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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Please Explain Blood Subtypes to Me?
Posted by: Seraffa, Friday, July 15, 2011, 2:55am
Hello - I'm asking for a very important reaason. I have not persued Dr D'Adamo's books yet but know I am an A+. Contrary to what I know the "healthy" diet and diegestive system of an A is, I cannot possibly eat that way. I have 2 autoimmune disorders - one of which started when I was 21 and was first diagnosed as "bulimia" but is always traceable back to the ingestion of starches, legumes and even milk sugar. The other illness is now very mild hyperthyroidism. I want to know what "blood subtype" is and what role it plays because it sounds very much like my blood subtype is ruling things for many years now as an "O" !!
Posted by: Lola, Friday, July 15, 2011, 3:32am; Reply: 1
http://www.dadamo.com/program_advanced_subtypes.htm
Posted by: Seraffa, Friday, July 15, 2011, 5:05am; Reply: 2
Hello. Thank you for listing blood subtypes, for me because I am probably winding up as being a "taster" due to hyperthyroidism. It was a very complicated thing to sift through at first.

But please tell me - where in Dr. D'Adamo's writings would ANYTHING come up as to why (I) an A would develop such horrible bulimia leading me to react to grain, legumes, fruit, fructose, milk sugar......forcing me to begin eating as an "O"? If my blood type is supposed to support the very foods I react against.....? I know I cannot turn into an "O" !
Posted by: Lola, Friday, July 15, 2011, 6:15am; Reply: 3
read the genotype diet, find out your genotype and secretor status...as well as subtype if you wish
you might be an explorer A having lamb as beneficial
The most recent rating of a food can be found using typebase:

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/typeindexer.htm

Read about the non secretor issue
http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/newbie/a.htm
library
http://www.dadamo.com/books.htm
http://www.4yourtype.com/departments.asp?dept=7
More information on SWAMI diets can be found at:


http://www.dadamo.com/clinic/swamigenotype.htm
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, July 15, 2011, 8:51pm; Reply: 4
Are you 100% positive that you're an A? More than one person has followed the wrong BTD before finding out that their blood type is other than what they thought it was.

You may be able to digest more grains and beans after doing some serious healing- perhaps you will be able to digest grains and beans once your gut is in better shape. Lactose intolerance is normal for As, and any dairy products you'd be likely to get (on the blood type diet or genotype diet) would be yogurt and cheeses that are naturally low in lactose.

It's also possible that you're an Explorer, and simply need much more meat and far fewer starches than the "Typical A."

With all your health problems, I would suggest that you either go with GTD or go right to SWAMI.
Posted by: Easy E, Friday, July 15, 2011, 9:04pm; Reply: 5
I am A and do a mostly paleoized version of the explorer diet, which is what i ate most of my life anyway.  Fruits and meats.  Of course i ate other stuff like pizza and french fries, breads and stuff like that.  

But i began in college eating a lot of starches, grains, alcohol, coffee, etc and developed bad indigestion problems.  Also started adding mayo, mustard, and sauces to foods, which i never did before college cuz i didn't like them.

Now i try to keep it more like i ate back when i was younger and do better.  Sauces, fats, and some oils give me bad indigestion.
Posted by: Seraffa, Monday, July 18, 2011, 4:00pm; Reply: 6
Thank you very much, everyone. Hope this bumps up for the "thank-you" but I'm going to buy Genome Type and persue more questions on other threads. I'm fasinated  and hope to lose weight as well, being chronically obsee for the past 10 years. THANKS!
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 1:06am; Reply: 7
I am interested in this as well, since I am an O, so I assume my dad must have been an O, as my mom, who is still alive is an A.  There are four kids in my birth family, two A's and two O's.

Does this make me an Oa?  I have been pondering this, as I am a hunter who is supposed to eat mostly fish.  I assume it has to do with the heart disease in my family, but I also can't help but wonder about the A influence of my mother.

Can anyone help me understand this?
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 1:22am; Reply: 8
Quoted Text
Does this make me an Oa?
No. The gene that carries blood type is what is called "diploid" meaning that it has two alleles, humans only have 3 different alleles possible for blood type. The only way you can be an O is if you are an Oo, A will always dominate over O as will B, A and B will battle it out and share dominance.
Posted by: Serenity, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 1:39am; Reply: 9
Quoted from grey rabbit
No. The gene that carries blood type is what is called "diploid" meaning that it has two alleles, humans only have 3 different alleles possible for blood type. The only way you can be an O is if you are an Oo, A will always dominate over O as will B, A and B will battle it out and share dominance.


This is very interesting.  
So my sons are A as I am A but their dad is O does that make them Aa or Ao?  :)
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:11am; Reply: 10
Quoted from grey rabbit
No. The gene that carries blood type is what is called "diploid" meaning that it has two alleles, humans only have 3 different alleles possible for blood type. The only way you can be an O is if you are an Oo, A will always dominate over O as will B, A and B will battle it out and share dominance.


So how do an A mother and an O father have O children if A is always dominant?  Sorry if I am sounding dumb here, but I just don't get it  ??)  This has always perplexed me.

I know my father is my biological father, as I have his rare blood antigen.
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:15am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Patty H
So how do an A mother and an O father have O children if A is always dominant?  Sorry if I am sounding dumb here, but I just don't get it  ??)

The A mother could be either Aa or Ao.
The O father would be Oo.

If the mother is Ao and passes the o to the child, since the father only has o to pass, the child will be O.

The dominance is within the person, but has no decision making capability about which allele is passed to a child...
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:18am; Reply: 12
Quoted from Serenity


This is very interesting.  
So my sons are A as I am A but their dad is O does that make them Aa or Ao?  :)

The sons MUST be Ao because the only allele the father could pass is o...
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:19am; Reply: 13
I know that I am an Ao because I know that I am an A (of course) and I have a daughter that is an Oo, her father was an Oo. One allele comes from the father and one from the mother, her father could only give her an O and I could have given her an O or an A, I gave her an O so she is Oo. If I were an Aa, I would only have been able to give her an A and she could not have been an O. Also, two Aos could have a child that was an Oo - that is why Os will never disappear!
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:23am; Reply: 14
My mom is an A, and my dad was an O. Does that mean that I'm an Ao?
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:24am; Reply: 15
Quoted from Patty H


So how do an A mother and an O father have O children if A is always dominant?  Sorry if I am sounding dumb here, but I just don't get it  ??)  This has always perplexed me.

I know my father is my biological father, as I have his rare blood antigen.


Everyone has two alleles (genes) for ABO blood type, one from each parent. O is a recessive blood type which means you must inherit an O gene from each parent. A and B are dominant to O which means if an offspring inherits an A or B from one parent and an O from the other parent then the offspring will be A or B blood type.

A and B however are codominant to each other. This is why blood type AB exists. Neither the A or B will completely dominate over the other. Hope this makes sense.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:25am; Reply: 16
Quoted from Drea
My mom is an A, and my dad was an O. Does that mean that I'm an Ao?


Yes, your O dad could only pass on O genes.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:29am; Reply: 17
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


Yes, your O dad could only pass on O genes.


That's so interesting. I've often found that I do better on a bit more protein than the standard A. Could this be the reason?
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:31am; Reply: 18
Thank you all, for your explanations.  I think I get it now.  So, just to make sure I understand, O's can only be Oo, even if they have an A, B or AB parent, yes? ??)
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:33am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Patty H
Thank you all, for your explanations.  I think I get it now.  So, just to make sure I understand, O's can only be Oo, even if they have an A, B or AB parent, yes? ??)

This is correct.
Posted by: Easy E, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:33am; Reply: 20
AA (A) can only give A gene.

Ao (A) can give A gene or o gene.

BB (B) can only give B gene

Bo (B) can give B gene or o gene.

Oo (O) is always O and only gives an o gene.

AB (AB) gives either an A or B gene.


A and B will express over o if an A or B gene is present.  The o remains dormant but able to be passed, so it is a recessive gene.  

The same principle for brown eyes and blue eyes.  Brown are dominant, blue are recessive.  o is a strange recessive because recessives usually are not the most common gene expression and are usually the result of a mutation after a dominant gene already exists.  All of these blood types existed before human beings existed as homo sapien.
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:36am; Reply: 21
Quoted from Easy E
AA (A) can only give A gene.

Ao (A) can give A gene or o gene.

BB (B) can only give B gene

Bo (B) can give B gene or o gene.

Oo (O) is always O and only gives an o gene.

AB (AB) gives either an A or B gene.


A and B will express over o if an A or B gene is present.  The o remains dormant but able to be passed, so it is a recessive gene.  

The same principle for brown eyes and blue eyes.  Brown are dominant, blue are recessive.  o is a strange recessive because recessives usually are not the most common gene expression and are usually the result of a mutation after a dominant gene already exists.  All of these blood types existed before human beings existed as homo sapien.


Excellent!  Thanks for the detailed explanation, Easy E  ;D
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:36pm; Reply: 22
Quoted Text
O's can only be Oo, even if they have an A, B or AB parent, yes?
If you are an O you cannot have an AB parent! Eye color is far more complex than blood type BTW, there are only three alleles for blood type and so far there have been 800+ alleles identified that have an influence on eye color! Therefore it is possible for a blue-eyed parent and a brown-eyed parent to have a blue-eyed child even though brown is dominant.
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, 2:39pm; Reply: 23
@Drea, I know that I am an Ao, but I do not do well on more meat than an A normally would, I don't think having a recessive o really does that much as far as food choices go.
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 12:50am; Reply: 24
Thanks grey rabbit. I don't mean "meat", necessarily, but definitely more protein. ;)
Posted by: Easy E, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 12:31pm; Reply: 25
Two A's can have an O child... Ao and Ao can both give o genes to produce an O offspring.  Same with two B's.  Or an Ao and Bo parent.  AB has only A or B to give, so can not give an o on their side to give oo in the offspring.  

Just like two brown eyed parents can be Bb and Bb to give bb, or blue eyes, but a brown eyed person with BB cannot give a b.  So the child will have brown eyes despite the color of the other person.
Posted by: grey rabbit, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 1:18pm; Reply: 26
Quoted Text
Just like two brown eyed parents can be Bb and Bb to give bb, or blue eyes, but a brown eyed person with BB cannot give a b.  So the child will have brown eyes despite the color of the other person.
Eye color is far more complicated than that! there are at minimum 6 genes that have been identified in direct connection with eye/skin color, there are, like I said before, over 800 alleles that those genes can have, so do the math, how many possibilities are there? Example, parent 1 : BbAAccDdeeFf Parent 2: BBaaCcddEEff, keep changing it up and see what you get! (How do I know this? My brother is a University Professor of molecular biology and he helped me write a paper on it for my Honors class :), requiring 8 other sources besides him  ) I think it is fascinating.
Posted by: Patty H, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 1:33pm; Reply: 27
Quoted from grey rabbit
If you are an O you cannot have an AB parent! Eye color is far more complex than blood type BTW, there are only three alleles for blood type and so far there have been 800+ alleles identified that have an influence on eye color! Therefore it is possible for a blue-eyed parent and a brown-eyed parent to have a blue-eyed child even though brown is dominant.


My father had brown eyes, red hair and pale skin, my mother has black hair, blue eyes and pale skin and myself and two of my siblings have blue eyes and fair skin.  My other brother has dark  brunette hair, dark skin and dark brown eyes.  His coloring is the predominant coloring of both of my parents' siblings.  My father did have a sister who was a red head, but the rest of his siblings were dark.  My mother's siblings were all dark.  None of us got my father's red hair or my mother's coal black hair.

Weird!
Posted by: Pixu, Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 1:38pm; Reply: 28
I'm the only one in my family with brown eyes, my mom's are greenish, dad's blue or grey and my older bro's are pale blue. I don't know where my eye color comes from, I just know they're greenish brown (once I tried on one brown contact lense, and my other eye looked green in comparison!!  :o ;D ) Also my skin's quite dark for a Finn (tho not at all so here in Spain  ;D )
Posted by: Easy E, Thursday, July 21, 2011, 12:10pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from grey rabbit
Eye color is far more complicated than that! there are at minimum 6 genes that have been identified in direct connection with eye/skin color, there are, like I said before, over 800 alleles that those genes can have, so do the math, how many possibilities are there? Example, parent 1 : BbAAccDdeeFf Parent 2: BBaaCcddEEff, keep changing it up and see what you get! (How do I know this? My brother is a University Professor of molecular biology and he helped me write a paper on it for my Honors class :), requiring 8 other sources besides him  ) I think it is fascinating.


Good thing God is in charge of our genes and not me!!!!!!!

Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, July 21, 2011, 12:22pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Pixu
I'm the only one in my family with brown eyes, my mom's are greenish, dad's blue or grey and my older bro's are pale blue. I don't know where my eye color comes from, I just know they're greenish brown (once I tried on one brown contact lense, and my other eye looked green in comparison!!  :o ;D ) Also my skin's quite dark for a Finn (tho not at all so here in Spain  ;D )


Don't green eyed people carry the gene for both blue and brown eyes?
Posted by: Maus, Friday, April 13, 2012, 6:06pm; Reply: 31
So there is no such thing as an Oa subtype?  Os can only be Os no matter of the parents blood type?
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, April 13, 2012, 7:09pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Maus
So there is no such thing as an Oa subtype?  Os can only be Os no matter of the parents blood type?

If you are referring to strictly ABO typing, you are correct.  The A would be dominant to the o, so you would be Type A with a recessive o, or Ao.

If you are referring to the typing in James D'Adamo's book, referenced in another recent thread, I can't answer your question fully as I haven't read his book and don't know what scientific backing he uses to substantiate his theories.
Posted by: Maus, Friday, April 13, 2012, 9:43pm; Reply: 33
I did not know there is a difference.  I thought subgroup is subgroup.  Confused now  ??)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, April 13, 2012, 10:18pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from Maus
I did not know there is a difference.  I thought subgroup is subgroup.  
James D'Adamo use the term blood subgroup differently than nearly anyone else.

This site is not associated with James D'Adamo so we do not use his unconventional definition.




On this site, we are concerned with the work of Peter D'Adamo.

His diet books are concerned with only two blood subgroups. Since these subgroups are only found in type A, and you are type O, you can ignore blood subgroups.

The diet rating systems of peter D'Adamo use A1 and A2.

A few food recommendations differ for A2.

Eighty percent of type As are A1.

A1 differs from A2 because of genetic difference in the coding of the A antigen.

A single nucleotide substitution that creates a single amino acid change (proline # 156 is changed to a leucine) and a deletion mutation which causes a frame-shift which extends the reading frame.

You can test the genetics or you can use blood serotyping to identify the antigen a person has.

There are other blood subgroups but they do not play a role in determining the diet recommendations in Peter's books.  (Actually in most of his books the A subgroups are not used, only blood types are used)

Posted by: Lola, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 1:49am; Reply: 35
a serotyping panel would help narrow down your subtype GR
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 2:28am; Reply: 36
Can this be "stickied" by any chance please? It is fascinating ;)
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