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BTD Forums  /  Nonnie Clubhouse  /  Good Flour Substitutes?
Posted by: 10628 (Guest), Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:19pm
Hi everyone,

I'm new to this.  I've been following the BTD for almost a year, starting off here and there and then getting strict when I noticed how much it helped my then nursing baby.  I haven't gotten my secretor status yet but believe I'm a Non-Secretor based on the further restrictions and my reactions to them.  

So my question is - before I got into the Secretor vs Non-Secretor I was substituting standard flour with spelt flour.  I like the results I was getting and the food was good.  Now that spelt is on my avoid list I was wondering if you had any suggestions on what to use, rice, quinoa, etc or if there was a master list somewhere that suggested what to use in different circumstances?

Thanks for any help,
Laura
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:26pm; Reply: 1
The best suggestion I have is to use any flour that is compliant for you.  

I have found that I like rice / flax meal mixture for pancakes.  

Many people use Flax meal bread here:http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1215

There are many recipes that turned up when I searched the recipe base for Flax bread:
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/csvsearch7x.pl?search=flax+bread&Category=&mytemplate=tp1&method=all&order_by=Name&order=abc&header=on

Happy eating.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:48pm; Reply: 2
you all know what it says in swami....
flax bread is listed, and also bread like the flax bread foccacia recipe, made with any or all or a mix of your compliant grains.....that works for me...no fuss
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:51pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Lola
you all know what it says in swami....

There are those that don't have swami...  They don't know what it says...
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:53pm; Reply: 4
Quoted Text
if there was a master list somewhere that suggested what to use in different circumstances?

this what we have and doesn t violate copyright issues, yet helps you choose food right
The most recent rating of a food can be found using typebase:

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/typeindexer.htm
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:55pm; Reply: 5
Quoted Text
There are those that don't have swami...  They don't know what it says..


for those, they all can use all grains, legumes or nuts listed in any of the books they are following, be it BT, GT, or a health series book :)
Posted by: amynell2693, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 12:10am; Reply: 6
I like rice flour (I mix both brown and white).  I've also heard almond flour is wonderful for baking (I haven't tried this, my son is allergic to all nuts).

Check out http://www.livingwithout.com for a list of substitutes.
Posted by: 10111 (Guest), Sunday, July 25, 2010, 5:31pm; Reply: 7
My favorite is Bob's Red Mill brown rice flour and I just use some beaten egg mixed in to help it stick together.  Xantham gum makes rice breads stick together but it's too gummy for my liking, and ground chia seeds help it stick together too but are hard to find in the stores around here.
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 5:37pm; Reply: 8
I made great muffins mixing flax meal, almond meal, rice flour and amaranth flour.  Not very
much amaranth flour (probably 1/4 of what recipe called for) because amaranth is a strong flavor.

You can buy quinoa and millet flour as well.  And I use buckwheat flour for pancakes.

As an A I use soy flour, but I'm sure you wouldn't want to do that as an O.

Bob's Red Mill website has great recipes using non wheat and non gluten flours.
http://www.bobsredmill.com/recipes.php
Posted by: Munchkin76, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 5:38pm; Reply: 9
Unveganista

Could you share your favourite brown rice flour bread recipe please (pray)??  Brown rice flour is one of my few superfood grains and I'd like to take advantage if possible.

Cheers

Andy
Posted by: 10111 (Guest), Sunday, July 25, 2010, 5:45pm; Reply: 10
Andy, I don't make yeast breads....never tried after I lost wheat  :'(.  I just make pancake like bread and don't have a recipe....just rice flour and dump in some egg mixed with water and cook it on the griddle....or bake it on a oiled cookie sheet....I'm a total minimalist lol.  :P

I make good cookies, but again no recipe....I cream soft butter and sweetener, add an egg and the juice and zest of a lemon, and then mix in the flour and if I add too much I add a little water, roll up little balls of it (refridgerate it to make it harder if needed) and smash them on a cookie sheet and bake.  i like cookies  :P
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 6:50pm; Reply: 11
focaccia
http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/breads/r/flaxbasicfoc.htm
video
http://video.about.com/lowcarbdiets/Focaccia-Style-Flax-Bread.htm
this one never goes wrong, and you can substitute any grain, nut or legume flour you want....make it sweet as well, depending on what you need
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 8:08pm; Reply: 12
I've found that brown rice flour or white rice flour can work in almost any recipe, although the results will be more crumbly.
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 8:22pm; Reply: 13
I can have sorghum flour but I've never used it.  Has anyone ever tried it?
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 8:58pm; Reply: 14
behaves pretty much like wheat, I think......in baking
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, July 25, 2010, 9:59pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Lola
behaves pretty much like wheat, I think......in baking


all recipes with sorghum say to use xanthan gum or corn starch.  It's a GF flour, is that why?

Posted by: Changeling, Monday, July 26, 2010, 3:55am; Reply: 16
Quoted from Chloe


all recipes with sorghum say to use xanthan gum or corn starch.  It's a GF flour, is that why?



Sorghum flour's taste "mimics" wheat, but it does not behave like wheat since it is gluten=free.  When combined with other starches, and a gluten sub (like guar or xanthan) it bakes a really tasty loaf of gluten-free bread.

Changeling
Posted by: paul clucas, Monday, July 26, 2010, 7:44pm; Reply: 17
I bake quinoa/amaranth/flaxmeal muffins.  They positively help me loose weight, and the flavor reasonable.
Posted by: 10628 (Guest), Tuesday, July 27, 2010, 2:46am; Reply: 18
Wow thanks for all of the answers and links.  This forum is SO helpful!
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, July 27, 2010, 7:22am; Reply: 19
:)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, July 27, 2010, 4:09pm; Reply: 20
I don't think that any of the gums (xanthan, guar, etc) are BTD compliant. If you cut out spelt and then add in xanthan gum to replace it, you might feel worse, rather than better.

My suggestion is to use a mixture of flour and starch and accept the fact that your baked goods will be more crumbly.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, July 28, 2010, 1:30am; Reply: 21
no need for gums if you have arrowroot and linseed
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, July 29, 2010, 2:35am; Reply: 22
Sorry to change the subject but is sourdough bread ok for B's ?
I can't find it anywhere.
Thanks :)
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, July 29, 2010, 3:29am; Reply: 23
yes, done with compliant flours
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, July 29, 2010, 12:17pm; Reply: 24
Yum, I love it !!
http://www.premieremoisson.com/Home/
This is where I buy it. They have lots of delicious breads !!
Thanks Lola. :) ;) ;D :K)
Posted by: Changeling, Friday, August 13, 2010, 4:00pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Lola
no need for gums if you have arrowroot and linseed


The need for gums is to mimic the 'stretch' and 'cohesion' of gluten that would be missing from the non-glutinous grains.  In my opinion, arrowroot and flax (linseed) do not provide that characteristic sufficiently.  However...in some of my older gluten-free baking books, gelatin can be substituted for xanthan or guar.  Chia may do the same.

Posted by ruthiegirl: "I don't think that any of the gums (xanthan, guar, etc) are BTD compliant. If you cut out spelt and then add in xanthan gum to replace it, you might feel worse, rather than better."

For those that are eating 100% BTD/GTD compliant, I say you are absolutely correct and one should NOT compromise by ingesting a non-compliant food.  However, for the rest of us that are not sensitive to either gum, and have suffered damaged intestinal villi from gluten, and for whom spelt is NOT an option, then the effects would be much more positive.

In gluten-free baking, you only use 1 tsp. of either gum per 1 cup of gluten-free flour.  One of my favorite recipes (which I don't use anymore, sigh...) calls for 3 tsp. xanthan.  If I were to cut up that loaf into 18 slices, that would amount to ingesting 1/2 gram per slice.  If I make spelt bread (for my husband) that calls for 3+ cups of flour and is cut into 18 slices, if I were to eat one slice, I would be ingesting a little over 1/8 cup (2 TB) per slice.  For me, even 1 tsp. would trigger an allergic reaction of dermatitis herpetiformis.

Although difficult, (I've been baking my own bread since the 70's :o) I work really hard at not eating so many grains...especially bread.  However, since I have experienced such devastating results ingesting gluten, (that went undiagnosed for over 30 years) the occasional 1/2 gram of gum is easily handled.  

After getting my secretor status (nonnie) results, my SWAMI gives guar a black dot.  I still avoid it, but if I do ingest it...well...I just have to pick my battles.

Changeling
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