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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  vegetable glycerin
Posted by: phillyclassic, Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 5:06pm
So in my Swami I am told that coconut oil/palm oil are avoids for me however vegetable glycerin is an optional beneficial sweetner...can anyone explain this? I am learning that vegetable glycerin is usually derived from coconut or palm oil?! If there is a different source please educate me, I have been interested in trying this in baking etc. Thanks for any replies.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 5:20pm; Reply: 1
don t try in baking preferably, cause it tends to smoke up your whole kitchen!!!
I know!!! lol

glycerol is the chemical composition of glycerin, no matter it s source....
so it s fine if in your list
Posted by: phillyclassic, Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 11:56pm; Reply: 2
Thanks Lola, what ways have you used it before?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 12:12am; Reply: 3
to sweeten my tea or hot chocolate and carob
Posted by: KellyAnn, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 12:23am; Reply: 4
I don't like vegetable glycerin as a sweetener.  For some reason it just doesn't taste good to me, but luckily Agave is a diamond beneficial for me according to SWAMI so I use that instead.  
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 12:35am; Reply: 5
Quoted Text
Dr D
Glycerine is the only effective humectant that can be used by non-secretors, since it can be shunted to either fat metabolism or glucose production, depending on metabolic status. Glycerine can be a carb on occasion, a fat precursor on occasion, a phosphoglyceride precursor on occasion, and it can simply pass through the body unused. For non-secretors, this is perfect. Thus, although it is there for moisture retention, it also tends to optimize fat<->carb<->fat conversion which is genetically a problem with non-secretors.
Posted by: Dr. Pepper, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 2:45am; Reply: 6
Humectant, now there's a $5 word...had to look that one up!


Does vegetable glycerin contribute its own "taste" or is it fairly neutral as a sweetener?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 2:50am; Reply: 7
it is very sweet....
like in all tastes......
taster status does play a roll in anything....
to each, their own! :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 3:07am; Reply: 8
humectant meaning it keeps things humidified
like in face creams and hand creams
the old bars had VG to not turn dry.....

the reason we find VG in the cosmetics isle at the wfs :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 4:48pm; Reply: 9
Whatever "bad stuff" from coconut or palm oil is refined out of it by the time it's made into vegetable glycerine. It's the same way Type As can have yogurt but not whole milk- something about the processing changes the way the body uses the food, making it better (or worse) for individuals. In this case, the end product, vegetable glycerine, is good for you, even though it may be refined from a source that isn't good for you.

I've never baked with vegetable glycerine, but I have used agave and honey. I find honey to be a much better sweetener in baking; agave tends to lose its sweetness when cooked. Agave sweetened cookies just don't taste sweet, while the honey-sweetened ones taste fine. Either sweetener is good in tea.
Posted by: phillyclassic, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 4:54pm; Reply: 10
I agree about cooking with agave, I have noticed a difference, it's just not very present after baking in taste...thanks for all the responses it helped clear up some curiosities I had.
Posted by: BHealthy, Sunday, December 16, 2012, 10:08pm; Reply: 11
I have two online sources for vegetable glycerine, both of which are food grade:

This one, https://www.starwest-botanicals.com/category/vegetable-glycerin/, which is not organic and states it's made from palm oil.

And this one, http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/bulkmisc/bulkmisc.php#bu_gly, which is organic but it's made from soy.

Which one would you get?  
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, December 16, 2012, 10:36pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from BHealthy
Which one would you get?  

There isn't a large price differential - unless the shipping is not dramatically different...  I would get the organic.  Dr. D. has stated that the source doesn't make a difference because the proteins have been adequately removed so there isn't a problem...  

I don't know that the non-organic would be a problem, but I'm happy to support organic sources when possible.
Posted by: Christopher1, Monday, December 17, 2012, 2:25am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Lola
Glycerine is the only effective humectant that can be used by non-secretors, since it can be shunted to either fat metabolism or glucose production, depending on metabolic status. Glycerine can be a carb on occasion, a fat precursor on occasion, a phosphoglyceride precursor on occasion, and it can simply pass through the body unused. For non-secretors, this is perfect. Thus, although it is there for moisture retention, it also tends to optimize fat<->carb<->fat conversion which is genetically a problem with non-secretors.


Does vegetable glycerin actually have health benefits though? Or is it just "benign" (i.e. harmless).
Posted by: BHealthy, Monday, December 17, 2012, 3:40am; Reply: 14
Quoted from Christopher1

Does vegetable glycerin actually have health benefits though? Or is it just "benign" (i.e. harmless).
It's in my SWAMI as a superfood.  I don't know why.

Posted by: Christopher1, Monday, December 17, 2012, 3:53am; Reply: 15
Quoted from BHealthy
It's in my SWAMI as a superfood.  I don't know why.



"Thus, although it is there for moisture retention, it also tends to optimize fat<->carb<->fat conversion which is genetically a problem with non-secretors."
-Dr. D

I guess this would explain its "medicinal" effects...
Posted by: Possum, Monday, December 17, 2012, 5:22am; Reply: 16
Quoted from Lola
don t try in baking preferably, cause it tends to smoke up your whole kitchen!!! I know!!! lol
I made a chocolate cake in the crock pot for my husband & used veg glycerine with absolutely no problems... Maybe in the oven &/or in cookies it might be a problem? Anyway, the cake was delicious & wonderfully moist ;)

Posted by: Lola, Monday, December 17, 2012, 5:33am; Reply: 17
good to know!!

:)
Posted by: BHealthy, Tuesday, December 18, 2012, 4:15am; Reply: 18
Quoted from ABJoe

There isn't a large price differential - unless the shipping is not dramatically different...  I would get the organic.  
Shipping at MRH was really high: 2.25 pounds of product valued at #27 was $13 shipping!  I will buy it there because I always prefer organic, but I'll wait until I need enough other things to justify the shipping.

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, December 21, 2012, 5:31pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from ruthiegirl
agave tends to lose its sweetness when cooked. Agave sweetened cookies just don't taste sweet, while the honey-sweetened ones taste fine. Either sweetener is good in tea.

I've since discovered that RAW agave works just fine in baking. I buy the "regular" agave at Costco where it's much less expensive, and I  buy raw agave at the HFS for when I want to bake. If there was no price difference, I would only buy the raw kind and save the cabinet space.
Posted by: aussielady582, Saturday, December 22, 2012, 3:45am; Reply: 20
I have been wondering where to buy vegetable glycerin in Australia. I still use agave nectar, rice syrup or maple syrup, but for people with food intolerance and possible fructose intolerance, maybe veg glyc would be better for making sweets, cakes, cookies/biscuits?? How do other type O's 'hunter's go with agave (high in fructose) and other sweeteners? esp if one has possible leaky gut syndrome and is trying to improve health? Thankyou.
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, December 22, 2012, 9:33am; Reply: 21
I finally tracked it down in NZ at a brewers supply shop - maybe that would help you too? I think some health food shops do stock it too :-/ ;)
Agave is the last thing to consume with fructose intolerance tbh
Posted by: RedLilac, Saturday, December 22, 2012, 2:31pm; Reply: 22
I never thought to use VG as a sweetener.  I mix it with my old thin bar soaps to make a liquid soap.  I recently switched to VG electronic cigarettes from Propyl glycol (PG) e-cig because I was getting a negative reaction from PG.  I guess it does make my e-cigs taste sweeter.
Posted by: Dianne, Saturday, December 22, 2012, 3:00pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Possum
I made a chocolate cake in the crock pot for my husband & used veg glycerine with absolutely no problems... Maybe in the oven &/or in cookies it might be a problem? Anyway, the cake was delicious & wonderfully moist ;)



Recently I made gluten-free biscotti with glycerin and it was fine.  :)
Posted by: chrissyA, Sunday, December 23, 2012, 2:35pm; Reply: 24
Vegetable glycerine can usually be found in the cosmetic section of health food stores :)
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, December 23, 2012, 5:01pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Dianne


Recently I made gluten-free biscotti with glycerin and it was fine.  :)


Can you please share your recipe? :)

Posted by: Melissa_J, Monday, December 24, 2012, 7:22am; Reply: 26
I have noticed the smoke with baking, especially in really sweet foods at high temperatures.  If less is used or it is cooked at a lower temperature it is fine.

The recipe for Chelsie's Cinnamon Cranberry Flax muffins http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/breads/r/chelsiemuffins.htm
with 1/4 cup VG for the sweetener worked nicely, if I remember right.  

I bet biscotti would be good...

Brownies did not  :-/

I'll have to try it in the crock pot.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, December 24, 2012, 3:48pm; Reply: 27
I'm nervous about eating things sold as cosmetics- are they as pure as the items sold for consumption?
Posted by: chrissyA, Monday, December 24, 2012, 10:19pm; Reply: 28
Ruthie - This is the one I use. It is food grade. I'm not sure if it is stated on the bottle, but it is on the webpage  :)
http://www.nowfoods.com/Personal-Care/Products/Body/Skin-Care-Oils/M003277.htm
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