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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  gluten free flour help
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Saturday, September 25, 2010, 5:58pm
This might help people, it was listed in a FM area (Fructose malabsorption_ but may be relevant to others - it does not take into account Blood type so for example corn flour is no good for me. but mau suit others perhaps someopne may evenm like to do a BTD version. all i had to do was read the bit about the rice flour being gritty to know she knew what she was talking about lol
> >
> >
> > Here's a bit of a run down on gluten free flours, from my own experience.
> >
> > Using just rice flour to replace normal flour, as you said, ends up with a
> gritty final product. It's best to mix it with at least one other flour for a
> better texture. The easiest gluten free plain flour mix to use is 1/2 rice
> flour, 1/2 corn flour (cornstarch) or potato starch. This gives a much nicer
> texture. Be careful to buy a gluten free or "pure" corn flour as some corn
> flour found at the supermarket actually contains wheat. Another tip with rice
> flour is to buy it prepackaged from Asian food shops as it is a lot finer in
> texture than what you buy at a health food shop. I think the brand I buy even
> says "fine white rice flour" on the bag.
> >
> > Corn/potato starch are best to substitute plain flour when thickening sauces
> eg. gravy. Arrowroot flour and tapioca can also be used but use too much and
it
> gives a jelly like quality to sauces! I like to use tapioca in savory pie
> fillings as it gives an attractive glossy finish.
> >
> > Tapioca is also good to use in cakes/breads to make them more pliable/give
> them a gluten like quality. Sweet rice flour is also great for this. If too
> much is used they make the end product really chewy.. prob about 1/3 cup to
> every 1 cup of rice/cornflour mixture is a good quantity.
> >
> > So far the flours I've mentioned are quite light in density, there are also
> more dense flours such as buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth, soy, sorghum, almond
> flours and cornmeal/polenta. These flours can be used as a primary ingredient,
> eg in buckwheat pancakes/orange, cornbread or almond cake, or mixed with the
> lighter flours to create a the texture/density you want for a recipe. I have
> made a delicious brownie recipe using mostly buckwheat flour, which turned out
> beautifully as it was very moist and dense.
> >
> > Nut flours, such as blanched almond flour/ground cashews make great moist
> baked goods but some people cannot tolerate them (like me, unfortunately).
> >
> > The thing about those heavy flours is that they are also quite strong in
> flavour, so I think they are best used in dishes that are very flavoursome eg
> choc cake as opposed to plain in flavour eg bread, as not all people enjoy the
> taste of some of these. I once had to throw away a whole batch of amaranth
> pancakes because the flavor was too strong.
> >
> > A lot of gf flour mixes use soy flour as the dense element. Unfortunately
> some people cannot tolerate soy so using a different dense flour to replace it
> is a good idea. I always have buckwheat flour on hand and add a tablespoon or
> two per cup of lighter flours to give a bit of balance. Buckwheat is sort of
> grey in colour and goes darker when liquids are added so depending on what
> you're making it may not look as good (eg. slightly grey shortbread biscuits).
> >
> > A gluten free all-purpose flour blend may be something like this:
> > 1 cup rice flour, 1 cup potato starch, 1/2 cup sweet rice flour, 1/2 cup
> quinoa flour.
> > But if you don't want to buy lots of different flours, remember the basic
half
> rice flour/half corn flour works well most of the time. These two flours are
> also easily found at the supermarket.
> >
> > Of course you can also add one teaspoon of xananthanam gum to this mixture
to
> also give more of a gluten-like quality (more pliable, moist). Make sure you
> mix it into the flour well before adding other ingredients, as sometimes it
> stays together in a little gelly lump when liquids are added!
> >
> > Most gluten free breads, cakes and muffins will not keep for as long as
those
> made with wheat flour so are best eaten fresh. I find that gf buiscits can be
> stored for a bit longer, and a funny observation I've made is that they often
> taste better the day after they were cooked!
> >
> > I leaned all this by experimenting (with plenty of mistakes).. hope it helps
> you!
> >
> >
> > Bern
> >
> >
> > p.s. to the American's in the group.. in Aus, cornstarch and cornflour are
the
> same thing. I think what you call corn flour is corn meal here.
Posted by: Vicki, Saturday, September 25, 2010, 7:04pm; Reply: 1
I just use one flour unless I'm trying to use up leftovers.  I stick to recipes that make it work out fine.  I can make pancakes, waffles, muffins, cake, and cookies.  I'd like to learn how to make a nice injera and will do that one day!  Amaranth and teff are both a very fine flour.  
Posted by: Monti, Saturday, September 25, 2010, 9:28pm; Reply: 2
thank you!
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, September 25, 2010, 9:55pm; Reply: 3
I like using compliant bean flours in place of gums or pot starch....
sweet potato starch is nice as well, for those bts/gts able to have them

your gluten free mixes do not work for me, unfortunately
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, September 26, 2010, 3:28am; Reply: 4
Quoted Text
I'd like to learn how to make a nice injera

according to an Ethiopian at the HFS, you first ferment a cup of teff with a cup of water, leave out all night

then knead to make the bread

google injera.....many hits...think there s even utube videos
Posted by: battle dwarf, Sunday, September 26, 2010, 5:30am; Reply: 5
my mother has a wonderful website about glution free/ suger free backing  and flours. it is a running blog by a woman who is going through culinary school specifacly for gluton free and suger free cooking and she shares what she is learning and her own exsperaments and recapies on her blog sight. i will have to see if i can get her to post a link for you pc.
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 6:15am; Reply: 6
That'd be handy battle dwarf..Did you get it?

Am really wondering too, what most people use to thicken meat juices to make gravy?
Posted by: Munchkin76, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 7:07am; Reply: 7
Quoted from Possum
That'd be handy battle dwarf..Did you get it?

Am really wondering too, what most people use to thicken meat juices to make gravy?


I always use arrowroot, or failing that brown or white rice flour. Arrowroot is my first choice as it works just like corn flour used to and doesn't affect the taste.
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 8:51am; Reply: 8
Thanks Andy ;-)
Posted by: Spring, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 3:04pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Possum
That'd be handy battle dwarf..Did you get it?

Am really wondering too, what most people use to thicken meat juices to make gravy?


Amaranth flour makes the most fabulous thickening I have ever used!
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 3:39pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Possum
Am really wondering too, what most people use to thicken meat juices to make gravy?

Either arrowroot or brown rice flour...  Mostly rice since it is much less expensive...  I buy the least expensive brown rice I can find and run it through the mill as fine as possible.
Posted by: cajun, Saturday, April 14, 2012, 8:13pm; Reply: 11
I bake cookies/brownies/cakes with one or more of these; brown rice flour, almond meal, buckwheat flour, flaxseed meal.
I don't want to use gums as they are all avoids for me. :-/
Some recipes turn out a little dense or not as elastic as I might prefer but they are always tasty and worth eating rather than "cheating" with avoid flours/sugars! ;)
My favorite, easy, go to recipe is my 3 ingredient peanut butter cookie.(GF and flourless) :D
1 c. organic unsalted peanut butter
1 egg
1c. raw sugar or honey ( I have gradually lessened this to 1/2 c. and it is ok )
Mix and drop on cookie sheets. Bake at 350 for 9 minutes.
(I do sprinkle raw sugar on top for a little crunch.) :)
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, April 15, 2012, 2:38am; Reply: 12
Cheers!!!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, April 16, 2012, 9:31pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Possum
Am really wondering too, what most people use to thicken meat juices to make gravy?


Arrowroot or white rice flour. I've found that brown rice flour is too gritty, but white rice flour works fine. I've also used white spelt flour if it's something for the kids that I won't be eating (such as cream sauce or cheese sauce for DS to pour over pasta.)

Posted by: Possum, Monday, April 16, 2012, 11:08pm; Reply: 14
cajun that cookie recipe looks great (subbing almond butter for the peanut butter)
& thanks Ruthie ;)
Posted by: Pixu, Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 11:16pm; Reply: 15
Great info  :K)

Ruthie, I don't know if you noticed (probably not, it was just before your net break) that I was wondering (in my sec test result thread) if you could give me some advice re GF baking..

So this thread was just what I needed, thanks PC  :K)
Posted by: Pixu, Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 11:17pm; Reply: 16
So could I make white rice flour processing white rice????? As easy as that??
As I can only find brown rice flour...
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 11:44pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from ruthiegirl
've found that brown rice flour is too gritty, but white rice flour works fine.

If your brown rice flour is gritty, you haven't cooked it enough...  This can happen when using it in baked goods, but for cooked goods, sauces, or gravies, it works well...
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 6:08am; Reply: 18
Quoted Text
make white rice flour processing white rice


yes
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:50pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from ABJoe

If your brown rice flour is gritty, you haven't cooked it enough...  This can happen when using it in baked goods, but for cooked goods, sauces, or gravies, it works well...


I've made gravies and cream sauces with purchased brown rice flour, and it always had a  gritty texture, no matter what I did. It was subtle, and the food wasn't "ruined" or anything, but in my experience, the white rice flour works better in sauces. It may have had something to do with the flour available to me, and how  finely ground it was.

I've tried making my own rice flour using a coffee grinder. I ended up with a combination of fine flour mixed with grits- it wasn't evenly processed at all, and the end result was hard to work with. I used it to make hot cereal, so it wasnt' wasted, but I considered it a "failed experiment."

Others have had good results making their own flour. Ask those people what they use to grind their flour- the equipment does make a difference.
Posted by: deblynn3, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:00pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Possum
That'd be handy battle dwarf..Did you get it?

Am really wondering too, what most people use to thicken meat juices to make gravy?


http://simplysugarandglutenfree.com/

Just saw this post.  I haven't visited it for a while. One of her earlier blogs goes into different flours and some combos that work.  She has added a lot of info to it so I guess I need to  revisit it.
Posted by: Ligia, Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 8:10pm; Reply: 21
I don't remember where I found this recipe for muffins made with rice flour.  The rice flour is soaked overnight.  I've made it with brown rice flour and it does not come out gritty at all.  It seems that the soaking helps.  Here it is.

Rice Muffins
Recipe by Theresa Brown
Makes 12-14

1 ½ cups rice flour
about ¾ cup warm water
2 tablespoons whey
¼ cup coconut oil
¼ cup honey
2 eggs
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder

Zucchini Muffins
1 ½ cups grated zucchini
¼ teaspoon dried ginger
Carrot Muffins
1 ½ cups finely grated carrots
½ teaspoon cinnamon
Fruit Muffins
1-1 ½ cups blueberries, blackberries
or raspberries
Mix the first three ingredients and soak overnight. After soaking, mix oil and honey thoroughly in a separate container. Add eggs, then salt, soda, powder, and any spices. Combine flour mix and egg mix with fruit or vegetable. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.
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