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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Bob's Red Mill Flax Meal shelf life????
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, August 25, 2011, 11:42pm
I guess I should call them, but maybe somebody knows.

I've had some flax meal for a long long time.  Probably 3 years or so.  It's been in the freezer most of the time, except for before I opened it.  Do you think it's still good?
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, August 25, 2011, 11:58pm; Reply: 1
I only ever buy whole flax and grind it myself because it supposedly goes bad fairly quickly.  If it was in the freezer then it should be basically as good as it was when you bought it so it just depends on how long it had already been ground when you bought it.
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Friday, August 26, 2011, 3:08am; Reply: 2
JJR- if you can avoid polyunsaturated oils & fats (aka ground flaxseeds and the oil) you're better off. I only use monounsaturated.  

Rancid oils

"This problem of polyunsaturated fats turning rancid is a very serious one. Yet it is never discussed by mainstream nutritionists and doctors who tell us that such fats are good for health.

Polyunsaturated fats - unlike saturated fats - are highly unstable and they spoil easily when exposed to heat, light and air. By the time they reach you, most would have already turned rancid. And rancid oils are highly toxic.

A good example is flaxseed oil which is rich in Omega 3, an essential fatty acid, are even marketed as health foods. But flaxseed oil is so sensitive and unstable that, according to some surveys by consumer advocacy groups, most brands are rancid by the time they reach the shelves - of "health food" stores!

To avoid rancil oils, buy only vegetable oils that are:

cold pressed
stored in dark bottles
kept away from heat
preferably unrefined and organic as well.
Such oils are costly. And even if you can afford them, you need to use them with care. Never use them for high heat cooking, such as deep frying or Chinese-style stir frying, with a big fire.

Regular, mass-produced vegetable oils have turned rancid from the time they were produced, because they are extracted using high heat. Having gone bad, the oils are then deodorised and various chemicals are also added to remove the bad smell, give the oil a nice colour, prevent the formation of bubbles during cooking and so on. I never cook with cold-pressed, unrefined corn oil and it forms so much bubbles that I cannot see my food. "
Posted by: jayneeo, Friday, August 26, 2011, 4:12am; Reply: 3
toss it and get a coffee  bean grinder dedicated to grinding flaxseeds then only grind as much as you can eat at a time.I finally did just that.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, August 26, 2011, 7:26pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from 14922
JJR- if you can avoid polyunsaturated oils & fats (aka ground flaxseeds and the oil) you're better off. I only use monounsaturated.  

Rancid oils

"This problem of polyunsaturated fats turning rancid is a very serious one. Yet it is never discussed by mainstream nutritionists and doctors who tell us that such fats are good for health.

Polyunsaturated fats - unlike saturated fats - are highly unstable and they spoil easily when exposed to heat, light and air. By the time they reach you, most would have already turned rancid. And rancid oils are highly toxic.

A good example is flaxseed oil which is rich in Omega 3, an essential fatty acid, are even marketed as health foods. But flaxseed oil is so sensitive and unstable that, according to some surveys by consumer advocacy groups, most brands are rancid by the time they reach the shelves - of "health food" stores!

To avoid rancil oils, buy only vegetable oils that are:

cold pressed
stored in dark bottles
kept away from heat
preferably unrefined and organic as well.
Such oils are costly. And even if you can afford them, you need to use them with care. Never use them for high heat cooking, such as deep frying or Chinese-style stir frying, with a big fire.

Regular, mass-produced vegetable oils have turned rancid from the time they were produced, because they are extracted using high heat. Having gone bad, the oils are then deodorised and various chemicals are also added to remove the bad smell, give the oil a nice colour, prevent the formation of bubbles during cooking and so on. I never cook with cold-pressed, unrefined corn oil and it forms so much bubbles that I cannot see my food. "


This is interesting.  I do eat Flaxseed oil sometimes.  But never cook with it.  But you're saying it's no good?  Huh.  From what I understand, flax is high in Omega 3's and can be good for you.  Plus, I'm talking about the meal and not the oil in this thread specifically.  What do you think about hemp seeds, chia seeds, and the seeds of flax in general.  I'd be hard pressed to think they're bad for us.  But, I could be wrong.  And I see that your point is more about how fast things can go rancid.  A very interesting thought.  
Posted by: jayneeo, Friday, August 26, 2011, 7:33pm; Reply: 5
chia seed is stable and easily chewed, in fact you can just swallow it whole if you wish......its a nuetral for me, but maybe for AB its a a superfood!
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Saturday, August 27, 2011, 2:25pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from JJR


This is interesting.  I do eat Flaxseed oil sometimes.  But never cook with it.  But you're saying it's no good?  Huh.  From what I understand, flax is high in Omega 3's and can be good for you.  Plus, I'm talking about the meal and not the oil in this thread specifically.  What do you think about hemp seeds, chia seeds, and the seeds of flax in general.  I'd be hard pressed to think they're bad for us.  But, I could be wrong.  And I see that your point is more about how fast things can go rancid.  A very interesting thought.  



Flax meal has a very very short shelf life. By the time you have opened the package, most if not all of it is already rancid.

Polyunsaturated fats are highly unstable (no matter what form they are in) due to the molecular composition.

I totally agree with Jayneeo. But the whole flax seed and grind as you need it. Then there is never a problem of rancidity  :)
Posted by: JJR, Saturday, August 27, 2011, 4:22pm; Reply: 7
I had some whole seeds once.  I guess I'll have to get more.  It doesn't go bad?  I have  coffee grinder I use to grind spices up.
Posted by: jayneeo, Saturday, August 27, 2011, 6:32pm; Reply: 8
I understand the whole seeds are very stable.
Posted by: JJR, Saturday, August 27, 2011, 11:13pm; Reply: 9
That's good!
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, August 29, 2011, 2:34am; Reply: 10
I'd be tempted to go ahead and use it up.  But then...I hate throwing away food. :o  I buy whole seeds and store them in the fridge and grind them as needed.
Posted by: Kathleen, Monday, August 29, 2011, 6:15pm; Reply: 11
Flax seeds grind up nicely in my Vitamix.

Great info on ground flax seeds, I do have an open package in my freezer that I will be throwing away.
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