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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Fresh Salmon Choices
Posted by: balletomane, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 4:52am
Yesterday at the grocery store I noticed many types of salmon for sale: Organic Irish salmon, New Zealand salmon, Australian salmon, Norwegian salmon... These are previously frozen. I am wondering which one is the safest choice. Is organic salmon farmed? Would it be inferior to wild or wild caught salmon--even if it's canned?

As for the salmon from Down Under, does any of you know how the salmons are caught/raised? I am inclined toward buying salmon closer to home, i.e. from New Zealand or Australia, but I am not familiar with the fishing practice there. It's all very expensive to buy "fresh" salmon vs. canned one so I want to make sure I'm making the best choice.
Posted by: honeybee, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 4:58am; Reply: 1
hmmm, Aussie salmon would be farm raised I reckon - esp if it is the Tassie one - Tassal Group is huge Co. here - they even on the local stock Xchange lol.

Have you seen the other thread recently on tinned fishes - discussion of wild caught vs farmed etc, v interesting:

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1315858174/
Posted by: balletomane, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 5:03am; Reply: 2
Thanks, honeybee. Yes, I have seen the other thread and participated.
In fact I have ordered a couple of month's canned wild salmon to stock :) but occasionally I would love to treat myself to a fresh piece of salmon... it tastes so good! As I live in Hong Kong, we don't have our own salmons, LOL! So I have to make a choice among the different imported ones.

Organic Irish seems at first glance to be a good choice but then I question if it's actually farmed (with organic feed???) and also is the Irish water very clean?  ??)
Posted by: honeybee, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 5:08am; Reply: 3
Tassie waters are clean - the feed would prob be soy though - and maybe even GMO?

Edited to add:

found this statement on their website

Quoted Text
Fish Feed

Only part of the feed we use depends on marine sources, and these sources are recognised globally as being limited. It is in our industries best interest to demand that fish stocks used for fish meal and fish oil is sustainability managed.

In Tasmania as in the rest of the salmon farming world, the fish farming industry is researching development of vegetable proteins as a supplement to ongoing reliance on fishmeal and oil for salmon nutrition.

We are working closely with local and international feed suppliers to trial and test these new, advanced diets.

Posted by: balletomane, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 5:10am; Reply: 4
Oh, what a pity! What can't they just catch them wild  :-/

My DH, who lived in Greenland for a few years when he was a kid, said they had so many salmons there that the smell of it makes him sick even today. How I wish I could eat all those salmons in Greenland! ;D
Posted by: honeybee, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 5:18am; Reply: 5
:D

Wild they are endangered of over-fishing tho  :-/ and even in danger from the farming...

Their are a few diff species too - red sockeye is really good - has allot of the carotenoids .

You are not near really great sashimi salmon in your part of Asia?
Posted by: balletomane, Sunday, September 18, 2011, 6:09am; Reply: 6
Honeybee, I see... Yes, sockeye is listed as a diamond on my SWAMI, but I didn't know about carotenoids in them. I love the taste of it even if it's canned. But in the supermarkets they never label the salmons according to type. They have ridiculous labels like "New Zealand salmon slice" or "Australian salmon slice"  ::)

Well, supposedly we're close to Japan. I do think Japanese salmon is used in the sashimi's here, but I wouldn't dare nowadays after Fukushima  :-/.
Posted by: honeybee, Monday, September 19, 2011, 9:07am; Reply: 7
Oh Fukushima  :'(

Our local organic store is advertising Canadian wild salmon today... it is frozen...
Posted by: shoulderblade, Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 1:55am; Reply: 8
Quoted from honeybee


Our local organic store is advertising Canadian wild salmon today... it is frozen...


I think either that or Alaskan would be your best bet. Otherwise it would seem to be either farmed or possibly contaminated.

Sad to say but if you can get a clean product on a dea, l stock up if you can.  :)



Posted by: Canadj, Sunday, September 25, 2011, 3:12am; Reply: 9
http://seachoice.org/

My friend gave me this link.  It tells of every fish in the world, and whether it's good based on the catching process, farming, geography, etc.  Eg. would be that all fish from China are bad because of the filthy waters, questionable catching, and over fishing.

Have a look.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Monday, September 26, 2011, 10:27pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Canadj
http://seachoice.org/

My friend gave me this link.  It tells of every fish in the world, and whether it's good based on the catching process, farming, geography, etc.  Eg. would be that all fish from China are bad because of the filthy waters, questionable catching, and over fishing.

Have a look.


Looks to me to be an excellent source. These people have put a lot of time and energy into tracking down all the data and organizing it into a useful format.

I have always gone on the 'play it safe' and only bought what I figured was a solid product. Variety suffers but then I don't have a lot of choices anyway.

Posted by: Patty H, Monday, September 26, 2011, 10:52pm; Reply: 11
Is it possible to ask if the salmon has been wild caught or if it is farmed.  I believe if you can ascertain this information, you could make better choices and go for the wild caught.  We are fortunate here, as most stores that sell fish now post whether it is farmed or wild caught.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 1:56pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Patty H
Is it possible to ask if the salmon has been wild caught or if it is farmed.  I believe if you can ascertain this information, you could make better choices and go for the wild caught.  W


I think that if you live on the East coast or the interior of North America you can tell by viaual inspection.

Farmed will be Atlantic. A fairly large fish. one side might be about 3-4 lb., flat pinkish flesh with a layer of fat between the skin and flesh. Lower priced big time.

Wild wiil be from the West coast or Alaska. From what I have seen smaller, side about 2 lb., very red flesh with no fat layer. Higher priced so I am sure the vendor would note it as 'wild'.

West coast or elsewhere? Ask someone else.   :)

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