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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Is poultry really necessary?
Posted by: Eat2Heal, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 6:16pm
My family consists of:

O+ SWAMI Gatherer overweight female (age 59)
O+ non-secretor SWAMI Explorer female normal weight with auto-immune disease (age 34)
B- male, slightly underweight, with sleep apnea, that eats whatever I cook for him at home and whatever he wants in his car and at work (age 41)
O+ severely gluten-intolerant 7 year old daughter with multiple food allergies
B+ 4 year old daughter with multiple food allergies
B 19 month old son (with epidermolysis bullosa)

As school starts for my oldest child next week, I have been looking anew at how I should be feeding my family.  All of us (except my husband) are already strictly gluten free.  My daughters' allergies include wheat (the O), eggs (both), peanuts (both), shellfish (the O), almonds (the B), and pecans (the O).  I used to love to cook, but now the thought of it just stresses me out.

We buy organic as much as we can, drive to a farm to get raw pastured milk, and have local access to grass-finished beef (which we buy by the half or whole animal) and grass-finished lamb (which we buy a little at a time at the farmer's market, but can buy by the whole animal to save money).  We use Trader Joe's to buy non-GMO romano cheese for me, manchego for the other O's in my family, grass-fed cheddar for the B's (although the baby doesn't like it), and organic butter for all of us.

My big concern right now is POULTRY!!!!!  

We have access to organic, pastured chicken, but it is a neutral for me and my O+ daughter, and an avoid for everyone else, so it isn't really worth the expense.  The only poultry choices that are neutral and/or beneficial for everyone in my family are ostrich and pheasant, but I cannot find an organic, pastured source for these that I can afford.  Oh, there is always turkey, a superfood for me and a neutral for everybody else, but have you seen the price of pastured, organic turkey?  And they are only seasonally available.  

Can we just stuff our freezer with lamb (diamond superfood for me, beneficial for everyone) and pretend poultry doesn't exist?  Eat red meat for 6 meals a week?  (Three to replace poultry meals)

Posted by: brinyskysail, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 6:35pm; Reply: 1
You certainly don't have to eat poultry, but I would make sure you get variety.  Red meat is, of course, good for O's and B's, but I'd make sure you get other proteins as well, like fish and eggs.  In LR4YT, Dr. D recommends 6-9 servings of red meat/poultry per week for type O and 2-6 for type B.  He also recommends 3-5 servings per week of fish/sea food for both type O and B.  Many type O's with swami discover that they are given more servings of fish than red meat.

Anyway, you can adjust the diet to fit your needs, just make sure you still get variety
:)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 7:16pm; Reply: 2
Wait for sales on pastured turkey and then pounce - load up your freezer.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 7:31pm; Reply: 3
I use a lot of turkey because, in my area, it's cheaper than beef. Actually, I'm using a lot of chicken this month, with my Type B son in sleepaway camp, but we'll go back to being a chicken-free household when he's back home.

But if poultry wasn't available, I'm sure we'd do just fine on red meat and fish. Beef or lamb 6 meals a week might be OK, or you might do better doing that 4 or 5 meals and adding in an extra  fish meal per week. I can see why you wouldn't want to bother with chicken- it's hard enough cooking for a large family, I agree it's too much hassle to cook things that only a few people can eat. I have on occasion cooked chicken just for myself for a lunch while the kids were in school.

Beans are also a nice choice for rounding out meals. Great northern beans are neutral or beneficial for everybody in my family (also Os and Bs) and I keep canned kidney beans on hand for the B to eat for lunch. He likes it mixed with brown rice and some melted cheese on top (goat cheese, cream cheese, or homemade paneer) in a thermos for school lunches. I see that your Bs aren't school-aged, but they might like that too. Although the toddler is more likely to enjoy the beans as finger food, not mixed with anything else. My son loved beans on his high chair tray when he was a toddler.

It looks like all of you can have walnuts? Keep those on hand for snacks and baking. Eggs are good as a "quick to prepare protein" for those of you who can have it, but I wouldn't bake with it, not when it's poison for some family members. Who in the family can safely eat eggs? Are you nursing either of the little ones?

I like the idea of buying a few turkeys when they're available; possibly butchering them into "single meal" sized portions before freezing. Although, with the size of your household it may be worth it to cook a whole turkey at once and have leftovers for a couple of days.
Posted by: Easy E, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 7:42pm; Reply: 4
Poultry does not mean chicken.  There are many different types of poultry out there!
Posted by: brinyskysail, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 8:41pm; Reply: 5
Quoted Text
Poultry does not mean chicken.  There are many different types of poultry out there!


Quoted Text
The only poultry choices that are neutral and/or beneficial for everyone in my family are ostrich and pheasant, but I cannot find an organic, pastured source for these that I can afford.  Oh, there is always turkey, a superfood for me and a neutral for everybody else, but have you seen the price of pastured, organic turkey?  And they are only seasonally available.


ostrich, pheasant, turkey - we're not just talking chicken ;)
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 9:42pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from brinyskysail
You certainly don't have to eat poultry, but I would make sure you get variety.  Red meat is, of course, good for O's and B's, but I'd make sure you get other proteins as well, like fish and eggs.  In LR4YT, Dr. D recommends 6-9 servings of red meat/poultry per week for type O and 2-6 for type B.  He also recommends 3-5 servings per week of fish/sea food for both type O and B.  Many type O's with swami discover that they are given more servings of fish than red meat.

Anyway, you can adjust the diet to fit your needs, just make sure you still get variety
:)


I totally agree with this.  I got my SWAMI from Dr. D's colleague, Dr. Nash.  I get seven servings of fish and only three servings each of red meat and poultry per week.  How about incorporating some fish into your diet.

Also, maybe you could eat chicken for lunch while your kids are at school.  Just because the B's can't have it doesn't mean the O's can't.  Keep it for meals when the B's are not around.  ;)
Posted by: Kim, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 9:44pm; Reply: 7
Frozen pastured turkey sale on Dartagnan.com while supplies last.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 11:05pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Patty H
Also, maybe you could eat chicken for lunch while your kids are at school.  Just because the B's can't have it doesn't mean the O's can't.  Keep it for meals when the B's are not around.  ;)


None of the Bs are school aged. One is 41, one is 4 (who may or may not be in preschool, and if she is in school, it might not be a long enough day for her to be away for lunch) and one is 17 months.

From what I can remember of the blur that was my children's early years, its too much trouble to cook one thing for me and another for the kids. Half the time my kids ate directly from my own plate, and I often ended up finishing their leftovers.
Posted by: Easy E, Thursday, August 18, 2011, 1:34am; Reply: 9
Quoted from Patty H


I totally agree with this.  I got my SWAMI from Dr. D's colleague, Dr. Nash.  I get seven servings of fish and only three servings each of red meat and poultry per week.  How about incorporating some fish into your diet.

Also, maybe you could eat chicken for lunch while your kids are at school.  Just because the B's can't have it doesn't mean the O's can't.  Keep it for meals when the B's are not around.  ;)


I'm curious about this because my fiance is an O gatherer.  Is it okay for her more so since her blood type is O and not B?  I always wondered that.
Posted by: geminisue, Thursday, August 18, 2011, 1:55am; Reply: 10
On your swami, if you can't get poultry, I would not substitute it with the red meat, unless what you are saying is your allowed 3(3-5 oz servings) so you will have like 6 2 1/2 oz servings, you have to consider what is in the meat, also)remember the foods that go with each other, to make it more harmonious, too.
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, August 18, 2011, 12:52pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from ruthiegirl


None of the Bs are school aged. One is 41, one is 4 (who may or may not be in preschool, and if she is in school, it might not be a long enough day for her to be away for lunch) and one is 17 months.

From what I can remember of the blur that was my children's early years, its too much trouble to cook one thing for me and another for the kids. Half the time my kids ate directly from my own plate, and I often ended up finishing their leftovers.


Unless, of course, you are cooking on a BBQ grill.  Then it is easy to throw on different types of protein.  We do this all the time.  My husband loves to make a big batch of chicken thighs and then freeze them in one-meal servings.  Then he just throws them in the microwave for his lunch with some frozen veggies or pre-cooked veggies.  Often times we will grill several different types of meat at once and then freeze most of it.  We try to keep several types of high-quality cooked protein available in our freezer.  ;)

All I am saying is that if you want to keep chicken in your diet, there are ways you can manage it without too much trouble, but I do understand the fast pace of a household with little ones.  :o
Posted by: marjorie, Saturday, August 20, 2011, 3:35am; Reply: 12
can someone explain the pasturized chicken? so, is this free range and organic sold in retail? I am just confused because how do we know if the chick is fed corn, and if so, isnt this a Negative for o's?

I would stick with fish when in doubt, however, that is just me.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Saturday, August 20, 2011, 3:38am; Reply: 13
Quoted from marjorie
can someone explain the pasturized chicken?


pastured, not pasturized.  Free range basically, instead of being indoors or cooped up in a box it's whole life
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, August 20, 2011, 5:44am; Reply: 14
Organic chicken is just fed organic food, which will be always grains (maybe some soybeans too).  I've never seen any chicken or turkey that was not supplemented with grain feeding, even those who run free in the pasture.
Posted by: Easy E, Saturday, August 20, 2011, 2:50pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Patty H


Unless, of course, you are cooking on a BBQ grill.  Then it is easy to throw on different types of protein.  We do this all the time.  My husband loves to make a big batch of chicken thighs and then freeze them in one-meal servings.  Then he just throws them in the microwave for his lunch with some frozen veggies or pre-cooked veggies.  Often times we will grill several different types of meat at once and then freeze most of it.  We try to keep several types of high-quality cooked protein available in our freezer.  ;)

All I am saying is that if you want to keep chicken in your diet, there are ways you can manage it without too much trouble, but I do understand the fast pace of a household with little ones.  :o


That is the way to go!!:)

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, August 21, 2011, 3:25am; Reply: 16
Marjorie- some people are very sensitive to the diet of the animals they eat; others don't have any problems with it. It's certainly better to eat chicken that hasn't been fed corn, but even corn-fed chicken is preferable to not getting enough animal protein.

However easy it might be to cook several different kinds of proteins for one meal, there's still the issue of the 17mo type B. At that age, all my kids would literally sit on my lap at mealtime and often eat from my plate. Even when they sat in the highchair next to me, they wanted what I had much of the time. I encouraged that, as it was a good way to introduce them to new foods that they might have rejected if I'd offered to them directly.  It would NOT have been practical for me to eat anything they couldn't or shouldn't be eating.
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 3:42am; Reply: 17
Quoted from ruthiegirl
...some people are very sensitive to the diet of the animals they eat; others don't have any problems with it. It's certainly better to eat chicken that hasn't been fed corn, but even corn-fed chicken is preferable to not getting enough animal protein.
I'm actually wondering if it's better for me to avoid poultry?! Even the organic chicken is corn fed & the turkey I can get is fed soy & I definitely don't do well on either!! ::) Just heard too, that poultry down here may well be sulphited too in the processing :o I usually feel best on just grass fed beef!!
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 4:39am; Reply: 18
Quoted from Possum
I'm actually wondering if it's better for me to avoid poultry?! Even the organic chicken is corn fed & the turkey I can get is fed soy & I definitely don't do well on either!! ::) Just heard too, that poultry down here may well be sulphited too in the processing :o I usually feel best on just grass fed beef!!

What does your SWAMI say about grass?
And - what kind of grass is it?
Possum, I'd think people would also have to start asking themselves what species of fishes, algae, etc., their food-fish have eaten.
Remember that free-range poultry eats flies - their favorite snack, say the organic poultry farmers.
Friend: How crazy do you want to make yourself?  :o :K)

Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 5:59am; Reply: 19
It's not about making myself crazy san j... I just want to make myself well!! The eggs &/or meat from poultry which has eaten soy or corn feeds, actually make my stomach feel sick/skin break out etc etc ::)
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 6:33am; Reply: 20
Quoted from Possum
It's not about making myself crazy san j... I just want to make myself well!! The eggs &/or meat from poultry which has eaten soy or corn feeds, actually make my stomach feel sick/skin break out etc etc ::)

Hey, luv. Sorry to read that about your condition. Amazing that you were able to trace it!
Goes to show that maybe I wasn't far off: Maybe people should be considering the grass steer-chow and the fish-chow, too, then, find out what what they eat have eaten...  :-/ (if they're suffering from food-borne illnesses for no obvious reason, of course).

Posted by: yaeli, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 8:02am; Reply: 21
Quoted from Possum
I'm actually wondering if it's better for me to avoid poultry?! Even the organic chicken is corn fed & the turkey I can get is fed soy & I definitely don't do well on either!! ::) Just heard too, that poultry down here may well be sulphited too in the processing :o I usually feel best on just grass fed beef!!
This is my tendency too. Organic chicken is a swami neutral for me, but when I have it I feel I've eaten an empty food. I clearly feel it adds nothing significant! So I treat it as a black dot, while I'd rather avoid it altogether. When I eat it it's only for comfort and good old time's memories sake, and this means an avoid. Turkey is a swami diamond for me, but there's neither organic nor free range turkey in my country, so I treat turkey the same as I treat chicken. So although swami recommends to me 4 servings of poultry per week, I regularly pass!

Posted by: yaeli, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 8:09am; Reply: 22
Quoted from san j
Maybe people should be considering the grass steer-chow and the fish-chow, too, then, find out what what they eat have eaten...  :-/ (if they're suffering from food-borne illnesses for no obvious reason, of course).
I'm convinced that people should be friendly with one another and care for one another and correct the ways they manage the planet, and ER4YT.

Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 10:29pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from san j
Hey, luv. Sorry to read that about your condition. Amazing that you were able to trace it!
Goes to show that maybe I wasn't far off: Maybe people should be considering the grass steer-chow and the fish-chow, too, then, find out what what they eat have eaten...  :-/ (if they're suffering from food-borne illnesses for no obvious reason, of course).
Well between your response & yaeli's I am convinced to avoid the turkey now... At least until I can get organic non soy fed!! I didn't eat any yesterday - just had beef & it is amazing how much more energetic I feel again (dance)(clap) Did 20 mins on my elliptical trainer AND then drove in & walked down into & round town & then back up the hill, for over an hour this morning as well!! Yesterday I was feeling so tired & bloated, I struggled to do 10 mins on the trainer... ::)
Posted by: san j, Thursday, March 7, 2013, 12:39am; Reply: 24
Even as a B, I can say that there is no comparison between the octane rush of red meat and the bare essential level maintained by turkey.
If you find poultry and eggs are not agreeing with you, Possum, you need to go with that - that's what I'm saying.
Me, I don't study the diets of my diet. You have to bear in mind that no poultry farmer can stop his or her birds from eating insects, for example. Fishermen can't vouch for what their catches have eaten. If that uncertainty makes you anxious when you don't feel well, I suppose you're happier to restrict your diet further.
It's not necessarily what I or most would do. But you are definitely an individual!  ;)
Posted by: Possum, Thursday, March 7, 2013, 12:59am; Reply: 25
Quoted from san j
Fishermen can't vouch for what their catches have eaten. If that uncertainty makes you anxious when you don't feel well, I suppose you're happier to restrict your diet further.
It's not necessarily what I or most would do. But you are definitely an individual!  ;)
Not sure how to take that lol I certainly don't worry about what fish or fowl eat that they can source for themselves ;) It is only the unnatural things, that are not normally part of their diet, that concerns me - like soy ::)

Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, March 11, 2013, 12:26am; Reply: 26
San J I disagree. Since lamb is sky  high locally and hard to find to boot, the main proteins I cook are turkey, beef, fish, eggs, and cheese. Goat occasionally as I know the farmer and she pasture raises the goats with just a little grain to keep them tame. I find beef to be a neutral to me(just like the book says) while lamb or turkey can give me a rush.
Posted by: marjorie, Monday, March 11, 2013, 2:36am; Reply: 27
I noticed a huge difference when I cut out poultry and stick to fish. ( working on the beef as well:)


For some reason, I do not trust what goes into the poultry at all, but beef seems to be ok as long as it is grass fed!
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