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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  What do you do with Celeriac / celery root?
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 4:40pm
I bought one.  The thing looks awful, but I just have a feeling I'll like it.  But how do you cook it?  Just boil?

I love rutubaga's.  For what it's worth.  I have no clue if it tastes similar or not.  I've steamed, boiled, roasted, slow cooked and even tried frying those once.  That last one didn't turn out, but I love it the other ways.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 4:57pm; Reply: 1
The safest route, I think, is just to peel, cut up and steam it. This way you can establish a reasonable cooking time and taste test it without messing up a whole meal if it happens that you don't like it. A good 'add in' for stews, I think.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 5:06pm; Reply: 2
I make coleslaw with it and also make pancakes with it.

Grate it in the food processor with an onion, add one egg and slight bit of flour.

Heat pan add some oil and make potato like pancakes with it, very yummy!
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 5:40pm; Reply: 3
Go to the "Sweet Potatoes for Os" thread where we talked about this yesterday. ;)
Go to your "Lamb pie" thread where I told about my shepherd's pie - maybe the day before. :)
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 5:43pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from shoulderblade
The safest route, I think, is just to peel, cut up and steam it.
By all means, slice and steam and sprinkle with olive oil. Excellent steamed / stir fried with artichoke hearts - and steamed / baked with sweet potatoes. Another option: steamed with green peas.

Do you make lamb stew? Try to add slices of celeriac and parsley root - yummi.  :)

Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 5:46pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from JJR
The thing looks awful, but I just have a feeling I'll like it.
Once you have peeled it, it will look civilized.

Posted by: san j, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 5:50pm; Reply: 6
ABNW: Do you like the flavor of celery?
You know what celery leaves do to a stock? Well, that's the general flavor of the root, but maybe a little "nuttier"? Subtler, too.

I find that the best way to START with celeriac is the "Mashed" route. Mix it with mashed potatoes, butter modified: Whoops - forgot to mention the cream and salt. That way you taste it in a "familiar" setting and can get a sense of what you want to do with it after that. I say half potatoes and half celeriac is a good start.

A traditional French appetizer is "céléri rémoulade": Raw julienned celeriac with a remoulade dressing. It marinates in it for a short time. It's very typical. You see it in France on many, many menus. Most gourmet cookbooks that include French cuisine will have a recipe for it; it'd also be easy to locate on the web. :)
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 6:36pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from san j
ABNW: Do you like the flavor of celery?
You know what celery leaves do to a stock? Well, that's the general flavor of the root, but maybe a little "nuttier"? Subtler, too.

Inspired by this thread, I'm steaming celeriac right now. The strong scent gives me the feeling that I'm invincible. It is a powerful veggie.

Posted by: Kathleen, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 6:47pm; Reply: 8
I'm making celery root soup tonight.  Onions sauteed in ghee, add cubed celery root and a bit of white wine, saute for 5 min or so, add homemade chicken broth, simmer til soft, then whiz up with the immersion blender.  Need to look in the Flavor Bible cookbook for a complimentry herb to top it with or a spice to add while cooking.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 7:26pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Kathleen
I'm making celery root soup tonight.  Onions sauteed in ghee, add cubed celery root and a bit of white wine, saute for 5 min or so, add homemade chicken broth, simmer til soft, then whiz up with the immersion blender.  Need to look in the Flavor Bible cookbook for a complimentry herb to top it with or a spice to add while cooking.


What kind of white wine are you using?
Posted by: Kathleen, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 7:46pm; Reply: 10
Dry vermouth is my standard cooking wine.....

san j, what kind do you use??
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, February 1, 2011, 10:54pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Kathleen
Dry vermouth is my standard cooking wine.....

san j, what kind do you use??


Depends what I'm making. I asked so that I'd get an idea of where you were going with the flavorings you said you'd investigate. :)

Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 3:22am; Reply: 12
This is a good thread.  Thank you all.  I have yet to cook with whine.  Yes, I know, heresy.  I'm kind of nervous about it, because whine just doesn't make me feel that good.  I don't know if it's just no good for me, or if it's making me detox.  But, I think if the alcohol gets cooked out, it may be better.  Although according to what I remember Alton Brown said, that it doesn't ever get completely cooked out.  

Anyways, thanks for the tip on the celery root.  I'm sure something will jump into my head.  

And for what it's worth San J, I have another pheasant completely defrosted in the fridge for hopefully tomorrow.  

I have to admit though, I'm feeling kind of under the weather.  Everyone around me has been sick and I've praying to God saying, it's a miracle I haven't been sick yet, but I may not have dodged that bullet.  I feel kind of lousy tonight.  Every time I get to feeling really well, this happens.  Oh well, such is life.  Hopefully I still have energy to make the pheasant, because I bet it would help!!!
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 3:55am; Reply: 13
When we made lamb stews, we used to boil big chunks of the root in with other herbs & spices (parsley root, fresh thyme, etc.) to make a very flavorful soup stock.  We didn't keep it in the soup though.
Posted by: 8717 (Guest), Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 4:05am; Reply: 14
Celery root is my favorite substitute for mashed potatoes.  I peel it, cut it into cubes and steam it.  When soft,
I puree it in the food processor with some olive oil and sea salt & pepper.   Another way I like it is roasted with
Butternut squash cubes of the same size  with olive oil and salt, like home fries.....yummy.
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 4:11am; Reply: 15
Quoted from JJR
I have yet to cook with whine.  Yes, I know, heresy.  I'm kind of nervous about it, because whine just doesn't make me feel that good.  I don't know if it's just no good for me, or if it's making me detox.  But, I think if the alcohol gets cooked out, it may be better.  Although according to what I remember Alton Brown said, that it doesn't ever get completely cooked out.

Alcohol has a lower vapor point than water, so doesn't even have to boil to vaporize all of the alcohol...  
Posted by: yaeli, Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 4:36am; Reply: 16
Quoted from JJR
Wine just doesn't make me feel that good.
Why bother I say.

Quoted from JJR
Although according to what I remember Alton Brown said, that it doesn't ever get completely cooked out.
It's true, it makes me dizzy even after a long cooking.

Quoted from JJR
I'm sure something will jump into my head.
For significant info I sometimes just do "copy thread" then "save to disc" for later perusal.

Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 6:40pm; Reply: 17
I like the roasting idea.  And the mashed potatoes.  And just about every way I've seen here, sounds good.  The foodtype base says you can even grate it and eat it raw.  That could be good too!
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 8:20pm; Reply: 18
When you finally get around to trying it, let us know how (you chose to cook/prepare it) and what you think (about the way you ate it). ;)
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, February 3, 2011, 1:48am; Reply: 19
I will!!
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, February 3, 2011, 2:17am; Reply: 20
Tonight I made a pot roast.  I used chuck roast, browned it in a dutch oven, removed it from the pan, then I sauted carrots, parsnips, routabega and celery root in the olive oil I browned the beef in.  Then I removed the root veggies and set them aside.  I sauted onion and garlic in the pan.  Next I added an entire bottle of red wine, beef stock, ghee, thyme, bay leave and fig jam in the pan to deglaze it.  I boiled the liquid, added the beef back, covered it and put it in the oven at 300 degrees for about three hours.  After three hours I added the veggies back, uncovered the pan and cooked it for another hour in the oven.  It was a great meal with a lot of left overs!  Cooking things in a pot like this with wine is my favorite kind of cooking!  There is a lot of work up front, but once you get it into the pot, you can relax.  I do this with beef stew meat or chuck roast, veal (osso bucco), lamb shanks or oxtails.  These meals are great if you are having company.  The house smells really good and you can spend time with your company sharing appetizers and talking instead of rushing around to cook!

It will be even better tomorrow when all the flavors.  It has been snowing for two days now, so this is perfect weather for this type of meal!
Posted by: JJR, Thursday, February 3, 2011, 3:05am; Reply: 21
You know what you're doing.  Sounds awesome.  Enjoy it!!!
Posted by: yaeli, Thursday, February 3, 2011, 3:13am; Reply: 22
Quoted from Patty H
It has been snowing for two days now, so this is perfect weather for this type of meal!
Winter celebration :)
Posted by: balletomane, Thursday, February 3, 2011, 11:19am; Reply: 23
Patty H, your pot roast sounds sumptuous! Licking my chops ;D

Instead of using the Dutch oven, how can you brown the chuck roast? Also, what exactly is a chuck roast? Are there other parts I could use? And what kind of red wine do you recommend?
Posted by: san j, Thursday, February 3, 2011, 10:01pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from JJR
The foodtype base says you can even grate it and eat it raw.  That could be good too!


Look back at my reply #6. Julienned or grated - same deal for this appetizer.
(Sorry. Haven't figured out how to put two quotes in one reply.)
:)
Posted by: Patty H, Friday, February 4, 2011, 12:16am; Reply: 25
Quoted from balletomane
Patty H, your pot roast sounds sumptuous! Licking my chops ;D

Instead of using the Dutch oven, how can you brown the chuck roast? Also, what exactly is a chuck roast? Are there other parts I could use? And what kind of red wine do you recommend?


Thank you!  What a great compliment!

A dutch oven is nothing more than a pot that can go from the stovetop burner into the oven.  If you do not have a pot like this, I would brown the beef in a frying pan and put it into a pot that can go into the oven, saute the veggies in the same frying pan and set them aside in a bowl to add later.  Finally saute the onion and garlic in the same frying pan, add the wine and beef stock, jam and herbs in the frying pan and bring to a boil.  Once it boils for a few minutes (you want to boil off the alcohol and deglaze the pan), put it in the pot with the beef and put it in the oven.

If you can't get beef chuck, you could use a round roast, shoulder roast, rump roast.  Any cut of beef that you would use for a stew would be good.  In fact, you could even use cut up stew meat.

As far as the red wine goes, I go to the liquor store and buy the absolute cheapest 750 ml bottle of wine they have.  Usually I go for a merlot, cab, pinot noir or red zinfandel.  Something with a little zip to it!

This recipe can also be used with lamb shank, veal shank, oxtails, etc.  You can also add plum tomatoes and fresh parsley at the end, say 30 minutes before you remove it from the oven.  Be sure to remove all the seed from the plum tomatoes.

This is also a great recipe to make the day before.  Refrigerate it in the oven proof pan and reheat in the same pan for an hour or so before you plan to serve it.  It will be even BETTER the second day!

Maybe I will write a cookbook for Type O nonnies.  I used to be a pastry chef, but that is OBVIOUSLY out now :(

No matter what your blood type, you should find a way to enjoy the food on your list and experiment!  We all have the option to eat fantastic meals with a little experimentation!
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 4, 2011, 2:03am; Reply: 26
simply hit the quote button as many times as you need quotes to appear


copypaste the sentence inbetween the brackets
Posted by: JJR, Friday, February 4, 2011, 5:21pm; Reply: 27
Can a cast iron go from stove top to oven?  I'm pretty sure it can, eh?
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 4, 2011, 5:40pm; Reply: 28
yes.......just don t touch without proper protection!!! ;)
Posted by: Jane, Friday, February 4, 2011, 5:43pm; Reply: 29
Patty,
I was interested in the fact that you added the fig jam.  Lately I've been making a stew with either veal or buffalo in the crock pot and using stewed tomatoes and New England Cranberry, Cranberry Pepper Jam.  It gives it just the right amount of zip.  I don't have as many steps and it doesn't sound as sophisticated as yours.  I just brown onions and red and yellow peppers and baby bellas in olive oil then put it in the crock pot with 2 pounds of the meat, a can of the Muir Glen stewed tomatoes, some fresh cut up gourmet tomatoes (yellow, brown, plum, etc.), some garlic, sea salt and paprika and about 1/3 of a jar of the Cranberry Pepper Jam.  I cook it  for hours and hours (sometimes overnight).  The hot pepper jam gives it some zing.  Good to take to work or for dinner and so easy.  I've also done with the stock and red wine.  I'll have to try it your way.  I've got some fig jam in the frig.
Jane
Posted by: Patty H, Saturday, February 5, 2011, 1:18am; Reply: 30
Quoted Text
The hot pepper jam gives it some zing.


Jane, I have hot pepper jam and will try it your way and then we can compare.  Looking forward to sharing recipes!
Posted by: balletomane, Saturday, February 5, 2011, 1:30am; Reply: 31
Quoted from Patty H


Thank you!  What a great compliment!

A dutch oven is nothing more than a pot that can go from the stovetop burner into the oven.  If you do not have a pot like this, I would brown the beef in a frying pan and put it into a pot that can go into the oven, saute the veggies in the same frying pan and set them aside in a bowl to add later.  Finally saute the onion and garlic in the same frying pan, add the wine and beef stock, jam and herbs in the frying pan and bring to a boil.  Once it boils for a few minutes (you want to boil off the alcohol and deglaze the pan), put it in the pot with the beef and put it in the oven.

If you can't get beef chuck, you could use a round roast, shoulder roast, rump roast.  Any cut of beef that you would use for a stew would be good.  In fact, you could even use cut up stew meat.

As far as the red wine goes, I go to the liquor store and buy the absolute cheapest 750 ml bottle of wine they have.  Usually I go for a merlot, cab, pinot noir or red zinfandel.  Something with a little zip to it!

This recipe can also be used with lamb shank, veal shank, oxtails, etc.  You can also add plum tomatoes and fresh parsley at the end, say 30 minutes before you remove it from the oven.  Be sure to remove all the seed from the plum tomatoes.

This is also a great recipe to make the day before.  Refrigerate it in the oven proof pan and reheat in the same pan for an hour or so before you plan to serve it.  It will be even BETTER the second day!

Maybe I will write a cookbook for Type O nonnies.  I used to be a pastry chef, but that is OBVIOUSLY out now :(

No matter what your blood type, you should find a way to enjoy the food on your list and experiment!  We all have the option to eat fantastic meals with a little experimentation!


Thanks for your detailed explanations. Now I know I can do with it too with my meager kitchen space and equipment  ;)

Too bad tomato is an "avoid" on my SWAMI... I can imagine how wonderful and zesty this dish would taste with the tomatoes!

Please do write that cookbook  :) I'm an O nonnie too. I want to learn from you!

By the way, how much beef stock would you need for 2 pounds of meat? I probably will only be able to do 1 pound max due to lack of space (I only have an oven slightly larger than a toaster oven). What is the oven temperature I should use? Should I shorten the baking time if the portion is halved?
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, February 5, 2011, 3:27am; Reply: 32
I d use a crock pot and leave all night
Posted by: Patty H, Saturday, February 5, 2011, 2:59pm; Reply: 33
Quoted Text
By the way, how much beef stock would you need for 2 pounds of meat? I probably will only be able to do 1 pound max due to lack of space (I only have an oven slightly larger than a toaster oven). What is the oven temperature I should use? Should I shorten the baking time if the portion is halved?


I use about 3 - 4 cups of liquid.  The meat should be mostly covered by the liquid, although a roast may stick up out of the liquid.  The oven temp depends upon how long you leave it in.  I had to leave it in for about four hours the other day, so I set the temp to 300 degrees.  If you need to cook it for 2 - 2 1/2 hours, I would use 350.

Give it a try and Bon Appetit!
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 2:54am; Reply: 34
This is way out there, but I just saw part of River Cottage Christmas, from England, on YouTube.

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall makes a Walnut torte and serves it with...
celeriac ice cream. Stroke of genius. Perfect festive winter fare.

Since so many ask here, so often, what to do with celeriac, I thought I'd suggest something outside the box. Ponder it!  :D
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