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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Why does beef make me feel this way?
Posted by: dyh080, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 5:29pm
Sorry if this has already been discussed but what is in beef that makes me feel so much better and relaxed immediately after ingesting it?

I'm a type o secretor who felt terrible on a temporary raw food( mostly vegetarian) diet....no sleep, irritable.

One weekend I ate a lot of grass fed beef and drank water....360 degree change.

Whenever I feel anxious and then eat beef I get immediate results.

Just wondering what nutrient in beef causes that? Is it tyrosine?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 5:32pm; Reply: 1
CLA!!!
http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=GT2%2D5SYN
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 5:50pm; Reply: 2
It makes me feel great, too.  I've been making grass fed beef bone broth.  I let it cool overnight in the fridge so that I can remove all the fat that has congealed on top.  It's pretty much completely defatted, and when I drink it I feel great, very satisfied and calm.  When it's cold it's like jelly, but it liquifies when you heat it.  I make soups from it, use it in rice.  It is my miracle food at the moment.  :)  (I hope it is also full of CLA).
Posted by: dyh080, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 5:58pm; Reply: 3
Thanks,
   I read that grass fed is higher in CLA than other beef but I get the exact same feeling when I eat non grass fed beef from the local pizza place.

   I like the idea of beef broth and will have to try it.
Posted by: jennyg, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 5:59pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from O in Virginia
It makes me feel great, too.  I've been making grass fed beef bone broth.  I let it cool overnight in the fridge so that I can remove all the fat that has congealed on top.  It's pretty much completely defatted, and when I drink it I feel great, very satisfied and calm.  When it's cold it's like jelly, but it liquifies when you heat it.  I make soups from it, use it in rice.  It is my miracle food at the moment.  :)  (I hope it is also full of CLA).


how do you make bone broth? i am cooking burgers as i type this  ;D
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 6:14pm; Reply: 5
Jenny, I buy grass fed beef bones at Whole Foods (because that is the only place I know of to get them here).  I brown them in the oven first.  Then put them in my crock pot and cover with water, add the juice of a lemon (if vinegar is ok for you, then use that).  The acid is to help extract the minerals from the bones as they simmer.  I let them simmer on low for two days and a night.  Strain it, let it cool, refrigerate overnight.  Skim off the fat next day, and it's good to use.  I have not added salt or any other seasonings.  I had a cup to drink for breakfast this morning...so good!  I add a pinch of sea salt and a sprinkle of dried ginger to mine as I heat it.  Enjoy!  :)

I have wondered whether the fat is considered "suet".  The birds would probably love that, rolled in birdseed and hung outside, but I haven't done that yet.
Posted by: jennyg, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 6:20pm; Reply: 6
Thanks O in Virginia!! I'm looking forward to trying it!
Posted by: dyh080, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 6:20pm; Reply: 7
Dear O in Virginia

   Thank you so much.....I going to buy a crock pot and follow your recipe. If I can get the same results as when I eat beef, this broth will definitely be my drink of choice.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 6:21pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from jennyg
Thanks O in Virginia!! I'm looking forward to trying it!


You're very welcome.  I think you will notice the effects.  :)

Quoted from dyh080
Dear O in Virginia

   Thank you so much.....I going to buy a crock pot and follow your recipe. If I can get the same results as when I eat beef, this broth will definitely be my drink of choice.


You will like it.  :)
Posted by: DenverFoodie, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 6:22pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from dyh080
Sorry if this has already been discussed but what is in beef that makes me feel so much better and relaxed immediately after ingesting it?

I'm a type o secretor who felt terrible on a temporary raw food( mostly vegetarian) diet....no sleep, irritable.


I think you just answered your own question.  It's not what's in the beef it's what's in you.  Your "O" blood type.  8)

Posted by: DoS, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 8:47pm; Reply: 10
I wish I could do that; get quick results from eating meat.
Posted by: Amazone I., Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 9:18pm; Reply: 11
the same for me with lamb. I justamente feel great ;)...  ;D ;D(clap)(ok)(dance)(smarty)(woot)(woot)(sunny)
Posted by: yaeli, Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 9:37pm; Reply: 12
(dance)  :K)  :K)  :K)  8)
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 1:06am; Reply: 13
Quoted from O in Virginia
I have wondered whether the fat is considered "suet".  The birds would probably love that, rolled in birdseed and hung outside, but I haven't done that yet.

Suet is beef fat prior to being rendered - just as it is cut off of the animal (or what is trimmed from a piece of meat prior to cooking.

Tallow is suet that has been cooked to get the solids and water out of it...

The fat from the top of your broth is essentially tallow, although it may have a bit of water content since you haven't heated it above the boiling point of water.

Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 2:05am; Reply: 14
Quoted from ABJoe

Suet is beef fat prior to being rendered - just as it is cut off of the animal (or what is trimmed from a piece of meat prior to cooking.

Tallow is suet that has been cooked to get the solids and water out of it...

The fat from the top of your broth is essentially tallow, although it may have a bit of water content since you haven't heated it above the boiling point of water.


Thanks very much for the info, ABJoe.  :)
Posted by: Jesi, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 3:03am; Reply: 15
Ok so as soon as I read this earlier I went to the store and bought my usual grass fed beef (it's SO delicious...just the right amount of fat for burgers...I get mine at Sprouts)..so anyhow I bought the bones and made a broth, but it tastes like Crisco water! YUCK! Did I put too much water for two bones? I added some beneficial veggies for taste and fresh rosemary and sage...didn't know what else to do to make it taste like something. I think tomorrow I'll boil half with some cubed beef or something and let it simmer...for now I'll just stick it in the fridge. lol. My hamburger was delicious though! had it with mashed turnip and sweet potato with ghee. YUM.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 3:43am; Reply: 16
Quoted Text
add the juice of a lemon (if vinegar is ok for you, then use that).  The acid is to help extract the minerals from the bones as they simmer.


I add the lemon at the very end......works like a charm and doesn't oxidize or loose its potency, yet extracts those minerals out of the bones just fine
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 4:29am; Reply: 17
next time follow a bone broth recipe

brown your bones in the oven first, then add water, veggies spices etc....
check the above recipe already given
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 4:57am; Reply: 18
I don't use any acid in my bone stock;  just simmer the bones for hours and hours and hours, covered.  I use the knuckle bones, which produce a great stock that gels up, just like jello.  ;)

In my kitchen, this stock is used as the base of my weekly lamb stew.  It makes a rich and nutritious base, with the addition of a dozen kinds of vegetables, lamb, herbs and spices, with a bit of ghee and EVOO.  (drool)
Posted by: christaalyssaA+, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 9:22am; Reply: 19
Pumpkin does it for me. If I make myself a pumpkin soup with fresh pumpkin, some garlic and other compliant spices/herbs, a bit of carageenan free soy milk. I feel zen like!

On the other hand... if I eat beef... (which I haven't done in over a year now)  I would have an almost bi polar reaction. Crying and being all depressed.

It's so good knowing what works and why it works for each of us personally!
Posted by: Harry O, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 1:51pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from dyh080


One weekend I ate a lot of grass fed beef and drank water....360 degree change.

Whenever I feel anxious and then eat beef I get immediate results.

Just wondering what nutrient in beef causes that? Is it tyrosine?


Beef does that for me especially when i'm low carbing. Anyway i believe that Dr. D'Adamo has explain part of this as our ABO genes are packed into the same band on Chromosome #9 (9q34) as the gene for Dopamine Beta Hydroxylase (feel good hormone). So in other words when we eat for our blood/geno type it has a positive influence on our neuro transmitters. At least that's my take about it  ;D
Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 2:18pm; Reply: 21
Beef...does it for me too.  It is the only way I start my day...with a big green salad also and lemon juice and olive oil...some herbs and spices...depending of what I have on hand.  

Victoria...just like jello...exactly...I have a hard time keeping my spoon out of it when it is like that.  ;)  Especially when I make a broth with different kinds of bones...beef, lamb, turkey and veggies and spices...and the bottom sediments in the container...just sooooo yummilicious.   :D

Debra :)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, February 10, 2011, 3:10pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Lola


I add the lemon at the very end......works like a charm and doesn't oxidize or loose its potency, yet extracts those minerals out of the bones just fine


So how long is the lemon actually in your broth?  When you say "at the very end", do you mean a few minutes or a half hour?  Can lemon extract minerals from bones in a short time?  I can see putting some acid in at the end to brighten the flavor, but I wonder if it's really necessary for mineral extraction if we're cooking the bones a long time anyway.  I've also read (maybe here or somewhere else) that the bones should be soaked first in cold water with acid.  I guess each has his/her own method.  Mine seems to be working pretty well, and it gels up nice and firm like jello when cool.  :)  I like mine as hot broth, though, or soup base.  I never did like foods in aspic.   :P
Posted by: Desiree, Friday, February 11, 2011, 3:37am; Reply: 23
I have wondered, also, why - when I eat a "good" piece of beef it seems to "make me sit up straight" in my brain.  And I feel strong and energized and "even".  I'm a B-Explorer and react to beef like this but not lamb - though I love lamb, too.  Wondering if it could be because I'm suseptible to anemia? And the beef helps in that aspect.  Or simply the CLA, mentioned.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 11, 2011, 4:28am; Reply: 24
try periodical liver cleanses.....follow the book instructions given
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, February 11, 2011, 4:32am; Reply: 25
I haven't read this entire thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating something already said.

Os are real good at over-producing stomach acid.  Stomach acid makes everybody a little cranky.  Red meat uses that acid in the digestion process and maybe the reason you feel better is because you've given the acid something to do other than irritate you. ;)
Posted by: Desiree, Friday, February 11, 2011, 6:54am; Reply: 26
Hi Lola ~ What's your thought on the liver cleanses? My response to the beef? Or the tendency toward anemia?  Once I found out I was an Explorer I have done them twice.  No green globs but good elimination for several days to a week after!  
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 11, 2011, 7:09am; Reply: 27
also work on your gut.....balance your ecology for better assimilation of nutrients
Posted by: Desiree, Friday, February 11, 2011, 7:15am; Reply: 28
Okay...periodic liver cleanse...work on gut.  I pretty much am compliant with no gluten, cut out the bad cheeses with my new found Explorer status...all the right meats, vegetables, fruits, teas...etc.  Take all my NAP sups including probiotics.  Is there something more I should be doing?
Posted by: paul clucas, Friday, February 11, 2011, 5:30pm; Reply: 29
Exercise until the exhaustion makes you feel good.  Gotta be sweating!   ;D

Explorers like Hunters have a high capacity exercise needs.  Exercise de-stresses, improves elimination, helps sleep quality, and generally detoxes you.  If the Explorer detox works for only a couple of weeks, try it twice a month.

Toxin elimination is the achille's heel of Explorers.
Posted by: Desiree, Friday, February 11, 2011, 6:02pm; Reply: 30
You've got that right about the exercise.  I haven't been back to the gym since travelling to Europe last October.  Then the holidays...Meant to get back "first thing in January - and look at me now! I miss the exhilieration but haven't started back yet.  Today is the day.  No time like the present.  Thanks for the boost - I can be so hard headed :-/

The book does say once a month for the detox - so maybe I  oughta heed the advice.  

I have never been a heavy drinker, nor a smoker or prone to any other such vices (except bad/ignorant food choices years ago) - yet even before I knew about Dr. D something in my head told me "you need to detox your liver" .  Thank goodness, now I know how.

Wish I had those psychic abilities with everything else!
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 11, 2011, 6:21pm; Reply: 31
slow wins the race :)
Posted by: san j, Saturday, February 12, 2011, 1:53am; Reply: 32
I'm no Explorer, nor an O.
But - sometimes - nothing is as energizing as beef - sometimes I get that "burger"-hankering, and nothing but beef'll do. Hold the ketchup. Hold the tomato. And I feel just right afterward. I think many of us go for that. There's a reason burgers are so popular in America. :)
Posted by: Amazone I., Sunday, February 13, 2011, 9:29pm; Reply: 33
:o(dizzy) P.C... your word's in Gd's ears but I nothing but feel drained after  a heavy treining... :-/ :B I always feld very sluggish and dizzy... :-/ :'(
but nothing against a fine & longer walk, dancing to a fine musica...(cool)(smarty)(ok)
Posted by: O plus, Tuesday, February 15, 2011, 9:45pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from jennyg


how do you make bone broth? i am cooking burgers as i type this  ;D


This thread is making me crave a bone in rib eye steak. Haven't had beef for over a year. Mostly fish and turkey.

Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 1:30am; Reply: 35
what are you waiting for!!
get some meat on those bones of yours! :)
Posted by: balletomane, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 3:19am; Reply: 36
Quoted from O in Virginia
I brown them in the oven first.  Then put them in my crock pot and cover with water, add the juice of a lemon (if vinegar is ok for you, then use that).  The acid is to help extract the minerals from the bones as they simmer.  


What does browning the meat do to it or the broth? Is it OK just to dump it into the boiling broth?
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 4:14pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from balletomane

What does browning the meat do to it or the broth? Is it OK just to dump it into the boiling broth?

That's a good question!  I've always been told to brown bones before making broth.  And I've always *assumed* it's because it adds color and flavor to the broth.  But I don't know whether that's actually true.  Perhaps there is some other reason for browning the bones first.  I made broth from turkey necks overnight without browning them first.  I put them in the pot as is (or was) and added water.  The broth looks rich and deeply colored from having simmered so long.
Posted by: jayneeo, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 4:22pm; Reply: 38
browning them (roasting in oven) brings out a certain flavor....
I always use a cup of wine (any color) to cook with bones ..extracts minerals, adds anthocyanins, adds a certain flavor...
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 4:34pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from jayneeo
browning them (roasting in oven) brings out a certain flavor....
I always use a cup of wine (any color) to cook with bones ..extracts minerals, adds anthocyanins, adds a certain flavor...

I think with beef bones in particular, browning brings out a better flavor, now that you mention it.  Last batch of beef bone broth I made, I didn't brown the bones as well as the previous batch, and it had a different flavor.  I thought that might have been because I got them from a different source, but perhaps a good roasting is what makes them taste best.  Didn't seem to matter with turkey, though.

Posted by: Jane, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 5:47pm; Reply: 40
How long do you roast them for and at what temp?
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 7:18pm; Reply: 41
I've never browned them first, but the flavor has not been a concern of mine since I use the stock in my lamb stew which has plenty of its' own flavor.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 7:26pm; Reply: 42
Browning occurs at a higher temperature than boiling.  Perhaps it's like making ghee.  You can't get it fully there in a double boiler.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 7:30pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from Jane
How long do you roast them for and at what temp?


350 - 375 F for about 20 - 25 minutes is usually fine in my oven.  Ovens vary, of course.  Just brown 'em until they look roasty and brown (not like char-grilled!).  Give it a shot, there are no rules carved in stone.  :)
Posted by: BluesSinger, Thursday, October 18, 2012, 3:36pm; Reply: 44
Ok.. I roasted the bones and then I roasted the vegies - celery, onion, carrots and then i put it all in a stock pot and covered it with cold water like the recipe said.. but now it's asking me to add a sachet of herbs...

does anyone do this?

also there was alot of fat in the roast pan.. which I put into the pot along with everything else...

when it;s all done (6 hours from now), do i refrigerate and then skim the fat off before I use it?

thanks so much!
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, October 18, 2012, 5:05pm; Reply: 45
Quoted from BluesSinger
Ok.. I roasted the bones and then I roasted the vegies - celery, onion, carrots and then i put it all in a stock pot and covered it with cold water like the recipe said.. but now it's asking me to add a sachet of herbs...

does anyone do this?

also there was alot of fat in the roast pan.. which I put into the pot along with everything else...

when it;s all done (6 hours from now), do i refrigerate and then skim the fat off before I use it?


That's the reason I choose to slow cook my bones separately before making stew.  The stock can be cooled overnight and the big thick layer of fat can easily be removed and discarded.  I know grass-fed beef (which I use) has a much healthier fat than grain-fed, but I don't feel the need to add a lot of beef fat to my diet.
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Thursday, October 18, 2012, 5:11pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from Lola


I tried CLA and I didn't do well on it. Wasted money again. I didn't sleep well.
Posted by: marjorie, Thursday, October 18, 2012, 8:08pm; Reply: 47
For sure, I am craving meat just reading these posts..... I wonder if I will get some this evening. I seem to keep trying to deprive myself and not sure why?????
Posted by: san j, Friday, October 19, 2012, 12:19am; Reply: 48
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GC/m-1342049395/s-0/

Just to see a thread from this summer re: Bs and Os sharing the Beef=Energy thing.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Sunday, October 21, 2012, 4:32pm; Reply: 49
yup... i've had the strained stock in the fridge overnight.  Should be able to skim the fat this morning and then drink it or use for soups.

it said to use 1 qt of water for a lb of beef bones.  is this right?  should I now add more water to the stock?  And when drinking it how much do I drink for benefit?  and when is a good time to drink beef broth?  anytime or?  ha ha.. i'm like a kid here with so many questions!  
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