.

I don't know how the Mg antigen would affect the Lectin information.  I presume, the lectin information would still be mostly accurate, but maybe incomplete - as the Mg antigen isn't accounted for...

Edited to add: It would probably depend largely on how the Mg antigen changed the blood type "shape"...
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, October 31, 2011, 5:31pm; Reply: 52
Quoted from ABJoe

I don't know how the Mg antigen would affect the Lectin information.  I presume, the lectin information would still be mostly accurate, but maybe incomplete - as the Mg antigen isn't accounted for...



I assume food lectins have never been tested on an individual with the Mg antigen, since it is so rare.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, October 31, 2011, 6:44pm; Reply: 53
Here are my thoughts:

If blood testing showed that you shouldn't eat certain foods, then you shouldn't eat those foods, no matter what SWAMI says about them. I  have page 1 of this thread open in another tab so I can refer to it easily.

Quoted Text
I have been advised to avoid kidney beans, corn, string beans, oysters, pinto beans, sardines and herring for six months.  All other foods are safe to consume.


I advise you to avoid all those foods for the next 6 months (or indefinitely), but I wouldn't go so far as to say that "all" other foods are safe to consume. I don't have your SWAMI in front of me, but I can guess that kidney beans and corn are avoids anyway, you've mentioned that string beans are a superfood on your SWAMI, and I don't know about oysters, pinto beans, sardines, or herring. There's more to "food is causing damage" than what can be found in this one blood test. Some forms of food-caused damage are more subtle and harder to test for.

I'd suggest that you continue to avoid your SWAMI avoids in addition to the IgG avoids. You probably need to play around with portion sizes and frequencies though, to reflect your ability to digest plant foods and inability to digest animal foods. It's up to you if you want to re-introduce specific plant foods- I know you were talking about eating oatmeal even though it's an O nonnie avoid. There's no need to eat things like peanuts or wheat though, and IMO you're still better off with brown rice and/or rice bran rather than oats and oat bran.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 31, 2011, 7:13pm; Reply: 54
Patty H,
why not contact Dr Nash and let her try to explain Dr D s response to you in layman s terminology, for you to really get it this time.

She is well aware of your Mg antigen thingy and will definitely know and try to explain it has little to do with the issue.

She might even tweak your swami to fit your IgG results and all you can submit to her....
the more information she has about you, the merrier!
Posted by: JJR, Monday, October 31, 2011, 9:29pm; Reply: 55
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Here are my thoughts:

If blood testing showed that you shouldn't eat certain foods, then you shouldn't eat those foods, no matter what SWAMI says about them. I  have page 1 of this thread open in another tab so I can refer to it easily.



I advise you to avoid all those foods for the next 6 months (or indefinitely), but I wouldn't go so far as to say that "all" other foods are safe to consume. I don't have your SWAMI in front of me, but I can guess that kidney beans and corn are avoids anyway, you've mentioned that string beans are a superfood on your SWAMI, and I don't know about oysters, pinto beans, sardines, or herring. There's more to "food is causing damage" than what can be found in this one blood test. Some forms of food-caused damage are more subtle and harder to test for.

I'd suggest that you continue to avoid your SWAMI avoids in addition to the IgG avoids. You probably need to play around with portion sizes and frequencies though, to reflect your ability to digest plant foods and inability to digest animal foods. It's up to you if you want to re-introduce specific plant foods- I know you were talking about eating oatmeal even though it's an O nonnie avoid. There's no need to eat things like peanuts or wheat though, and IMO you're still better off with brown rice and/or rice bran rather than oats and oat bran.



What I'm reading into this thread is: She wants to eat wheat because her IGg says it's OK.  She said she doesn't have any reaction to any foods, so, it's not about what to avoid.  Correct me if I'm wrong PattyH.  None of us can tell you what to do, but if your swami says no wheat, than you have to choose if you're going to trust it or not.  I don't think a computer program can know us better than ourselves, and your intuition is key.  But having said that, it we have the right to be wrong and sometimes the doctors know better.  And I will restate my opinion, most wheat products that you go out and buy at the market, restaurants, etc are highly suspect of being good for anybody.  In my humble opinion.  Now if you go and buy your own wheat berries, cook it straight or mill it yourself, than, that's a different story.  
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Monday, October 31, 2011, 11:31pm; Reply: 56
Patty H.


It's hard to make sense of all this. An IgE antibody is an allergic antibody so if you have any antibodies to specific foods that are IgE then at one time or another you might have been allergic to that food.

IgG is one of those antibodies that shows up as a secondary immune response. For example, if you are exposed to a certain virus  the primary immune respone came by way from the production of IgM antibodies. A second exposure to the same virus will invoke an IgG response. This is what protects you from having a second bout with the exact same virus. But mutations in the virus can change its antigenic structure enough that your natural immunity is unable to afford much protection.

Different parts of the immune system have control over which antibodies are produced and when. IgG antibodies can be set off with the help of the T cells and macrophages. The plasma cells are essentially responsible for the production of our humoral (antibody) immunity. But Tcells may play an important role in food sensitivities and or allergies as regularly as a humoral response.

The answer to your question is actually quite complex and not as simple as antigen/antibody reactions.

Perhaps some foods items you have not had even a primary reaction to so that would explain no secondary response therefore no IgG responses to those foods.

As to what Dr. D. was saying in his post antibodies are essentially specific as to what they react to but sometimes they can react non-specifically as well.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 12:01am; Reply: 57
Quoted from Lola
Patty H,
why not contact Dr Nash and let her try to explain Dr D s response to you in layman s terminology, for you to really get it this time.

She is well aware of your Mg antigen thingy and will definitely know and try to explain it has little to do with the issue.

She might even tweak your swami to fit your IgG results and all you can submit to her....
the more information she has about you, the merrier!


Lola, I do plan to contact Dr. Nash with all my results but I need some additional testing completed and right now my funds are rather low, so I need to wait until I can afford the additional testing, which should finish the testing my doctor wants to do.  Then my plan is to send Dr. Nash all my testing and set up a phone conference.  I am not sure when I will have the funds to complete the testing, so I came here for some answers first, hoping that someone would be familiar enough with this testing to advise me in the interim.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 12:05am; Reply: 58
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Here are my thoughts:

If blood testing showed that you shouldn't eat certain foods, then you shouldn't eat those foods, no matter what SWAMI says about them. I  have page 1 of this thread open in another tab so I can refer to it easily.



I advise you to avoid all those foods for the next 6 months (or indefinitely), but I wouldn't go so far as to say that "all" other foods are safe to consume. I don't have your SWAMI in front of me, but I can guess that kidney beans and corn are avoids anyway, you've mentioned that string beans are a superfood on your SWAMI, and I don't know about oysters, pinto beans, sardines, or herring. There's more to "food is causing damage" than what can be found in this one blood test. Some forms of food-caused damage are more subtle and harder to test for.

I'd suggest that you continue to avoid your SWAMI avoids in addition to the IgG avoids. You probably need to play around with portion sizes and frequencies though, to reflect your ability to digest plant foods and inability to digest animal foods. It's up to you if you want to re-introduce specific plant foods- I know you were talking about eating oatmeal even though it's an O nonnie avoid. There's no need to eat things like peanuts or wheat though, and IMO you're still better off with brown rice and/or rice bran rather than oats and oat bran.


Ruthie, thanks for this advice.  I have so many questions now, it is difficult to know what to eat and what not to eat.  I am an O who has a difficult time metabolizing animal fat and now all grains, with the exception of corn, seem to be ok for me.  I am not making any serious changes to my diet, although I am eating some avoids now as a test, and frankly I feel no issues.  I need to get to the bottom of all of this so I have a definitive plan.  That is how I function best!

Right now, I feel a bit like the odd man (woman) out, if you know what I mean  ??)
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 12:16am; Reply: 59
Quoted from JJR



What I'm reading into this thread is: She wants to eat wheat because her IGg says it's OK.  She said she doesn't have any reaction to any foods, so, it's not about what to avoid.  Correct me if I'm wrong PattyH.  None of us can tell you what to do, but if your swami says no wheat, than you have to choose if you're going to trust it or not.  I don't think a computer program can know us better than ourselves, and your intuition is key.  But having said that, it we have the right to be wrong and sometimes the doctors know better.  And I will restate my opinion, most wheat products that you go out and buy at the market, restaurants, etc are highly suspect of being good for anybody.  In my humble opinion.  Now if you go and buy your own wheat berries, cook it straight or mill it yourself, than, that's a different story.  


ABJoe, your insight and responses have been clear and concise.  Thank you.  I appreciate that.  It is not that I want to eat wheat.  It is that my doctor says I CAN eat wheat, oats, etc.  Since I need to cut back on animal fat, I need to look at other foods that I can eat.  Combine all of this information with the fact that I am an APO E4/3 - see the separate thread on The Perfect Gene Diet - and the author of the book says that people with my genotype, not GenoType according to Dr. D, should eat a high carb diet, consisting of whole, organic grains and fruits and vegetables along with moderate amount of animal protein, mostly consisting of fish, some chicken and basically no red meat.

So now you can see that I am putting many components of the testing I have done together to try to understand what is the best diet for me to avoid my family history of premature, severe heart disease.  My APO E genotype is no surprise, given my family history.  I am not saying I would base a diet on one gene, but it certainly is a gene that tends to speak LOUDLY in my family  :-/

My goal is to explore and embrace my unique individuality and eat a diet that will help to minimize my risk of heart disease.  Funny that I don't seem to fit the typical O profile, but there are exceptions to every rule.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 12:37am; Reply: 60
Quoted from Captain_Janeway
Patty H.


It's hard to make sense of all this. An IgE antibody is an allergic antibody so if you have any antibodies to specific foods that are IgE then at one time or another you might have been allergic to that food.

IgG is one of those antibodies that shows up as a secondary immune response. if you are exposed to a certain virus for example the primary immune respone came by way from the production of IgM antibodies. A second exposure to the same virus will invoke an IgG response. This is what protects you from having a second bout with the exact same virus. But mutations in the virus can change its antigenic structure enough that your natural immunity is unable to afford much protection.

Different parts of the immune system have control over which antibodies are produced and when. IgG antibodies can be set off with the help of the T cells and macrophages. The plasma cells are essentially responsible for the production of our humoral (antibody) immunity. But Tcells may play an important role in food sensitivities and or allergies as regularly as a humoral response.

The answer to your question is actually quite complex and not as simple as antigen/antibody reactions.

Perhaps some foods items you have not had even a primary reaction to so that would explain no secondary response therefore no IgG responses to those foods.

As to what Dr. D. was saying in his post antibodies are essentially specific as to what they react to but sometimes they can react non-specifically as well.


Thank you for such a detailed response.  You obviously know what your are talking about.  Would it be possible for you to explain this in more laymens terms?  I reacted to very few foods.  In fact, my only strong response was to curry powder.  I had a moderate response to kidney beans and a mild response to a few other foods listed earlier in this post.  Are you saying that at one time I may have been allergic to things like wheat and dairy, but now I am not?  Sorry to sound like such a dummy here, but I really want to understand what you are saying.  THANK YOU!!!  Patty
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 12:46am; Reply: 61
Quoted from Patty H


ABJoe, your insight and responses have been clear and concise.  Thank you.  I appreciate that.  It is not that I want to eat wheat.  It is that my doctor says I CAN eat wheat, oats, etc.  Since I need to cut back on animal fat, I need to look at other foods that I can eat.  Combine all of this information with the fact that I am an APO E4/3 - see the separate thread on The Perfect Gene Diet - and the author of the book says that people with my genotype, not GenoType according to Dr. D, should eat a high carb diet, consisting of whole, organic grains and fruits and vegetables along with moderate amount of animal protein, mostly consisting of fish, some chicken and basically no red meat.

So now you can see that I am putting many components of the testing I have done together to try to understand what is the best diet for me to avoid my family history of premature, severe heart disease.  My APO E genotype is no surprise, given my family history.  I am not saying I would base a diet on one gene, but it certainly is a gene that tends to speak LOUDLY in my family  :-/

My goal is to explore and embrace my unique individuality and eat a diet that will help to minimize my risk of heart disease.  Funny that I don't seem to fit the typical O profile, but there are exceptions to every rule.


Gotcha.  Wouldn't it be beneficial to look at grains that are already geared more for O's besides wheat.  Isn't Rice and Quinoa GTG on your swami?  Possibly Millet?  Amaranth.  There's lots of different types of rices out there to go to town with.  And yeah, oats seem to work for me real well.  Rice seems to be the best out of all of them for me.  Quinoa is an awesome grain too.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:05am; Reply: 62
Quoted from Patty H
I just received my IgG Food Antibody results and I am amazed.  The ONLY food I have a moderate intolerance to are kidney beans.  I have a low intolerance to string beans, oysters, sardines & herring (both of which I never ate before the GTD), corn and pinto beans.  I have very low intolereance to Lactalbumin, alfalfa, asparagus, cod, crab, lobster, salmon, shrimp, sole, tuna, egg yolk, buckwheat, corn gluten, oats, peanuts, rice, sesame and wheat.

I have no intolerance whatsoever to dairy, cane sugar, coffee.

However, in reading the results, the foods considered very low are still allowed to be eaten, as ther response was barely measurable, which means the foods on my allowed list are, wheat, goats milk, yogurt, cheddar cheese, cottage cheese, gluten (no response detected!!!), cow's milk, soy, apples . . .  I had no high reactions to any foods.

This makes sense to me.  I have long wondered why so many people on this forum complain of the issues they have with avoids, yet I don't have nor have I ever had, ANY of those types of reactions.  I have often wondered if my rare blood antigen is more protective when it comes to food intolerances.  Maybe it is something else, but I do not seem to be a typical O in any way, given my genetic inability to break down dietary fiber and my lack of food intolerance to commonly accepted BTD/GTD avoids.

I have been advised to avoid kidney beans, corn, string beans, oysters, pinto beans, sardines and herring for six months.  All other foods are safe to consume.

Certainly, I am experiencing some confusion here  ??)



Your IGg indicates  that you have intolerances to some things you mention this in the post above. Someone can look for the old thread by Dr. D if they care to-- I think it was over the summer, but it may have been in little fishes. But it is really not important. He had none at all.  My point is that the genotype/BTD are the best thing you will find to keep your body healthy.

If you want to focus on the IGg food list to create a diet for you then do that. It is certainly up to you.



Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:22am; Reply: 63
Perhaps you just want to cheat patty, lol if so do..  

I think the general consensus on her is to avoid wheat regardless of any slight difference in a sub groups of your blood type. perhaps if you had less tests you could see Dr Nash sooner. ;)

In conclusion - I assume that perhaps you could get away with eating more wheat for arguments sake, or more of some avoids but eventually they will create a negative response, so why bother darling oxo

Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 2:37am; Reply: 64
Quoted Text
my plan is to send Dr. Nash all my testing and set up a phone conference.


have your mercury numbers changed by now?

focus on beneficials to help you heal favorably

moving forward is your goal, right?


Quoted Text
"What do you expect the doctor to do? He can only prescribe something that will mask the symptoms until you heal yourself. He can not heal you."~ Gitti
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 6:55am; Reply: 65
Quoted Text
IMMUNITY AND RESISTANCE

Evidence suggests that non-secretors have lower levels of the antibodies IgG and IgA. The lower levels of IgA are especially significant and may help explain why non-secretors tend to have more frequent problems with heart valve disturbance though to be the result of infection of the bloodstream due to dental work. One of the innate defenses against superficial infections by Candida species appears to be the ability of an individual to secrete the water-soluble form of his ABO blood group antigens into body fluids. Since they cannot do this, it is not surprising to find that non-secretors also carry more Candida organisms in their mouth and digestive tract than secretors. Non-secretors appear to have an increase in the prevalence of a variety of autoimmune diseases including ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthropathy, Sjogren�s syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and Grave�s disease. Non-secretors appear to be at extra risk for recurrent urinary tract infections.
Posted by: Kumar, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 7:26am; Reply: 66
It looks as if IgG test is everything! Food tolerance-intolerance is one issue among so many innumerable issues!
Posted by: Dr. D, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 8:23am; Reply: 67
The great majority of lectins are ABO specific; not specific for the minor blood groups.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 10:04am; Reply: 68
Quoted from Dr. D
The great majority of lectins are ABO specific; not specific for the minor blood groups.


Dr. D, what I don't understand is the difference between IgG, IgE and IgA reactions versus lectin reactions.

If the IgG and IgE panels say I can tolerate wheat and dairy (among other things) and my IgA Celiac panel says I don't have Celiac and I can tolerate gluten, how would the lectin reaction be different?  I am hoping someone can explain this to me  ??)
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 10:12am; Reply: 69
Quoted from Andrea AWsec



Your IGg indicates  that you have intolerances to some things you mention this in the post above. Someone can look for the old thread by Dr. D if they care to-- I think it was over the summer, but it may have been in little fishes. But it is really not important. He had none at all.  My point is that the genotype/BTD are the best thing you will find to keep your body healthy.

If you want to focus on the IGg food list to create a diet for you then do that. It is certainly up to you.





Yes, this is true.  I have moderate intolerance to kidney beans  and low intolerance to string beans, sardines (herring), oysters, corn, pinto beans.  The only high reaction I had was to the spice curry powder.  My doctor said food intolerance issues are not my issue, in general.  I have other things on which I need to focus.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 11:06am; Reply: 70

I do not chose to follow my docs advice, I prefer Dr. D'Adamo's perspective on healthy living.  Your doc quite possibly does not have a full understanding of lectins and disease.

So from his knowledge base he tells you that you can eat what ever you want... again this is up to you.


Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 12:48pm; Reply: 71
I'm dizzy too lol
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:25pm; Reply: 72
Quoted from Andrea AWsec

I do not chose to follow my docs advice, I prefer Dr. D'Adamo's perspective on healthy living.  Your doc quite possibly does not have a full understanding of lectins and disease.

So from his knowledge base he tells you that you can eat what ever you want... again this is up to you.




Andrea, that is not what I said.  I said my doctor told me food intolerance issues were not my issues.  I have other, more important issues to work on instead.  The other health issues I need to work on have nothing to do with food.  And yes - she is a natural healer who is quite well respected - and I choose to follow her advice.

I have not said I am going to go out and stuff myself with wheat and dairy day in and day out.  I didn't do that BEFORE the BTD/GTD so why would I start doing that now.  But I need to put the results of my testing into perspective.  What it means is if I go out to a nice restaurant and they have excellent bread, I can stop obsessing over food and have a slice of bread.  If I go to a friends' house for dinner and she serves ice cream and pie for dessert, I can join them and have a slice.

I have other, much larger health issues I need to deal with at this time.  Neither the BTD or the GTD have managed or solved those issues, so yes - I need to focus on the other things right now.  Otherwise, I may end up with some very serious health issues that have nothing to do with food.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:32pm; Reply: 73
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
http://www.wellsphere.com/lupus-article/understanding-your-igg-food-allergens-by-steve-nenninger-nd/1348472


Dr. Steve Nenninger wrote this book about Igg testing, you can down load it here.

He is a good friend of Dr. D'Adamo.


Andrea, I got the sense from this posting that you were validating the results of my IgG testing, as Dr. Steve Nenninger, who is a good friend of Dr. D'Adamo's, is quite convinced of its validity, so I am surprised that you are now backtracking on the validity of my testing.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:47pm; Reply: 74
Quoted from ABJoe

I don't know how the Mg antigen would affect the Lectin information.  I presume, the lectin information would still be mostly accurate, but maybe incomplete - as the Mg antigen isn't accounted for...

Edited to add: It would probably depend largely on how the Mg antigen changed the blood type "shape"...


What does that mean, ABJoe?
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:48pm; Reply: 75
Patty I not back tracking on your issues. I merely provided you with information you can do with what you want.

I am not here to argue with you.

You are testing and testing-- I am not sure where you are headed with all this.

Here we support the BTD/GTD and SWAMI as a lifestyle. You seem to want your cake and to eat it too.

In the end it is always up to you.

Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 1:55pm; Reply: 76
Patty i think we should start a "argue that a black cow is white" Thread ;) perhaps if you got another user name you could sit there all day and argue with yourself lol

I suspect you are not blood type O at all, you are the start of a new blood type "AB+O" that can eat whatever makes you feel good with no apparent downside, for the short term. I suspect that i shall leave you to it.

ether that or your real name is mercola, on here to wear us down lol

all meant in jest of course, whether a true word or not ;)

Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 2:02pm; Reply: 77
Quoted from Captain_Janeway
Patty H.


It's hard to make sense of all this. An IgE antibody is an allergic antibody so if you have any antibodies to specific foods that are IgE then at one time or another you might have been allergic to that food.IgG is one of those antibodies that shows up as a secondary immune response. if you are exposed to a certain virus for example the primary immune respone came by way from the production of IgM antibodies. A second exposure to the same virus will invoke an IgG response. This is what protects you from having a second bout with the exact same virus. But mutations in the virus can change its antigenic structure enough that your natural immunity is unable to afford much protection.

Different parts of the immune system have control over which antibodies are produced and when. IgG antibodies can be set off with the help of the T cells and macrophages. The plasma cells are essentially responsible for the production of our humoral (antibody) immunity. But Tcells may play an important role in food sensitivities and or allergies as regularly as a humoral response.

The answer to your question is actually quite complex and not as simple as antigen/antibody reactions.

Perhaps some foods items you have not had even a primary reaction to so that would explain no secondary response therefore no IgG responses to those foods.

As to what Dr. D. was saying in his post antibodies are essentially specific as to what they react to but sometimes they can react non-specifically as well.


Captain_Janeway, I had no reactions at all on the IgE testing.  Plus my total IgE if 46.9.  I am well within the reference range of <= 87.

Of all the foods and spices tested on the IgG, I tested high to curry, moderate to kidney beans, and low to string beans, oysters, sardines, corn and pinto beans.  All other foods are fine.

On my IgA for Celiac and Gluten Sensitivity, my total IgA is 227, Reference Range 69-446
Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (tTG IgA) is <1.2, Reference Range <4.0
Anti-Deamidated Gliadin IgA (DGP IgA) is 5, Reference Range <20
Anti-Gliadin IgA (AGA IgA) is 11, Reference Range <20
Anti-Gliadin IgG (AGA IgG) is 4, Reference Range < 20

These results indicate NOT Celiac and NO Gluten Sensitivity
Posted by: Mother, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 2:23pm; Reply: 78
WOW PC, that was so helpful. Sarcsasm doesn't suit you, or anyone
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 2:31pm; Reply: 79
From what I've gleamed of the scientific stuff posted in this thread, it seems that non-secretors have a weaker IgG immune response overall. So it makes sense that you don't have "obvious allergic" reactions to some of these foods. It doesn't mean that these foods are "perfectly safe for you to eat." It just means that your immune system isn't reacting to them.

Quoted from Dr D
The great majority of lectins are ABO specific; not specific for the minor blood groups.


This means that your body still gets damaged by lectins that are bad for type Os, because you're still a type O individual.

Lectin reactions can be subtle and don't always show up on currently available blood tests. When your immune system reacts to threats, it can show up on those IgG or IgA or IgE tests. If your immune system ignores the damage, there's nothing for a lab to test for.

Quoted from ABJoe
It would probably depend largely on how the Mg antigen changed the blood type "shape"...


I think he's asking if the Mg antigen changes the chemical shape of the red blood cells enough for it to change how lectins respond to your blood.

I haven't studied lectins under a microscope, but it seems to me that the Mg antigen is probably NOT going to affect lectin reactions. It does seem to affect things like carbohydrate tolerance and the ability to digest fats and proteins, but that's not directly happening in the blood stream. That's how your genes are affecting your pancreas, liver, stomach acid production, etc. You can tolerate a much higher level of carbs in your diet than the "typical O" and, simultaneously, you can't fully digest animal fats and proteins as well as the "typical O." But I don't see any evidence that lectin response should be different.

What that means, IMO, is that you still need to follow your SWAMI food lists, minus the half dozen or so foods eliminated by IgG testing. Wheat and barley are still bad news for Os, even if you need to eat a lot more grains than I do, and even if you don't seem to have a problem with gluten specifically. You're probably OK eating black-dot rye on a regular basis. Navy beans are still a poor choice for you, even if you need more vegetable protiens. Even O nonnies get a decent variety of beans and grains, even if the "typical" O nonnie gets teeny portions of them. You can have black beans and rice, or great northern beans with quinoa, and as an O nonnie you probably can have lentils.

It's up to you if you want to be less  compliant with those foods that don't cause any obvious reactions. I don't reccomend it, but that's your decision to make. More important than your occasional restaurant avoids, IMO, is what you prepare for yourself on a daily basis.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 2:39pm; Reply: 80
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Patty I not back tracking on your issues. I merely provided you with information you can do with what you want.

I am not here to argue with you.

You are testing and testing-- I am not sure where you are headed with all this.

Here we support the BTD/GTD and SWAMI as a lifestyle. You seem to want your cake and to eat it too.

In the end it is always up to you.



Andrea, it is not my intent to argue with anyone.  I am merely seeking information.  And yes - I am testing and testing.  Why? Because the testing is giving my doctor and I a clear picture of my genetic tendencies and other current health issues that are specific to me at this point in my life.  I am not sure how that would be considered a bad thing.  Given my family history, we both feel that the testing has helped us to identify my own personal risks.  This testing has also set a path towards wellness.  Diet and exercise is certainly a part of that path, but it is not the only path.

This thread is four pages long.  I have gotten a lot of great advice, but I still don't understand how IgG, IgE and IgA reactions and lectin reactions are different, why one might be more important than the other and how to meld the two.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:02pm; Reply: 81
Right now, I feel a bit like the odd man (woman) out, if you know what I mean  ...Patty

I guess a lot of us have felt this way at times, Patty. It is not a comfortable feeling! What we eat is a very important part of our lives - if we don't eat we will die - literally. So it is no wonder that when things are not making sense, and our bodies are not reacting the way we or someone else would expect to something that is either supposed to be good or bad for us that we become disturbed and very uncomfortable and anxious. I'm sitting here wondering how the health in your family members has played out while dealing with your type situation. Maybe you have discussed this already. Anyway, if I were you I would eat a basic diet that is the best you can come up between these two regimens until you can afford the further testing and consultation! Don't kill yourself trying to figure all this out in the meantime - PLEASE! The best to you in your efforts!(smile)
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:13pm; Reply: 82
From Lola:

IMMUNITY AND RESISTANCE

Evidence suggests that non-secretors have lower levels of the antibodies IgG and IgA. The lower levels of IgA are especially significant and may help explain why non-secretors tend to have more frequent problems with heart valve disturbance though to be the result of infection of the bloodstream due to dental work. One of the innate defenses against superficial infections by Candida species appears to be the ability of an individual to secrete the water-soluble form of his ABO blood group antigens into body fluids. Since they cannot do this, it is not surprising to find that non-secretors also carry more Candida organisms in their mouth and digestive tract than secretors. Non-secretors appear to have an increase in the prevalence of a variety of autoimmune diseases including ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthropathy, Sjogren�s syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and Grave�s disease. Non-secretors appear to be at extra risk for recurrent urinary tract infections.


Didn't I read somewhere lately that Dr. D. had said that dumping a Deflect  in your mouth and swishing it around would temporarily make a Secretor out of a nonSecretor? Maybe it was in a unique situation, but I remember reading that.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:27pm; Reply: 83
Quoted from Patty H


Thank you for such a detailed response.  You obviously know what your are talking about.  Would it be possible for you to explain this in more laymens terms?  I reacted to very few foods.  In fact, my only strong response was to curry powder.  I had a moderate response to kidney beans and a mild response to a few other foods listed earlier in this post.  Are you saying that at one time I may have been allergic to things like wheat and dairy, but now I am not?  Sorry to sound like such a dummy here, but I really want to understand what you are saying.  THANK YOU!!!  Patty


Even if you had a previous allergy to a certain food, lets say peanuts for example,  that would have shown up as an IgE reaction and you knew you were allergic to peanuts then over time when you avoid that food the IgE level will decrease over time.

Once the stimulus has been removed over a period of time the level of IgE, IgG, or IgA will decrease. This is how the immune response works and thank goodness it does. So yes your blood work on IgE can look like you are not allergic to anything now. But our immune system is made up of memory T cells so if you ingest something that you were previously allergic to you may not necessarily have an immediate response. But if you keep on  and on and on ingesting this same food then you can most certainly revert back to being allergic to it.

I hope this clears up your question.
Posted by: gardengirl, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:38pm; Reply: 84
I'm also with the - it's your choice. If something isn't working for you, don't do it. Was the BTD working for you? It worked for me when I could stick to it. I also had the FST and yes, a lot of it contradicts the BTD but I have to go on trial and error. I have low reaction to grains and wheats but my experience is they okay in small moderation (as my SWAMI allows) and not even every day. My FST also gave a 0 to apples but I do feel not right within an hour or so of eating apple  but I can have applesauce, apple butter, apple cider or baked apples with no effects? So, I do but not raw. I am using a combination of my SWAMI, my FST and what feels wrong and right. Yeah, it would be so easy to just have someone say "just eat this" and it is perfectly fitted to me but that isn't the case with me. It's very confusing, I know as I flip flop all over in what I "believe" but I more of less know what I have to do and have to just do it. Sorry, Nike.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:41pm; Reply: 85
Quoted from Patty H


Dr. D, what I don't understand is the difference between IgG, IgE and IgA reactions versus lectin reactions.

If the IgG and IgE panels say I can tolerate wheat and dairy (among other things) and my IgA Celiac panel says I don't have Celiac and I can tolerate gluten, how would the lectin reaction be different?  I am hoping someone can explain this to me  ??)


Patty, he stated earlier it's a different scientific way of looking at what it does to your system.  He showed the pros and the cons for each.  Have you ever read the Encyclopedia by Dr.D?  It explains what lectins are and what kind of damage they can do.  But it in short, lectins that react with your blood type can gum up your system.  The food "agglutinates" with your blood.  Think, "Clump".  In some cases to the point that it can be harmful to your organs, system, create inflammation, etc etc.  That's it in a super simple form.  And probably not a good one.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:42pm; Reply: 86
Quoted from Patty H


Captain_Janeway, I had no reactions at all on the IgE testing.  Plus my total IgE if 46.9.  I am well within the reference range of <= 87.

Of all the foods and spices tested on the IgG, I tested high to curry, moderate to kidney beans, and low to string beans, oysters, sardines, corn and pinto beans.  All other foods are fine.

On my IgA for Celiac and Gluten Sensitivity, my total IgA is 227, Reference Range 69-446
Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (tTG IgA) is <1.2, Reference Range <4.0
Anti-Deamidated Gliadin IgA (DGP IgA) is 5, Reference Range <20
Anti-Gliadin IgA (AGA IgA) is 11, Reference Range <20
Anti-Gliadin IgG (AGA IgG) is 4, Reference Range < 20

These results indicate NOT Celiac and NO Gluten Sensitivity


Obviously no celiac or gluten sensitivity. Your IgA level is perfect it is in the midpoint of the range. Many celiacs have lower than normal IgA levels in their blood and this perhaps may be a cause for so many of their health issues.

IgA is a first line of defense found in your tears, saliva, GI fluids, and other body fluids. It protects us from all the nasties in our internal environment.

Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:43pm; Reply: 87
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


Even if you had a previous allergy to a certain food, lets say peanuts for example,  that would have shown up as an IgE reaction and you knew you were allergic to peanuts then over time when you avoid that food the IgE level will decrease over time.

Once the stimulus has been removed over a period of time the level of IgE, IgG, or IgA will decrease. This is how the immune response works and thank goodness it does. So yes your blood work on IgE can look like you are not allergic to anything now. But our immune system is made up of memory T cells so if you ingest something that you were previously allergic to you may not necessarily have an immediate response. But if you keep on  and on and on ingesting this same food then you can most certainly revert back to being allergic to it.

I hope this clears up your question.


Thank you, Captain_Janeway!  I really appreciate your detailed response.

Did you see where I posted my results in hopes that these might add more information.  I don't know whether the additional information adds anything new, but I thought I would post it.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 4:49pm; Reply: 88
Quoted from Patty H


Thank you, Captain_Janeway!  I really appreciate your detailed response.

Did you see where I posted my results in hopes that these might add more information.  I don't know whether the additional information adds anything new, but I thought I would post it.


All of those other tests are part of the celiac profile and shows how you react to gluten in an IgG or IgA fashion as well as how the tissue responds to it. That is if your tissues have created an autoimmune response to the gluten. Your tests do not show this.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 5:12pm; Reply: 89
Quoted from JJR


Patty, he stated earlier it's a different scientific way of looking at what it does to your system.  He showed the pros and the cons for each.  Have you ever read the Encyclopedia by Dr.D?  It explains what lectins are and what kind of damage they can do.  But it in short, lectins that react with your blood type can gum up your system.  The food "agglutinates" with your blood.  Think, "Clump".  In some cases to the point that it can be harmful to your organs, system, create inflammation, etc etc.  That's it in a super simple form.  And probably not a good one.


Thank you, JJR.  I do understand the theory behind lectins.  What I don't understand is the relationship between lectin theory and IgG theory.  I guess I assumed that if a food caused my blood to agglutinate due to the lectins, this would also show up as an immune response on either the IgG, IgE or IgA.  Since that did not happen in my case, it is confusing to me how my immune response can show nothing yet a food is causing my blood to agglutinate.  I was under the impression that there is a definite correlation.  Auto-immune diseases are considered an evenutal outcome of a diet high in lectins which cause an over-active immune system, so I am wondering why, in my case, my immune system is not responding to dietary lectins.

I hope that makes sense.  I have struggled to put this question into words . . . I am not sure if I succeeded in stating my question clearly.  Maybe someone else can jump in to help me.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 5:28pm; Reply: 90
My theory is that perhaps, your blood cells are agglutinating but your immune system may not be responding to it. Perhaps certain lectins only make your blood clump into really small clumps, and your immune system "ignores" clumps below a certain size.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 6:54pm; Reply: 91
I agree with ruthie.  I think the Food allergy tests are immune based.  Lectins and agglutination may not show up the same way.  Just like the test doesn't show your assimilation of fats or your amino acid levels, etc etc.  It's a different test.

Have you tried Quinoa, Millet and Rice flours, etc?    There is so much more out there than wheat.  People use almond flours too.  Heck, if potatoes are OK for you, that'd probably be better than wheat products.  Possibly.  Or lentil flour.  Or just eat these in their whole grain state.  That's what I do.  Rice and oats.  Mmmmmmmm...
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 7:39pm; Reply: 92
Ok, so I want to clear up a misconception here.  I am not saying I am going to go out and eat wheat daily.  What I did say in one of my earlier posts is that if I have wheat once in a while, I don't think it will hurt me.  

I ate very limited amounts of wheat and wheat products prior to the BTD/GTD.  I had also stopped eating a lot of sugar.  I have maintained a good weight for my height for over 26 years.  I have done that by limiting things like wheat, dairy and sugar.

I have no intention of going out and gorging on wheat and wheat products.  :o  I am simply trying to incorporate this information.  I have considered oatmeal, since it is good for cholesterol, but I haven't done that either.  I am in the learning phase.  I am not looking to have my cake and eat it too, as it was put earlier.  I am simply trying to understand what my testing means in relationship to my current diet and my inability to break down dietary fat.  By the way, I wrote dietary fiber in my first post.  That is an error.  It is fat I have difficulty breaking down, so I wanted to clear up that as well.

I hope this puts the idea to rest that I plan to add wheat to my daily food intake  ;)
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 10:41pm; Reply: 93
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


Obviously no celiac or gluten sensitivity. Your IgA level is perfect it is in the midpoint of the range. Many celiacs have lower than normal IgA levels in their blood and this perhaps may be a cause for so many of their health issues.

IgA is a first line of defense found in your tears, saliva, GI fluids, and other body fluids. It protects us from all the nasties in our internal environment.



Thank you for this interpretation, Captain_Janeway.  Can you, perhaps shed light on the difference between IgG, IgE and IgA reactions vs. lectin reactions?
Posted by: gardengirl, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 11:06pm; Reply: 94
Here is an article that gives information on lectins. It is given in a very simple way and from what I get out of it, you can't test if you are intolerant to lectins, well, you can but it's you doing your own work, trial and wait and see.
Hope it helps you out. For me, lectins are terrible, even though my IgG testing says they are fine. I sound "worse" off than you health wise so I see the damage immediately but less and less as I stay away from offending foods meaning, that they seem okay but if I over do it, watch out.
http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 11:40pm; Reply: 95
Quoted from Patty H
Ok, so I want to clear up a misconception here.  I am not saying I am going to go out and eat wheat daily.  What I did say in one of my earlier posts is that if I have wheat once in a while, I don't think it will hurt me.  

I ate very limited amounts of wheat and wheat products prior to the BTD/GTD.  I had also stopped eating a lot of sugar.  I have maintained a good weight for my height for over 26 years.  I have done that by limiting things like wheat, dairy and sugar.

I have no intention of going out and gorging on wheat and wheat products.  :o  I am simply trying to incorporate this information.  I have considered oatmeal, since it is good for cholesterol, but I haven't done that either.  I am in the learning phase.  I am not looking to have my cake and eat it too, as it was put earlier.  I am simply trying to understand what my testing means in relationship to my current diet and my inability to break down dietary fat.  By the way, I wrote dietary fiber in my first post.  That is an error.  It is fat I have difficulty breaking down, so I wanted to clear up that as well.

I hope this puts the idea to rest that I plan to add wheat to my daily food intake  ;)


(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(wink)(wink)(wink)
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 12:33am; Reply: 96
Quoted from Patty H
What does that mean, ABJoe?


As you know from page 19 of Eat Right 4 Your Type, each of the blood type markers has a different antigen.  Pgs. 24-28 discuss how lectins adhere to blood cells of the various types - and Dr. D. has shown us which lectins adhere to which blood types.  

The question I had is if and how the Mg antigen would change the blood type marker significantly enough to limit the damaging work lectins do.  Dr. D. graciously stepped in and answered that minor antigens have very little effect.  This answers the question for me.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 1:35am; Reply: 97
Quoted from ABJoe


As you know from page 19 of Eat Right 4 Your Type, each of the blood type markers has a different antigen.  Pgs. 24-28 discuss how lectins adhere to blood cells of the various types - and Dr. D. has shown us which lectins adhere to which blood types.  

The question I had is if and how the Mg antigen would change the blood type marker significantly enough to limit the damaging work lectins do.  Dr. D. graciously stepped in and answered that minor antigens have very little effect.  This answers the question for me.


Thank you, ABJoe for responding.  I appreciate it!
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 3:32am; Reply: 98
Patty,
check out this jewel!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYKuKMS4ZQ4

and this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ5t6r_FiT4
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 11:09am; Reply: 99
Quoted from Patty H


Thank you for this interpretation, Captain_Janeway.  Can you, perhaps shed light on the difference between IgG, IgE and IgA reactions vs. lectin reactions?


I have never studied lectins in any kind of detail so I am not really qualified to say what kind of humoral response would occur after exposure to lectins.

I have worked as a blood bank technologist for several years at a large University and you really don't work with lectins that often. Not as you might think anyway.

As I said earlier, T cell reactions, the cellular immune response, may play a role as well even more so than our antibody responses toward food allergies or food sensitivities.

Sorry, I wish I could be more help here.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 11:57am; Reply: 100
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


I have never studied lectins in any kind of detail so I am not really qualified to say what kind of humoral response would occur after exposure to lectins.

I have worked as a blood bank technologist for several years at a large University and you really don't work with lectins that often. Not as you might think anyway.

As I said earlier, T cell reactions, the cellular immune response, may play a role as well even more so than our antibody responses toward food allergies or food sensitivities.

Sorry, I wish I could be more help here.


Please don't apologize.  You have been tremendously helpful and I am greatly appreciative of the time and effort you spent in explaining my results.  Thank you very much  :K)
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 12:40pm; Reply: 101
Quoted from Lola


Lola, thank you for sharing these links.  Fascinating!  I have to admit when I posted this thread, I did not know there was a difference between the IgG reactions and lectin reactions until Dr. D posted his first post.  I certainly have learned a lot  ;)

Also, I realized you asked about my dental work and I did not respond.  I had an infection in a tooth that apparently died a slow, pain-free death.  I had to have that taken care of before I could start the amalgam removal.  I was supposed to start the amalgam removal this past Monday, but we had a freak snow storm and the dental clinic had no power as of Monday morning, so my appointment had to be cancelled.  I am now scheduled to start the amalgam removal on Nov 8th.  Unfortunately, I have so much dental work to be done that I might need to spread it out over three years because of the cost.  :o  Although I have dental insurance, it only pays for so much.  :-/  I need several crowns as well and that is where most of the huge costs come in.  Dental insurance only covers 50%.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 1:37pm; Reply: 102
This may be entirely off the wall, Patty, but have other members of your family been bothered with dental problems?
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 1:52pm; Reply: 103
I am not sure.  I know my brother told me yesterday that he has several fillings/crowns in his molars, but I don't know about my other two siblings.  My mother will be 93 on Friday and she has all her own teeth and they are in great shape.  I don't know if any of my other siblings are nonnies, either.

I DO know of the link between bad dental health and heart disease, if that is why you are asking?
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 1:57pm; Reply: 104
Quoted from Patty H


Lola, thank you for sharing these links.  Fascinating!  I have to admit when I posted this thread, I did not know there was a difference between the IgG reactions and lectin reactions until Dr. D posted his first post.  I certainly have learned a lot  ;)

Also, I realized you asked about my dental work and I did not respond.  I had an infection in a tooth that apparently died a slow, pain-free death.  I had to have that taken care of before I could start the amalgam removal.  I was supposed to start the amalgam removal this past Monday, but we had a freak snow storm and the dental clinic had no power as of Monday morning, so my appointment had to be cancelled.  I am now scheduled to start the amalgam removal on Nov 8th.  Unfortunately, I have so much dental work to be done that I might need to spread it out over three years because of the cost.  :o  Although I have dental insurance, it only pays for so much.  :-/  I need several crowns as well and that is where most of the huge costs come in.  Dental insurance only covers 50%.


I feel your pain. I got two new crowns and a new porcelain type filling last year and this year. After all that, I am greatful to have a lot of the amalgam removed from my mouth. But I still have a lot more amalgam than I  would like to have.  ::)
Posted by: AKArtlover, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2:02pm; Reply: 105
When you have the ability to break food down to the smallest molecules, very little gets into the blood that the body has to mount a clean up response to. If you have variety where you aren't eating the same food day in and day out, it's a good thing. When you are getting all your beneficials, it's a happy day because you have all the building blocks you need for good health. --- IF you have the ability to digest them. Many people have compromised digestion/assimilation issues with either fats, carbs, or proteins or any combination. This is where the right digestive enzyme can bridge the gap.

When you have a leaky gut (because of lectin damage, celiac, etc. -- think Dr. D said there are 100's of reasons), stuff gets through and it's no good. Avoiding lectins in this situation would be extra important.

Gluten isn't digestable by the human body. We're ok when it passes through and we don't have the bad gut critters having a feast. When it leaks into the bloodstream and travels to let's say, the brain, not a happy day.

Glad to not be a gluten head anymore.

There are other things related to WGA if you care to search this site.

And glad to learn about 'Vitamin G'-- grounding to the Earth. Improves digestion and bowel flora. A big AhHa moment. God brought man from the earth-- important that he is connected to it--great design. :) http:/www.earthing.com (this is my most recent and easiest soapbox).


This is my understanding at this point in brief of things somewhat related to this post-- thought I'd put the 2 cents in.  ;D
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2:03pm; Reply: 106
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


I feel your pain. I got two new crowns and a new porcelain type filling last year and this year. After all that, I am greatful to have a lot of the amalgam removed from my mouth. But I still have a lot more amalgam than I  would like to have.  ::)


I hear you!  I could probably add a small room onto my house with all the money I will spend on my teeth.  Given the heart disease in my family, however, and the fact that I am highly toxic in lead and mercury, I need to get it done.  I plan to manage the process depending upon my financial ability to pay.  I sure do wish I could get it all done right away, but it is really cost prohibitive  :'(
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2:11pm; Reply: 107
Quoted from AKArtlover
When you have the ability to break food down to the smallest molecules, very little gets into the blood that the body has to mount a clean up response to. If you have variety where you aren't eating the same food day in and day out, it's a good thing. When you are getting all your beneficials, it's a happy day because you have all the building blocks you need for good health. --- IF you have the ability to digest them. Many people have compromised digestion/assimilation issues with either fats, carbs, or proteins or any combination. This is where the right digestive enzyme can bridge the gap.

When you have a leaky gut (because of lectin damage, celiac, etc. -- think Dr. D said there are 100's of reasons), stuff gets through and it's no good. Avoiding lectins in this situation would be extra important.

Gluten isn't digestable by the human body. We're ok when it passes through and we don't have the bad gut critters having a feast. When it leaks into the bloodstream and travels to let's say, the brain, not a happy day.

Glad to not be a gluten head anymore.

There are other things related to WGA if you care to search this site.

And glad to learn about 'Vitamin G'-- grounding to the Earth. Improves digestion and bowel flora. A big AhHa moment. God brought man from the earth-- important that he is connected to it--great design. :) http:/www.earthing.com (this is my most recent and easiest soapbox).


This is my understanding at this point in brief of things somewhat related to this post-- thought I'd put the 2 cents in.  ;D


Interesting!  I have difficulty breaking down dietary fat.  Could an enzyme be taken specifically for that purpose?  I know that most enzymes are broad spectrum.  Could I get one more specific to fat?

The reason I ask is that I have been advised to stop eating some of my diamond foods such as beef and beef products, due to my inability to break down dietary fat, I have been told I can consume lamb, but that may change.  I am not sure about the other red meats such as buffalo, veal, venison, etc.  I can no longer eat sardines, herring or oysters, as I had a reaction to them, so I am basically looking at fish and chicken, with lamb once in a while.  I would love to be able to consume beef if I can be sure to aid in the digestion of the fat.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2:24pm; Reply: 108
Quoted from AKArtlover
When you have the ability to break food down to the smallest molecules, very little gets into the blood that the body has to mount a clean up response to. If you have variety where you aren't eating the same food day in and day out, it's a good thing. When you are getting all your beneficials, it's a happy day because you have all the building blocks you need for good health. --- IF you have the ability to digest them. Many people have compromised digestion/assimilation issues with either fats, carbs, or proteins or any combination. This is where the right digestive enzyme can bridge the gap.

When you have a leaky gut (because of lectin damage, celiac, etc. -- think Dr. D said there are 100's of reasons), stuff gets through and it's no good. Avoiding lectins in this situation would be extra important.

Gluten isn't digestable by the human body. We're ok when it passes through and we don't have the bad gut critters having a feast. When it leaks into the bloodstream and travels to let's say, the brain, not a happy day.

Glad to not be a gluten head anymore.

There are other things related to WGA if you care to search this site.

And glad to learn about 'Vitamin G'-- grounding to the Earth. Improves digestion and bowel flora. A big AhHa moment. God brought man from the earth-- important that he is connected to it--great design. :) http:/www.earthing.com (this is my most recent and easiest soapbox).


This is my understanding at this point in brief of things somewhat related to this post-- thought I'd put the 2 cents in.  ;D


Just to add to this, I had some very comprehensive testing that measures things like malabsorption markers, bacterial/fungal/yeast dysbiosis markers and digestive support, among many other things.  I don't have absorption or digestive issues.  I do, however, have some bacterial/fungal/yeast issues that need to be addressed.  I have to have some more testing (which I referenced earlier in this thread) but I need to wait until my finances allow for the testing.  Between all my dental work and the different testing I have been doing, I have stretched my pocketbook to the limit for now.  Hopefully within a month or two I can afford the final test.
Posted by: AKArtlover, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2:47pm; Reply: 109
I wasn't breaking down fat. Followed the pattern of craving it, then avoiding it. Lipase is my friend. I take a multiple plant based enzyme from Loomis. I was on Formula 2 for awhile, but am switching to 30. If there is a practioner in your area, they can do a personalized workup for you. The only thing I didn't care for about number 2 was the fenugreek was a black dot on SWAMI and I haven't been getting the variety during a period of transition and stress. Fenugreek is detoxifying. I'm thinking it was black dot on SWAMI for 30 days because I'm an Explorer and detoxing a toxic person too quick (and my lymph was congested) isn't a good thing. But that's a random guess. I was on one from Premier Research for about a month or so and seemed to do better with that in the meanwhile. Liking the basic 30 now. Loomis is the company that basically developed the digestive enzyme supplements. The other companies were started after in cahoots with former employees. Loomis ran them all through on real people with real issues and tweaked along the way to see what worked. Practical observation has validity in absence of double blind studies, as we know which are sometimes impractical.  ;)

I took the first Loomis course. Completely sold on digestive plant based enzymes given in an individualized way.

A little lecithin with a fatty meal is also good. The bile has to degrease it so you can absorb it. If you have thick bile, sometimes an issue.The lecithin degreases it. This is why it is helpful for people who have had their gallbladder removed (a medical travesty IMO). They have a constant drip but no deposit to squeeze out in times of need.

Water and salt are important to making bile. I think I told you I had been inadvertently avoiding salt (the good kind-- not table salt) for a long time.  

Also need to support the liver (dandelion is lovely) and probably do a detox recommended for Explorers castor oil/lemon/olive oil thing. I haven't done the detoxes, because I haven't made time for them. I'm changing things up after this big project is finished and going to focus on getting things in line health wise before I move on to other things that are in the inbox, so to speak.

Which reminds me-- I need to ground (and my computer tolerance must be up because no finger tingles) and I need to get on with things. Love to you all.  :K)

Also, go see Dr. Nash in person if possible. Or the Shift that Dr. D runs if it's a monetary issue. A phone call is a last resort.
Posted by: AKArtlover, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 2:56pm; Reply: 110
Yeast is protective against mercury. This is also an issue with cellulase in digestive enzymes. It kills yeast internally or externally on contact. There is then the possibility that the mercury the yeast is bound to becomes free floating. It is a good idea to do something about that simultaneously.

Dr. D mentioned cilantro in a capsule when I was observing the Shift.

I really like that idea, especially for someone with fillings.You might search "mercury chelation" on this site for ideas.

He also mentioned that the integrity of the fillings is more important and that the challenge test is extremely sensitive and there are other issues with it. He's not a big fan of the test. People can get too worked up about it.

I could tell the difference when I got my tiny intact one out. Though I tend to be a supersensitive type. My husband said he noticed I was less irritable after. That wasn't the word he used, but it isn't appropriate here.

Train of thought, I am wondering if mercury resonates with frequency from computers-- EMF connection and I was spending many hours on the computer then. Interesting.

Best to you Patty, I'll be popping in now and then, but not on nearly as much as in the past. 8)
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 3:04pm; Reply: 111
Thanks for all the great info, AKArtlover!  Really appreciate it!
Posted by: AKArtlover, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 3:07pm; Reply: 112
http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/new/9steps.htm

I've heard this person's name before...

I noticed
Quoted Text
Lipids (made from fatty acids) make up 60–80% of the central nervous system and need to be constantly replenished. Deficiency makes the nervous system vulnerable to the fat soluble metals, such as metallic mercury constantly escaping as odorless and invisible vapor evaporating from the amalgam fillings.


another puzzle piece. At that time, I was also low on fat intake. I now realize I wasn't digesting fats properly so they could be utilized efficiently.

Time to support my CNS bigtime.  ;D
Posted by: AKArtlover, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 3:08pm; Reply: 113
You're welcome. Learning in the process of sharing. ;)
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 4:05pm; Reply: 114
Digestive enzymes, like "Lypo Gold" by enzymedica are made specifically to target digesting fats and proteins.  Probiotics will help you break down your foods and so will cultured vegetables.  

Lamb is really really good.  I wouldn't let the fact that you're not currently breaking down proteins and fats change your whole diet completely.  I'm not sure how much meat you were eating, but everyone needs protein and fat.  Especially O's.  So, you just need help digesting it.  You may not do better eating more grains.  But it sounds to me like you haven't been eating grains, other than wheat, that are healthy for you up til now.  Which kind of has my scratching my head.  

And by the way, if you're not breaking down your fats and proteins, it IS a gut thing.  It may be genetic, but it still has to do with your gut.  What test showed you that, if you don't mind me asking, and by whom was it done?  I've had that done before too.  Mine was by Genova Diagnostics.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 4:33pm; Reply: 115
Quoted from gardengirl
Here is an article that gives information on lectins. It is given in a very simple way and from what I get out of it, you can't test if you are intolerant to lectins, well, you can but it's you doing your own work, trial and wait and see.
Hope it helps you out. For me, lectins are terrible, even though my IgG testing says they are fine. I sound "worse" off than you health wise so I see the damage immediately but less and less as I stay away from offending foods meaning, that they seem okay but if I over do it, watch out.
http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html


Thanks for the link, gardengirl.  I read it and noticed that he is not a fan of the Blood Type Diet or the idea that lectins are blood-type specific.  He states that the Blood Type Diet contains the second highest amount of food lectins of all the high protein diets  :-/
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 4:40pm; Reply: 116
Quoted from Patty H
I am not sure.  I know my brother told me yesterday that he has several fillings/crowns in his molars, but I don't know about my other two siblings.  My mother will be 93 on Friday and she has all her own teeth and they are in great shape.  I don't know if any of my other siblings are nonnies, either.

I DO know of the link between bad dental health and heart disease, if that is why you are asking?


Yes, that is why I asked. There just seems to be a link somewhere, I just wish it was not costing you so much to find it.  :'(  However, maybe you're more like your mother than the others and will escape the heart problems they suffer. That is certainly my wish for you.(smile)
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 4:46pm; Reply: 117
Quoted from JJR
Digestive enzymes, like "Lypo Gold" by enzymedica are made specifically to target digesting fats and proteins.  Probiotics will help you break down your foods and so will cultured vegetables.  

Lamb is really really good.  I wouldn't let the fact that you're not currently breaking down proteins and fats change your whole diet completely.  I'm not sure how much meat you were eating, but everyone needs protein and fat.  Especially O's.  So, you just need help digesting it.  You may not do better eating more grains.  But it sounds to me like you haven't been eating grains, other than wheat, that are healthy for you up til now.  Which kind of has my scratching my head.  

And by the way, if you're not breaking down your fats and proteins, it IS a gut thing.  It may be genetic, but it still has to do with your gut.  What test showed you that, if you don't mind me asking, and by whom was it done?  I've had that done before too.  Mine was by Genova Diagnostics.


First off, JJR, I wanted to say again that I have NOT been eating wheat, other than to add it back into my diet for two weeks prior to the IgG, IgE and IgA testing.  I did post that in this thread, but maybe you missed it.  All I said what that, according to the testing, I CAN eat wheat as I did not react to it.  Nor did I react to gluten.  I am not Celiac or gluten intolerant, but I have NOT beein eating wheat.  I do eat brown rice, rice cakes and quinoa.  I have some millet bread but I bought the loaf six months ago and have probably eaten two slices, so I don't eat a lot of grains, ESPECIALLY WHEAT!!!

I believe cultured veggies are out for O nonnies, although someone might say I am wrong on that.  I am basing that information on the fact that I cannot eat pickles or other similar foods.

I do take a probiotic daily.  According to the testing I had, my probiotic levels are excellent.

I have an SNP on one of the genes that controls cholesterol, which is why I have difficulty breaking down dietary fat.  Given my family history of heart disease, this makes total sense to me, so I DO need to change my diet to compensate for my genetic inability to break down fat or I may end up with heart disease, like the rest of my family members.  My testing was genetic testing, also done by Genova Diagnostics.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 4:57pm; Reply: 118
I've never heard that cultured veggies were bad for O nonnies. I consume beet kvass regularly, and have been doing so for years. It doesn't make intuitive sense to me that I should get probiotics from a pill rather than from food, and if yogurt and kefir are avoids, that leaves cultured vegetables. I've gotten lazy and forgotten to drink the beet kvass, and my digestion defintiely suffers when that happens. It's clear that a source of probiotics is essential for continued good health.

Pickles are an avoid, but the rating for pickles in  BTD/GTD/SWAMI is for cucumber pickles, and  cucumbers are also an avoid. In the past few weeks, I've  been using polyflora O to start my beet kvass ferments; for years I was using wild strains of bacteria in my ferments rather than paying money for cultures.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 5:04pm; Reply: 119
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I've never heard that cultured veggies were bad for O nonnies. I consume beet kvass regularly, and have been doing so for years. It doesn't make intuitive sense to me that I should get probiotics from a pill rather than from food, and if yogurt and kefir are avoids, that leaves cultured vegetables. I've gotten lazy and forgotten to drink the beet kvass, and my digestion defintiely suffers when that happens. It's clear that a source of probiotics is essential for continued good health.

Pickles are an avoid, but the rating for pickles in  BTD/GTD/SWAMI is for cucumber pickles, and  cucumbers are also an avoid. In the past few weeks, I've  been using polyflora O to start my beet kvass ferments; for years I was using wild strains of bacteria in my ferments rather than paying money for cultures.


Thanks for sharing that.  It wasn't just pickles, but saurkraut, too, but obviously cabbage is an avoid, too.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 5:20pm; Reply: 120
just learn to ferment your beneficial veggies and you ll all be fine!

use sea salt only.....it works!

we all know vinegar is a no no and veggies have been tested
so to each their own.....the more personalized the plan, the better
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 9:03pm; Reply: 121
I sent you a response on PM.  And fwiw, I didn't react to wheat on my IGg tests nor did they say I was celiac when or gluten sensitive when I was at mayo.  But my swami says no, except for sprouted wheat, so I just don't eat it.  I believe I'm better off for not.  At least all the yucky processed stuff.  I think if I could sprout my own wheat berries and learn to make bread out of it, it would be cool, but it's only neutrals.  So, I try to stick to the beneficials.  
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 9:25pm; Reply: 122
Quoted from JJR
I sent you a response on PM.  And fwiw, I didn't react to wheat on my IGg tests nor did they say I was celiac when or gluten sensitive when I was at mayo.  But my swami says no, except for sprouted wheat, so I just don't eat it.  I believe I'm better off for not.  At least all the yucky processed stuff.  I think if I could sprout my own wheat berries and learn to make bread out of it, it would be cool, but it's only neutrals.  So, I try to stick to the beneficials.  


Yes - I agree.  I certainly don't plan to consume it often, but like I said, if I go to a restaurant and they have amazing bread, I may just try a slice.  I have no intention of making it a habit.  I have very good self-discipline, so I don't worry about not being able to stop eating it.  I rarely consumed wheat before the diet, except in the form of wheat beer, which I LOVE!!!  Maybe drinking your wheat doesn't count?  Just kidding  ;D
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, November 3, 2011, 3:46pm; Reply: 123
Hey, if you feel like it doesn't mess with you, I can totally understand it.  I believe I've heard Dr.D say it's more about eating the right stuff than avoiding the wrong stuff.  And if I wasn't dealing with health problems, I'd be much more apt to eat anything.  I'm hoping that eating well has helped me fight my problems to a better degree, than if I was gumming up my system with food that isn't good for me.  But even then it's hard to know.  I just know what stuff makes me feel lousy after eating it.  And most of that has to do with sugar.  But especially sugar and wheat together.  It just seems like a bad combo for me.  But then again, so is Ice Cream.  Bummer for me.  Hehhehehe.  Maybe someday I'll feel good enough to give in once in a while.
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, November 3, 2011, 5:40pm; Reply: 124
Quoted from JJR
Hey, if you feel like it doesn't mess with you, I can totally understand it.  I believe I've heard Dr.D say it's more about eating the right stuff than avoiding the wrong stuff.  And if I wasn't dealing with health problems, I'd be much more apt to eat anything.  I'm hoping that eating well has helped me fight my problems to a better degree, than if I was gumming up my system with food that isn't good for me.  But even then it's hard to know.  I just know what stuff makes me feel lousy after eating it.  And most of that has to do with sugar.  But especially sugar and wheat together.  It just seems like a bad combo for me.  But then again, so is Ice Cream.  Bummer for me.  Hehhehehe.  Maybe someday I'll feel good enough to give in once in a while.


JJR, I feel for you and for the many folks on this forum who are in a constant state of pain or discomfort.  I am fortunate that I do feel really good in general and when I do cheat, it does not bother me at all.  I do keep my cheating to a bare minimum.  I might cheat once a week, sometimes as little as once a month.  I eat no sugar or sweet stuff during the week, except for acceptable fruit.  I don't sweeten anything, even with compliant sweetener, so when I do cheat it is usually with ice cream, beer, white wine or cheese.  Once in a while I will eat some chocolate, but I even keep that to a minimum now.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, November 4, 2011, 2:53pm; Reply: 125
FWIW, I do eat a tiny amount of dark chocolate every week.  It's about the only thing that doesn't mess with me.  It's a very small amount, so I don't care that it has sugar in it.  Because I don't touch it any other time.  I eat a tiny bit of honey in my grains, but even that amount is laughable.  It's like 1/4 teaspoon or so.  I do it because there might be benefits to it.  But if I eat too much of any sweetener, my heart races.  Even honey.  Stevia never seemed to do that to me though.  But for some reason I quit eating that too.
Posted by: NancyEllen, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 12:37am; Reply: 126
I had blood drawn today for my IBA 22 IgG testing.  I almost went down for the count.  I had two people holding my head up while I drank orange juice (yuk) and ate premium saltines (blech!!).  It was an adventure.  I will find out the results on Nov 21st when I go back to the ND.  Am very curious.   btw, is passing out when having blood drawn a Type O thing?  This isn't the first time it has happened to me.
Posted by: Patty H, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 12:41am; Reply: 127
Quoted from NancyEllen
I had blood drawn today for my IBA 22 IgG testing.  I almost went down for the count.  I had two people holding my head up while I drank orange juice (yuk) and ate premium saltines (blech!!).  It was an adventure.  I will find out the results on Nov 21st when I go back to the ND.  Am very curious.   btw, is passing out when having blood drawn a Type O thing?  This isn't the first time it has happened to me.


I don't pass out, but I can't watch.  I definitely look away.  Please let us know what your testing shows when you get the results.  Sorry it was so difficult for you to have the blood drawn  :-/
Posted by: Patty H, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 12:43am; Reply: 128
Quoted from JJR
FWIW, I do eat a tiny amount of dark chocolate every week.  It's about the only thing that doesn't mess with me.  It's a very small amount, so I don't care that it has sugar in it.  Because I don't touch it any other time.  I eat a tiny bit of honey in my grains, but even that amount is laughable.  It's like 1/4 teaspoon or so.  I do it because there might be benefits to it.  But if I eat too much of any sweetener, my heart races.  Even honey.  Stevia never seemed to do that to me though.  But for some reason I quit eating that too.


JJR, it sounds like you are really in touch with your body.  I think you should eat your chocolate!  ;D
Posted by: NancyEllen, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 12:55am; Reply: 129
Thanks Patty, I don't watch when they draw blood either!  I will definitely let you all know the results when I get them.  :)
Posted by: KimonoKat, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 1:13am; Reply: 130
I've donated platelets for years and occasionally they take blood products.

After platelet donation, (two hours lying very still) I do feel cold and have to get out in the sun pronto.  I've never fainted, but I can get tired real easy after donation.

I always watch them put the needle in. I can tell if a nurse is good at their job or not, just by watching how they attempt to get the vein.
Posted by: Patty H, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 1:08pm; Reply: 131
Quoted from KimonoKat
I've donated platelets for years and occasionally they take blood products.

After platelet donation, (two hours lying very still) I do feel cold and have to get out in the sun pronto.  I've never fainted, but I can get tired real easy after donation.

I always watch them put the needle in. I can tell if a nurse is good at their job or not, just by watching how they attempt to get the vein.


that sounds really uncomfortable.  I have never heard of donating platelets.  Why do you do that?  To be charitable or to have them store them for your own potential later use?  Just curious, KK.  I have wondered if I should start donating blood (although I am exactly at the weight where it is questionable as to whether I CAN donate) because of my rare blood antigen.
Posted by: JJR, Sunday, November 6, 2011, 5:39pm; Reply: 132
Thanks PattyH.  Like I said, I have no clue if it's good or bad for me, but it makes me feel good mentally.  And supposedly chocolate does have some good properties, so, a little bit isn't going to kill me.  It gives my spirits a boost.  I think.


I can't watch them taking my blood.  Or put the needle in.  I did get lightheaded once when they took a lot of blood.  And one time when I tried to watch.  So I learned.  
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, November 7, 2011, 12:50pm; Reply: 133
Quoted from JJR
Thanks PattyH.  Like I said, I have no clue if it's good or bad for me, but it makes me feel good mentally.  And supposedly chocolate does have some good properties, so, a little bit isn't going to kill me.  It gives my spirits a boost.  I think.


I can't watch them taking my blood.  Or put the needle in.  I did get lightheaded once when they took a lot of blood.  And one time when I tried to watch.  So I learned.  


Chocolate is a diamond on my SWAMI.  It is also good for the soul!  ;D
Posted by: JJR, Monday, November 7, 2011, 3:42pm; Reply: 134
:)
Posted by: KimonoKat, Monday, November 7, 2011, 5:00pm; Reply: 135
Quoted from Patty H


that sounds really uncomfortable.  I have never heard of donating platelets.  Why do you do that?  To be charitable or to have them store them for your own potential later use?  Just curious, KK.  I have wondered if I should start donating blood (although I am exactly at the weight where it is questionable as to whether I CAN donate) because of my rare blood antigen.


I'm O neg, universal donor, the most needed blood type.  Los Angeles has a large Blood Type O population because of the high percentage of Latinos.

Years ago, I learned that one of my relatives by marriage, the wife's children had  a rare disorder that could only be cured by a bone marrow transfusion.  At that time, to get on the bone marrow registry, all I had to do was donate platelets to the Red Cross. It wouldn't cost anything if I did that.  Unfortunately, the children did not survive; I believe they were unable to find matches for them. Now, I do it as part of giving back to society.  

You are hooked up to a machine with a needle in one arm. You get to lie on a very form fitted lounger type chair, that has a video screen so you can watch DVD movies. You get your own head phones to listen.  From the time I first get in the chair to when I leave it can be as long as 2 hours, depending on if they take a double or triple draw from me. Each time I go, you have to answer all the questions on their very detailed questionaire, just to ensure that the blood you are donating is from a safe source.  I'm a high platelet producer, so the Red Cross loves for me to donate.  You can donate platelets every 2 weeks, compared to whole blood products which is a much longer time frame.


Platelets I believe are for cancer patients that are not making enough of their own platelets while they are undergoing cancer treatment.  One time, years ago, the Red Cross called me in because my platelets were almost a perfect match for a patient at UCLA.  That was a very rewarding experience, and I've continued to donate platelets over the years.  Each platelet donation counts the same with the Red Cross as if you donated a pint of whole blood.

If you (collective you reading this) are healthy and can donate blood products, please do.  Give back to society and possibly save a life.

As an aside, the nurse's have occasionally commented on my good iron count, (because they get patients that can't donate due to low iron.  I always tell them it's because of the Blood Type Diet and that I eat plenty of red meat.  I tell them that if they have Type A's (or AB's) that want to donate but can't because of low iron, they should recommend liquid chlorophyl (made from alfalfa) to them. Although chlorophyl doesn't have iron in it, (IIRC, there is only one molecule different between chlorophyl and red blood) my herbalist told me years ago it acts like a blood booster, or a blood transfusion in the body.

Sharing with the best of intentions.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 3:01pm; Reply: 136
Amazing, KK!  Thank you for sharing that.
Posted by: NancyEllen, Monday, November 21, 2011, 8:34pm; Reply: 137
I got my Intestinal Barrier Assessment 22 IgG results today.  On the Food Parameter Summary, Egg Whites and Pork are High. Moderate is Baker's Yeast, Kidney Beans, Beef, Brewer's Yeast, Corn and Cow's Milk.  Low is Gluten, Oats, Shrimp and Wheat.  I have been Gluten Free since 9/5/11 so that isn't a problem.  Egg Yolks and Beef are a Super Food on my Swami Xpress and egg whites are a neutral.  I've been eating a lot of beef.  Wonder why that is a super food for me.  
Posted by: Lola, Monday, November 21, 2011, 9:28pm; Reply: 138
gosh Nancy!

make an appointment at the CT, Bridgeport University shift....

so close and so personalized!!
http://www.generativemedicine.org/healthcare/
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, November 21, 2011, 10:09pm; Reply: 139
Quoted from NancyEllen
I got my Intestinal Barrier Assessment 22 IgG results today.  On the Food Parameter Summary, Egg Whites and Pork are High. Moderate is Baker's Yeast, Kidney Beans, Beef, Brewer's Yeast, Corn and Cow's Milk.  Low is Gluten, Oats, Shrimp and Wheat.  I have been Gluten Free since 9/5/11 so that isn't a problem.  Egg Yolks and Beef are a Super Food on my Swami Xpress and egg whites are a neutral.  I've been eating a lot of beef.  Wonder why that is a super food for me.  


Wow!  That is interesting that egg whites are high and beef and yeast are moderate, since those things are supposed to be good for O's.  Sardines and herring tested moderate for me so I had to cut those out of my diet, losing one of my staple lunch foods.

Are you allowed to eat the things that register low?
Posted by: NancyEllen, Monday, November 21, 2011, 10:20pm; Reply: 140
"Are you allowed to eat the things that register low?"

No Patty, nothing is allowed until my gut is healed.  
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, November 21, 2011, 10:26pm; Reply: 141
Quoted from NancyEllen
"Are you allowed to eat the things that register low?"

No Patty, nothing is allowed until my gut is healed.  


Good luck with that NancyEllen.  Did you have the testing because you are having difficulty with your gut?  I never did but my doctor wanted to rule out some stuff, so that is why mine was tested.
Posted by: NancyEllen, Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 12:40am; Reply: 142
Thanks Patty!

No I never felt any symptoms in my gut.  I am feeling very tired and also have a lot of stress.  Even though I am tired, I have trouble sleeping but the ND gave me something to help my cortisol levels when I saw her on 11/2/11.  I have been sleeping deeper which is such a change for me.  So things will get better.  It just takes time.  :)
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, November 24, 2011, 2:14pm; Reply: 143
Quoted from NancyEllen
Thanks Patty!

No I never felt any symptoms in my gut.  I am feeling very tired and also have a lot of stress.  Even though I am tired, I have trouble sleeping but the ND gave me something to help my cortisol levels when I saw her on 11/2/11.  I have been sleeping deeper which is such a change for me.  So things will get better.  It just takes time.  :)


If you don't mind me asking, NancyEllen, what did your ND give you for cortisol?  I have the exact same issue.  According to some recent testing, I am in "wear and tear mode".
Posted by: NancyEllen, Sunday, March 4, 2012, 3:55pm; Reply: 144
Patty!!  I am so sorry!  I never saw your question.  The ND gave me Designs for health "Phosphatidyl Serine Powder" 1/4 tsp at a time.  It is very expensive so when it was used up, I already had a bottle of Seriphos "Phosphorylated Serine" in my cupboard so I open up the capsule, divide the powder in half and mix one of the halves with a little bit of organic unsweetened applesauce about an hour before I go to bed.  Then while I am reading in bed, I take 4 1 mgs of sublingual melatonin.  This has worked out great for me.  I am sleeping better, although I still wake up during the night, and feeling much better!  I hope that helps.   :)
Posted by: D.L., Sunday, March 4, 2012, 7:39pm; Reply: 145
Patty - I took the IgG food blood test because I thought I might have leaky gut syndrome. My IgG test showed I should avoid avacado, banana, blueberry, orange, papaya, pineapple, red grape, gliadin, gluten, malt, rye, wheat, eggs, mushrooms, asparagus, garlic, and squash mix. These were the exact fruits I had been eating practically every day, along with mushrooms, asparagus, garlic, and squash every few days. I was told that the test was for the delayed, not the fast-acting food allergies. I thought I had been avoiding gluten-containing foods and eggs because I am highly allergic to them, but they told me I was getting gluten and eggs in something because they scored the highest. I found out it was because of the mayonaise on my salads. Dairy foods scored low, even though I know I am allergic to them. Same with oats. They said it was because there was none in my system to test, as I had not been eating those things. The other foods scored moderate or low, even though I had never even tasted some of them. O.K., then, I thought maybe everything I was eating caused a reaction. But no, aparently not. For example, peanuts, which I eat all the time, scored low, yet sunflower seeds, which I am highly allergic to and never eat, showed low also. Crazy! The IgG doctor said avoid all those things for 4 months, and then reintroduce them one at a time on a 4-day rotation diet and see how I do.
A lot of things on that avoid list are also on my Swami avoid list, BUT there are also things that are on the IgG avoid list that are on my Swami beneficial list. So it is confusing.
So what I've done for now, is avoid everything that is on my Swami avoid list, everything that I know absolutely that I have had allergic reactions to for years, and everything that is on my IgG avoid list.
That basically leaves vegetables (which I'm learning to eat), a few beans, a few fruits, a few nuts, some fish (which I don't like), and I eat a little good beef occasionally. So eating is no fun!!!! And I still don't feel good, basically because some of these foods are causing my pulse to go up and bothering my heart. Ugggggg!
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, March 4, 2012, 8:49pm; Reply: 146
Quoted from D.L.
A lot of things on that avoid list are also on my Swami avoid list, BUT there are also things that are on the IgG avoid list that are on my Swami beneficial list. So it is confusing.
So what I've done for now, is avoid everything that is on my Swami avoid list, everything that I know absolutely that I have had allergic reactions to for years, and everything that is on my IgG avoid list.
That basically leaves vegetables (which I'm learning to eat), a few beans, a few fruits, a few nuts, some fish (which I don't like), and I eat a little good beef occasionally. So eating is no fun!!!! And I still don't feel good, basically because some of these foods are causing my pulse to go up and bothering my heart. Ugggggg!
It sounds like you are dealing with a very porous intestinal lining.  Probably should spend some time focusing on intestinal health
to reduce the sensitivity to the foods that are supposed to be good for you...  
Posted by: D.L., Sunday, March 4, 2012, 11:19pm; Reply: 147
ABJoe - What would you suggest? I'm trying to do everything right.

Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, March 5, 2012, 12:34am; Reply: 148
Quoted from D.L.
ABJoe - What would you suggest? I'm trying to do everything right.


This should help...  Along with eating all beneficial foods...
http://www.dadamo.com/protocols/18.html
Posted by: NancyEllen, Monday, March 5, 2012, 12:57am; Reply: 149
DL, how long have you been avoiding the foods on your IgG Food Paramenter Summary?
Posted by: D.L., Monday, March 5, 2012, 8:53pm; Reply: 150
NancyEllen - It has been several months now. I have started trying some of my IgG avoids, such as blueberries and avocado, which are beneficial on my Swami. The trouble is, I don't know if I have a reaction to them or not because it would be a delayed reaction (not like my immediate reaction to dairy, grains, and eggs). It could be a reaction to something else, such as the pollen that is starting to float around everywhere here. I didn't even know to begin with that I had any kind of problem with those foods. I was having a smoothie with bananas, berries, and flax every afternoon before I took that test, as well as avocado on my salads. (And even planted 6 little blueberry bushes.) My biggest question every day is "What do I have for breakfast"? Since I am also pre-diabetic it is a big challenge! If I go too long without eating, I get dizzy and feel faint. If I don't balance my glycemic foods, my blood sugar goes up too high. If I eat salty foods, my blood pressure goes up and my heart beats too fast. I already have heart trouble. How in the world did I get in this shape?
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