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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Lamb and Beans, why????
Posted by: JJR, Friday, August 12, 2011, 3:26am
I just watched an episode of "Take Home Chef" and Curtis made a wonderful leg of lamb but he paired it with beans.  And I know some of the restaurants around here, the French inspired places do this too.  I don't get it.  It seems like a heavy combination to me.  I think lamb and, oh, carrots.  Or Lamb and, a salad.  Or some broccoli.  Lightly steamed.  That seems like a better combination to me.  

Does this bug anyone else?  Is there a reason behind this pairing?  What do you all think?
Posted by: Lola, Friday, August 12, 2011, 5:45am; Reply: 1
green string beans.....very French :)
Posted by: yaeli, Friday, August 12, 2011, 6:32am; Reply: 2
For me lean lamb - braised - and fava beans (from frozen and w/o the husks) - slightly cooked - is an ideal combination.  :) Geno-harmonic I believe, and just sprinkle it with tahini. SWAMI hits the bull's eye also re the taste buds.
Posted by: Amazone I., Friday, August 12, 2011, 7:03am; Reply: 3
lamb and beans ooh oohh = yummyciolous ;D :D(drool)(smartyp)(cool)tons of garlic & onions, des herbes de provence...oui..oui..ouiii ;)(dance)(smarty)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, August 12, 2011, 8:28am; Reply: 4
IF it was green beans I donĀ“t think it is heavy  :D
Hower dry beans and lamb can be on the heavyside -but tast in winterdays  8)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Friday, August 12, 2011, 1:50pm; Reply: 5
Maybe historically, the beans were all that was available at the time of year a dish of beans and meat was traditionally made.  Maybe it was too early in the season for fresh veggies?  And maybe the beans were added to meat dishes to bulk them up so more people could eat.  Now, we have fresh produce and everything else year round.  That used to not be the case.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, August 12, 2011, 4:47pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from O in Virginia
Maybe historically, the beans were all that was available at the time of year a dish of beans and meat was traditionally made.  Maybe it was too early in the season for fresh veggies?  And maybe the beans were added to meat dishes to bulk them up so more people could eat.  Now, we have fresh produce and everything else year round.  That used to not be the case.


This makes the most sense to me.  And yeah, green beans sounds much better with lamb than any other bean.  Although I've never had Fava beans.  That's what he made with them.  And then corn.  There were no veggies at all!  Corn is a grain in my book.

Posted by: Seraffa, Friday, August 12, 2011, 10:52pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from O in Virginia
Maybe historically, the beans were all that was available at the time of year a dish of beans and meat was traditionally made.  Maybe it was too early in the season for fresh veggies?  And maybe the beans were added to meat dishes to bulk them up so more people could eat.  Now, we have fresh produce and everything else year round.  That used to not be the case.


If only the chef knew about our diets. When I first saw this thread I thought of myself and beans and concluded "the lamb will fart"....now I see what you are saying. Ask a Brit! They are the ones so keen on beans with.....even breakfast (yuk)  :P  what an odd habit. Beans and tomatoes I think it was. But they like their beans.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 1:48pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Seraffa


If only the chef knew about our diets. When I first saw this thread I thought of myself and beans and concluded "the lamb will fart"....now I see what you are saying. Ask a Brit! They are the ones so keen on beans with.....even breakfast (yuk)  :P  what an odd habit. Beans and tomatoes I think it was. But they like their beans.


Baked beans at breakfast never appealed to me much either, but now that I eat veggies at breakfast it doesn't seem as revolting.  Hey, southerners like their beans, too!  Black eyed peas, butter beans, field peas 'n snaps (my favorite), red beans 'n rice.
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 4:06pm; Reply: 9
I have a favorite recipe I make in the slow cooker called "Braised Lamb Chops with White Beans." I just love the creaminess the beans bring to this dish. I don't find it too heavy but a beautiful blending of flavors and textures.
Posted by: cajun, Saturday, August 13, 2011, 9:37pm; Reply: 10
Wholefoodie, I am with you! Yummo!
Anyone heard of cassoulette from the Languedoc region of France? Each family has their own version with various meats but the one I had in Carcasonne had duck and lamb. Many make it with ham, chicken, duck, lamb.....but those white beans are so creamy good!
Lamb Shoulder steaks, wild and brown rice, French string beans, and fresh arugula/romaine/red onion/pear and walnut salad are a favorite meal I fix for my family.
Posted by: JJR, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:20am; Reply: 11
That's what they call it at this French Restaurant my wife and I have gone to the last two years for our anniversery!!!  Cassolette.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 3:25pm; Reply: 12
I think you mean cassoulet (?).  I wish I could still have duck - but it is an avoid now.  :(
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 4:35pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from yaeli
For me lean lamb - braised - and fava beans (from frozen and w/o the husks) - slightly cooked - is an ideal combination.  :) Geno-harmonic I believe, and just sprinkle it with tahini. SWAMI hits the bull's eye also re the taste buds.


Fava is a Swami Diamond for me, and I've never cooked them.  Never even tasted them, and I was wondering what to do with 'em.  Maybe I'll start with the frozen/no hulls.  Thanks for the idea, Yaeli.  :)
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 5:11pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Victoria


Fava is a Swami Diamond for me,


me too, I have only been able to find them dried. They were a good replacement for garbanzo beans in the hummus I made. This winter I might try some in a lamb stew, could be very good.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 5:25pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from grey rabbit


me too, I have only been able to find them dried. They were a good replacement for garbanzo beans in the hummus I made. This winter I might try some in a lamb stew, could be very good.


How do you prepare dried fava?  Is it same as other dried beans?
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 5:45pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Victoria


How do you prepare dried fava?  Is it same as other dried beans?


pretty much, I soaked them overnight and then cooked them till they were soft. The ones I found were "Bob's Red Mill" and they had recipes on the back. :)
Posted by: SandrAruba, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 5:46pm; Reply: 17
Black beans and Lamb is a genoharmonic combination on my Swami. I eat it together lots of times.
Posted by: DoS, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 6:31pm; Reply: 18
With pinto or green beans... or both! For me!
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Sunday, August 14, 2011, 6:36pm; Reply: 19
In Italy  you find also green fava beans and artichokes with lamb, tasty as eggplant, zucchini or bell peppers stir fried !
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