Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Reminder to read ingredients even Sea Salt
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Sunday, March 20, 2011, 9:09pm
I have just had a good reminder about reading ingredients.

I purchased Iodized Sea Salt in a local hfc and started having a reaction to my food.   :o  :o Sores around my mouth. I have finally traced it to the newly opened box of Sea Salt. It contains Evaporated Sea Salt, Calcium Silicate(Anticaking agent), Dextrose, Potassium Iodide, and Sodum Bicarbonate.  I know I've had this brand before and never reacted, so I either didn't buy the iodized or they have changed their formula. The brand is Natural Value.

I'm now smarter but can't eat my newly made salad dressing and quite bummed :B about it. I can't eat the crackers I baked yesterday either to go with the salads.

The good news is that I found out before I baked anything today. :)
Posted by: shoulderblade, Sunday, March 20, 2011, 9:26pm; Reply: 1
Quoted from MsRubyLu
contains added Dextrose, Potassium Iodide, and Sodum Bicarbonate


Actually this does not sound like what you normally consider to be 'sea salt'. Good idea to read carefully I suppose.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, March 20, 2011, 9:32pm; Reply: 2
inflammation big time for us nonnies!

the hidden names for corn
http://www.cornallergens.com/list/corn-allergen-list.php
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Sunday, March 20, 2011, 9:34pm; Reply: 3
I hate the fact that you can't just go by the name of something... I guess that would be too simple :-/  Dextrose is a definite avoid on my swami.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, March 20, 2011, 9:43pm; Reply: 4
love the fact that you now know this and can make better choices :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, March 21, 2011, 3:57pm; Reply: 5
Dextrose is generally corn-derived, and it's usually found in iodized salts.

My guess is that the company makes both iodized and non-iodized versions of the sea salt, and you've bought the non-iodized version in the past. The packaging might not even be all that different.

I  buy two different kinds of salt for my kitchen: RealSalt (ingredients : sea salt.) No fillers, anti-caking agents, etc. I also buy Diamond Kosher Salt (ingredients : sodium chloride) as backup in case I run out of the good salt and to use in things like the water for boiling eggs or pasta, plus I keep a box in the bathroom for my neti pot and hand washable laundry.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Monday, March 21, 2011, 6:18pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from MsRubyLu
I have just had a good reminder about reading ingredients.

I purchased Iodized Sea Salt in a local hfc and started having a reaction to my food.   :o  :o Sores around my mouth. I have finally traced it to the newly opened box of Sea Salt. It contains Evaporated Sea Salt, Calcium Silicate(Anticaking agent), Dextrose, Potassium Iodide, and Sodum Bicarbonate.  I know I've had this brand before and never reacted, so I either didn't buy the iodized or they have changed their formula. The brand is Natural Value.

I'm now smarter but can't eat my newly made salad dressing and quite bummed :B about it. I can't eat the crackers I baked yesterday either to go with the salads.

The good news is that I found out before I baked anything today. :)


If you politely complain to the HFS, they should allow you to exchange the product for something that you can tolerate.  They might even decide to return the remaining stock to the distributor.  It worth a try, especially if you shop there regularly.
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Monday, March 21, 2011, 6:22pm; Reply: 7
I did even better.. I emailed the company and got a very polite reply this morning offering a refund or some other uniodized salt.  I also called the HFS and will follow up with the one who does the ordering. :)
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 2:53pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from MsRubyLu
I have just had a good reminder about reading ingredients.

I purchased Iodized Sea Salt in a local hfc and started having a reaction to my food.   :o  :o Sores around my mouth. I have finally traced it to the newly opened box of Sea Salt. It contains Evaporated Sea Salt, Calcium Silicate(Anticaking agent), Dextrose, Potassium Iodide, and Sodum Bicarbonate.  I know I've had this brand before and never reacted, so I either didn't buy the iodized or they have changed their formula. The brand is Natural Value.

I'm now smarter but can't eat my newly made salad dressing and quite bummed :B about it. I can't eat the crackers I baked yesterday either to go with the salads.

The good news is that I found out before I baked anything today. :)

As I've posted many times in the past, it is especially important to read salt labels, as you wouldn't ever think this, but virtually all mainstream salt companies add corn sweeteners to their salt!  MADDENING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  It is usually in the form of "dextrose".  If you see "dextrose" in a salt brand, put it back on the shelf!

I find it infuriating that "they" (the infamous "they" again) add sugar to salt.  Many dentists tell their patients to rinse/gargle with salt water and even they don't realize that most salts have sugar and thus they are advising their patients to rinse with sugar!  When I was but a mere lass, I guess I always had a bit of the BTDer in me, just waiting to come out, because I don't know why I read the ingredients of salt, but I reported to my lifelong (at that time) dentist that Morton's Salt has dextrose in it and dextrose is sugar and did he know he was telling me to rinse with SUGAR?  He couldn't believe it at first and was flabergasted when I produced the salt in question, complete with label (man, was I a pain-in-the-butt kid or WHAT?   ;D (woot)).

The main reason I buy sea salt is precisely due to the dextrose situation (not to mention the silica "anti-caking agent", etc.) that most mainstream brands add.  Did I mention how infuriating this is to me?  If there is one thing that irks me right outta my gourd it is when companies add junk (particularly junky wheat or corn ingredients) to foods that DO NOT NEED IT, such as salt, luncheon meats, sunflower seeds, dried cranberries, etc.  Leave the food alone!

Grrrrrrrrr.   >:(
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 2:59pm; Reply: 9
P.S.  Let me guess, was this so-called "sea salt" by Hain brand?  They are horrible, a health food brand in name only (EXCEPTION:  they merged with Celestial Seasonings Teas, which used to be a good company, before that, and a few of their teas are still uncorrupted by junky ingredients, notably, their peppermint--both the organic and non--and their chamomiles--both plain and "sleepytime").  Always read labels, period, but especially of Hain products and "Organic Valley", which is another rant-worthy "health food" company.  The fact is that more and more of the natural foods industry is being bought off by big conglomerates, selling out, and or otherwise becoming "health food" and/or "natural" in name only.  Read, read, READ those labels 'til you just can't read no mo'!  They sneak things into the weirdest, most unexpected places (like that Organic Valley puts CORN STARCH into sour cream:  WHY?).

WHY?  I demand to know why!
Posted by: 312 (Guest), Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 4:30pm; Reply: 10
OK, I just went over to read my salts, Diamond Crystal Kosher, just salt!  Yes!  Trader Joe's Sea Salt, fine crystals, just salt!  Thanks for the heads up anyway, dextrose in sea salt?  Sounds hard to believe.  Only in America......
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 4:34pm; Reply: 11
Peppermint, actually the brand this time wasn't Hain it was Natural Value out of Sacramento, CA.. There website is http://www.naturalvalue.com if you want to give them a bad time.  They said the dexrose and Sodium Bicarbonate were to stablize the Potassium Iodide.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 5:20pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from MsRubyLu
Peppermint, actually the brand this time wasn't Hain it was Natural Value out of Sacramento, CA.. There website is http://www.naturalvalue.com if you want to give them a bad time.  They said the dexrose and Sodium Bicarbonate were to stablize the Potassium Iodide.

::) Stabilze, schmabilize.  I like my sea salt UNSTABLE as the day is long, thank you very much!   ;D
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 11:14pm; Reply: 13
That's why you should always avoid salt with added iodine. Get your iodine from natural sources, such as seaweeds.

Iodized salts have never been kosher for Passover, and a few years ago I figured out why: the corn-based dextrose added to ALL iodized salts.
Posted by: cajun, Thursday, March 24, 2011, 12:01am; Reply: 14
My wonderful splurge (actually not bad)....sea salt from the Camargue of France...ing: Sea Salt! ;)
Posted by: kauaian, Thursday, March 24, 2011, 7:45pm; Reply: 15
I live on an island where they harvest sea salt in the old Hawaiian way.  In the town that I live which is on the west side, they make salt beds in the clay mud & use the sun to evaporate the sea water.  I only exclusively use Hawaiian salt in my house. 8) Also it's great to know the people who actually still harvest the salt.
Posted by: cajun, Friday, March 25, 2011, 12:43am; Reply: 16
Kauaian,
I know of the Hawaiian sea salt..is that the same one? In many gourmet cookbook/magazines it is one of the sea salts recommended, along with the French Camargue(Mediterranean) or French(Atlantic) sel gris.
I have only been to the Big island once. We loved the west and visiting a wonderful coffee plantation ( Kona is my absolute favorite) and beautiful little Catholic church overlooking the ocean! :)
Posted by: eva b., Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 4:59pm; Reply: 17
yes, it's amazing isn't it.  I for some reason looked at the ingredients listed in the fine ground sea salt I had been using for years, and found it contained anti-caking agent and other unmentionable things which I can't remember because I have thrown it out.

I replaced it with some GEO brand finely ground sea salt which has nothing added to it, the HFS checked it before I went in for it.  Mind you, it's funny because when using it, I can actually see why they put anti caking agent in it, because it does have a tendency to  clump.  Mind you, I am not complaining. ;) :)
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 7:30pm; Reply: 18
So far no one has mentioned Himalayan pink "sea salt" which is actually mined from ancient sea beds and is pink due to trace elements......BUT NO ADDITIVES.  

That is what I've been using for quite a while.  It seems to have more flavor than "white sea salt".....but perhaps the pretty color makes me think it is more flavorful?

There are some other brands of white sea salt that have anti caking agents, so yes it is always good to read all labels of all things at all times.  EVEN if you pick up two cans or jars or boxes that are 'the same thing', sitting next to each other on a shelf.   Just trust me on that one, OK?    
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 12:06am; Reply: 19
http://www.naturalvalue.com/sea-salt-discontinued/

Now the new management has done what they call a “SKU Rationalization.”  SKU stands for “stock keeping unit” – an item, as it were.  And they told us that our volume wasn't big enough to keep producing our salt in our label and were discontinuing it.

So our salt is disappearing from store shelves.

It wasn’t our decision.

We weren’t making a lot of money selling salt, but it was a good product at about half the price of the national brand.

We looked around to see if we could find another producer, but this company has the business locked up.  In most of the US, table salt is mined, as opposed to sea salt.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 1:33am; Reply: 20
From the other coast and not cheap:

http://www.wellfleetseasaltcompany.com/
Posted by: Spring, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 3:31am; Reply: 21
I think Real Salt from Redmond Trading Company in Utah is delicious. It doesn't list anything but real salt as its ingredient.  But mostly I use Himalayan Pink.
Here are some comments from Real Salt's website:
Himalayan Pink
Like Real Salt, the Himalayan brands are harvested from an ancient salt deposit that would have been created long before there were any modern toxins. Geologically, the Himalayan deposit is very similar to Real Salt; they both have the full spectrum of minerals and both can be considered crystal salts. Tasted side by side, Real Salt is a bit sweeter, while Himalayan tends toward an earthy flavor.

The big difference between Real Salt and Himalayan is to do with consequences of geography. Real Salt comes from the USA (Redmond, Utah), and the Himalayan deposits are in and around Khewra, Pakistan. There are 17 different mines supplying the Himalayan brands, and some have more modern standards than others.  Generally, Real Salt is half the cost (we’re so glad we don’t have to ship it from Pakistan!) and we know you can always trust the quality, processes, and labor policies that bring Real Salt to your kitchen.
Posted by: Spring, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 3:35am; Reply: 22
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
P.S.  Let me guess, was this so-called "sea salt" by Hain brand?  They are horrible, a health food brand in name only (EXCEPTION:  they merged with Celestial Seasonings Teas, which used to be a good company, before that, and a few of their teas are still uncorrupted by junky ingredients, notably, their peppermint--both the organic and non--and their chamomiles--both plain and "sleepytime").  Always read labels, period, but especially of Hain products and "Organic Valley", which is another rant-worthy "health food" company.  

I totally agree with everything you said about these two companies! >:(
Posted by: Mother, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 7:31pm; Reply: 23
I use real salt as well. I also like Primordial Himalayan. no additives and it never  clumps
Print page generated: Friday, May 29, 2015, 12:45pm