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BTD Forums  /  Journal Club and Literature Review  /  Aberrant secretors
Posted by: Vista, Tuesday, August 23, 2011, 5:43pm
It seems like some people of blood type A and B only secrete A or B substance and not H according to some articles I have found recently. From what I have understood, it seems like the amount of H that is secreted in individuals also is different and that the amount of H that is secreted is genetically determined.

Homozygous blood type A (A/A) and B (B/B) individuals might not secrete any H at all while heterozygous blood type A (A/O) and B (B/O) individuals secretes H antigen.

The H substance is secreted in higher titre in group O individuals, the A2 group secrete less H than the O but more than the A1, group B secrete little H and AB the least.


"Differences between families in the amount of salivary H substances"
http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/66443/1/j.1469-1809.1962.tb01308.x.pdf

"ABH ANTIGENS IN NORTH INDIANS' Suraksha Agarwal ABSTRACT"
http://web2.sbg.org.br/gmb/edicoesanteriores/v11n1/pdf/a15v11n1.pdf

"Rev. Brasil. Genet. V, 4, 793-805 (1982) (Brazil. J. Genetics)"
http://web2.sbg.org.br/gmb/edicoesanteriores/v05n4/pdf/a12v05n4.pdf
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, August 23, 2011, 10:59pm; Reply: 1
So H is what type O secretors secrete? And type O non-secretors don't secrete H or anything else?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Tuesday, August 23, 2011, 11:11pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from ruthiegirl
So H is what type O secretors secrete?


Yes

Quoted Text
And type O non-secretors don't secrete H or anything else?


Non secretor secrete only a minimal amount of blood type antigens A B or H into saliva and other body fluids (excluding blood).
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 1:23am; Reply: 3
So, non-secretors are actually "minimal secretors" rather than complete "non-secretors"?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 3:34am; Reply: 4
A Non-secretor on the other hand puts little to none of their blood type into these same fluids.
Posted by: Vista, Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 7:52am; Reply: 5
ABH secretors with low H-antigen titre in the saliva can be incorrectly classified as non-secretors from what I've understood.
Posted by: DoS, Saturday, September 24, 2011, 11:27pm; Reply: 6
Non-secreters secret low amounts, but it is also alcohol soluble instead of water soluble; I believe I read from Dr. D.
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, September 25, 2011, 2:48am; Reply: 7
Quoted from Vista
ABH secretors with low H-antigen titre in the saliva can be incorrectly classified as non-secretors from what I've understood.


Then would a blood test (Lewis phenotyping) as opposed to a saliva test be a better determinant of secretor status?
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, September 25, 2011, 3:10pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Patty H
Then would a blood test (Lewis phenotyping) as opposed to a saliva test be a better determinant of secretor status?


I hope so.   :-/  I did the saliva test first, and then asked my Dr. for the Lewis test at my last visit when he was taking blood for cholesterol count, etc., and I came out non-secretor on both tests.  I didn't trust my saliva test, only because I couldn't get it out of my mind that I'd done it incorrectly.  The blood test confirmed me as a nonnie, though.  But I don't know if it is more precise than saliva testing.   ??)
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, September 25, 2011, 5:21pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from O in Virginia


I hope so.   :-/  I did the saliva test first, and then asked my Dr. for the Lewis test at my last visit when he was taking blood for cholesterol count, etc., and I came out non-secretor on both tests.  I didn't trust my saliva test, only because I couldn't get it out of my mind that I'd done it incorrectly.  The blood test confirmed me as a nonnie, though.  But I don't know if it is more precise than saliva testing.   ??)


Same for me O in V, I did both and both confirmed my non-secretor status.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Monday, September 26, 2011, 8:27pm; Reply: 10
The preferred method to test for ABH secretor  status  is by PCR. Only done by reference blood banks. Mostly done to confirm unusual or very rare ABO blood group genes in a population.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 12:26pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Captain_Janeway
The preferred method to test for ABH secretor  status  is by PCR. Only done by reference blood banks. Mostly done to confirm unusual or very rare ABO blood group genes in a population.


What is PCR?  Is this different from Lewis Phenotyping?  I have a rare blood antigen and my blood needed to be sent to the American Red Cross reference lab as they were they only ones who had the antibody to test it.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 3:34am; Reply: 12
Quoted from Patty H


What is PCR?  Is this different from Lewis Phenotyping?  I have a rare blood antigen and my blood needed to be sent to the American Red Cross reference lab as they were they only ones who had the antibody to test it.


Polymerase Chain Reaction. PCR is a type of genetic test that relies on the duplication of certain segments of DNA that make up a specific sequence of nucleotides contained in a gene.

Lewis phenotyping and the MN and in your case the Mg antigens are screened serologically. Which means they are tested via the use of an antiserum. Sometimes the issue with using antiserums is that they are not specific enough. Certain other antigens can react with those antiserums at times giving unreliable results.

Organ transplant recipients are tested both ways via serology and PCR.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 12:56pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


Polymerase Chain Reaction. PCR is a type of genetic test that relies on the duplication of certain segments of DNA that make up a specific sequence of nucleotides contained in a gene.

Lewis phenotyping and the MN and in your case the Mg antigens are screened serologically. Which means they are tested via the use of an antiserum. Sometimes the issue with using antiserums is that they are not specific enough. Certain other antigens can react with those antiserums at times giving unreliable results.

Organ transplant recipients are tested both ways via serology and PCR.


I think I understand - when you have to be ABSOLUTELY SURE, you need to use the PCR, otherwise the person could reject the organ?

How would organ transplantation be affected by someone with a rare blood antigen, like the members of my family and me?  Would that organ need to come from someone with the Mg antigen?
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