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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Cornstarch Substitute?
Posted by: 14418 (Guest), Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:05pm

What is a good substitute for cornstarch to thicken sauces and soups since corn is a no-no for O's?

Thanks!
Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:08pm; Reply: 1
Arrowroot powder perhaps.  I find that brown rice flour works well.  It's a bit gelatinous like corn starch.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:18pm; Reply: 2
I use arrowroot flour + sometimes tapioca flour
Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:19pm; Reply: 3
Tapioca might be an avoid for Os.  It's an avoid on my SWAMI.  Double check.  Unfortunately, tapioca is one of the reasons I have to avoid prepackaged gluten free products.  :(  I used to love tapioca pudding.  That was another life.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:22pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from O in Virginia
Tapioca might be an avoid for Os.  It's an avoid on my SWAMI.  Double check.  Unfortunately, tapioca is one of the reasons I have to avoid prepackaged gluten free products.  :(  I used to love tapioca pudding.  That was another life.


it's neutral for O secretors and avoid for nonnies
Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:23pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from brinyskysail


it's neutral for O secretors and avoid for nonnies


Ah, that's why.  OP will need to secretor status.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:23pm; Reply: 6
Rice flour (starch) or arrowroot are probably the best...
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:58pm; Reply: 7
Also agar if you don't have it as an avoid. I do.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 4:52pm; Reply: 8
IME, white rice flour is better for thickening sauces than brown rice flour. The brown rice flour sometimes leaves a gritty texture.

Arrowroot can be used as an exact sub for cornstarch. Rice flour is a perfect sub for flour- 1 tablespoon of starch (arrowroot, potato starch, or corn starch) is equal to the thickening power of 2 tablespoons of flour (rice flour or "all purpose wheat flour.")

Flour and starch are often used differently in recipes. Starch is dissolved in a little cold liquid and added to a pot of hot liquid, and it thickens up in a few minutes. Flour is usually cooked in oil or butter first (called making  a roux) and then you slowly add liquid while stirring constantly to avoid lumps. That's usually done at the beginning of a recipe or in a separate pot, so it can be less convenient than adding starch towards the end of a recipe. Adding flour to an already hot liquid doesn't always work- you're as likely to get thin broth with lumps of hard cooked flour as you are to get a nice smooth gravy.

I've also heard of people using eggs to thicken sauces, although I haven't tried it personally. You beat an egg, blend it into a small amount of liquid from the recipe in a separate bowl, then add that mixture to the big pot and stir it in and let it cook a few minutes longer to thicken up.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 5:05pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from ruthiegirl
IME, white rice flour is better for thickening sauces than brown rice flour. The brown rice flour sometimes leaves a gritty texture.

Good to know!  I only have brown rice flour in the house, not white.  But I will remember that in future for baking cookies.  I used brown rice flour for ginger snaps and they came out a bit...sandy.  Though tasty.

Quoted from ruthiegirl
I've also heard of people using eggs to thicken sauces, although I haven't tried it personally. You beat an egg, blend it into a small amount of liquid from the recipe in a separate bowl, then add that mixture to the big pot and stir it in and let it cook a few minutes longer to thicken up.

That's called tempering.  You also have to do that with sour cream when you're making stroganoff, not that I make that anymore.  You can't just dump a cup of sour cream into the sauce, it has to be tempered first so it doesn't separate.  Just some extra useless info for us Os!  ;)
Posted by: san j, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 6:41pm; Reply: 10
Kudzu (alt. spelling: kuzu).
Posted by: Possum, Monday, April 1, 2013, 11:03pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from O in Virginia
Tapioca might be an avoid for Os.  It's an avoid on my SWAMI.  Double check.  Unfortunately, tapioca is one of the reasons I have to avoid prepackaged gluten free products.  :(

Quoted from brinyskysail
it's neutral for O secretors and avoid for nonnies
Just wanted to open up some discussion re tapioca flour/starch... I'm wondering if tapioca starch is also sulphited the same as cornflour is? Thinking now, my chronic back ache isn't because of the coconut sugar... It's more likely to be from some raisin bread I made, that had tapioca starch in it (which I am thinking must be sulphited)... My husband developed similar symptoms & he ate the bread too (but not the chocolate)... We are both feeling like old cripples right now... ::)

Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, April 1, 2013, 11:42pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Possum
I'm wondering if tapioca starch is also sulphited the same as cornflour is?

It appears (by looking at at Arrowhead Mills products on a page for celiac products) that some is and some isn't, unless they just haven't included the sulphiting information on all of the labels...
http://www.food4celiacs.com/ShopOnline/AM/150.html
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 12:22am; Reply: 13
Thanks Joe... Nothing on labeling  >:( - am going to ring them especially seeing as it is affecting my husband as well (I don't usually indulge at all) ;)
Posted by: Adam, Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 12:43pm; Reply: 14
I have made a gumbo before and used oil and spelt flour to make a roux.  You have to watch it like a hawk and make sure it darkens but doesn't burn.
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 2:54pm; Reply: 15
San J, it's good to know that there's some practical use for Kudzu LOL
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