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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  New side dish idea?
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Saturday, October 22, 2011, 1:17am
I have a bumper crop of winter squash right now including Tahitian Melon(kind of like a large and sweet butternut). I've been thinking. How about slicing it up into thin layers, slicing  apples up into thin layers, alternate the layers, drizzle a mixture of agave and lemon juice mixed with spices(mace and cardomon maybe) and dots of butter,  and top with shredded sharp cheddar cheese and chopped pecans. Then bake for about an hour. It's an idea anyhow though it obviously needs some tweaking.

The things you think of when walking the dog!
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, October 22, 2011, 1:22am; Reply: 1
delicious!
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Saturday, October 22, 2011, 1:29am; Reply: 2
sounds to me like your body is telling you are deficient in something ;)

says he who had a large bowl of curry flavoured roasted sweet potato earlier this evening lol
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Saturday, October 22, 2011, 1:30am; Reply: 3
It does sound good. I love butternut squash and this is a favorite of mine from my blog:

http://www.lifeongreenlane.com/?p=335

My friend started a tradition of a big batch of Butternut squash soup kept warm in the crock pot for Thanksgiving. She sets it up outside of the kitchen with tea cups and saucers. This is her way of getting everyone out of the kitchen while she is still preparing the meal.

Gulfcoastguy, wasn't it you who posted a recipe with sweet potatoes, apples, some parmesan, etc. in layers that bakes in the oven? The squash would work well for that too!
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Saturday, October 22, 2011, 1:55am; Reply: 4
Yes but it didn't go over very well. I've actually got Thanksgiving on the mind. Nobody there is going to eat sweet potatos unless they are mashed and have got marshmallows on top(gag me with a spoon)
Posted by: geminisue, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 1:09pm; Reply: 5
try baking the sweet potatoes, slice thinly, dip in egg white and spiced ground flaxseed and fry in compliant oil.

Or slice very thin, sprinkle with olive oil and sea salt and make chips out of them.
Posted by: Brighid45, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 2:02pm; Reply: 6
Maybe add some sauteed onions in those layers with the apple . . . the onion and apple are equally sweet but not overwhelmingly so. I do this with sweet potatoes in a slow cooker and drizzle with a little ghee. Add a hit of cumin and garlic if you want a savory flavor and it's pure heaven. I bet it would be even better with the squash, lemon juice and agave.

Don't know why people insist on eating that nasty sickeningly sweet casserole with the marshmallows on top. Around here they make it with Bruce's canned sweet potatoes which are loaded with corn syrup and then dump more corn on top (marshmallows are almost all corn-derived ingredients). :X  :-/ I hated sweet potatoes for years because of that stupid recipe. It wasn't until I had a baked sweet potato with just a little sea salt and butter that it became clear how delicious they really are.
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 2:06pm; Reply: 7
I like butternut or hubbard squash mashed and spread out in a baking dish, then topped with ghee, salt and (*cringe*) Parmesan cheese.  Bake it till it looks yummy.

I made some curried pumpkin soup once that was astonishing.  It had coconut milk, curry powder, baked and mashed pumpkin and butter.
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 2:09pm; Reply: 8
You know, that baked sweet potato casserole doesn't have to be that sweet.  My mom made it with pineapple juice instead of sugar.  Instead of putting marshmallows on top, you could top the sweet potatoes with caramelized pecans and pineapple circles.  In a pan, melt ghee.  Add pecans and honey or agave.  Cook for a minute, stirring constantly.  Then pour that mixture over the pineapples which are on top of the sweet potatoes.  Bake it for half an hour or so.  Yum!  Maybe I'll make that this year!
Posted by: Jane, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 2:17pm; Reply: 9
There's a recipe that is made for the Jewish holiday holidays that's made with sweet potatoes, prunes and baby carrots  Cut it up into thin slices, put some ghee in the baking dish and if needed a little agave or turbinado sugar.  It cooks at 350 or 400 for quite a while, up to 3 hours, covered, then uncovered for the last 1/2 hour.  Delicious.  Apples and/or cranberries would be a delicious
addition.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 2:28pm; Reply: 10
I like the idea of savory sweet potatoes with onions & spices.  Everybody in my family likes that marshmallow cr@p on top of theirs, too.  It's traditonal.  I just scrape it off now, but I never liked it back then either, the very sweet & savory mixed on one plate.  Thanksgiving dinner is such a strange meal.  At least if you have lots of side dishes there is something for everyone.  Or can be.  :-/

GCG, your squash dish sounds yummy.   :)  Personally, I don't think it needs the cheese, but if you can have it - good for you!!
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Sunday, October 23, 2011, 4:17pm; Reply: 11
That sounds really good!  I think new food combos can really help adherence the longer you do the diet.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 4:54pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from O in Virginia
I like the idea of savory sweet potatoes with onions & spices.  Everybody in my family likes that marshmallow cr@p on top of theirs, too.  It's traditonal.  I just scrape it off now, but I never liked it back then either, the very sweet & savory mixed on one plate.  Thanksgiving dinner is such a strange meal.  At least if you have lots of side dishes there is something for everyone.  Or can be.  :-/

GCG, your squash dish sounds yummy.   :)  Personally, I don't think it needs the cheese, but if you can have it - good for you!!


Sharp cheddar cheese with apple pie is a tradition to cut the sweetness and I'm a B Nomad so there is very little dairy I can't have. It also makes it look like a more traditional casserole. As far as savory I have made Chipolte Scalloped Sweet Potatos(see foodnetwork.com) but I have 50 pounds or so of squash not sweet potatos.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 5:03pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from gulfcoastguy


Sharp cheddar cheese with apple pie is a tradition to cut the sweetness and I'm a B Nomad so there is very little dairy I can't have. It also makes it look like a more traditional casserole. As far as savory I have made Chipolte Scalloped Sweet Potatos(see foodnetwork.com) but I have 50 pounds or so of squash not sweet potatos.


I realize you were talking about squash, not sweet potatoes.  It's just the conversation veered toward sweet potatoes, too.  I also know that cheddar wtih apple pie is traditional for some (not me, I used to like mine with ice cream).  True, most people like their casseroles au gratin.  I'm just jealous that you can have all that cheese.   ;)
Posted by: Brighid45, Sunday, October 23, 2011, 10:29pm; Reply: 14
I grew up eating sharp cheddar with homemade apple pie. It's an acquired taste but quite delicious.

Slice up some of those squash and give the recipe a try GCG, let us know how it turns out. :)
Posted by: san j, Monday, October 24, 2011, 12:09am; Reply: 15
I was totally with you until the Sharp Cheddar.
Though it's a favorite of mine, as a cheese, I think I'd rather see Gruyère in there, also splendid with apples.
I would also use walnuts instead of pecans.
Pecans are a very rich nut, for me too much so with cheese, usually. When you consider the "dots of butter" on there... you've (for me) ventured into the "Dessert" category...which is itself okay. (drool)
Posted by: chrissyA, Monday, October 24, 2011, 1:26am; Reply: 16
I'm coming over!!!  ;)
Posted by: JJR, Monday, October 24, 2011, 2:02am; Reply: 17
I was reading a book called "Berries, Nuts and seeds" and your recipe is practically identical to the one listed in the pecan section.  It's supposed to be real good for battling fatigue.  I think he had nutmeg in it also.  But no cheese I don't think and it was with acorn squash and not butternut.  But the green apples were paired with it and I was kind of like, Huh.  I'll tell you what I LOVE acorn squash, and butternut squash.  And sweet potatoes too.  And in our house, we don't add any sugar stuff to sweet potatoes.  There totally sweet on there own if you roast them.  
Posted by: marjorie, Monday, October 24, 2011, 2:05am; Reply: 18
Quoted from geminisue
try baking the sweet potatoes, slice thinly, dip in egg white and spiced ground flaxseed and fry in compliant oil.

Or slice very thin, sprinkle with olive oil and sea salt and make chips out of them.


This is a good one! Sounds great. Thanks:)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, October 24, 2011, 2:14am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Brighid45
I grew up eating sharp cheddar with homemade apple pie. It's an acquired taste but quite delicious.

Slice up some of those squash and give the recipe a try GCG, let us know how it turns out. :)


I just sliced and cubed a watermelon sized squash, enough for 9 pints of squash pickles. Since the recipe is for 4 pints even doubled I have a pint left over. Maybe a small test batch in the middle of the week.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, October 24, 2011, 2:17am; Reply: 20
Quoted from san j
I was totally with you until the Sharp Cheddar.
Though it's a favorite of mine, as a cheese, I think I'd rather see Gruyère in there, also splendid with apples.
I would also use walnuts instead of pecans.
Pecans are a very rich nut, for me too much so with cheese, usually. When you consider the "dots of butter" on there... you've (for me) ventured into the "Dessert" category...which is itself okay. (drool)


We have quart jars full of shelled pecans in the freezer, good crops the last couple of years. With the economy the way it is I'm trying to work with what is free as much as possible. The cheese hasn't been bought yet.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, October 24, 2011, 2:23am; Reply: 21
Quoted from JJR
I was reading a book called "Berries, Nuts and seeds" and your recipe is practically identical to the one listed in the pecan section.  It's supposed to be real good for battling fatigue.  I think he had nutmeg in it also.  But no cheese I don't think and it was with acorn squash and not butternut.  But the green apples were paired with it and I was kind of like, Huh.  I'll tell you what I LOVE acorn squash, and butternut squash.  And sweet potatoes too.  And in our house, we don't add any sugar stuff to sweet potatoes.  There totally sweet on there own if you roast them.  


Well the nutmeg is under consideration. I prefer sweet potatos with just a little butter usually.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, October 24, 2011, 2:31am; Reply: 22
Quoted from Ribbit
You know, that baked sweet potato casserole doesn't have to be that sweet.  My mom made it with pineapple juice instead of sugar.  Instead of putting marshmallows on top, you could top the sweet potatoes with caramelized pecans and pineapple circles.  In a pan, melt ghee.  Add pecans and honey or agave.  Cook for a minute, stirring constantly.  Then pour that mixture over the pineapples which are on top of the sweet potatoes.  Bake it for half an hour or so.  Yum!  Maybe I'll make that this year!


I have a recipe in a book for butternut squash glazed with brown sugar and pineapple juice or orange juice and butter. The oj is out now days as well as the brown sugar but a little molasses or agave and pineapple juice still works.
Posted by: san j, Monday, October 24, 2011, 3:42am; Reply: 23
I'm still waiting to find out how those squash pickles turn out... ;)
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Monday, October 24, 2011, 3:53am; Reply: 24
sounds yummy :)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, October 24, 2011, 4:23am; Reply: 25
Quoted from san j
I'm still waiting to find out how those squash pickles turn out... ;)


I'm in the midstage of the first batch. I peeled and cubed 9 pints of squash tonight. As usual I had to make a store run so the actual canning will have to be tomorrow. I do need to know how long a sprig of oregano is though.
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, October 24, 2011, 10:58am; Reply: 26
I'd say a sprig should be about 4-5 inches long and not too bushy or too many side shoots.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, October 24, 2011, 9:08pm; Reply: 27
Thanks Brighid!
Posted by: san j, Monday, October 24, 2011, 9:58pm; Reply: 28
Quoted Text
The recipe calls for 2 sprigs in each pint jar. Each sprig should be no taller than the jar, I reckon, even though they're pliable.
Fresh oregano is very, very pervasive. It tends to over-power a product, I learned the hard way. And the fact that there'll be vinegar in there means the herb's essential oil will be all the more extracted into the "brine". So I'd err on the side of meagerness/shortness.  


I'm quoting myself from your September thread in which you posed the same question. "Err on the side of meagerness/shortness." This can be an overpowering herb. In answer to your question, above:

Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I do need to know how long a sprig of oregano is though.

:)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 1:37am; Reply: 29
Quoted from san j
I'm still waiting to find out how those squash pickles turn out... ;)


The jars are cooling right now. Salting the squash and letting it sit really firms up the texture. The pickles will be ready in 3 weeks.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 2:06am; Reply: 30
Give us a holler, y'hear?  :D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 3:42am; Reply: 31
Quoted from san j
Give us a holler, y'hear?  :D


8 pints in this batch. Whoever started $elling white wine vinegar in 12.75 ounce bottles $$$$. I needed 1/2 cup from the last expensive bottle. Well the honey wan't real cheap either since I used local honey from the farmers market.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 12:24pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Brighid45
I'd say a sprig should be about 4-5 inches long and not too bushy or too many side shoots.

lol, just popped onto the board and the first thing I see is delightful little you guesstimating proper sprig length.  I love this place.   :K)

Posted by: Brighid45, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 2:38pm; Reply: 33
Well it is confusing trying to figure out non-standardized measurements, so this was just my suggestion, but I understand what you mean :) Can't wait to see how those pickles turn out.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 3:56pm; Reply: 34
I ended up not putting the actual sprigs in the jars. In the recipe you put the honey, vinegar and spices in a pot and bring them to a boil for 10 minutes before ladling over the squash stuffed jars. Then just hot wat processing the jars for 10 minutes. You don't want to actually cook the squash just seal the jars. Since I ened up puting the spices and liquid into a crockpot to heat it for 2 hours instead I thought enough of the essence was in the liquid and the jars would be more attractive without "weeds" in them. BTW salting the squash chunks like some people do eggplant really firms it up.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 6:32pm; Reply: 35
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I ended up not putting the actual sprigs in the jars.


Glad to see that. That whole sprig-length thing was a question mark that had the potential to ruin your pickle.

I once ruined a dish, for a big party, with fresh oregano - it's that serious.

You can always season the pickled squash after the 3 weeks are up, when you have more control. And, to that end, you can always use dried oregano, too, which is much easier to work with...  ;)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 7:35pm; Reply: 36
Oh I boiled the oregano in the pickling mixture, I just strained it back out before packing the jars.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 7:46pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Oh I boiled the oregano in the pickling mixture, I just strained it back out before packing the jars.


Even so. This may have saved your pickle.
It's having the sprigs of fresh oregano leeching into the blend - especially being drawn out by the vinegar - for three weeks that might have botched the batch. This is a highly volatile herb. I think it was irresponsible of the recipe's author to be so vague about quantity with such an ingredient. The tiniest snippet (as in 1" long or less) per jar would probably suffice.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 3:53pm; Reply: 38
Quoted from Brighid45
Well it is confusing trying to figure out non-standardized measurements, so this was just my suggestion, but I understand what you mean :) Can't wait to see how those pickles turn out.

You are darn tootin' it is confusing to figure out sprig length, which is why I sincerely meant I love this place for being the only place I know of where it is being discussed. Hey, you could do one of those 3-ish minute PBS informative pieces on food/cooking tips, and the segment could be called ... wait for it ... "Brig on Sprigs".
Posted by: san j, Saturday, November 5, 2011, 4:34pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
You are darn tootin' it is confusing to figure out sprig length, which is why I sincerely meant I love this place for being the only place I know of where it is being discussed.


Apropos:

I was watching YouTubes of World Class Chefs cooking.
I think it was Eric Ripert making rabbit, but it might have been someone else.

And - guess what? He was adding sprigs of an herb to the dish in the pan, and the "sprigs" were no more than 2 inches long.

My guess is that the length of the sprig should be proportionate to the volatility of the essential oils in the fresh herb. Oregano and rosemary, for instance, are highly volatile; a long sprig, or branch, would quickly overpower a dish. Dill, on the other hand, is very mild, and it would take a lot more of it to do so.

Therefore, sprig length should really, in the recipes of responsible writers/editors, be specified.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, November 7, 2011, 3:02pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from san j


Apropos:

I was watching YouTubes of World Class Chefs cooking.
I think it was Eric Ripert making rabbit, but it might have been someone else.

And - guess what? He was adding sprigs of an herb to the dish in the pan, and the "sprigs" were no more than 2 inches long.

My guess is that the length of the sprig should be proportionate to the volatility of the essential oils in the fresh herb. Oregano and rosemary, for instance, are highly volatile; a long sprig, or branch, would quickly overpower a dish. Dill, on the other hand, is very mild, and it would take a lot more of it to do so.

Therefore, sprig length should really, in the recipes of responsible writers/editors, be specified.

Good point!  At least, I think it was a good point--I forgot my glasses again today (did the same thing last week, and am now starting to wonder seriously about my brain, function-wise), so I can barely make out the words on the computer screen  ;D.  But I think your point is:  sprig length would depend on both the specific herb and the specific recipe.  And if that is your point, it is a stellar one!

(clap)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, November 7, 2011, 4:19pm; Reply: 41
I bought another jar of local honey at the Peter Anderson Art Festival this weekend. So I might make another batch of winter squash pickles. I just wish white wine vinegar wasn't quite so expensive but I have everything else allready on hand.
I'm going to seriously test the "if it fits it ships" boxes from UPS. Another site that I'm on has a Hollerday gift exchange. I'm including my sweet and spicey winter squash pickle, my fig bbque sauce, a cd including 8 pages of my recipes, a local cook book, lotion and soap, and a blown glass pendant. The cushening will be rosemary sprigs from my bush since she uses it for crafting.
Posted by: san j, Monday, November 7, 2011, 8:04pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from Peppermint Twist

Good point!  At least, I think it was a good point--I forgot my glasses again today (did the same thing last week, and am now starting to wonder seriously about my brain, function-wise), so I can barely make out the words on the computer screen  ;D.  But I think your point is:  sprig length would depend on both the specific herb and the specific recipe.  And if that is your point, it is a stellar one!

(clap)


PT: I don't think leaving your glasses at home is reason to doubt your brain-function  ;)
And you should be able to "zoom in" on the print, anyway, so ... why the reading trouble? No need to wonder - just enlarge the print. I'm such a techno-newbie and I'm instructing YOU?  ??) 8) :D

Anyway, glad you found the content of my post helpful.

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, November 7, 2011, 8:42pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from san j
botched the batch.


Something about that phrase jumped out at me. I should make up a tongue-twister that includes the phrase.

Butch botched the batch of...um, the next word coming to mind is something about mommy dogs and I don't think it would go through the website's filter intact.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Monday, November 7, 2011, 9:38pm; Reply: 44
Quoted from ruthiegirl


Something about that phrase jumped out at me. I should make up a tongue-twister that includes the phrase.

Butch botched the batch of...um, the next word coming to mind is something about mommy dogs and I don't think it would go through the website's filter intact.


Haha!!

Maybe you could use belch instead  ;)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, November 7, 2011, 9:51pm; Reply: 45
Ah, I think I got it!

Butch botched the batch of boiled beans by belching.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Monday, November 7, 2011, 9:52pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Ah, I think I got it!

Butch botched the batch of boiled beans by belching.


(clap)(woot) I like it!

Sounds like what would have happened to Peter Piper after he finished eating up that peck of pickled peppers I reckon - he should have got a Swami!
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 4:09am; Reply: 47
SWAMI, how I love ya how I love ya, my dear ol' SWAMI.  ::) ;D ;)
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, November 16, 2011, 1:05pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from ruthiegirl


Something about that phrase jumped out at me. I should make up a tongue-twister that includes the phrase.

Butch botched the batch of...um, the next word coming to mind is something about mommy dogs and I don't think it would go through the website's filter intact.

Butch botched the batch of butterscotch!

(Sometimes, I amaze myself!)

Posted by: san j, Monday, November 21, 2011, 2:44am; Reply: 49
Okay, look, gcg. You've been teasing us long enough with this pickled butternut squash fantasy. We want the results, and we want 'em NOW.
;D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, November 21, 2011, 3:41am; Reply: 50
To me it is very good. I believe people who like the exotic and different will like it and the traditionalists won't try it. Probably will appeal to Nomads since we generally like the exotic and can tolerate vinegar.  It is expensive to make it if  you have to buy every thing. I grew the oregano and the winter squash but good honey and white wine vinegar are expensive.It did have a nice firm and crunchy texture. One cousin says "it doesn't taste like butternut squash, it's not sweet". Mom likes it, two of the more adventuresome aunts and the offspring of the most adventuresome likes it. The challenge is fitting it into a meal. I think a leftover turkey wrap with it in it would be very good. The acidity is good at cutting through the fatty tones of meats. The two turkey breasts I cooked with Mom had her nervous. She thought they might be dry so I gave them the "Paula Deen" and basted them with a whole stick of unsalted butter. I also made the turkey meatloaf recipe that I've posted her(a double recipe was completly demolished). Most of the items brought to todays feast had avoids of course but the turnip greens were excellent as was the brocolli rice casserole and there was a nice cheese/almond ball made to look like a pinecone. Desserts were a wash though I was tempted to try the homemade chocolate chip cheesecake and discard the crust.
Posted by: san j, Monday, November 21, 2011, 7:23am; Reply: 51
Did the heat of the pepper come through?
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, November 21, 2011, 11:59am; Reply: 52
a bit, probably the right amount not to over power it.
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Friday, December 2, 2011, 1:19am; Reply: 53
I made parsnips with turmeric, pretty good.  Also a cooked cactus salsa dish-- cactus, red onion, garlic, jalapeno peppers cooked in butter and garnished with goat cheese.
Posted by: honeybee, Friday, December 2, 2011, 1:50am; Reply: 54
interesting salad sahara - what is eating cactus like?
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