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BTD Forums  /  Nonnie Clubhouse  /  How not to over eat??
Posted by: Goldie, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 4:37pm
I am finding it hard to stop eating when I am full.

how to stop..  
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 4:44pm; Reply: 1
that s where you can have all your veggie servings for the day.......
try and fit in those 5 cups right there, after you thought you d already eaten, and before you grab the carbs or other sweets or whatever you cant stop eating even if full.......

if you have absolutely no desire for those 5 servings of veggies then, it simply means you need to use other methods of self discipline and get busy in a project to take your mind off food and the addictive behavior
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 5:20pm; Reply: 2
Staying busy away from the kitchen helps me.  Doing thing with my hands (crafts) keeps my hands occupied rather than reaching for snacks, often out of boredom.  Just being out and about keeps my mind off of food.  If you're truly hungry, that's different, but you know you will be healthier eating according to your SWAMI.  I get the munchies, too.  I eat too much chocolate (need to work on that - I'll get there).  Rice cakes used to be my friend, but I can easily eat more of those than I should.  I like a banana in the afternoon.  And lately I like a cup of beef bone broth with a pinch of ginger and sea salt.  It's filling and very satisfying to cravings.
Posted by: Goldie, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 5:39pm; Reply: 3
I seem not to be able to stop eating if I cooked to much..

just finished a bowl 1/4 cup quinoa because I cooked it.. I could have cooked half.. then i would be happy.. instead I ate all..

I will buy a smaller pan 5 inches only so that i can cook less.. this is a must..

keeping busy does not do it. so far.. only getting away from the food does..

I think....  
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 5:43pm; Reply: 4
Also think about how good the leftover quinoa would be added to an omelet or something like that the next day and get little leftover dishes so you don't feel like you have to throw it out or eat it to not be wasteful. :)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 5:57pm; Reply: 5
That's a good tip, Ms. Ruby.  I like to make stir fries out of leftovers, or omelets.  It's fun to see what I can come up with.  I rarely throw leftovers away anymore, it all gets eaten.  No more mysterious things at the back of the fridge that were forgotten about.   ;)
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 6:00pm; Reply: 6
I try to only buy foods that are compliant.  That way if I have the munchies, my choices are limited to what I can eat because that is all I have in the house.  Since chocolate is a superfood for me, I often have a little chocolate to curb my sweet tooth.  Sometimes mango or blueberries are good, too!

Goldie, one thing you might want to consider is that you eat more out of habit than out of hunger.  That habit is difficult to break and requires determination.  I think getting out for a walk instead of reaching for food when you are not really hungry is a good idea.  If the weather is bad, figure out something else you can do such as a hobby, as mentioned above, or going to someplace indoors where you can walk.

I have seen in some of your other posts that you are scared to be hungry and I wonder why.  I don't mind the feeling of hunger.  Is it because of your diabetes?  If so, maybe you can set a specific schedule for your food.  Three meals a day with two or three small snacks in between meals.  Once you get into a predicable routine, that should help.

Only eat what is on your plate.  No second helpings.  

Finally, I usually get the munchies when I am tired, so maybe you need to look at that.  Are you getting enough rest and exercise?  All of these things have helped me when I had a weight problem for a few years.  Remember, it is a marathon not a sprint.  One day at a time!!!
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 6:04pm; Reply: 7
Thumbs up for Patty's post.  What great advice!  I needed that, too.  :)
Posted by: EquiPro, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 6:08pm; Reply: 8
This is a very tough question, as far as I am concerned and this issue has been one of the most difficult of my life to overcome.  However, I HAVE overcome it.

I have been an overeater since childhood.  I have also struggled with my weight since childhood, too.  Part of this, I now realize, has to do with the fact that I am a Gatherer and have always desired the lean body of a hunter.  Because of this, I started dieting at a young age, and I am convinced that all these years of diets contributed to my overeating.

In the GTD book, it talks about Gatherers having a difficulty in controlling their appetite, and the information about this was very applicable to my situation.  I started my first diet at age 10 and continued to diet, on an off, into my early 40s.  I overate because I was hungry all of the time.  I am convinced that I was hungry all of the time because of the diets that I had followed all of my life, that severely limited either calories or food groups or both.  I had tried many different things to learn to control my appetite and hunger, but nothing truly worked.  I'm sorry, Virginia, but, for me as a Gatherer, at least, the tricks like being busy away from the kitchen never worked and simply did not address the problem.  All they did was make me more obsessed about being hungry and further my overeating when I finally would eat.

Fortunately/ unfortunately, I finally stopped overeating, but the method that worked for me is not something that I can recommend.  What finally stopped me from overeating, completely, was to absolutely not diet or limit my food intake in any way for several years.  I decided that I had had it with dieting and food constraints and that I was going to eat what I wanted and I would accept the resulting weight gain without judgement or self-hate.  If I wanted a cookie, I ate them and in whatever quantity I wanted.  If I wanted pasta, I ate it and in whatever quantity I wanted.  I gained weight eating that way BUT, eventually my weight leveled off.  I gained size, but eventually my size stabilized.  I ate and ate, but, eventually I stopped eating.  Instead of being 175 lbs and a size 12, I ended up at a size 18.  And I stayed at that exact size for 3 years.  For the first time in my entire life, I could grab any piece of clothing in my closet and it would fit.  My size never changed.

I also stopped overeating.  If I wanted a cookie, I would have them, but gone were the days when I would eat an entire package of cookies.  Instead, one or two would do me and I wouldn't eat more than that.  My portions slowly began to shrink and I started to understand what it meant to be satisfied, rather than full.  I started to never eat until full and I started to understand when I was really hungry vs. when I was just "wanting something".

Eventually I became ready to try to work towards my goal weight without the fear of overeating and I haven't overeaten once since starting back again.  I truly believe that part is over for me.  My portions are actually quite small, and eating to the point of feeling full is not comfortable for me anymore.  I never overeat.

Yesterday, I took a day off of the GTD and ate what I wanted to eat.  I know that I have to do this periodically in order to be compliant most of the time.  It is not realistic for me to think that I will never eat pizza again, never eat another cookie.  That is a path, for me, of obsession again and with obsession comes overeating.  What I find interesting is that, while I ate all of the things that I wanted yesterday, I didn't overeat any of them.  I ate one large cookie.  I ate a normal large portion of pasta, and didn't finish it.  I also was careful to eat bennies with these avoids, such as lamb and beneficial fruits.

I woke up today feeling good.  I didn't feel any more hungry than usual.  I didn't have any cravings.  I didn't feel disappointed in myself.

I don't know what the answer is for you.  A lot of it depends on why you overeat.  For me, it was obviously my body's reaction to a lifetime of dieting that created a feeling of depravation and starvation and it wasn't until my body really and truly KNEW that I wasn't going to do that again, that it finally set me free from a nearly constant battle with my appetite.  Eating a lot of beneficials will probably help you.  I hope that you are able to come to a place of peace with your appetite, without having to go through what I did.
Posted by: EquiPro, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 6:15pm; Reply: 9
Ah.  I looked further and saw that you are, indeed, a Gatherer.  Well, then you know what Dr. D writes about us is true:  we really struggle with our appetite.

Please try re-reading Dr. D's section about Gatherer's and their problems with appetite control.  It was an "ah-hah" moment for me because of my struggles with appetite and overeating throughout my lifetime.  I truly don't know if tricks or willpower works.  They never worked for me.  Hopefully, you can find an answer because being hungry all of the time sucks and makes following any diet plan misery because it feels like you are suffering through it and that you can't wait to "get there" so that you can eat again.
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 6:21pm; Reply: 10
Thank you, Virginia and great post Equipro.

I have believed for a long time that many of our habits around food are psychological in nature.  Some people eat to fill a void.  Figuring out this is the first step to working towards a healthy attitude towards food.

During the one time in my life that I was overweight, I was definitely filling a void because I was lonely.  I was eighteen and had broken up with my boyfriend of a couple of years.  I didn't meet anyone I was interested in, so I ate because I was lonely.  Then I gained weight.  Then I was less attractive to men so finding someone who loved me just the way I was became more difficult (particularly at that age) so I would get depressed and eat more and gain more weight, and on and on it went.  It was like being tied to a stake in the ground and just going around and around and around.

I am not saying this is the case for anyone else, just for me.  Food is a very private thing.  Some people eat to live, others live to eat.  Working on the emotional aspects of food, as you did, Equipro, is critical to finding your own equilibrium.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 6:25pm; Reply: 11
It's been a challenge for me as well.

DD1 has had this problem since she was about 10- she started stress eating when she first found out we were moving, and never really broke the habit until very recently. While she was ill, if she overate she'd vomit the next time she coughed (which was every few minutes for a while there.) She basically had the choice between "stopping now even though I'm not quite full" or vomiting a few minutes later. By the time the coughing and vomiting stopped, she'd adapted to eating smaller portions. She lost about 4 lbs from the illness and another 2 lbs since she recovered.

Even my ex husband, who's a truck driver on the road all the time (coming in for a visit about once a month) and has zero interest in BTD, has been steadily losing weight since he started to "stop eating when he's full."

I really, really need to focus on portion sizes myself. I need to "eat with my head, not my gut" for at least a week, until my body adjusts to eating "just the right amount of food."
Posted by: maira, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:12pm; Reply: 12
In the place I work I am sorrounded by food 24x7 and i have no where to walk away from... because thats part of my job.... so when i have nothing much to do...i feel like grabing a bit...
what i normally do is...drink a lottttt of water ( maybe with some lemon slices) ... drink a lot of green tea... and i always have baby carrots with me...  i like them ...its a benefit for my blood type and its also good for your skin :)

If you dont like carrots....try the water...it makes you really full :)
Posted by: Susana, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:41pm; Reply: 13
Fascinating post from Equipro which also shows the accuracy of Dr. D's work.

Years back Equipro and me, amongst others, were buddies in trying to figure out how to stop overeating. Over two years ago I also decided not to follow any nutritional plan and eat what I wanted. The difference, and it is where Dr. D shines, is that I am a hunter and in the process I have lost, and maintained a 24lb weight loss, even without any exercise other than some strolls.

I actually did not take the decision of not worrying over food. I just found something I felt passionate about and food issues just did not have a place in my life. I did not eat because I was hungry. I ate, as Patty says, to fill a void, to stop the boredom although it did feel like hunger at the time. No matter which tricks I used nothing helped. Even finding a new hobby or activity was difficult given my constant preoccupation with food. I can say I was fortunate that the new interest grabbed be so strong.

I still eat a lot, especially compared to my husband who eats like a bird, but I control what I eat. I still have times when I want to eat more but I can get hold of the situation and stop. I do not like feeling stuffed. I realize I am now able to stop thinking on how good something tastes,  the culprit for making me eat more, quite fast. If I have some problems forgetting about it I just tell myself I can have it later. When it is appropriate to eat again. When I am hungry, have set the table, and can enjoy the food as it deserves. I think of how I would not jump on the first attractive man I see. Same discipline. I have a good laugh thinking of the reaction of the man and find something to entertain me. I am not sure this would have worked a few years back but it works now.

Goldie, are you finding you are eating more out of control now that you have allowed carbs back into your diet? If so, it may not be real hunger. I do not know what Dr. D has to say about gatherers. I'll change a few things in my Swami see if I can get a gatherer profile.

Best of luck,
:K)
Posted by: Susana, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:53pm; Reply: 14
I forgot to mention, I have bought some good looking glass containers of different sizes where I place leftovers. It allows me to skip or greatly reduce food preparation several times per week. I have hated leftovers so I ate them. Now I save them.

:K)
Posted by: Goldie, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:55pm; Reply: 15
I am grateful that I don't have to over eat as far as portions are concerned.. (maybe not all true)

ut I already bought a 8 inch pan (did that reduction from 12 the 9 inches) and it allows for a full two course meal of veg and protein.

ut when I make on oz more food then I really need I seem to have issues and I eat it anyway.. I really liked all that was written above, especially the 'recognition of 'so called sad stories..

I know for us here compliance is a given.. we are less arguing about that .. but the way we get to the MENTAL peace of mind tat is the question. I know I have never been hungry.. but since the day I got married I have had to stop from gaining weight.

It coinsided with the FIRST time I was told that I have diabetes.. but did not then, ut it stuck in my throat and as I gained weight after a few month of my wedding.. I 'suffered' ever since.  STUCK IN MY THROAT is interesting as I eat to feel stuffed to my throat... a laugh... but on insight over which to ponder...

yes I have on emotional fear of 'hunger'.. I think it's like a fear of acceptance.. or fear of belonging ... or some such thing .. it is totally not needed.. I am fine in all those areas ( for my 67 years)  but I do not enjoy my life as I should.. but today I volunteered to do something that would give me great pleasure. It's been a long time since I did anything like it. and I had all the opportiunity to have a good entry..

I love some creativeness, but food is my fear.. I can feel it in my gut even as I type this.. really emotional as I am stuffed even now..

But I will get the small 5 inch pan that will make it much easier to make a proper portion. but its only a trick,,

YES it's a HABIT.. and as such can be broken .. takes some weeks .. but yes I needed that reminder to say .. yes I can do this too.. I have done other such things. . yes I can.. be it by focusing on the habit of thinking wrongly or of hand to mouth .. I need to ponder on that.. Thanks for your stories.. thanks..      

          
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:56pm; Reply: 16
Quoted Text
I overate because I was hungry all of the time.  I am convinced that I was hungry all of the time because of the diets that I had followed all of my life, that severely limited either calories or food groups or both.  I had tried many different things to learn to control my appetite and hunger, but nothing truly worked.


This is interesting, EquiPro because Hunters are hungry all of the time, too!  I was shocked to read in the GT book and my SWAMI that hunters complain of being hungry all the time.  I used to tell my friends that I am constantly hungry.  Hunger was part of my daily existance.  I worked very hard to resist it with work, walking, activities, etc.  If I was involved in something I could forget about my hunger.

Each one of us is an individual.  For me, I think my constant hunger during these last 25 years that I do not need to lose weight was that I chose the wrong foods.  Once I started having some type of protein for breakfast and eating later in the morning as opposed to as soon as I got up, I found I was less hungry and could go longer between meals.  It took me a while to figure this out, but since I have I am not truly hungry all the time.

The munchies is a different thing, however, like you say in your post.

Quoted Text
My portions slowly began to shrink and I started to understand what it meant to be satisfied, rather than full.  I started to never eat until full and I started to understand when I was really hungry vs. when I was just "wanting something".


It looks like although Hunters and Gatherers are different, we have some common ground.  Hopefully we can all learn from one another in an encouraging and supportive way.  

Goldie think about your relationship with food and your food choices at different times of the day.  You are on the right track and you have our collective support!
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 10:29pm; Reply: 17
My daughter and I are both B Nonsecretors, but I'm a Nomad and she is a Gatherer.  Our relationship with food is as different as night and day.  If not for Dr. D and his genotype approach, I never would have been able to understand her anxiety about food and she would not have achieved the degree of peace that she now has.  

One thing that has helped her is to eat potent food and stay away from empty 'food'.  It's not just about staying away from toxins/avoids.  She has been super-intentional in the foods that she chooses, picking those that leave her with a feeling of deep satisfaction. She does not put food in her mouth that is just filling, and she is very careful to meet all the various food requirements, such as fats, protein, fresh vegetables (especially green ones).  She is diligent to not put things in her mouth that upset her blood sugar balance, causing crashes and cravings.

She doesn't live with me, so I'm not sure exactly which foods those are, but she tells me that it is working and she has absolutely no cravings or compulsions any more.
Posted by: MsRubyLu, Sunday, February 13, 2011, 10:40pm; Reply: 18
Goldie,  This is such a good thread and reminder for us all.  Thank you for posting it.

Victoria. I loved your quote "One thing that has helped her is to eat potent food and stay away from empty 'food'.  It's not just about staying away from toxins/avoids.  She has been super-intentional in the foods that she chooses, picking those that leave her with a feeling of deep satisfaction"

It's so true and makes such a difference to eat right.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Monday, February 14, 2011, 1:06am; Reply: 19
Quoted Text
For me, I think my constant hunger during these last 25 years that I do not need to lose weight was that I chose the wrong foods.

I have less "wants" when I'm eating the right foods, too.  I call it being shnibbly - grazing around the kitchen, feeling sorta hungry sorta not, not really knowing what I want.  Maybe that is true hunger - for the right foods.  I am also aware now of when I'm anxiety-eating, which is a different thing.  If I eat when I'm anxious, then I eat with unawareness of the process of eating, and the food gets stuck in my throat.  It's painful.  I used to think it was eating too quickly, but I'm a slow eater compared to my husband.  It's some kind of constriction that happens when I'm anxious and trying to eat.  It happens less often now that I'm aware of it.  I still get shnibbly, though.

Great thread, enjoying reading everybody's posts.  :)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Monday, February 14, 2011, 1:30am; Reply: 20
regular use of water and also green tea will help.

walking will also help because it is difficult to cook and eat when you are walking.

reading instead of going on the computer will also help think outside the box. make up games to help yo like

if you are hungry say okay i can't eat for 30 mins and i have to have   glass of water first. drink the water immediately and have a large cup of green tea in 25 mins if you are still hungry have some very compliant food but no fruit or avoids or fruit juice.

be strong oxo
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, February 14, 2011, 1:33am; Reply: 21
Another thought I had on the subject --

For most of my life I had IBS and acid reflux.  There was a constant state of inflammation/irritation going in in my digestive tract.  Even though I was never in a shortage of food, the unease that I felt in my innards was similar to the sensation of hunger.  And when I kept my stomach full, with food pressing onto the irritated tissues, the discomfort was temporarily dulled.  Of course, the effect of this is that I was perpetuating the internal irritation and creating a vicious cycle as the packed stomach prompted more acid reflux.

There is a period of psychological and physical discomfort, unease and  panic  involved in breaking a cycle -- whether it is food, sugar, alcohol, etc.  Just pushing through it can seem impossible, but there is light at the end of the tunnel, after giving the stomach and gut a break.  They need to heal.
Posted by: Patty H, Monday, February 14, 2011, 1:40am; Reply: 22
Quoted Text
If I eat when I'm anxious, then I eat with unawareness of the process of eating, and the food gets stuck in my throat.  It's painful.  I used to think it was eating too quickly, but I'm a slow eater compared to my husband.  It's some kind of constriction that happens when I'm anxious and trying to eat.  It happens less often now that I'm aware of it.  I still get shnibbly, though.


I have had a revelation, so to speak, about this.  It seems that my throat often closed when I would eat and I would choke.  This became a family joke - my husband would say I have small pipes, since I am a very small woman, to make light of the fact that if we were at a dinner party or in a restaurant, I would begin to choke and need water.

I have since discovered that giving up pepper has made this phenomenon go away.  I have not choked once since last night when we were out to dinner at a friend's house and I drank something that was not on my list.  My throat closed and I began to choke again.

I think our bodies try to tell us in many different ways that we are not eating for our type.  Mine happened to be choking constantly on food.  When I eat for my type, I do not choke!

It is interesting to me to pay attention to the things that do not happen any more.  Most of us only pay attention to the positive aspects of our diet, but is very important to pay attention to the things that are negative that no longer happen on a regular basis.  Choking on food or drink is one of those negative aspects for me.
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