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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Delighting in Lamb: For Bs
Posted by: san j, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 2:40am
Calling all Bs and helpers thereof!

Who loves Lamb?

What are favorite B-friendly Lamb recipes or dishes or combos?
Say maaaaaa if you love lamb and tell us what you like, what partner / family member likes, etc.

Favorite cut(s), too, and ways of preparation, and places to obtain...

Whatever.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 2:45am; Reply: 1
pm GCG!!! ;D
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 3:01am; Reply: 2
I'm not a B, and I only eat lamb once in a while (it's neutral). I like a chop with a little sea salt and rosemary, seared, medium rare. Lamb is very good, 10,000 coyotes can't be wrong!
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 3:56am; Reply: 3
I haven't eaten much lamb recently, the price locally has soared. I'll get back to this tomorrow night.
Posted by: honeybee, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 4:11am; Reply: 4
Lamb steaks are great here atm; ground them in the food processor with fresh rosemary, garlic, oregano, chilli, sea salt and an egg.
Sometimes add parmesan, turmeric & cayenne too.
Then shape burger patties to grill on a cast iron bbq plate. Great with a sweet potato and roast garlic gratin, & grilled pineapple.

Cutlets are always a hit (purse needs to take a hit to buy them atm though!) love them with a lemon & mint yoghurt.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 4:33am; Reply: 5
My favorite is lamb chops, but they are priced out of my reach now.  So I've switched to leg of lamb, which my butcher cuts off the bone into manageable chunks.  One of my fast food meals is just to simply cut the lamb into smaller pieces, season with Himalayan salt, onion and garlic granules and a good curry powder.  Then I saute the meat on all sides, leaving it just a little pink in the center, and toss it with some steamed vegetable.  It's a 6 minute meal. :P
Posted by: san j, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 5:22am; Reply: 6
Y'know, this is a good thread to call upon from time to time, to remind one of what is really good and so, so simple.

I love these descriptions!

Don'tcha just love the way lamb juices interact with the yogurt or the herbs? Isn't lamb amazingly tasty roasted over a fire/coals? I dunno - it brings back some sort of ancestral memory for me or something.

I know a lot of y'all are off of bread(s), but I like a lamb-burger on some sort of flatbread so the juices and herbs and any sauce can sog up the bread, too. I also go for a roasted leg - delicious butterflied/roasted with lots of garlic and herbs rubbed in.

If you can from time to time procure a chop - even one PRIME chop - what a treat...
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 1:39pm; Reply: 7
I like all lamb but lamb shank is my favorite.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 3:20pm; Reply: 8
I don´t eat much lamb- due to horreble high prices here and taste...

But I prefer lamb chops -pink  with lemonjuice and rosemary.

I do like a leg of lamb as well
-if it is baked with real appelcider /white wine and  herbs  and thin foil over
at 100 c/ 212F for at least 12 hours - take thin foil over and get the oven really high so the meat browns the last 30 min.
Meat is then very silky and amazing tender.

Somehow I can´t stomach lamb fat s
o I rarely eat minced lamb unless  have minced it myself.
It is the only animal fat apart from chicken fat that my body reacts severe to  :X :-/

I am a weird B  :B

I have noticed that the type of lamb matters as well I do better on the leaner and more wild types of lamb.
Posted by: 14428 (Guest), Sunday, July 31, 2011, 3:36pm; Reply: 9
I swore off lamb too...don't like it :X, but Patty H has a nice recipe, hopefully she'll chime in here. I do like the sound of those burgers Honeybee.  :) I never thought of grinding it up in a food processor, that would help because it's not tender, I buy the Australian leg of lamb, but have found it fatty and tough, too much work, it's a diamond for me...so maybe I should give it another go trying those burgers. Thanks Honeybee, can you do that with the leg of lamb? :)

Woops, I'm an O, sorry
Posted by: JJR, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 6:57pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Henriette Bsec
I don´t eat much lamb- due to horreble high prices here and taste...

But I prefer lamb chops -pink  with lemonjuice and rosemary.

I do like a leg of lamb as well
-if it is baked with real appelcider /white wine and  herbs  and thin foil over
at 100 c/ 212F for at least 12 hours - take thin foil over and get the oven really high so the meat browns the last 30 min.
Meat is then very silky and amazing tender.

Somehow I can´t stomach lamb fat s
o I rarely eat minced lamb unless  have minced it myself.
It is the only animal fat apart from chicken fat that my body reacts severe to  :X :-/

I am a weird B  :B

I have noticed that the type of lamb matters as well I do better on the leaner and more wild types of lamb.


I have found that the only lamb I can stomach well, is grass fed.  Our local supermarkets carry locally raised stuff, and it's bleech to me.  Flavor is bad and they are most likely corn fed.  But Sam's Club carries New Zealand lamb which is fine.  I buy that when I run out of this stuff I get from my Doctor's assistant, who also runs an organic, grass fed farm of Cow's, sheep and chickens.  Her eggs are awesome too.  That stuff is medicine to me.  But the sam's club stuff is pretty expensive.  We just bought some and I was like, wow.  That's a lot of money.  

I like it any way.  

Posted by: deblynn3, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 7:07pm; Reply: 11
BD and I couldn't find any this weekend :'(.

I do have some packages of ground lamb in my freezer which I like to make Shepherd's Pie using sweet potatoes on top. ;D
Posted by: san j, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 8:10pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from deblynn3
BD and I couldn't find any this weekend :'(.

I do have some packages of ground lamb in my freezer which I like to make Shepherd's Pie using sweet potatoes on top. ;D



I have been known to make a ground lamb Shepherd's Pie using a puréed blend of mashed white potato and celeriac.


Quoted from Henriette Bsec
I am a weird B   :B


But we love you, anyway. :K) ;) ;D



Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 8:23pm; Reply: 13
I don't enjoy ground lamb (not to say I wouldn't eat it, because I do at times) because it's fattier and tastes stronger.  I'm more satisfied if I eat a smaller portion of a more lean and tender cut.  JJR, I agree with you on the grass-fed assessment.  Our leg of lamb options at the butchers are very tender.  And the lamb chops, tender!  I haven't tried lamb steak yet.  How about Rack of Lamb???
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 9:08pm; Reply: 14
I had medium rare rack of lamb with a wine reduction sauce once, fantastic. Somebody else was paying the bill though.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 9:28pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I had medium rare rack of lamb with a wine reduction sauce once, fantastic. Somebody else was paying the bill though.


uh huh!  (ok)
Posted by: san j, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 9:45pm; Reply: 16
Some like to be served the rack; some prefer the chops separated. One doesn't necessarily taste any better than the other.
Posted by: BTypeAUS, Sunday, July 31, 2011, 10:58pm; Reply: 17
I use lamb to make stir fries its so good  :)
Posted by: JJR, Monday, August 1, 2011, 3:11am; Reply: 18
It's a shame it's so much more than beef.  I mean, you wouldn't think it should be.  They probably don't eat as much.  I think it's just less popular here.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, August 1, 2011, 3:55am; Reply: 19
I think that a larger percentage of it is produced over seas is the main problem. Couple that with the fall of value of the US dollar. The price of beef is going up also but it is mainly produced in the US. Hmmm? that does make it a bargain for export.
Posted by: honeybee, Monday, August 1, 2011, 7:55am; Reply: 20
Have diced a lamb leg and sauteed some fresh garlic, grated ginger and an onion in some ghee. The lamb went in, with some ground coriander seed, garam masala, turmeric, sea salt and cayenne, stir fried over high heat for 1 min; added cup of water to a nearly empty apricot jam jar and shook it up, a splash of the red from my glass and the jammy water went it...

Rice on the go and some green beans and cauli to finish in the pot once lamb cooked through on low heat for about 30 mins. Think i'll add a half cup of yoghurt and bunch of coriander that was in our csa share this week that has already gone limp  :(

Some preserved mango and lime would make this a really awesome dish, pity I never have them, not even a preserved lemon  :'(

I used to love going to the indian diner for lamb & paneer curry with a big mango lassi  which is like a fruity salty yoghurt drink :P

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, August 1, 2011, 8:06am; Reply: 21
Hoenybee that sounds really good. :D :D :D :D
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, August 1, 2011, 4:42pm; Reply: 22
Yesterday, I made a huge pot of lamb stew:

saute in ghee:  one red onion and half dozen or more large garlic cloves (chopped), then add a heaping double handful of chopped maitake and shitake mushrooms, stirred together until mushrooms are half done

add:  1 quart gelled knuckle-bone beef stock plus 1 cup of ginger liquid (made by simmering 1/4 C chopped ginger for a couple of hours and straining)
      1 rounded Tb of spices, customized to my food list (cumin, coriander, tumeric, anise, ginger, cardamom, fennel)
Stir together until liquid comes to a simmer.

add:  8 C or so of chopped vegetables.  I aim for as many as possible.  Usually something like -- 1 fennel bulb with some of the green tops, double handful of celery with tops, a few carrots, several tiny zucchini, 1/2 red bell pepper, fresh chopped tumeric

Cover pot and simmer while cleaning and chopping (or tearing) 8 C (packed) greens[/b.  This time I used spinach, rainbow chard and an entire bunch of fresh basil.  Also, at this point, I cut 1 1/2 pounds or more leg of lamb into bite-sized pieces. Sometimes I add an entire delicata or butternut squash, which I have baked whole, then scooped out of the skin.

Add to simmering stew:  1 Tb dry parsley flakes; 1 tsp or so, good quality sea salt, 1/4 C extra virgin olive oil, all the greens, and the chopped lamb.  

Mix well, replace lid and simmer for another 20 minutes or so, until lamb is done and greens are all wilted into the stew.

I eat the first bowl as is.  Then I puree the rest and keep in wide mouth quart jars to enjoy for the next week.  

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, August 1, 2011, 6:17pm; Reply: 23
Very facinating recipe Victoria - sounds like something  might enjoy when autumn arrives- thanks :)
Posted by: honeybee, Monday, August 1, 2011, 9:40pm; Reply: 24
Lamb and ginger are a great match.
Fennel bulbs are great in a lamb shank & quinoa soup too. Nothing better than to light the fire on a cold sunday morning and have a shank soup on the go, the smell has got to bring good spirits  :D
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 1:26am; Reply: 25
Quoted from JJR
It's a shame it's so much more than beef.  I mean, you wouldn't think it should be.  They probably don't eat as much.  I think it's just less popular here.


Sheep are much more labor intensive to raise than cattle.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 3:30am; Reply: 26
We raised them for a few years. At the local slaughter house there was a basic "kill fee". Then the hide is a greater percentage of the weight as compared to cattle. It takes nearly as long to process a yearling sheep that might yield 80 to 100 pounds as to process a steer that could yield 600 or better. Shearing is'n't much fun, neither is trying to worm the stubborn things. Sheep can also manage to kill them selves in inventive ways and are more vulnerable to predators the most common of which is neighborhood dogs.
Turkeys were easier, they didn't get mastitis though some of the dumber ones would lay their eggs in fireant beds.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 6:01am; Reply: 27
GCG: Well don'tcha jes' know how to warm this here city-girl's l'il ol' heart.  :K)

You meanin' to tell me lamb chops don' come from the butcher shop?  ??)


PS. Actually sheep are raised and grazed here in Marin County, just over the GG bridge... It's considered ideal country for that, near the Ocean.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 4:31pm; Reply: 28
Shows how much I know about raising meat animals.  I'll have to get my doctor's assistant on this one, as they raise both.
Posted by: grey rabbit, Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:45am; Reply: 29
Quoted from san j

PS. Actually sheep are raised and grazed here in Marin County, just over the GG bridge... It's considered ideal country for that, near the Ocean.


I grew up about 50 north of SF, there was the most idyllic sheep ranch near where the Russian River emptied into the ocean.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 2:06am; Reply: 30
Quoted from grey rabbit


I grew up about 50 north of SF, there was the most idyllic sheep ranch near where the Russian River emptied into the ocean.


Yes! Near Jenner, right? Some of the most gorgeous sheep-grazing real estate in the world, it's got to be. Really green, in season. sloping pastures to cliffs' edges, overhanging the Pacific. Perfect...

You grew up there? :D

Posted by: grey rabbit, Thursday, August 4, 2011, 1:15am; Reply: 31
Jenner by the Sea! I actually lived on Burnside Road Sebastopol, CA. This was back before there were any vineyards there, just apple orchards. Every Sunday afternoon when the weather was good we would drive to the coast, and head north till we found a good spot for a picnic and then kids and dog and parents would hike down what I thought at the time was an impossibly steep cliff to an often-times empty beach. We would spend the afternoon gathering driftwood or other interesting objects, have a campfire and cook a picnic lunch. When it started to get dark and cold, kids and dog, smelling of seaweed and covered with sticky sand climbed into the back of the old truck and we'd head home. Some of my fondest childhood memories!
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, August 4, 2011, 2:36am; Reply: 32
Quoted from san j
GCG: Well don'tcha jes' know how to warm this here city-girl's l'il ol' heart.  :K)

You meanin' to tell me lamb chops don' come from the butcher shop?  ??)


PS. Actually sheep are raised and grazed here in Marin County, just over the GG bridge... It's considered ideal country for that, near the Ocean.


Yeah in my family I'm the first generation to grow up off the farm though as you can see I stayed pretty connected with it. My folks grew up in depression days, they are realists and taught us to be realists also. When ever I hunted or fished Mom would cook the catch...after I did the butchering. They were open about financial matters also. Taught me a lot of gardening, livestock care, home and auto repair, cooking you name it. Then they trusted me with whatever I tried to do. Drive off to a college I had never been to at 17? Here is a map, gas is cheaper in ---town. Write when you get a chance.
Posted by: san j, Thursday, August 4, 2011, 6:32am; Reply: 33
Quoted from grey rabbit


I grew up about 50 north of SF, there was the most idyllic sheep ranch near where the Russian River emptied into the ocean.


So it looks like we're talking about that same beautiful place.
That whole region - Sebastopol / Occidental / Jenner is ... very nice.

But back to.. maaaaa ;D

Posted by: san j, Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 6:06pm; Reply: 34
Just had lamb again from the Indian restaurant.
It was a Seekh Kabob - Ground spiced lamb, skewered and roasted in the tandoor.

Lamb takes spices well. Really well. Feel free to "go for it" - with herbs, too, in other cuisines. Experiment, because when you get it right it's heavenly.  :D
Posted by: jayneeo, Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 6:53pm; Reply: 35
Oh my! DH makes an unbelievable lamb lollipop, marinated in tons of fresh herbs and wine, then grilled...heavenly! They're cut from the rack into riblets, hence the name. They're superbeneficial for us gatherers!
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