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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Figs: what to do with them.
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 12:58pm
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1391
Posted by: O in Virginia, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 1:43pm; Reply: 1
Fig preserves are lovely on toast.  You can make a savory fig jam, too, which is nice as a relish for grilled fish or whatever.  Use a spoonful in salad dressings for a nice flavor.  Do you have a bumper crop or something?  If so, lucky you!  :)
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 1:59pm; Reply: 2
Our fig bushes are still babies.  But we have a friend with a huge tree, and she said we could have all we wanted.(woot)
Posted by: Goldie, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 2:20pm; Reply: 3
Oh I am moving there..

back slices into,bread, add it to jellow add it to any dish.. I mean is there anything better.. and I looked it up.. its on my super swami food list..

TYPE O:

Non Secretor:
BENEFICIAL: Contains component which either blocks polyamine synthesis or lowers indican levels..... I mean could I ask for anything more???


I wonder how soon I can have some.. I FORGOT ABOUT about FIGS because I confued them with Dates which are avoid for me..

.. thanks for the chance to remind me of the chewy goodness..
Posted by: O in Virginia, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 2:30pm; Reply: 4
Figs are neutrals on my swami.  I love them, but I have been trying to concentrate on super-fruits.  Can you have gorgonzola cheese?  Figs are nice if you cut them, fill with gorgonzola cheese (or some other compliant cheese) and run under the broiler.  That used to be nice with prosciutto but we don't eat pork now.

Goldie, eat them figs, girl!   ;)
Posted by: passionprincess, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 2:42pm; Reply: 5
Figs with cheese are heavenly! You all are lucky! My earliest memory of figs is getting them off my friend's tree, peeling them, and eating them on the spot. :) Yummy!
Posted by: grey rabbit, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 3:35pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from O in Virginia
Figs are nice if you cut them, fill with gorgonzola cheese (or some other compliant cheese) and run under the broiler.


I gotta try this! Figs are superfood and gorgonzola is a neutral. Do you think I could do this with dried figs? Never seen fresh ones around here.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 3:44pm; Reply: 7
We just eat them right off the tree.
Posted by: JJR, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 4:28pm; Reply: 8
I have to admit, I bought some fresh and I'm really not sure what to do with them.  They didn't taste very good to me at all.  I'm not real picky, and I think if I kept eating them, I'd be fine.  But the way they taste, they make me wonder if they're good or not.  OR spoiled.  And I cut one open and those seeds are like huge pieces of fluff.  I was like, Hmmmmm.....  Now DRIED, I love them.  Love love love.  And I can learn to like them not dried, if I get through my initial fear of if they're ok and if they'll mess with me or not.  

So should you peel them?  What about those huge, practically flowers, in the middle?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 5:36pm; Reply: 9
I never peel figs, but others do.

I think the key is that figs need to be fully ripe (but not rotting)

Figs should be soft to the touch and easily give when you poke them. Figs should also be fragrant with a sweet smell (not a rotting one).
Posted by: jayneeo, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 6:44pm; Reply: 10
I slice them and serve as dessert with mascarpone! Heaven! (Ah, Lola's right! That's an avoid cheese! Hey, I have that once a year!) ;)
Posted by: cajun, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 10:09pm; Reply: 11
Oh, Jayneeo...girl you know whats good! ;D

Well you all can come on over to my little orchard in the southern CA high desert very soon because my black mission fig tree has a great yield about ready! :D
I eat them any and every way I can!

My Dad loves my fig galette :
Pastry dough, almond meal, cream, sugar, egg and lots of fresh figs with a small amount of pear or raspberries in center.
(I have subbed almond milk for the cream and used date sugar.)
Posted by: honeybee, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 10:09pm; Reply: 12
We plan on planting a fig tree in our garden too  :D

I have had dried figs and dried apricots stuffed with a mixture of fresh ricotta, soft goats cheese, lemon juice and maple syrup (drool)(ondrugs)
Posted by: jayneeo, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 10:24pm; Reply: 13
mmm, cajun, your galette sounds divine!
honeybee, I have made that too, only with honey!
Posted by: Kim, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 10:32pm; Reply: 14
OMG, figs and marscapone, heaven!!!  They are a diamond on my swami! ;D
Posted by: md, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 1:28am; Reply: 15
A sandwich made with fig jam and peanut butter or almond butter is good.
Posted by: Joy, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 2:56am; Reply: 16
Here's another way to have dried figs.  Everything hinges on how compliant  each ingredient is for you
Be innovative and substitute if necessary.

Cook brussel sprouts in quarters.  When they are just about tender add the figs that have been cut in half..  It calls for pieces of crumbled bacon (yikes I said bacon but subsitute soy bacon bits,
turkey bacon crispy whatever.  

When everything is just cooked add some salt, pepper, and fresh lemon juice.

Makes a nice veggie dish.

Joy
Posted by: JJR, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:22am; Reply: 17
Oh that sounds really good.  I've used cranberries with brussel sprouts before too.  And Turkey bacon.  This sounds really good!
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 4:52am; Reply: 18
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
We just eat them right off the tree.


Oh boy that can get slimy....... nothing worse than overripe or underripe.....figs bleed ....
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 4:54am; Reply: 19
Quoted from md
A sandwich made with fig jam and peanut butter or almond butter is good.


Homeade newtons!

Oh and don't forget you can discard the dried skins if you wish after they are dried and you can use them as a filling without having to cook a jam.
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 4:56am; Reply: 20
Quoted from jayneeo
I slice them and serve as dessert with mascarpone! Heaven! (Ah, Lola's right! That's an avoid cheese! Hey, I have that once a year!) ;)


I wonder if, after a year of eating everything else, you will find you don't care for the mascarpone taste or texture anymore, once you keep eating your superfoods.

Posted by: Kim, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 2:25pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Seraffa


I wonder if, after a year of eating everything else, you will find you don't care for the mascarpone taste or texture anymore, once you keep eating your superfoods.



Ricotta cheese with figs would be good too, if you can have it.
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:14pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from jayneeo
I slice them and serve as dessert with mascarpone! Heaven! (Ah, Lola's right! That's an avoid cheese! Hey, I have that once a year!) ;)


I use sour cream, which is similar to mascarapone cheese, and brown sugar (both avoids) under the broiler, but once in a while a real delight!

Otherwise, I just eat them raw.  They are great in salads, too!  Love, love, love those figs.  My daughter loves them too.  We can't keep them in the house when I buy them.  They go bad fast, so it is best not to let them hang around.  They are not cheap when you need to pay for them.  A fig tree would be heaven  :o
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:19pm; Reply: 23
I just canned 14 pints of fig bbq sauce yesterday. I've posted the recipe on here before but it has several avoids for most types, mainly dijon mustard and black pepper and apple cider vinegar. It beat any store bought version I can find though and no tomato!
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 5:47pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I just canned 14 pints of fig bbq sauce yesterday. I've posted the recipe on here before but it has several avoids for most types, mainly dijon mustard and black pepper and apple cider vinegar. It beat any store bought version I can find though and no tomato!


I can think of many ways around dijon mustard, black pepper and apple cider, care to post the recipe again? Please?
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:20pm; Reply: 25
Tonight I will, I've got to hit the road back home. I also picked my first winter squash today for this years garden.
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:49pm; Reply: 26
Scratching my head....and I can't think how in the world you peel a fig.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 8:54pm; Reply: 27
search in recipe center......GCG says he posted one there
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 9:10pm; Reply: 28
Quoted from Patty H
They go bad fast, so it is best not to let them hang around.

I friend I give figs to told me of this method he uses to keep the figs good...

Put the figs in a freezer bag so they are just touching (or not) and freeze.  When you want one (or some), take them out of the bag and allow them to thaw for some time prior to use.  This way all of the unused are staying good...
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 9:12pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from Ribbit
Scratching my head....and I can't think how in the world you peel a fig.
Some figs have a firmer skin than others...  The figs from my tree get ripe and you can't peel anything, but my neighbors tree, you almost have to peel the figs as the skins resemble leather...  

His a purchased tree while mine is a seedling of his...

Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 9:17pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Ribbit
Scratching my head....and I can't think how in the world you peel a fig.


Here are some methods to peel figs. (You may still be scratching your head about why anyone would want to peel a fig, after you finish reading.)

1) Take a paring knife and cut off the the outer layer of the fig.

2) To make the above easier, divide the fig into quarters. Then it is easy to use a knife to remove the outer layer of the fig.

3) Gently pull off the stem and the skin attached to it, then peel the rest with your fingers.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 11:31pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Lola
search in recipe center......GCG says he posted one there


No I posted here, give me a couple of hours to unpack and eat and I'll repost.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, August 15, 2011, 12:27am; Reply: 32
Gulf Coast Guy Fig BBQ Sauce Recipe:

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1300574694/s-11/highlight-fig/
Posted by: grey rabbit, Monday, August 15, 2011, 12:47am; Reply: 33
:)
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, August 15, 2011, 12:53am; Reply: 34
Oh, so figs are like people: some are thinner-skinned than others.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, August 15, 2011, 1:14am; Reply: 35
Quoted from C_Sharp


Thanks Sharp! I have an eye allmost swollen shut from a wasp sting and wasn't looking forward to retyping it.

BTW if you multiply the recipe by 8 to use 1/2 gallon of figs(for canning) the yield is 14 pints ergo the yield for a single recipe is 1 and 3/4 pints.
Posted by: Kim, Monday, August 15, 2011, 1:49pm; Reply: 36
Can't wait to try this.  I have to omit hot peppers. :-/  I can have red pepper flakes, but the last time I did that, I was in agony with stomach pain for a day.  
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