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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Foods high in Quercetin????
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, May 25, 2011, 3:47am
I think pineapple has it.  What else??

Sorry if I asked this before.  I did a search and didn't find it, if I did.  

So thank you!!!
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, May 25, 2011, 4:43am; Reply: 1
Green Tea
Dillweed,
Apples     
Yellow Wax Hot Peppers     
Watercress     
Hartwort Leaves     
Ancho Peppers     
Buckwheat     
Bee Pollen     
Cocoa, powder     
Onions
Cranberries
Kale
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 12:06am; Reply: 2
Thank you!  You are full of good info.  Someone else told me about this bee pollen recently.  You really can eat it?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:10am; Reply: 3
Quoted from JJR
You really can eat it?


Bee pollen can be added to smoothies.



Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:21am; Reply: 4
Quoted from JJR
Someone else told me about this bee pollen recently.  You really can eat it?

Be careful with bee pollen if you are susceptible to pollen allergies...  You need to make sure it isn't going to blow you up!
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 4:13am; Reply: 5
That's what I was thinking.  It's funny how these things work though, because tonight I was reading a book that mentioned how bee pollen is a superfood.  I wasn't even searching that info out.  

I go easy with any new food.  You know?  Muscle test, take it slow, etc. etc.
Posted by: upnorth6, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 10:36am; Reply: 6
If you go with Bee Pollen eat only a few granules at a time it will be enough to know if you are allergic to it......

I've done quite well with it and was up to a few TBS a day about a year ago....a good friend of mine tried one granule and with in minutes had a stuffy nose....please be careful....you want it to be a very high quality pollen...
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 4:21pm; Reply: 7
Thank you all for that.  I don't even know where to get it.  I have a few more foods that I need to try first anyways.  I have chia seeds calling my name.  Chestnuts in a jar that I've passed over too long (I read in a book they help with weight loss) and there was something else I needed to try soon.  I forget what right now.  
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 4:24pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from JJR
I have chia seeds calling my name.  Chestnuts in a jar that I've passed over too long (I read in a book they help with weight loss)


I thought you were trying to gain weight?
Posted by: SquarePeg, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 6:40pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from JJR
-snip-
I go easy with any new food.  You know?  Muscle test, take it slow, etc. etc.
How do you do the muscle test?  I'm curious if it's a "blind" test in which you test the new substance along with a known benign control without knowing which is which.

Posted by: C_Sharp, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 6:56pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from SquarePeg
How do you do the muscle test?  I'm curious if it's a "blind" test in which you test the new substance along with a known benign control without knowing which is which.



You can do it that way if you so choose.
Posted by: brinyskysail, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 7:05pm; Reply: 11
is there any way to accurately muscle test yourself?  I'd rather have someone do it for me (becuase it seems like it would have to have some bias if you do it yourself) but the person I know who does it moved away
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, May 26, 2011, 7:33pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from brinyskysail
is there any way to accurately muscle test yourself?  I'd rather have someone do it for me (becuase it seems like it would have to have some bias if you do it yourself) but the person I know who does it moved away

Some people can accurately muscle test themselves, others either do not have, or have not developed, the ability.

I do have a practitioner verify my results at times just to make sure I am still getting accurate answers.
Posted by: JJR, Friday, May 27, 2011, 4:44pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from brinyskysail


I thought you were trying to gain weight?


I think the book was saying it helps with your appetite.  Maybe I was reading it the wrong way.  



I muscle test myself and I know I may not always be 100%, I think I've gotten somewhat the hang of it.  It's not a perfect science, but my results have coincided many times with other people that are proficient, so....  I rely on it to a certain degree.  Like I said though, I don't think I'm perfect at it.  It's just an added benefit if I'm reading it right.  Just one more tool.  

I face north, hold the food or supplement or oil or whatever by my belly and say, can I eat this? In my head, or Is this beneficial, or will this help me.  You can be specific I'm told.  And yes is forward and no is backward.  You will tilt a little. Or you may.  My sister has this weird thing where it just sort of scrunches around and takes about 3 minutes for it to actually tilt either way and she gets frustrated and just doesn't do it.  Your mind can affect your results, so you have to try and not influence your answer.  Either way, it all sounds like weird science to me, but there are too many times that someone has done this to me, or used these techniques and the bodies energy to figure out what I need, and it has seemed to help.  So, I do it.  Knowing that I may not be perfect.  But if I'm wrong, so what.  I would've maybe ate the thing anyways if I didn't have the skill to muscle test and just wait for the results afterward.  

I also try and search my feelings for what I'm craving and what my body may be telling me I need.  Is that going to be a perfect science also?  Heck no, but I think there is some power in our intuition.  I remember watching a thing on the history channel about a guy who was lost at sea for some reason and was catching fish.  And at first he would eat the fish, but then after like a week or something, he started eating the eyeballs and all the organ meats and skipped the flesh.  And he didn't know why.  And I guess it was because those were the nutrients he needed more at the time to survive the whole ordeal.  Which he did.  And it was quite a long period that he was lost.  Something to that degree.  Ribbit was the one who talked about trying to see if your mind will tell you what you need to eat.  

Like I said, just another tool.  Sorry for the long answer, but some of you may get something from it.
Posted by: italybound, Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 4:18pm; Reply: 14
I know pineapple contains bromelain, but it also contains quercitin?
Posted by: Mickey, Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 4:51pm; Reply: 15
Garlic is high in quercitin.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 5:20pm; Reply: 16
Garlic is also a food eaten in rather small quantities. Just how much quercitin should we aim for in  a day, and how much is in a clove of garlic?
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 7:31pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from ABJoe
..... or have not developed, the ability.


Developing the ability is the key. Here is a link:
http://www.goodhealthinfo.net/herbalists/muscle_testing.htm
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, July 23, 2013, 8:50pm; Reply: 18
I have to ask Italy, what made you revive this thread?  It's 2 years old!

But you're right, I think I was wrong about quercitin being in pineapple.  I'm not sure why I thought that.  Huh.  
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 2:40am; Reply: 19
JJR, I was looking for info on quercitin. :-)   Where better to look than on BTD.  ;D
Posted by: yaeli, Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 3:24am; Reply: 20
USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content of Selected Foods

http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12354500/Data/Flav/Flav_R03.pdf

Tables start at page 16 (of 159).

"Mean values in the database are reported as mg/100g of fresh weight of edible portion of
food." (p. 5)
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