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BTD Forums  /  (N=1).  /  (n=1). The Epigenetics of Lifespan
Posted by: Dr. D, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 12:42pm
http://n-equals-one.com/blogs/2010/10/07/the-epigenetics-of-lifespan/


The beneficial effects of caloric restriction (or therapies that mimic caloric restriction) appear to exert transgenerational effects -at least in rotifers. A new study appears to implicate the enzyme catalase with the longevity benefits of caloric restriction.
Posted by: O in Virginia, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 1:32pm; Reply: 1
Thanks for posting that, Dr. D., an interesting read for sure.  I'm not sure I'm disciplined enough to impose caloric restriction on myself, and I don't really trust pharmaceuticals (when I watch those commercials the side effects always sound as bad if not worse than the condition the drug is supposed to cure); but I'm also trying not to become obese and therefore most definitely cut my life short.  It's a walk down a fine line.  It looks like half the American population (obese) are headed toward a shorter lifespan.  I sometimes see young women in their teens and 20s who are fatter than I am now at 52, and then I wonder how big they'll be by the time they get to my age.  If they live that long.   :(
Posted by: Dr. D, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 1:37pm; Reply: 2
NAP 'Cortiguard' has the Ayurvedic herb Bacopa in it. Bacopa enhance catalase in the nervous system, which may help explain its nice effects on the brain

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20678517
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 2:43pm; Reply: 3
and thus, a great synergist when caloric restriction is involved.....for weight loss
together with following the guidelines.

here again, the gut/brain relation..... :)
Posted by: balletomane, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 5:09pm; Reply: 4
I read the blog with great interest, as I used to worry so much about my husband's eating habits (or lack thereof). He has been imposing caloric restrictions on himself without doing it consciously. I was afraid this kind of "fasting" would do harm to his gut bacteria. But it seems that it is not so harmful after all? It gives me hope that he will live very long  ;)

I wonder though how do we define calorie restriction in a human being? How low is still "safe"?
Posted by: AKArtlover, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 5:12pm; Reply: 5
It seems that maybe we need efficient food that is not necessarily high in calories. No room for a ton of empty calories.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 6:22pm; Reply: 6
If weight is steady, then there are enough calories to maintain the current level of activity.  

As AKArtlover said, "we need efficient food that is not necessarily high in calories. No room for a ton of empty calories".  Low caloric intake requires a high density of nutrition, so that all needs are met.  Easily assimilated food, requiring no extra work load on the body just to process it. Food that satisfies the body physically as well as the mind.  Hi-octane fuel, efficient;  natural, fresh food, rich in an assortment of deeply pigmented colors;  plenty of protein and a balance of vegetables, fruits and healthy fats.

It's not about starving oneself.  (happy_gangsta)
Posted by: AKArtlover, Thursday, October 7, 2010, 8:40pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Victoria
If weight is steady, then there are enough calories to maintain the current level of activity.  

As AKArtlover said, "we need efficient food that is not necessarily high in calories. No room for a ton of empty calories".  Low caloric intake requires a high density of nutrition, so that all needs are met.  Easily assimilated food, requiring no extra work load on the body just to process it. Food that satisfies the body physically as well as the mind.  Hi-octane fuel, efficient;  natural, fresh food, rich in an assortment of deeply pigmented colors;  plenty of protein and a balance of vegetables, fruits and healthy fats.

It's not about starving oneself.  (happy_gangsta)


Well said Victoria!
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, October 8, 2010, 12:19am; Reply: 8
Quoted from AKArtlover

Well said Victoria!


You provided the seed thought for that little speech!  (happy_gangsta)
Posted by: SandrAruba, Friday, October 8, 2010, 10:29am; Reply: 9
There is a comment at the end of the article about Audrey Hepburn suffering from all kinds of ailments due to the fact that she lived through the hunger winter (WWII). The first thought that came to me was that malnutrition is something completely different then CR. Am I right?
With CR you do get the (or some) necessary nutrition right?
Posted by: AKArtlover, Friday, October 8, 2010, 1:00pm; Reply: 10
I think the goal of CR is to get super concentrated nutrician, so your body functions optimally on less calories. Not only from the genetic standpoint that Dr. D talked about, but it's logical that the body has to do less work in digestion. In empty calories, unless you are doing excessive physical work, it seems like the net effect is such a lower payoff-- and the things we consider "empty" these are usually things that either have additives or high sugars or fats and the body has to work harder to process. The standard fast food diet of America-- empty calories. Always hungry. Starving in the land of plenty, I call it.

My niece and nephew are 18 year old eating machines. I doubt there is an unused calorie for them as they are both runners with rabbit metabolisms. They eat sooo much, they are likely getting their nutrients, but in an innefficient manner. They aren't eating fast food, but they have never seen a dessert they didn't like. It fits what they are choosing to do right now.

I met a gal who lived through a war on canned spinach and tomatoes. That is not conscious CR; that's desparation. Will she get the same genetic effect? Maybe. Maybe that would be a blessing from the bad time she went through.

Ramble, ramble.  :)
Posted by: RedLilac, Friday, October 8, 2010, 2:15pm; Reply: 11
I hope people with anorexia won’t use this study as justification for their actions.  AKArtlover’s statement, "we need efficient food that is not necessarily high in calories. No room for a ton of empty calories" should set the standard.
Posted by: Goldie, Friday, October 8, 2010, 2:32pm; Reply: 12
Dr.D I LOVE A THREAD for each BLOG, for honestly so much phew just over my hairline .. so a discussion on each will be wonderful.. makes it much more meaningful, and I feel less stupid/intimidated to ask a question.. yet I feel other might not understand all every time either.


I think today when we talk of food -enough or not- most have no clue.. I had brought up teens that starved for lack of planning by their mother so there was no food.. paper filled in at the end of the month, but when they had food, then they ate with two hands and mostly less nutritious foods.. now of the 3 kids are skinny the fourth and youngest is way over the top from the beginning- but all solid as she walks and swimms a lot.. still I wonder about CR in their case .. what might it mean..

as for the over weight 23 year old.. what will be here life?  even doing BTD for 3 month strict (I was there) she is O neg and Nonnie  - she did not seem to loose any weight - maybe at best not added any.  and in her case had such sever heartburn that she ended up in urgent care (me bringing her) 3 times in one week thinking she had heart failure.. when she was 18..  she still suffers but actually less even with all junk food now..  
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, October 8, 2010, 5:50pm; Reply: 13
AKArtlover, I think you really understand this concept.  There may be other applications for the calorie restriction concept from a scientists' viewpoint, for the sake of experiments.  But from our perspective, we who are all about the highest level of health possible, calorie restriction has to be about a diet that meets all our nutritional needs, not one that starves us.  You're right that most SAD diets are high in calories, low in nutrition, leaving the eater so unsatisfied that they compulsively keep eating in an attempt to meet the unmet needs.

Healthy CR is the opposite of that approach;  Leaving off empty foods in favor of potent, easily used power-packed fuel that is appropriate for each person's own body type.  That sure sounds like a good idea to me.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 8, 2010, 8:10pm; Reply: 14
caloric restriction doesn t mean nutrient restriction
Posted by: AKArtlover, Friday, October 8, 2010, 11:11pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Lola
caloric restriction doesn t mean nutrient restriction


Way to sum it up, Lola. ;)
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, October 10, 2010, 12:32pm; Reply: 16
So, how many calories  = CR? One of the things I've liked best about BTD/GTD is the fact that when I eat the way I'm supposed to be eating, I'm sated. One of the big draw-backs to most "diets" is that a person is walking around hungry all day long. If I were hungry all day long I would not be able to keep up the program and I would not have quality of life. I'd rather have a shorter, happier life than a long one where I was constantly hungry.
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, October 10, 2010, 1:46pm; Reply: 17
GR,
I don't know the answer, but I'm with you on the quality of life issue.  Although, I can't help think that I'm far better off following GTD and eating as much I need, rather than following my previous diet of eating lots of toxins and starving to death...  I know that I am healing very intensely now and that can't be having a strong aging effect...
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, October 10, 2010, 2:26pm; Reply: 18
I hear ya ABjoe, I'm very happy with swamiX, I'm in better shape now than I've ever been.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, October 10, 2010, 3:00pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from grey rabbit
So, how many calories  = CR? One of the things I've liked best about BTD/GTD is the fact that when I eat the way I'm supposed to be eating, I'm sated. One of the big draw-backs to most "diets" is that a person is walking around hungry all day long. If I were hungry all day long I would not be able to keep up the program and I would not have quality of life. I'd rather have a shorter, happier life than a long one where I was constantly hungry.


I think the term CR is subjective.  It's certainly not a "part" of the BTD/GTD.

After a long time on Dr. D's programs, I have gotten to know my body better than I used to, and it is easier for me to understand what it is asking for.  My own take on CR is that I have found that my own body functions much better without having to deal with empty food in any form.  That gives me the responsibility to make sure that what I do eat is super nutritious (for my own unique body), well balanced and satisfying.  I would not be happy in a state of deprivation.  My diet is rich and luscious.

I never count calories, or even think about them.  However, I can see that I'm eating the amount of calories that my body needs to maintain strong energy and hold my weight at the level that I was in college, without dieting.  
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 10, 2010, 7:30pm; Reply: 20
putting together meals, using your genoharmonic combinations, and or SFs and diamonds,
gives me nutrient rich satisfaction, always....
I never have cravings, and can go for hours without feeling hungry.....
also the quantity of food I need, has been very much diminished.....
I love my lifestyle!
Posted by: Dr. D, Sunday, October 10, 2010, 10:10pm; Reply: 21
... but if we can find things that work like CR, then we'd have the best of all things.
Posted by: Goldie, Monday, October 11, 2010, 12:38am; Reply: 22
So I followed some thing on the web.. about (rapid) weight loss..for me at least get off dead center..

It recommended the following:

4 meals a day.. up to 300 calories.. I don't count calories I know a luncheon plate is ok for me.. or a saucer is half that..

4 meals spaced 4 hour apart.. for me 3 hours would be better.. as I am a constant grazer.. bad HABITS..

the other thing needed is to eat 2 vegetables before eating.. so some green leaves and carrots or a salad?  then my reg O non secr foods..

4  protein drinks 1 before each meal.. not protein like ensure... but my BTD O protein.. I seem to do ok with 1 spoon and some blueberries or pineapple.. so no big deal..

then the guy recommended many glasses of ice water in between .. I have seen that before.. might be ok as it is supposed to use energy for digestion..and then again I need the liquid..

At the end of it all exercise..

I think I wish to try the regimen, it seems not frightening because of the protein drink .. I might not become fearful of becoming hungry.. a rather stupid fear as I have never been hungry.. but my psyche is messed up..

and then if I eat Swami.. --wo--man : that might be a mighty way to do things right..

ANY comments??  
    
Posted by: yaeli, Monday, October 11, 2010, 2:26am; Reply: 23
Victoria and Lola, these sharings/testimonials are wonderful. I'm going to keep them. Just grateful to have met the diet, the boards, yourselves.

Posted by: Victoria, Monday, October 11, 2010, 4:45am; Reply: 24
Quoted from yaeli
Victoria and Lola, these sharings/testimonials are wonderful. I'm going to keep them. Just grateful to have met the diet, the boards, yourselves.



(ok) (hehe)  And right back at ya, yaeli!
Posted by: AKArtlover, Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 4:33pm; Reply: 25
Maybe conscious calorie restriction is not the goal anyway. I think when you are getting all the nutrition then you may not be hungry anyway. Maybe it's an efficiency gene? I love effciency so I'm probably biased. Ramble, ramble.  Sorry if I veered too far off the point of the blog-- having those genes ramp it up. Great entry. :)
Posted by: AKArtlover, Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 3:33pm; Reply: 26
Random person I connected with because of our dogs posted this in her Facebook notes. Not sure if the link will work for you.

http://www.facebook.com/notes/patti-turner/middle-aged-mice-on-bcaas-live-12-longer/449157568319

Middle-aged Mice on BCAAs Live 12% Longerby Patti Turner on Friday, October 8, 2010 at 12:37pm

Mice given BCAAs in their drinking water enjoy healthier and longer lifespans, reports a new study.

Scientists are actively seeking aging-intervention strategies to help people maintain their youth in anticipation of a sharp rise in the elderly population – due to the “baby boomer” generation – and an unprecedented number of elderly in North America and throughout the developed world.

Now, a new study in the October issue of Cell Metabolism reports that middle-aged, male mice given a cocktail of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) – leucine, isoleucine, valine – in their drinking water lived an average of 12 percent longer (869 days compared to 774 days) than middle-aged, male mice drinking regular water.

The scientists, from Milan University, found that the BCAA-fed mice exhibited similar changes as those seen with calorie restriction or resveratrol supplementation, showing an increase in longevity-gene SIRT1 activity and an increase in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria levels.

The treated mice also showed improved exercise endurance and motor coordination, and had fewer signs of damage from oxidative stress.

In future studies, the researchers plan on performing similar experiments with female mice.

“This is the first demonstration that an amino acid mixture can increase survival in mice,” said lead researcher Enzo Nisoli, referring to prior studies that showed that the cocktail of BCAAs extends lifespan in yeast.

Getting BCAAs in the Diet

Nisoli suggests that older people may find similar anti-aging benefits from including BCAAs in their diets by eating protein or taking supplements high in BCAAs as part of a complete “nutritional approach” for aging gracefully.

Supplements of BCAAs are widely used by athletes, including bodybuilders, because they help to trigger protein synthesis and drive muscle growth, especially when taken within 20 minutes after workouts.



http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/retrieve/pii/S1550413110003049
Posted by: Easy E, Monday, July 25, 2011, 7:35pm; Reply: 27
I believe that taking in excess calories causes the body to use its energy more for digestion.  The energy could be used for healing and repairing instead.  If the stomach is always stuffed full, the energy all goes towards digesting, and other tissues will break down more quickly i think.

When you are full, you can't think as sharply, or exhert yourself fully as you could, because this energy is at your stomach breaking down the food.

Thats the qigong explanation for how calorie restriction extends life!!  Just like in all things, a balance must be found for the best calorie to healing ratio i believe.  It is math!
Posted by: Goldie, Monday, July 25, 2011, 7:48pm; Reply: 28
yes to all you said.. Easy E.. Right on.. Eat Right and things start to fall into place..  and then build on the courrage you are developing to live right, you need it to live longer.. which is by it self not so hot.. but at least if one must burry all their friends kids and cousins, then at least be healthy enbough to be able to do so...
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