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Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 1:40pm
Every recipe I see for making yogurt calls for dried milk.

Tell me all you know abut homemade yogurt. Please :)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 1:43pm; Reply: 1
True but there is milk and there is milk lol I just found a Goats yogurt and a sheep's yogurt in Sainsbury's In Belfast, testing them both one this week and one next week with Emily. more as a treat than a staple though. no added anything.

if you can make cheese from almonds why not yogurt? just s thought.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 2:54pm; Reply: 2
Looks like most starter cultures are just probiotics?

I guess I could just use the polyflora A.. and some store bought yogurt?

Can I then stop using the polyflora A once I have a culture?

Anyone making kefir?

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 3:04pm; Reply: 3
There are lots of experienced yogurt and kefir makers on this forum:

http://www.mothering.com/community/forum/list/365

They should be able to help you figure out the nitty-gritty of yogurt making, help you obtain kefir  grains, etc.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 5:07pm; Reply: 4
I haven't made yoghurt using dairy (not many options on my list I'm afraid), but I did make it once with my homemade almond milk and I only used a probiotic capsule as a starter - so your Polyflora A should hit the button.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 5:44pm; Reply: 5
Andrea, I've made my own yogurt for decades.  As in Ghee making, once you have done it successfully a few times, it's so fast and easy, it hardly requires thinking.  I buy fresh goat milk from a local farmer, but you can use any kind of milk.  I've never tried non-dairy.

If you have an electric yogurt maker, use the directions on it.  I use a small ice chest that is the size for a six-pack of soda or beer.  Preheat it by filling with hot water while you get the milk ready.

Heat 1 quart of milk to the point that it starts to lift the foam.  Immediately remove from heat.  Cool for a few minutes and pour into very clean pint-sized glass canning-type jars (heavy glass).

Let the jars of milk cool until you can hold one of them against your cheek for 5 seconds and it feels comfortably warm with no pain. Think 'giving this to a small child to drink'.

To each pint of milk, add 1 rounded Tb of yogurt that has live cultures.  Close the lids tightly and shake very well.  Once your own yogurt is established, you can use your own yogurt to start the next batch.

Pour the hot water out of the little 'ice chest' and refill with hot tap water.  Set the jars into hot water with the water level reaching to the bottom of the lids, but not over, just to avoid the chance of water leaking into the yogurt.

Close the chest, set on a folded towel or rug in an out of the way place that is on the warm side.  Wrap a thick folded towel over top and sides and leave it alone.  It generally takes a minimum of 8 hours for the yogurt to set up.  I leave mine for 10 hours because I get the best consistency that way.  The longer it works, the less lactose the finished product will have.  If it sets to long, it will go in the other direction and begin to thin out again and get more tart.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 5:52pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Looks like most starter cultures are just probiotics?

I guess I could just use the polyflora A.. and some store bought yogurt?

Can I then stop using the polyflora A once I have a culture?



This past winter, I switched to using my Polyflora as the starter.  It took a couple of attempts to establish the culture, but now it's all I use -- no need to add any store-bought yogurt.

Since I make my yogurt in 1 pint containers, I started with 2 capsules for each jar.  The first batch  was a little too thin.  So the next batch, I used a couple of spoonfuls of the 'thin' yogurt and added another capsule of Polyflora to each jar.  It turned out better.  After that, I didn't need to add any more capsules to the yogurt.  I've been using only the yogurt to start each batch.  It stands up beautifully, even when the jar is tilted.

If you have any problems, speak up.  I've got several trouble-shooting suggestions if needed.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 6:13pm; Reply: 7
wow that sounds very doable victoria. might give that a go. have to llo for a goat to hijack lol
Posted by: bel, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 12:50am; Reply: 8
i use easiyo to make my yogurt. So easy and so delicious and more nutritious! check it out at http://www.easiyo.com :)
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 2:03am; Reply: 9
Quoted from bel
i use easiyo to make my yogurt. So easy and so delicious and more nutritious! check it out at http://www.easiyo.com :)


Bel, that's an interesting little device.  I wonder if it would work well for someone who just wants to scald whole milk and add living cultures without buying their packets.  What do you think?
Posted by: honeybee, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 2:07am; Reply: 10
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Every recipe I see for making yogurt calls for dried milk.

Tell me all you know abut homemade yogurt. Please :)


Interesting, I wonder if dried buttermilk could work with polyflora caps as per Victorias GREAT instructions?
Posted by: bel, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 2:36am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Victoria


Bel, that's an interesting little device.  I wonder if it would work well for someone who just wants to scald whole milk and add living cultures without buying their packets.  What do you think?


heys, you can check up their faqs, i think they did mentioned something about using your own milk/starters but im not sure about that cause i usually buy their packets as its economical and healthier (can read up about their products) I usually get the unsweetened one to avoid the sugar and add my own fruits or honey to it! Its really convenient and makes excellent yogurt cos you can determine how tart you like it :)  and most importantly no avoids! :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 2:39am; Reply: 12
polyflora works with practically any milk.....be it dairy or seed or grain or pulse....
experiment
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Friday, February 25, 2011, 5:00pm; Reply: 13
I haven't made yogurt in years but if I remember correctly the reason they use the powdered milk is to make it thicker.  The yogurt maker came with recipes and it said to use milk plus powdered milk if you wanted thicker with out having to add gelatin.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, February 25, 2011, 7:13pm; Reply: 14
I was quite pleased with how the Polyflora capsules make my yogurt as thick as the commercial brands without adding any thickeners or powdered milk.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 3:07am; Reply: 15
Yogurt came out great!

Thick and delicious.. Wow who knew that adding polyflora to it would make it so thick.

Thank you for all your great ideas and support.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 3:45am; Reply: 16
(hehe)  (clap)  (sunny)
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 3:59am; Reply: 17
have been telling you this from the very start.....but you wouldn t listen!! ;D
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 5:00am; Reply: 18
Quoted from Lola
have been telling you this from the very start.....but you wouldn t listen!! ;D


Lola, I sense that you feel "unheard" (this is the second reference you've made that we aren't listening ;)).
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 5:38am; Reply: 19
;D I ll get over the dilemma, no worries
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 1:29pm; Reply: 20
(woot)(woot)(woot)

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 3:03pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from honeybee


Interesting, I wonder if dried buttermilk could work with polyflora caps as per Victorias GREAT instructions?


Most commercial dried buttermilk doesn't have any active cultures in it, unlike the refrigerated "cultured buttermilk" that can be used to make quark or farmer's cheese (using buttermilk as the only source of cheese cultures.)

My recent cheese-making research tells me that you can use reconstituted dried milk, then add whatever cultures you want, and make cheese that way. I imagine it would work the same way with yogurt. So I'm sure you could use reconsituted buttermilk as the "milk" and then add polyflora as the "culture" and make yogurt that way. But it won't have any cultures from the buttermilk itself.
Posted by: 7596 (Guest), Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 4:17pm; Reply: 22
I was doing my yogurt with goat milk and sheep or goat cheese before. Milk will ferment into yogurt best when the mix stays on room temperature some time than raise to a temperatue no more than 37-38 centigrades for some time.

I'll be doing yogurt again when I find raw goat milk a few months later. Yogurt from goat milk is too fluid, some people say but it's the best I'll be able to find. I'd try with sheep's milk also if I found.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 4:36pm; Reply: 23
Os aren't really supposed to have yogurt Onur. It's a healthy food for As, Bs, and ABs, but not for us Os. We're better off getting our probiotics from cultured vegetables, rather than from cultured dairy.
Posted by: Sharon, Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 10:12pm; Reply: 24
I'm making my own yogurt with polyflora AB! Thanks for the ideas. Great advice!
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, March 2, 2011, 10:51pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Sharon
I'm making my own yogurt with polyflora AB! Thanks for the ideas. Great advice!


Way to go, Sharon!  (ok)  
Posted by: Kim, Thursday, March 31, 2011, 2:02pm; Reply: 26
Can anyone make recommendations for making yogurt with raw milk.  My first attempt did not set up properly.  Also, because I am using raw milk, I wasn't sure I could reuse the yogurt for the next batch or needed to keep a starter batch that was not from raw milk.  Somewhere I read that the starter from raw milk won't continue to culture properly so I should use store bought yogurt for the starter.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, April 1, 2011, 2:12am; Reply: 27
paneer
http://www.recipedelights.com/basics/Paneer.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQu5jVagfao
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, April 1, 2011, 4:23am; Reply: 28
Quoted from Kim
Can anyone make recommendations for making yogurt with raw milk.  My first attempt did not set up properly.  Also, because I am using raw milk, I wasn't sure I could reuse the yogurt for the next batch or needed to keep a starter batch that was not from raw milk.  Somewhere I read that the starter from raw milk won't continue to culture properly so I should use store bought yogurt for the starter.


It can be almost like luck to be able to come out with a successful yogurt made from raw milk.  This is because heat has not been used to kill bacteria in the milk.  This doesn't mean that the bacteria would necessarily be unhealthy for people to consume, but the bacteria might compete with the yogurt cultures.  This is very common and can result in weakening the yogurt strain.  Often, the yogurt will not even 'set up'.

I purchase raw goat's milk from a local farmer and bring the milk to a quick boil.  The resulting yogurt is consistently perfectly and provides a strong starter for future batches.

The original starter is Dr. D's Polyflora!  :)
Posted by: Kim, Friday, April 1, 2011, 11:29am; Reply: 29
I have had powdered goat milk before but never the real thing.  I have heard good things about it.  I am going to see if a farm nearby has it.  Not sure if it is legal in VA to sell it or not.  I have a cow share to get the raw milk, (which I can't have now to drink), so maybe I might have to do the same to get the goat milk.  I want to make my own yogurt and stop buying it.

We live on 19 acres and are trying to become self sufficient.  In another month we are getting Turkeys to raise for meat.  I was going to do chickens for meat until I found out that they are not allowed for me.  

Thanks!!
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, April 1, 2011, 4:08pm; Reply: 30
Goat milk has a thicker consistency than cows milk.  Depending on the breed of goat, can also be much more flavorful...  

Goats are relatively easy to raise, as long as you have a tall enough fence to keep them where you want them...
Posted by: Kim, Friday, April 1, 2011, 6:18pm; Reply: 31
We thought about raising them but we have maybe 12 acres cleared out of 19 acres and we have horses.  Normally there would be plenty of pasture for both, but last year we had a long drought and we didn't even have enough pasture for our three horses.  If I can find a farmer who sells the milk or lets me buy a share that might work.  Right now, I am not well enough to handle the goats.  I haven't even been able to ride my horses in three years.  I am hoping that the GTD is going to help me heal.
Posted by: delightfuldeb, Monday, February 3, 2014, 5:05pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Yogurt came out great!

Thick and delicious.. Wow who knew that adding polyflora to it would make it so thick.

Thank you for all your great ideas and support.


So Andrea, what was your ratio of Polyflora to milk? How much milk did you start with and how much Polyflora did you use? Also, did you use any "starter" yogurt with the polyflora?
Posted by: aussielady582, Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 3:00am; Reply: 33
I tried making yoghurt and kefir, but always wondered if the end product was definately lactose-free.  Then I decided that I'd prefer to get my nutrients from mostly fresh foods, veg especially & just eating better combinations and choices, and avoiding the foods which don't digest down well.
I'm not too keen on fermented foods, but if I chose one, it would be carrot/onion/kale or similar fermented vegetables probably.
For me as an O and my own genitic makeup, dairy doesn't digest down well, it also slows down liver and bowel function, and I still am not sure about the casein / milk proteins,  it feels very rich and heavy.  where, I do better on lighter and easy to digest, esp vegetables which don't place a burden on my organs/glands and interfere with mineral absorption.
Cheeses (which I often ate in the past), with the salt, high saturated fats... well.... not for me at this time, sorry cheese!
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 4:51am; Reply: 34
I've made a couple of batches in the crock pot and a couple of batches in the oven. I think I'll try the cooler method next. I love yogurt and eat a lot of it.
Posted by: delightfuldeb, Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 5:16am; Reply: 35
Quoted from Drea
I've made a couple of batches in the crock pot and a couple of batches in the oven. I think I'll try the cooler method next. I love yogurt and eat a lot of it.


Drea, do you use the polyflora in your yogurt?
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, February 6, 2014, 3:31am; Reply: 36
I haven't, though with all the rave reviews here, I'll try it! I either use a spoonful of the previous batch or a spoonful of some org plain whole milk yogurt.
Posted by: rosa, Monday, February 10, 2014, 12:22pm; Reply: 37
Like Bel, I use the EasiYo container for making soya yoghurt for my DH who's an A. I don't bother using the easiyo packets which I found to be very expensive after a while. I just heat up some organic soya milk, add a little  sugar(as the probiotic needs something to feed on..though I guess other sweeteners could be used), then add a probiotic, stir it all together, and 'voila' about 12 hrs later there's delicious live soya yoghurt, with no nasty thickeners etc.
Dairy would work just the same,  but no sweetener necessary then.

I occasionally experiment with almond or walnut milks...not much luck yet..  
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, February 23, 2014, 2:09am; Reply: 38
I made a huge batch of yogurt the other day and the method was not only very easy, but the yogurt came out superb! Start to finish in the crockpot, and used the oven to incubate...

Here's a link to the recipe:Crockpot Yogurt. My starter was the organic whole milk yogurt (plain) from Trader Joe's.
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 2:20am; Reply: 39
I've been making my own yogurt and just went grocery shopping for more milk. But now I remembered that I ate the last of the yogurt for breakfast...which means I don't have ANY for the next batch! Doh! Do you think I can make it solely using the Polyflora A? I'd hate to waste a whole half gallon of organic milk...(second guessing myself)...if I do use Polyflora, how much should I use for said half-gallon?
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 4:45pm; Reply: 40
Drea,
I don't eat dairy anymore, but for the last couple of years of yogurt making, I ONLY used Polyflora.  It made the best yogurt of any system that I tried.  Getting it started is the only part that is tricky, simply because I don't have a way of giving you an exact measurement.  

I never made it in large containers, such as 1/2 gallon or 1 gallon at a time.  I used pint sized glass canning jars, set into a small ice chest with hot (tap) water, not covering the lids.

So, for each pint, I remember starting out with a little more Polyflora than I needed, but I wanted to be sure.  I think I used one capsule per cup of milk and found that it was unnecessary.  Maybe one capsule per pint?  I'd rather use a little too much than too little and have it not set up.  You might want to do a smaller batch just to get a feel for it and come up with your yogurt starter.  Because after you get one successful batch, you just use your own yogurt to start successive batches.  I used 1 Tb of my yogurt per pint to make the next batch.  

You can continue using just your own yogurt until, and if, you notice that the yogurt is not as thick as it used to be.  Then, add in a little Polyflora along with your yogurt starter the next time.  I usually did that after 4 or 5 batches, just to keep the microorganisms healthy and strong.
Posted by: deblynn3, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 4:59pm; Reply: 41
Quoted from Victoria


It can be almost like luck to be able to come out with a successful yogurt made from raw milk.  This is because heat has not been used to kill bacteria in the milk.  This doesn't mean that the bacteria would necessarily be unhealthy for people to consume, but the bacteria might compete with the yogurt cultures.  This is very common and can result in weakening the yogurt strain.  Often, the yogurt will not even 'set up'.

I purchase raw goat's milk from a local farmer and bring the milk to a quick boil.  The resulting yogurt is consistently perfectly and provides a strong starter for future batches.

The original starter is Dr. D's Polyflora!  :)


I did the same with fresh raw cow's milk year ago, did well
Posted by: deblynn3, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 5:02pm; Reply: 42
wonder how the polyflora would work on a nut milk?
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 5:29pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from deblynn3
wonder how the polyflora would work on a nut milk?


I had the same thoughts but would want to first try soy milk...

The commercial brand almond yogurt, Anande is a little watery which is why I never liked it.
I really love a thick sour Greek yogurt...Must be impossible to achieve results like this in our kitchens. The commercial yogurts always seem to require gums and stabilizers to create a yogurt
that has the perfect texture....Not sure I'd want to go to all this trouble if I couldn't be assured
of decent results.

What would happen if I just took one of my containers of commercial yogurt, opened the top
and stirred in a few Polyflora A.....would these cultures "catch" and grow in the refrigerator or
would I have to leave it in a warmer place?  Would this work at all?

Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 5:58pm; Reply: 44
I think that if a 'milk alternative' is capable of thickening without the addition of stabilizers, then Polyflora will do as good or better than other yogurt starters.  I've never tried making yogurt with nut, grain or soy milk.

I was delightfully surprised at how successfully the Polyflora worked with the goat milk.  All my other cultures, natural yogurt for starters, etc. made a nice creamy yogurt.  But the Polyflora made the yogurt so thick that I could turn the container upside down and it didn't run out.  Of course, I didn't press my luck!  I just tried it for about 1 second!  lol!  :D  
Posted by: Jane, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 6:15pm; Reply: 45
Need to try that.....Lately I've been splurging with Brown Cow Greek, the maple flavor. It's an avoid but the cream yogurts bother me less than the low fat ones.

CULTURED PASTEURIZED MILK, CREAM, PURE MAPLE SYRUP, SUGAR, PECTIN, NATURAL FLAVOR
CONTAINS LIVE ACTIVE CULTURES: S. THERMOPHILUS, L. BULGARICUS, L. ACIDOPHILUS AND BIFIDUS

It's so good it's like dessert.....and very filling.  

Can't get the Amande yogurt at my local WFs anymore.  Not sure why.  I didn't love it but thought it was a good substitute for regular yogurt.  I do buy the goat's milk and have it once in a while.  
Posted by: deblynn3, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 6:36pm; Reply: 46
I have a quart yogurt maker, if the polyflora makes for a thicker yogurt, this might be the best way. I've never been much of a yogurt, pudding, or jello fan. But Ken loved yogurt and now is eating way to much cottage cheese, as it a "bene" and I can't get it through his head that it's still milk produce. His allergies are the worst they have ever been.
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, March 20, 2014, 6:44pm; Reply: 47
so many great simple vegan ideas for making yogurt here:

http://wakingupvegan.com/2012/09/23/homemade-vegan-yogurt-no-equipment-required/
Posted by: Drea, Friday, March 21, 2014, 1:32am; Reply: 48
Thanks all! I think I'll start with a quart and use 2 Polyflora capsules and go from there...when I make a gallon, I only use 2 Tbsp of yogurt, but the cultures are already live and active...I'll post the results.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Friday, March 21, 2014, 7:52am; Reply: 49
I've successfully made almond milk yoghurt from home-made almond milk. I just made it thicker with less water and added two polyflora caps to it (was about 750ml of milk). Kept it warm overnight until it had sort of separated. I then suspended this concoction in a nut milk bag in a sieve over a bowl in the fridge to let some of the 'whey' drain. The remaining 'curd' was thick and creamy like the good ol' Greek yoghurt I remembered.
Posted by: deblynn3, Friday, March 21, 2014, 2:16pm; Reply: 50
Quoted from Munchkin76
I've successfully made almond milk yoghurt from home-made almond milk. I just made it thicker with less water and added two polyflora caps to it (was about 750ml of milk). Kept it warm overnight until it had sort of separated. I then suspended this concoction in a nut milk bag in a sieve over a bowl in the fridge to let some of the 'whey' drain. The remaining 'curd' was thick and creamy like the good ol' Greek yoghurt I remembered.


oh, this sounds nice, I will give it a try, later next week, I've got company coming in Tuesday and have to many things to do first.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Friday, March 21, 2014, 6:33pm; Reply: 51
Quoted from deblynn3


oh, this sounds nice, I will give it a try, later next week, I've got company coming in Tuesday and have to many things to do first.


Brilliant! Let us know how it turns out!

I might try make a batch again this weekend (it's been such a while) and see how it goes. Will update once I've done it.

Andy
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, March 21, 2014, 6:42pm; Reply: 52
Quoted from Munchkin76
I've successfully made almond milk yoghurt from home-made almond milk. I just made it thicker with less water and added two polyflora caps to it (was about 750ml of milk). Kept it warm overnight until it had sort of separated. I then suspended this concoction in a nut milk bag in a sieve over a bowl in the fridge to let some of the 'whey' drain. The remaining 'curd' was thick and creamy like the good ol' Greek yoghurt I remembered.


That's exactly what I'm trying to duplicate....the thickness and creaminess of Greek yogurt.  Thanks so much for sharing.  Can't wait to try it!!  :)

Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 23, 2014, 6:10pm; Reply: 53
Okay Peeps, I made the full gallon of milk last night because it needed to be used up. I used two Tbsp of Polyflora (since that is the amount of yogurt I would have used), set it in a warm oven for 15 hours, but it never set up.

Do I toss it or can I try again with the same batch?

I don't have any more milk and won't be going to a grocery store until Tuesday.
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, March 23, 2014, 7:25pm; Reply: 54
Quoted from Drea
Okay Peeps, I made the full gallon of milk last night because it needed to be used up. I used two Tbsp of Polyflora (since that is the amount of yogurt I would have used), set it in a warm oven for 15 hours, but it never set up.

Do I toss it or can I try again with the same batch?

I would allow it to continue to sit and maybe check it every 4 hours or so...  As I recall from an earlier discussion, it takes some time for the dry flora to activate vs. the previous yogurt already active and just needing to multiply.
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 23, 2014, 9:43pm; Reply: 55
I reheated it back up to 110 F and it did thicken. I'm glad I at least tried, rather than tossing; I didn't have anything to lose!
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 24, 2014, 2:02am; Reply: 56
The yogurt is done, though it is nowhere near as tangy as using yogurt for a starter nor is it as tangy as my taste buds desire. In fact, while it is yogurt consistency, it's taste is closer to whole milk. Blech.

Oh well. I saved some in a glass jar in case I run out of yogurt in the future, but I'm going shopping on Tuesday for some more milk and yogurt....
Posted by: deblynn3, Monday, March 24, 2014, 2:43pm; Reply: 57
Quoted from Drea
The yogurt is done, though it is nowhere near as tangy as using yogurt for a starter nor is it as tangy as my taste buds desire. In fact, while it is yogurt consistency, it's taste is closer to whole milk. Blech.

Oh well. I saved some in a glass jar in case I run out of yogurt in the future, but I'm going shopping on Tuesday for some more milk and yogurt....


If it's like the yogurt I made each batch you make. (using milk from the first batch) will get more tangy, and you can leave it out longer. think k-tea.
Posted by: Jane, Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:16pm; Reply: 58
I ordered a yogurt maker from Amazon and it should arrive today.  I bought some goat's milk - just a small container from WFs yesterday.  I wanted to try some almond milk but all the ones I looked at had stabilizers in them so I'll try the whole goat's milk first.  Since I've never done it before, should I start with adding some existing yogurt - I have both the brown cow greek and some goat's milk blueberry yogurt????
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:27pm; Reply: 59
Jane, I know you are busy, but you can make your own almond milk that doesn't have any additives, and then culture that...if you have a Blendtec or a Vitamix...
Posted by: Jane, Monday, March 24, 2014, 5:20pm; Reply: 60
I don't have a Blendtec or Vitamix.  I do have a cheap Magic Bullet.  I'll have to experiment after I try the fresh goat's milk.  
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, March 24, 2014, 8:22pm; Reply: 61
Quoted from Jane
I ordered a yogurt maker from Amazon and it should arrive today.  I bought some goat's milk - just a small container from WFs yesterday.  I wanted to try some almond milk but all the ones I looked at had stabilizers in them so I'll try the whole goat's milk first.  Since I've never done it before, should I start with adding some existing yogurt - I have both the brown cow greek and some goat's milk blueberry yogurt????


Which yogurt maker did you buy?  Please be sure to share your results. I would gladly buy a yogurt
maker if it were foolproof. Waiting for your feedback.  :)

I have a small conundrum. My SWAMI says I can't drink sheep's milk....but machego which is a sheep's milk cheese is beneficial. And yogurt is a beneficial.  If I were to use sheep's milk to make
yogurt, is this the same as drinking sheep's milk?  I can't have cow's milk either but am allowed
cow's milk yogurt....Well at least my SWAMI doesn't specify any particular milk to use or not use for yogurt.
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, March 24, 2014, 11:52pm; Reply: 62
Quoted from Chloe
I have a small conundrum. My SWAMI says I can't drink sheep's milk....but machego which is a sheep's milk cheese is beneficial. And yogurt is a beneficial.  If I were to use sheep's milk to make yogurt, is this the same as drinking sheep's milk?  I can't have cow's milk either but am allowed cow's milk yogurt....Well at least my SWAMI doesn't specify any particular milk to use or not use for yogurt.

I would say that since both milks are avoid, but yogurt is beneficial, that either could be used to make the yogurt without a problem.  It sounds like you are probably sensitive to some sugar in the milk that the bacteria eat during the yogurt-making process...
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 12:43am; Reply: 63
Foolproof yogurt can be made in a crockpot...just sayin'  ;)
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 1:15am; Reply: 64
Drea, the roughest part of making yogurt with Polyflora is the very beginning.  I remember it taking two to three batches before I felt that the bacteria had really matured or become established . . or whatever.  Then I was able to use my yogurt to make new batches, with a great mellow/tart flavor.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 7:31am; Reply: 65
Quoted from Chloe


Which yogurt maker did you buy?  Please be sure to share your results. I would gladly buy a yogurt
maker if it were foolproof. Waiting for your feedback.  :)

I have a small conundrum. My SWAMI says I can't drink sheep's milk....but machego which is a sheep's milk cheese is beneficial. And yogurt is a beneficial.  If I were to use sheep's milk to make
yogurt, is this the same as drinking sheep's milk?  I can't have cow's milk either but am allowed
cow's milk yogurt....Well at least my SWAMI doesn't specify any particular milk to use or not use for yogurt.


Hi Chloe

This is the yoghurt maker I use: http://www.moulinex.com/Products/yogurt-makers/yogurta.aspx

I like it because, it has a timer, keeps the yoghurt at the perfect temperature for you, and has individual glass jars (rather than plastic). I'm in the UK and these are easy to find online, not sure about the States though but in sure they must be there too.

I hope you find the right solution.

All the best

Andy
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 1:18pm; Reply: 66
I watched a youtube video making yogurt in the crock pot.  Looks pretty easy although my goal is
to make Greek yogurt so that's an extra step.  I've made Greek yogurt from a container of plain yogurt
many times just by straining, so that part I can do.  And probably if I get myself a  good thermometer
I could figure this out without having to purchase a yogurt maker, although I would like to have the little jars and not have to babysit yogurt with a thermometer.

Thanks, Joe....makes sense that I could use sheep's milk for yogurt and it's probably the lactose/sugar that would be the problem if I were to drink the milk.  

Now here's a question.  Could i make almond milk yogurt by using fresh almond milk plus a small container of dairy yogurt as my starter?  And add a Polyflora or two just to personalize my pbx, or is this overkill?  Just wondering if it's possible to use a dairy based starter for a vegan yogurt.  I know the result is going to be a hybrid, and not a vegan product, but just thinking if I could pull this off.
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 1:57pm; Reply: 67
Quoted from Chloe
Could i make almond milk yogurt by using fresh almond milk plus a small container of dairy yogurt as my starter?  And add a Polyflora or two just to personalize my pbx, or is this overkill?

If there is an indication of the probiotic strain used in the dairy yogurt to show that it is a beneficial one for your type, this will be the easiest way to make it...

If the bacteria is unknown, or not the best for you, then using a Polyflora would enhance the probiotic strain.  I'm not sure whether it would be better to include the dairy yogurt with the Polyflora initially to have a better tasting yogurt product or whether it would be better for the bacteria strain to start with plain Polyflora and go through the maturation process that Victoria spoke of...
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 2:53pm; Reply: 68
It came yesterday and I quickly read through the directions.  I bought it because of the little glass jars that come with it.  This is the one I bought because it was the highest rated on Amazon -  Euro Cuisine YM80 Yogurt Maker.  I bought a quart of goat's milk that I was going to try and use.  Almond milk would be preferable.  Directions say not to use flavored yogurt as a starter and that's all I have right now.  
I don't know how much polyflora to use for that amount but I may try just one capsule and see how that works.  Says not to mix in any flavoring until after it's done.  I'm going to have to play with it.

Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 4:03pm; Reply: 69
Jane, I'm interested to learn whether you have to heat the yogurt on your own?  Get it to the proper
180 degrees, let it cool ro 100-110 degrees and then add your starter plus milk and transfer it to the yogurt machine which basically just seems like it's holding a temperature for a prescribed
amount of time..  IF that's the case, I'm better off seeing if I can do this in my crock pot.

So, for anyone who has had good luck with the crock pot method....after I've added my starter to the milk and the mixture is already at 100-110 degrees, how do I keep it warm for the time it takes to culture the yogurt?  And how much time should it take?
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 5:25pm; Reply: 70
Chloe,
Yes according to the directions, you boil the milk until it starts to run up the sides.  Probably just as easy to do it in the crockpot.  I think it would make too much for me though.  I like the glass containers.
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 5:38pm; Reply: 71
Quoted from Jane
Chloe,
Yes according to the directions, you boil the milk until it starts to run up the sides.  Probably just as easy to do it in the crockpot.  I think it would make too much for me though.  I like the glass containers.


That's what I thought.... thanks....now I know there are no machines that allow you to dump in milk and starter and press a button, wait until a timer goes off and have yogurt...  When straining a large batch of dairy yogurt to make Greek yogurt, the whey drips away through a strainer leaving far less yogurt.  

I like the glass containers for storage but I'd have to dump out the plain yogurt to strain first
before replacing.

Now that I know there are no shortcuts, will try this in my crock pot with sheep's milk..... if I can find it.

Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 12:27am; Reply: 72
Quoted from Chloe


So, for anyone who has had good luck with the crock pot method....after I've added my starter to the milk and the mixture is already at 100-110 degrees, how do I keep it warm for the time it takes to culture the yogurt?  And how much time should it take?


Chloe, I've done this a couple of different ways: first, if your oven can be set for 100 degrees, then you can do that (some do, some don't; mine will only go as low as 170 F), you can use just the oven light to keep the inside oven warm enough, and wrap the crock and lid (not the electric parts, just the ceramic part) in a big bath towl, and place it inside the oven for 10-12 hours, or you can wrap the whole crock (electrics, and all) inside a big bath towel, and leave it on your counter top for the same amount of time.

This last go round, with the Polyflora A, I put the ceramic bowl and lid in the oven with the oven light on for about 14 hours, and then had to reheat the mixture back up to 110F and left it on the counter wrapped up in the towel for another four to five hours, but honestly, I wouldn't have had to do that if I were using yogurt as starter...
Posted by: deblynn3, Saturday, March 29, 2014, 8:30pm; Reply: 73
I just got some almond milk made, only about 1cup. added 2 polyflora O tabs and put in yogurt maker we will see what happens. I wanted to use home made almond milk, with organic nuts. I can't use any of my three crock pots, the lowest temp was 120 and I'm not sure at what temp the polyflora would die at.  So we will see what happens.
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 12:37am; Reply: 74
I recently bought a dimmer that I plug the crockpot into so I can use the electrics to  keep the temp at 110F...I successfully kept water at 110F using the warm setting and the dimmer on the lowest setting...I'm using whole milk (organic) and store-bought yogurt for this batch, and I'm using a towel to cover the whole crockpot. Next batch I'll use the last batch of polyflora yogurt I made last week.
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 5:15pm; Reply: 75
Quoted from Drea
I recently bought a dimmer that I plug the crockpot into so I can use the electrics to  keep the temp at 110F...I successfully kept water at 110F using the warm setting and the dimmer on the lowest setting...I'm using whole milk (organic) and store-bought yogurt for this batch, and I'm using a towel to cover the whole crockpot. Next batch I'll use the last batch of polyflora yogurt I made last week.


Ooh, that's a great solution....can you share what kind of dinner this is?  Brand?...So
I should plug the dimmer into the crock pot and then set the crock pot on what setting?  I only
have two options....high or low..  

Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 7:15pm; Reply: 76
Success! I was able to set the Lutron dimmer just about at the middle and the crockpot on warm. I think all crockpot models will have different heat limits, so some of the work is specific to each crockpot. Btw, I couldn't find the dimmer in my local big box store, and so had to order thru Amazon.

Due to timing, the yogurt remained at 110F for 15 hrs and is tangier than I like (12 hrs is just about right, but I wasn't going to wake up at 3:00 am).

I'm happy that the dimmer worked, though the oven method also works (using only the oven light).
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 7:31pm; Reply: 77
Drea, is this what you bought?

Lutron TT-300H-WH Electronics Plug-In Lamp Dimmer....I found it on Amazon but don't want to
order it unless it's the correct item.
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 11:26pm; Reply: 78
Quoted from Chloe
Drea, is this what you bought?

Lutron TT-300H-WH Electronics Plug-In Lamp Dimmer....I found it on Amazon but don't want to
order it unless it's the correct item.


Looks the same (sorry, already tossed the packaging).  Any dimmer that allows something to plug into it (as opposed to the ones the are installed in electrical boxes) should work.  
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 31, 2014, 1:34am; Reply: 79
After the yogurt sat in the fridge for the day, it thickened up (without straining) and I actually really like the tartness! Dinner is served.
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 8:36pm; Reply: 80
I think the first thing I need to do is buy a thermometer.  The meat one doesn't go low enough.  I was going to try with the goat's milk over the weekend but I got busy doing my taxes and didn't get to it.  Probably will have to wait until this weekend or I'll be up all night.  Won't have time in the morning to start it, especially the first time.  Looking forward to trying it.
The directions say not to add any flavoring until the yogurt is done.  Is that what you do Drea?
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 2:51am; Reply: 81
I don't add any flavoring at all; I actually like the taste of plain yogurts...but if I do want to add anything, I do it at the time of each serving...more flexibility that way. ;-)
Posted by: deblynn3, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 3:00am; Reply: 82
I made the raw almond milk yogurt using O polyflora  (NAP) I didn't make a full quart, it turned out very watery. So I drained off the water. Left me with 1/4 cup of polyflora/almond yogurt cheese? I will try making a full batch using 1/2 of my cheese, I tried a small bit wasn't bad will see what it's like with fruit tomorrow. So using the polyflora did work for me using my yogurt maker.  

Just thought I'd report back.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 7:49am; Reply: 83
Excellent Deblynn, this is what I do. One needs a lot of almond milk to start as you 'lose' so much with straining. But it's nice and creamy and fully bennie. Let us know how it goes using the last batch as a starter for the next I've never done this.

Thanks, Andy
Posted by: Jane, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 8:56pm; Reply: 84
Andy and Deblynn,
Would you tell me exactly what to do.  I bought some almond milk.  I have polyflora and I also have some plain Greek style yogurt that I could use for a starter.  I still need to get the right kind of thermometer.  I just bought a yogurt maker with the glass containers.  I'll probably try over the weekend but I'd love some help with exactly what to do with almond milk....Jane
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 12:06am; Reply: 85
Quoted from Lola
have been telling you this from the very start.....but you wouldn t listen!! ;D


Well, Lola, aren't you used to that by now!? And the funny thing is, now WE are having to deal with the same lack of attention in other people. I have to tell you something funny that happened today...!  Our friend with the bladder cancer was suffering something terrible with a pollen allergy which he had never had before. Well, of course, I told him all about quercetin, et cetera, and he told me he had already taken an antihistamine. Of course, I reacted negatively to that and told him I would NEVER take an OTC antihistamine! Anyway, since he is already spending over $600 a month on supplements he decided he would stick with the antihistamine. He went by to see his doctor and guess what! He recommended the exact things I had already told him except he suggested he take a whole lot more than I would have!  ;D
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 12:27am; Reply: 86
Jane, I haven't made yogurt with almond milk, nor do I have a yogurt maker, but I did do a batch with Polyflora and mine came out watery as well. I'm going to try the second batch using the starter from the first Polyflora batch next, and see if I can't get a product more to my liking.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 3:42am; Reply: 87
Yogurt is VERY unforgiving about the temperature. And it needs to be as constant as possible. I made some in the oven one night using soy milk. (I might add here that I started making yogurt with cow's milk forty-five years ago, but with the new diet I wanted to try soy yogurt.) Anyway, to try something new I decided to try the oven on the lowest temp, which, of course, was not low enough. But to my utter surprise the next morning the "yogurt" was the best drink I have ever made in my entire life whether it had any culture to it or not. It was so delicious! But now I can't have yogurt made with soy so I'm looking for something else. During the hot summer months a cold yogurt drink would be sublime! I'm going to try homemade almond milk first. Can't tolerate all that junk in the commercial variety found around here.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 6:19am; Reply: 88
Quoted from Jane
Andy and Deblynn,
Would you tell me exactly what to do.  I bought some almond milk.  I have polyflora and I also have some plain Greek style yogurt that I could use for a starter.  I still need to get the right kind of thermometer.  I just bought a yogurt maker with the glass containers.  I'll probably try over the weekend but I'd love some help with exactly what to do with almond milk....Jane


Hi Jane

I made mine with home-made almond milk, as all the commercial ones here have stabalisers added and I'm not sure how this would affect the live bacteria. Here's what I did - starting from already having milk made. I mixed the contents of two polyflora caps into a litre of almond milk, I then poured this mixture into a clear glass bowl which I placed on my yoghurt maker base. I didn't put it in the glass jars for this stage as I knew from past experience there was another stage to do for which the bowl is more useful. So, with the bowl with polyflora milk in it on the yoghurt maker, I switched it on and covered with the lid - my bowl is slightly too high for the lid to completely reach the base but it worked out fine. I set the timer originally for 5 hours, but it didn't look ready. It was 'done' at 7 hours. When I say done I mean, you'll see that the yogurt has started to separate a lot and it smells really tangy. At this stage, I suspend a fine strainer lined with a cloth over another bowl or jug and pour the yoghurt mix in to strain out the 'whey' - I leave it in the refigerator for this stage. The resulting 'curd' yoghurt is thick and creamy. Mine was strained and good to go after an hour of straining.

I don't know how it will turn out if you use a little of your cows milk yoghurt as a starter as I've never tried this before. Also, I've never used some of the old batch as a starter for the next so I'd be curious to hear how both these methods turn out if you try them.

Good luck.

Andy
Posted by: Jane, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 3:09pm; Reply: 89
Thanks Andy.  The almond milk I bought was refrigerated and has very very few additives so I'll at least try it.  I have plenty of polyflora so I'll try that over the weekend.  You heat the almond milk the same way you would cow's milk - boil then cool to 95 degrees?
Posted by: Munchkin76, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 3:21pm; Reply: 90
Jane, I don't bother heating the almond milk. The main reason the instructions tell you to heat and then cool is so you can remove the skin that normally forms on dairy milks, as these seal out the oxygen from the little beasties. Fortunately with non-dairy milks this isn't a problem.

Oh, and also heating kills bacteria which again isn't a problem for non-dairy milks.

Good luck

Andy
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 5:42pm; Reply: 91
Andy, your "second step" is how Greek yogurt is made. Not necessary but worthwhile to people who prefer Greek yogurt. I love both methods but have a tendency to want to keep things as simple as possible these days!  :) Besides, I enjoy yogurt drinks with a passion! When I could have it, my favorite snack after spending time gardening, was a yogurt drink with a small grilled cheese sandwich and fruit. Yummy!
Posted by: deblynn3, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 9:41pm; Reply: 92
I did mine much the same way as Andy. I will make the next batch tonight I just leave my yogurt machine on overnight.
Posted by: Spring, Friday, April 4, 2014, 12:44am; Reply: 93
Quoted from deblynn3
I did mine much the same way as Andy. I will make the next batch tonight I just leave my yogurt machine on overnight.


What kind do you have, deblynn? The one I bought long ago wore out and I started using pint jars in a small dutch oven filled with water on top of the stove. I would check the temp of the water now and then and turn the heat on if it was low. Maybe I could just try that again. There is something sort of neat about having a dedicated yogurt maker, though! But some of them have a tendency to have hot spots which isn't good at all. Hemp yogurt really has my interest right now. I could almost live on yogurt drinks!
Posted by: deblynn3, Friday, April 4, 2014, 1:12pm; Reply: 94
it's an "Salton" just a 1qt. Ym9 looks like mine. Mine is several years old now but seems to work fine. I had one that had the individual glasses.  I think this one work better.
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 1:56pm; Reply: 95
I just finished putting away my latest batch of cow milk yogurt using a second generation Polyflora starter, half a gallon of milk, and the crockpot with a dimmer. Here are my notes (mostly for myself, but someone else might find them useful):

I'm still perfecting the setting using the dimmer switch; last night, using the warm setting and the dimmer midway, the liquid temp got down to 75. It was already gelled by the time I got up to check, and it happened sometime between 11:00 pm and 6:30 am.

The second generation of Polyflora is still not producing a tangy yogurt, though it is setting up nicely this time around. I'll continue to save 2 Tablespoons from my previous batch, but I like the way the yogurt starter makes cow milk into yogurt better. First time, everyt time. Perfect amount of gel and perfect amount of tangy (for me).
Posted by: Chloe, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 4:54pm; Reply: 96
Been looking at the Euro Cuisine automatic yogurt maker and reviews are high.  I want the easiest
possible way to do this so I use it often.  My oven is never going to hold the temperature as it's butting up to a cold outside wall....and cools down way too quickly so I'm afraid I'm never going to
keep this yogurt at the right temperature.  As for using my crock pot...I could, but rather have this
be automatic and turn off by itself....ready to have lids screwed on jars and head right to the 'fridge
to be cooled.  Going to ask DH to tell kids I want this for Mother's Day...It would be the perfect gift! :)
Posted by: Spring, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 5:15pm; Reply: 97
Debbie, I really like the idea of having a single large container. I would think that would help eliminate the problem of hot spots. The yogurt maker I had decades ago was flat with four glass containers that fit exactly on top of it. Some of the dishes got broken so I finally  simply sat a very small dutch oven on the surface, added four 12 ounce jars for the yogurt, and finished filling with warm water before putting the lid on. It made perfect, delicious yogurt until it finally bit the dust after several years. I'm like Chloe that I want something simple that I can almost do with my eyes closed! The older I get the more appealing that is to me!
Posted by: Chloe, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 5:43pm; Reply: 98
Quoted from Spring
I'm like Chloe that I want something simple that I can almost do with my eyes closed! The older I get the more appealing that is to me!


What makes me crazy is instructions....pages and pages of instructions.   I went to William's Sonoma website and watched a very detailed instruction video of how the Euro Cuisine works.
Smart merchandising.....if someone shows me how to do something, I'm there.  If I have to read
and figure out stuff, it's TMI and I don't want to do it at all.

BTW, here's the video...(second box underneath photo with green arrow) .it looks amazingly easy.
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/automatic-yogurt-maker/

Posted by: Spring, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 7:06pm; Reply: 99
I'm sort of wild-eyed right now wondering if I could liquify cottage cheese and make yogurt from that! Why under the sun I am supposed to be able to eat these cheeses and can't have my beloved milk yogurt is beyond me!!! I have just been reading Adele Davis' comments about yogurt, and she said that women made yogurt for hundreds of years who had never heard of a thermometer! Maybe not as much bacteria was running around in those days! Anyway, her recommendation for temp was anywhere from 100 to 120 degrees. In her day you could get yogurt makers that produced six pints or more of yogurt at a time. She said if your yogurt doesn't thicken suitably in spite of the temp being high enough or too high, just add more starter and incubate a little longer. Also, if the cows have been given antibiotics they can destroy the batch. Of course, she is talking about real, fresh milk. The real deal. Her yogurt recipe was ready in about three hours. She taught me what I know about making and enjoying yogurt! The last publication of her "Let's Cook It Right" that I have was published in 1962.
Posted by: Chloe, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 7:22pm; Reply: 100
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/products/organic-cottage-cheese

Spring, This is cultured cottage cheese if you're interested and can find this brand.

What other dairy options does SWAMI give you?
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 11:06pm; Reply: 101
Quoted Text


BTW, here's the video...(second box underneath photo with green arrow) .it looks amazingly easy.
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/automatic-yogurt-maker/



If I could find exactly this base with a single glass jar big enough to hold 2 quarts of milk, for a reasonable price, I would purchase it in a heartbeat!
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 11:40pm; Reply: 102
Quoted from Drea


If I could find exactly this base with a single glass jar big enough to hold 2 quarts of milk, for a reasonable price, I would purchase it in a heartbeat!


Found it! Ordered it...will be here on Wednesday. Sweet!
Posted by: Jane, Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:06pm; Reply: 103
I used refrigerated almond milk that I put in a pot on the sink with warm water to take the chill out and then added two polyflora and put in the 7 jars and into the yogurt maker.  I let it sit for 8 hours but it didn't set.  I went on line this morning and it said that with almond milk you have to start with something you've made yourself and then add all this stuff.  Maybe I should have added something sugary like agave or maple syrup for the polyflora to interact with.  I'll try again.  
Posted by: deblynn3, Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:43pm; Reply: 104
Jane I didn't add any sweet at all, I'm just not sure if any of the gums or whatever would interfere with polyflora and I warmed mine to about 110F added polyflora about 85, not know what temps the polyflora could take.   I still haven't made a second batch will try this afternoon, I have to make more almond milk.
Posted by: Jane, Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:53pm; Reply: 105
deblynn, thanks!  Can you give me the proportions....how much almond milk and how many polyflora.  I'm guessing that you are right and that the stabilizers in the refrigerated almond milk that I bought are the problem.  When you make the almond milk, do you use blanched almonds and do you soak them overnight first?  You can tell I'm a complete neophyte...
Posted by: Drea, Monday, April 7, 2014, 8:44pm; Reply: 106
Jane, when I make almond milk, I soak whole almonds for 8-12 hours, drain, rinse, drain again. Then I toss the almonds and the water in my high speed blender...Not sure if a regular blender or food processor would work, though, because I've not tried either to make almond milk. I have, however, made almond milk using organic, freshly ground almond butter (from the hfs) and water using my hand-held stick blender. Hope this helps.
Posted by: Drea, Monday, April 7, 2014, 8:46pm; Reply: 107
I think the reason that the batch of yogurt I made with the polyflora took so long to set was that I used too much of the polyflora for the amount of milk. When I make cow milk yogurt with cow milk yogurt as the starter, I only use 1 Tablespoon of starter to 2 quarts of milk (the starter needs a lot of room to populate).
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, April 7, 2014, 11:45pm; Reply: 108
Quoted from Drea
I think the reason that the batch of yogurt I made with the polyflora took so long to set was that I used too much of the polyflora for the amount of milk. When I make cow milk yogurt with cow milk yogurt as the starter, I only use 1 Tablespoon of starter to 2 quarts of milk (the starter needs a lot of room to populate).


Are you buying the Euro Cuisine yogurt maker with the 2 quart container?  I was focusing on the unit with the individual jars because they're glass.  Wondering about making yogurt in plastic!

What's the proper amount of Polyflora to use per quart of milk?

THe Euro Cuisine video shows using 5 oz of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk.

Anyone ever used the starter by Yogourmet?  
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 12:00am; Reply: 109
I purchased the Yogourmet 2-quart size. I read in the comments that there is a 64 ounce jar that can be used in place of the plastic, and I'm hoping that the jar I have that looks the same will fit. I'll post my results. It's arriving on Wednesday. Looking forward!
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 12:02am; Reply: 110
Quoted from Chloe


Are you buying the Euro Cuisine yogurt maker with the 2 quart container?  I was focusing on the unit with the individual jars because they're glass.  Wondering about making yogurt in plastic!

What's the proper amount of Polyflora to use per quart of milk?

THe Euro Cuisine video shows using 5 oz of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk.

Anyone ever used the starter by Yogourmet?  


I think using 5 ounces of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk is WAY too much. Everything I've read so far says to use 2 Tablespoons to 1 gallon, and that holds true to my own experience. I've only ever made cow yogurt. I'd also like to mention that if you can have cow dairy at all, making the yogurt with cow yogurt as starter is way easier, and tastier (IMO).
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 12:19am; Reply: 111
Quoted from Drea


I think using 5 ounces of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk is WAY too much. Everything I've read so far says to use 2 Tablespoons to 1 gallon, and that holds true to my own experience. I've only ever made cow yogurt. I'd also like to mention that if you can have cow dairy at all, making the yogurt with cow yogurt as starter is way easier, and tastier (IMO).


Well I will take your advice when I try this but the Euro Cuisine video shows using 5 oz of prepared yogurt ....don't know why they use that much.

I feel my sinuses get stuffy on cow's milk  yogurt but I'm fine on sheep's milk yogurt and cheeses....so if I can find sheep's milk anywhere,  I would use my starter from the commercial sheep's milk yogurt I've been buying. It's just expensive to buy sheep's milk yogurt.  Before buying the yogurt maker, my first priority is to see if I can find sheep's milk in any local store.
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7:25pm; Reply: 112
I think my problem was that I used refrigerated almond milk and it has some stabilizers.  I used 2 polyflora.  Maybe I needed more and maybe it needed more than 8 hours.  I bought the Euro Cuisine.  It has the glass jars.  I bought the one without the automatic stop because of the comments I read that said it didn't really help that much.  It has a gauge on the front that you can set to the number of hours but I didn't pay any attention to that since it doesn't turn it off or anything.  I found a recipe online yesterday and I took it home so I don't have it with me that called for using almonds and either cashews or macadamia nuts.  It said to add a little sweetener for the yeast to feed on. I'll have to try again over the weekend.  

Drea, when you use the almond butter from the health food store (I buy that every week) do you still need to strain it?
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7:33pm; Reply: 113
Quoted from Jane
I think my problem was that I used refrigerated almond milk and it has some stabilizers.  I used 2 polyflora.  Maybe I needed more and maybe it needed more than 8 hours.  I bought the Euro Cuisine.  It has the glass jars.  I bought the one without the automatic stop because of the comments I read that said it didn't really help that much.  It has a gauge on the front that you can set to the number of hours but I didn't pay any attention to that since it doesn't turn it off or anything.  I found a recipe online yesterday and I took it home so I don't have it with me that called for using almonds and either cashews or macadamia nuts.  It said to add a little sweetener for the yeast to feed on. I'll have to try again over the weekend.  


On  the automatic Euro Cuisine you choose the amount of hours
you want to process, it made little sense to me too that I'd want or need something automatic...
when all I really need is to know how many hours I'd want to process.  And note that on the
manual dial, then pull the plug when the time was up.  All the auto feature would be is a timer.

I carefully read the reviews on the manual shut off vs the auto and all I could tell was a $10 difference.

Only advantage I can see to automatic  shut off would be if I simply wasn't home and the unit was running and running and running...THe auto feature to me is more of a safety feature for people who might forget they've got a yogurt maker operating in the kitchen.

So at this point, I'm waiting for you to produce your perfect batch of yogurt :)....and I'm still searching to see if I can find sheep's milk anywhere around here.

Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 8:28pm; Reply: 114
LOL In response to all the aggravation about making the perfect yogurt - how long to  incubate, which milk, and which that, blah, blah, blah, in protest I went out and bought some plain Stonyfield Greek yogurt and on Sunday ate a whole half cup of it mixed into a little rice milk. Took two lactase capsules, a DPN probiotic and felt wonderful!  ;D Of course, I don't plan to make a habit of that by any means! I think now that the soy milk I was mixing into it before is why the drink bothered me. I have never in my life had the symptoms that my brother has when he eats the least bit of lactose. Mine are more to do with muscle aches and pains which is the way it affects my sister. So I don't know what gives here. No sinus issues or anything of that sort. But this time I didn't even have the aches and pains. I have a head full of questions, to say the least!
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 8:56pm; Reply: 115
Jane, if I were to make almond milk from almond butter and wanted to use it for yogurt, then yes, I would strain it. If I'm going to put it in my coffee, then maybe not.
Posted by: Jane, Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 5:31pm; Reply: 116
Thanks Drea.  The only difference I can see would be that the almonds may not have been soaked?  Does that really make a difference?
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 11:44pm; Reply: 117
Quoted from Chloe
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/products/organic-cottage-cheese
Spring, This is cultured cottage cheese if you're interested and can find this brand.

What other dairy options does SWAMI give you?

Feta cheese, Mozzarella cheese, Paneer cheese, Ricotta cheese. I can eat a little, but not much, Mozzarella cheese without a problem, but the others, I have no idea where Dr. D. found these cheeses in a form that a person trying to eat a healthy diet would be willing to eat. They are full of junk (gums, etc., even in the organic versions) that I am not about to eat! The Mozzarella bothers me a lot worse than yogurt. Yogurt is easy, I can find a perfectly wonderful organic, delicious dairy product that is not outrageously expensive, to say nothing for how convenient it is. The cottage cheese I am eating now is not organic but it only has about three ingredients in it and is only lightly salted as opposed to most of the others that have an awful amount of salt in them. It is very good. My DDIL found some of the Nancy brand today that is loaded with stuff I don't want, but I agreed to try it. I will let you know how that turns out. I must say that the older I get the more weary I get of things being so complicated. I am ordering from five different companies, at least, and going to three different groceries every week. I wish Dr. D. would give people a very good reason not to eat foods that are easy to find without so much trauma. I know this can't be good for people.
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 12:31am; Reply: 118
I got my yo gourmet in the mail today, and the glass jar I have fits perfectly inside! I'm cooling down the milk to put it into the yogurt maker, as I type! So excited!
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 8:33am; Reply: 119
First batch of yogurt made in the Yogourmet 2-quart machine worked like a charm. Woke up to take the puppy out to potty, and decided to check on yogurt. It's been approximately 8 hours, and it's perfectly tangy.

I used cow milk with cow milk starter: 2 quarts of milk, heated to 180 deg F, then cooled to 110 deg F, with 1 Tablespoon starter. Perfection! And the finished product is already in its own glass jar. I'll have to get another jar if I want to make another batch before this one is finished. This particular jar was purchased to ferment with specific lid apparati. But I'm glad to find an additional use for it.

The Yogourmet is super easy, does a great job, and if you are interested in making yogurt in a single container, instead of several small jars, then this may be for you. The consistent temperature water bath is the key. And way easier than the crockpot method, though with the Yogourmet you have to heat the milk on the stove (which takes less time overall, but requires more attention). It cleans up in a snap (just have to dump the water and drain to dry), and doesn't take up a lot if space. I normally don't like single-use appliances, but after making yogurt in a variety of ways, this one is my new fave.

Almond yogurt is not that appealing to me, so I may not be making it anytime soon. I'm happy with my full fat organic cow yogurt.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 3:37pm; Reply: 120
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/nancys-cottage-cheese-tastes-tart-in-comparison-to-other-brands-of-cottage-cheese-why-is-that
Quoted Text
Nancy's lowfat cottage cheese has a fully cultured old-fashioned flavor. We set our cottage cheese with four strains of lactic cultures, the same ones used for sour cream, instead of coagulants like rennet. We allow them to grow slowly to maximize the flavor and increase its digestibility. We use probiotic cultures in our cottage cheese for additional health benefits. The cultures pre-digest lactose or milk sugar, and lactic acid is a by-product of this growth of cultures. The result is Nancy's "tart and tangy" flavor with an abundance of live cultures. Need to sweeten it up? Fresh fruit usually does the trick!

So the question to me is how is this different from regular cottage cheese on SWAMI? Or yogurt. But I don't expect an answer to these questions. Why should I? The only thing I can think of is that Dr. D. doesn't like the particular live cultures in bought yogurt, but I have never heard anything said about that for other A-types who CAN eat yogurt, and the same probiotic blend is recommended for all A-types, whether they can eat yogurt or not. So the conundrum is if cottage cheese is re-cultured into yogurt would it be an avoid or not. Stack that up against cheeses that are the absolute pits for me that are superfoods - I can only scratch my head.....
And, Drea, just be thankful making yogurt with plain old milk is easy for you! No need to worry about "resistance" there!(smile)
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 3:48pm; Reply: 121
Quoted from Spring
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/nancys-cottage-cheese-tastes-tart-in-comparison-to-other-brands-of-cottage-cheese-why-is-that
So the question to me is how is this different from regular cottage cheese on SWAMI? Or yogurt. But I don't expect an answer to these questions. Why should I?
And, Drea, just be thankful making yogurt with plain old milk is easy for you! No need to worry about "resistance" there!(smile)


I'm assuming (although not certain) that cultured cottage cheese has all the benefits of regular
cottage cheese plus the additional good bacteria found in yogurt.

"Curds is a dairy product obtained by curdling (coagulating) milk with rennet or an edible acidic substance such as lemon juice or vinegar and then draining off the liquid portion (called whey). Milk that has been left to sour (raw milk alone or pasteurized milk with added lactic acid bacteria or yeast) will also naturally produce curds, and sour milk cheese is produced this way. The increased acidity causes the milk proteins (casein) to tangle into solid masses, or "curds". The rest, which contains only whey proteins, is the whey. In cow's milk, 80% of the proteins are caseins. Curd products vary by region and include cottage cheese, quark (both curdled by bacteria and sometimes also rennet) and paneer (curdled with lemon juice). The word can also refer to a non-dairy substance of similar appearance or consistency, though in these cases a modifier or the word curdled is generally used (e.g. bean curds, lemon curd, or curdled eggs).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curd

Yoghurt, yogurt, yoghourt, youghurt or yogourt (see spelling below), is a dairy product produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. Fermentation of the milk sugar (lactose) produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yoghurt its texture and its characteristic tang. Soy yoghurt, a non-dairy yoghurt alternative, is made from soy milk. "

It is nutritionally rich in protein, calcium, riboflavin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.[1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yogurt

Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 5:46pm; Reply: 122
Thanks, much, but that still doesn't answer my questions. I know how each of them are made and have done so many, many times. The key words were "on SWAMI!" I need a very good high protein drink during the spring and summer that will tide me over from one meal to the next when I am spending hours upon hours doing yard work. I have always had a dislike of dealing with powdered protein, but I do have the DPN version every morning in my drink. I don't seem to be able to face it more than once a day.
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 8:11pm; Reply: 123
Quoted from Spring
Thanks, much, but that still doesn't answer my questions. I know how each of them are made and have done so many, many times. The key words were "on SWAMI!" I need a very good high protein drink during the spring and summer that will tide me over from one meal to the next when I am spending hours upon hours doing yard work. I have always had a dislike of dealing with powdered protein, but I do have the DPN version every morning in my drink. I don't seem to be able to face it more than once a day.


can you drink kefir?  Can you use pea protein?  (it's pretty tasteless, although you said you prefer
not to use powdered protein)...i guess you could put yogurt into a smoothie.....but it seems difficult to come up with a protein drink that doesn't start with some kind of powder.

High protein food bar?  Would that work?




Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 10, 2014, 10:53pm; Reply: 124
No, I can't have kefir. You can see why I am so bent on trying to make this yogurt drink work! It is absolutely perfect for my need. It is in a drink form and can be quickly assimilated and downed. Protein bars don't seem to work when you are hot and needing a lot of something to drink besides water. Some people freeze them and that seems to work for them, but they just seem to make me feel hotter. A couple of hours ago I decided to have another yogurt drink the same as I did the last time with 2 lactase and  1 probiotic. I went out and worked really hard about an hour and a half  - the temp was about 90 in the sun, and I feel wonderful. Totally! Cottage cheese makes me feel good too, but I have not found an easy, satisfactory way to make a quick drink out of cottage cheese. It is too bland besides. I don't take lactase with cottage cheese. I will see how Nancy's cottage cheese/yogurt works. I still may try to make yogurt out of cottage cheese on my own. More later....
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, April 12, 2014, 11:26pm; Reply: 125
Made my second batch of yogurt in the Yogourmet today. After heating the milk and then cooling it down, the incubation period was 7 hours. That is much better than the 12-15 hours it was taking in the oven and crockpot methods. Now I can make yogurt during the day, rather than having to time it to be incubating overnight.
Posted by: Spring, Sunday, April 13, 2014, 4:01am; Reply: 126
Quoted from Chloe
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/products/organic-cottage-cheese
Spring, This is cultured cottage cheese if you're interested and can find this brand.?

Chloe, this yogurt/cottage cheese is absolutely delicious! I got the plain and couldn't be more pleased. Wished now that I had gotten several cartons of it. So now I don't have to wonder if cottage cheese can be made into yogurt because it can!

Posted by: Drea, Sunday, April 13, 2014, 4:23am; Reply: 127
Nancy's cottage cheese is my favorite, too! I normally don't like cottage cheese, but Nancy's has a nice bite.
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, April 13, 2014, 6:51pm; Reply: 128
Quoted from Spring

Chloe, this yogurt/cottage cheese is absolutely delicious! I got the plain and couldn't be more pleased. Wished now that I had gotten several cartons of it. So now I don't have to wonder if cottage cheese can be made into yogurt because it can!



Thanks for letting me know....although I can't have cottage cheese, my Warrior husband can...
Glad you could find it and happy you loved it.  :)

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