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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Gluten sensitivity
Posted by: ArwenLegolas, Friday, April 29, 2011, 3:09am
My husband who is a Blood type B is on a gluten free, low fat, low sodium diabetic diet. He also suffers from Duodonitis, diverticulosis and GERD (which does not make it to the upper regions of his esophagus)Many of the products that are gluten free contain corn meal. I really could use some suggestions as to what would be a good strategy for him.  ??)

I also could use a easy to understand explanation for a person who has absolutely no nutrition sense (Him) why it is not a good idea to eat corn. I tried to explain but I am not doing so good of a job. Anybody?
Posted by: Lola, Friday, April 29, 2011, 3:13am; Reply: 1
why not find out his secretor status, and have him follow the diabetes book with protocols and all??

that is the most individualized physiological advice I can give you when asking for specific advice for someone close
Posted by: brinyskysail, Friday, April 29, 2011, 3:21am; Reply: 2
A lot of gluten free products are made with rice flour (brown or white, although brown would be healthier if your husband doesn't have any problem with fructans).  I have seen bread, crackers, tortillas, noodles, all kinds of things made with rice that do not contain corn.

have you looked around glutenfreemall.com?  It has a lot of products and lists the ingredients for each.  Even if you don't order from the site, you may find some products or brands to look into.

Good luck  :)
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, April 29, 2011, 3:39am; Reply: 3
Quoted from ArwenLegolas
I also could use a easy to understand explanation for a person who has absolutely no nutrition sense (Him) why it is not a good idea to eat corn. I tried to explain but I am not doing so good of a job. Anybody?

For someone who doesn't understand anything medical, it may be hard to explain in medical terms so I'm going to quote from ER4YT:
Quoted from ER4YT, pg. 145
For Type B's, the biggest factor in weight gain are corn, buckwheat, (and others)...  Each of these foods has a different lectin, but all of them affect the efficiency of your metabolic process, resulting in fatigue, fluid retention, and hypoglycemia - a severe drop in blood sugar after eating a meal.
  
I really don't know what words he would understand, but basically, corn is going to affect the cellular processes, toxify the digestive system, etc...  Corn makes the whole body work harder to correct the problems caused by the corn, so it can't focus that same energy on other healing.  

If he gave up the corn for a month, then had a meal of it, he would notice the difference - I'd almost guarantee... ;)
Posted by: AKArtlover, Friday, April 29, 2011, 2:16pm; Reply: 4
Most of the issues with processed foods are that they contain avoids for many or all types. This includes gluten free foods. You may have to look for the most basic things or look for recipes to modify and make your own. Rice pasta-- ingredients are rice and water. Rice crackers. Yucca crackers. These are about the only foods that have been modified in the gluten free world that are 100% compliant for me. Whole foods are the way to go.

Explanation without all the science at the most basic level: You are what you eat? ;D ;)

Welcome!

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, April 29, 2011, 2:34pm; Reply: 5
The best way to eat a corn free, gluten free diet is to stop eating commercially prepared gluten free products! Most of those GF cookies, breads, etc are full of carbs and empty calories- not something that belongs in a diabetic's diet. His diet should be based on lots of veggies, animal protiens (red meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheeses)  modest amounts of vegetable protien, and small portions of fruits and whole grains.

He shouldn't be eating that many grains to begin with, and what  grains he does eat should be in the form of whole grains, such as brown rice or cooked quinoa. As a B, he can have potatoes for some of his starch servings as well. I see no need for any kind of bread or cracker substitute, and certainly no need for cookies or other sweets! If he really "needs" some sort of bread, bake it yourself with rice  flour, or use rice cakes. Instead of sandwiches, pack salads with "sandwich fillings" mixed in, and compliant dressings (olive oil plus lemon, lime, or grapefruit juice and optional spices.)

The best dietary strategy is  a simple one: eat lots of whole foods, not packaged ones.  This way you control the amount of sodium in everything, as well as the ingredients. If he's eating meals away from home, encourage him to pack food from home rather than buying it ready-made, where it's hard to control the ingredients.

I would tell him "corn is hard for you to digest, and it's probably making the GERD (and other GI problems) worse."
Posted by: TJ, Saturday, April 30, 2011, 3:18am; Reply: 6
Quoted from ArwenLegolas
My husband who is a Blood type B is on a gluten free, low fat, low sodium diabetic diet. He also suffers from Duodonitis, diverticulosis and GERD (which does not make it to the upper regions of his esophagus)Many of the products that are gluten free contain corn meal. I really could use some suggestions as to what would be a good strategy for him.  ??)

I'll add my voice here.  Trying to make gluten-free substitutions while continuing to eat mostly the same way as before is not going to be very effective.  I had to give up on the idea of eating sandwiches.  Simplify to more basic foods (fresh meats, fruits, vegetables) is a good way to go.  It's probably a good idea to avoid all baked goods for a while, and just take time to break with the old ways and learn the new ones.

Here's an article that might also help:
Gluten: No Grain, No Pain

Posted by: O in Virginia, Saturday, April 30, 2011, 1:15pm; Reply: 7
So true about breaking with the old ways.  All the subsitutions are full of avoids for me.  I had to bite the bullet and understand that sandwiches and bread and wheat products are no longer a part of my lifestyle unless I bake them myself from compliant organic grains, which is so labor intensive that it makes it only an occasional indulgence.  My SWAMI tells me I'm not meant to be a starchitarian.  I don't miss corn at all, but avoiding it requires vigilence if you use any canned or packaged foods or condiments.  I have finally accepted that I myself have to prepare most of what I eat from scratch.

As far as how to explain to your husband the benefits of eating right for his blood type, all I can say is he will feel the results himself.  The science behind all this is so far above my head, it would be a full time job to try to educate myself and keep up.  I suppose I'm further along the road to understanding than I was a year ago.  It takes time to get used to all this.  I just try to stay compliant on my SWAMI and track my progress.  I try to keep my husband compliant for his blood type, but ultimately what he eats is his own decision.  When I shop I buy foods that are compliant for both our blood types (O and A) so there are choices for us both.
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, April 30, 2011, 6:27pm; Reply: 8
It really is about breaking with the old mind-set.  We are so programmed to believe that grain starches are the mainstay of a healthy diet.  If a person is a blood type A, then their bodies may handle more grains than a type B, but type B's should not be overloading on grains of any kind.  If we are going along with the old mind-set that flour products are necessary, then we will always be struggling to find substitutions for bread, crackers, pasta, wheat-based desserts, etc.  That is really the challenge in the beginning.

A healthy B diet is based around a wide range and variety of fresh foods:
fish, meat, abundant vegetables including lots of greens, some fruits and a little whole grain.

If you and he really need baked goods, please consider learning to bake your own.  There are many good and easy things in the recipe section of this web site.  And if he's willing, get a secretor test for him and that will help you nudge him in the direction of foods that well really help to build health.  
Posted by: ArwenLegolas, Monday, May 2, 2011, 2:23am; Reply: 9
I went through all of the symptoms of Wheat intolerance and Celiac disease, but there were not enough markers that pointed exclusively to it. He didn't have a diagnosis from a Doctor, but thought because he couldn't lose weight, and always seemed to gain weight after eating a lot of breads, and because his abdomen is swollen, that he was wheat sensitive.

We also do not buy ready made. I cook from scratch and we normally don't eat sweets. The only time I would say is during the Kiddish on sabbath, but maybe we should quit that, too.

We bought some brown rice Tortillas. Maybe we can get used to them. Personally, I have a rough time losing weight, too. My type is supposed to do well on rices, but I gain a pound or 2 after eating sushi. Right now I got one thing that is Pre-made, Indian Lentils. And it has no avoids in it.

Most of my food is either fresh or frozen, except of something like apple sauce or fruits.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 3, 2011, 6:19pm; Reply: 10
When you eat sweets during the Kiddush on Shabbos, is that at home or at the synagogue?

Whenever I go to the kiddush at shul (synagogue) I have some red wine and seltzer, and none of the food they offer (occasionally I'll have some herring if they offer it.) There's nothing else there that's safe for me to eat: the cakes and cookies have wheat and the kugel has potatoes (and possibly wheat as well.) Even the sodas either have HFCS or aspartame in them. If there's no seltzer that week, I drink tap water. The point of the kiddush at shul is to socialize, and I can do that with or without food.

Then I make my own kiddush when I return home, and serve compliant foods with the meal (including spelt or 100% rye challah.)

You could also bake challah from gluten free oat flour, if he truly needs to avoid all gluten, rather than keeping it to a minimum. If he needs to avoid all gluten, then he can't have spelt. But if he just needs to minimize his gluten intake, then 2 slices of spelt bread per week (one Friday night and one Saturday afternoon) may be tolerated. Spelt is lower in gluten than wheat. Also, just going from BTD food lists, spelt is a superfood for  B secretors while wheat is only neutral, but if he's a non-secretor, then wheat is an outright avoid and spelt is neutral.
Posted by: Spring, Friday, March 9, 2012, 4:25pm; Reply: 11
Quoted Text
If he gave up the corn for a month, then had a meal of it, he would notice the difference - I'd almost guarantee...

I WOULD guarantee it - without hesitation!
Posted by: zenphoenix, Friday, March 9, 2012, 9:05pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from ArwenLegolas

We bought some brown rice Tortillas. Maybe we can get used to them. Personally, I have a rough time losing weight, too. My type is supposed to do well on rices, but I gain a pound or 2 after eating sushi. Right now I got one thing that is Pre-made, Indian Lentils. And it has no avoids in it.



the rice in most commercial sushi's has some sort of sugar or corn syrups added to it. i know, colour me surprised too. I had noticed problems after eating sushi a few times, so asked at the restaurant how they made it. I was surprised to learn that they added sugars to the already "sweet rice". I guess it makes it easier to handle.

I've asked at some other places, and this is a fairly common practice... especially in the high volume sushi places.

So it may not be the rice per se, but the preparation method.
When i do choose to have sushi, i always ask for gluten free soy sauce (which i am not supposed to have either, but  ::) ) and also ask for no sesame. Sesame causes weight gain for Bs also .... maybe for ABs too?
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