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BTD Forums  /  Journal Club and Literature Review  /  ADHD...it's the food stupid(News article)
Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, 9:33pm
My hubby was reading some of his daily news articles and he came across this and thought I would be interested.   I guess he is paying attention more than I thought.  :D

What floored me was the teachers.  Sooooo slowly the world is finding out.  We just keep plugging away planting seeds...tra la la la (whoa...Isa was in my head ;) )

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/03/25-4

Debra :)

Oh c**p how do I fix the title?   I don't like the word...but it's supposed to be stupid not supid.  
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, 9:54pm; Reply: 1
We need patience to wait but we know we are right on with Dr D BTD and GTD !
Posted by: TJ, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, 11:55pm; Reply: 2
Excellent article!  I shared it on Facebook.
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, March 31, 2011, 1:36am; Reply: 3
Love even just the title.  Slowly the word is getting across the stupid barrier with artificial colours banned in the UK.  Aldi in Australia has banned them in preparation for the government to ban them.  Only problem is there's a natural colour 160b annato that causes problems with many people.  Why oh why do they need to put that in ice cream to make it a slightly off white?  Read the labels or cook it yourself as always.
Posted by: 10809 (Guest), Thursday, March 31, 2011, 12:25pm; Reply: 4
Thanks for sharing that. ADHD has come up for my son. I know its his diet. He does not hear a word I say. I will send him this.
Posted by: paul clucas, Thursday, March 31, 2011, 6:20pm; Reply: 5
Certified Nutrition Educators may be waking up to the work that they should have been doing for the past four decades.  Since they are still talking about palid uniform dietary advice, there is little danger that they will make substantial progress. :-/

Princessmia, does your son have mismatched thumb prints, or index prints?

My son's prints are mismatched, but not like mine and he is not quite ADHD or dyslexic, which is a great relief to me.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, March 31, 2011, 6:33pm; Reply: 6
I find it hard to beelive that only 2/3 of the kids were helped! Why didn't the other third benefit from the dietary changes?

Maybe the "hypo-allergenic" diet included something that 1/3 of the subjects were allergic or sensitive to; even rice is a potential allergen. Or maybe they were getting the wrong balance of nutrients (not enough meat/too many grains for an O, or too few veggie proteins for an A, etc.) Or perhaps those kids were reacting to something else in the environment (such as artificial fragrances or colors in the soap in school; these topical and inhaled chemicals are removed on the Feingold Program.)
Posted by: 10809 (Guest), Thursday, March 31, 2011, 9:57pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from paul clucas
Certified Nutrition Educators may be waking up to the work that they should have been doing for the past four decades.  Since they are still talking about palid uniform dietary advice, there is little danger that they will make substantial progress. :-/

Princessmia, does your son have mismatched thumb prints, or index prints?

My son's prints are mismatched, but not like mine and he is not quite ADHD or dyslexic, which is a great relief to me.


Have not checked him yet. Still in the process of figuring myself out. What does it mean if they are mismatched?
Posted by: TJ, Friday, April 1, 2011, 12:46am; Reply: 8
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I find it hard to beelive that only 2/3 of the kids were helped! Why didn't the other third benefit from the dietary changes?

This is the diet she tried:
Quoted Text
In Pessler’s study the children were placed on a restricted diet consisting of water, rice, turkey, lamb, lettuce, carrots, pears and other hypoallergenic foods—in other words, real, whole foods. This means that by default the diet contained very few, if any, food additives.

It's still a one size fits all approach.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, April 1, 2011, 5:20am; Reply: 9
an explorer trait, the mismatch
Posted by: Lizzie, Friday, April 1, 2011, 10:34am; Reply: 10
Makes me feel good about listening to Dr D and steering kids in the right direction - without them knowing it most of the time!!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, April 1, 2011, 8:06pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from TJ

This is the diet she tried:

It's still a one size fits all approach.


That's my point. It was probably too low in animal protein for the Os, and possibly too low in vegetable protein for the As, too many pears for somebody with fructose malabsorption, and bad news for anybody allergic to rice.

Also, diet alone may not be enough for some kids with heavy metal toxicity, brain damage, or other health problems. You can't expect any approach, not even something individualized like SWAMI, to "fix" 100% of anything.

Considering the "one size fits all"ness of the approach, it's incredible how 2/3 responded so dramatically. Taking a look at the suggested diet, it looks like they've taken out all gluten and limited the diet to a few "not likely to  be allergenic" foods that are probably good for everybody on BTD.
Posted by: AKArtlover, Saturday, April 2, 2011, 11:44am; Reply: 12
Just saw for the first tv ad for an ADHD drug that parents need to "ask their doctor about"  :-/
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Saturday, April 2, 2011, 2:31pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from AKArtlover
Just saw for the first tv ad for an ADHD drug that parents need to "ask their doctor about"  :-/


UGH!!
Posted by: Joy, Saturday, April 2, 2011, 5:17pm; Reply: 14
Helping people who have ADHD/ADD through food is definitely not a "one size fits all" solution.
Food is not the only answer although I feel in alot of situations it certainly can help by eliminating alot of food additives.

The big picture has to be considered.  I've read stories about parents with children who are hyperactive or have severe symptoms that not only affect the child greatly and adversely but also the parents.  They are at their wits end.  Medication can make a huge difference.

An experienced and caring physician would  recommend a medication based on alot of research of the individual's symptoms.  One type of medication is not a "magic pill".  If a medication or dosage does not work in due time they try another.  The proper medication, dosage, and aware of side effects are all taken into consideration.  

I am not an advocate of taking prescription medications per se.  But the appropriate diagnosis by a qualified professional who does prescribe medication for ADD doesn't mean they are handing out prescriptions and giving them to children or adults, for that matter ,like M&Ms.

Joy
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, April 3, 2011, 1:21am; Reply: 15
Many parents on the Feingold message board have kids who don't respond enough to diet alone. Many of them have other children who did respond to diet alone, although some kids still do need drugs. But they tend to need much lower doses of drugs than "typically needed": staying off of various food and environmental chemicals is helping them to respond to smaller medicine doses than they'd otherwise need, lowering the risks for side effects.
Posted by: 10809 (Guest), Sunday, April 3, 2011, 12:52pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Lola
an explorer trait, the mismatch


My thumbs and index fingers are not are not mismatched but middle and pinkys are. From what I understand, fingerprints are pretty accurate in determining what you are. I am not sensitive to caffeine. I have 7 whorles, 2 ulnar loops and one radial loop. I have white lines as well. I am a secretor and an A type. From what I can see is Teacher so far.
Posted by: 10809 (Guest), Sunday, April 3, 2011, 12:54pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from 10809


My thumbs and index fingers are not are not mismatched but middle and pinkys are. From what I understand, fingerprints are pretty accurate in determining what you are. I am not sensitive to caffeine. I have 7 whorles, 2 ulnar loops and one radial loop. I have white lines as well. I am a secretor and an A type. From what I can see is Teacher so far.


There has been no cancer in my family.
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