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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Mineral/Organic Cosmetics Ingredients--Safe?
Posted by: balletomane, Monday, May 17, 2010, 8:58am
I have noticed that most of the organic/mineral makeups contain iron oxide, zinc oxide, titanium dioxide and mica.

How safe are these ingredients?

I search for them on the Skin Deep EWG Cosmetic Safety Database and found that they are low to moderately hazardous (1-3 on a scale of 10).

http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/

Frosty is the skin care expert here. Can you offer some insights? And anybody else out there who have been using this type of cosmetics and have something to share?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, May 17, 2010, 1:28pm; Reply: 1
I know that titanium dioxide (and possibly zinc oxide as well) is (are) dangerous to breathe in (so if you buy the powder to make your own sunscreen, you need to wear a mask while working with it), but it's perfectly safe when used on your skin- the molecules are too large to be absorbed into your skin. This is not true of the "nano" versions, common in conventional sunscreens.

Iron oxide is just rust, and zinc oxide is commonly used in diaper rash ointments.


Posted by: battle dwarf, Monday, May 17, 2010, 6:44pm; Reply: 2
can't be worse than all those sythetic chemachals in regular makup. don't use much myself but i love my burts bee's coloered lip balms. just about the only thing i can use sence all the "medicated" or spf ones literaly make me sick to my stomac. you know they say the average woman eats several pounds of lipstick a year? i don't even buy thet much in ten years so i must be beloe average on that. ;D
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 2:17am; Reply: 3
Quoted from battle dwarf
you know they say the average woman eats several pounds of lipstick a year? ;D


IF I wear lipstick it is from "Ecco Bella" made out of flowers!
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 2:19am; Reply: 4
Quoted from balletomane
And anybody else out there who have been using this type of cosmetics and have something to share?


I have been using mineral makeup for many years and I don't seem to have a problem with it, I like the fact that it reflects the damaging UV/UVA rays rather than absorbs them like most sunscreens do.
Posted by: Frosty, Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 4:13am; Reply: 5
Quoted from balletomane
I have noticed that most of the organic/mineral makeups contain iron oxide, zinc oxide, titanium dioxide and mica.

How safe are these ingredients?


In my opinion they are about as safe as you can get right now.

I can't or I should say I won't wear mineral makeup because it makes me look old.  It seems to find every little fine line I have on my face and make them look like wrinkles. EEEEK!!!!  Now I am my own worst critic and being the perfectionist type A personality I am, it drives me nuts to see my fine lines and they really are fine, accentuated.  

So, when I wear makeup, which I rarely do in the summer months, I airbrush my makeup on.  Ever wonder why your female news anchors look so good?  It is because they are wearing HD airbrushed makeup.  It is very light, doesn't need touching up and takes about two minutes for me to do my foundation and blush and another minute if and when I use shadow.  Ingredients are iron oxides and a dispersal solution.  I make my own, so I am not at the mercy of some manufacturers ingredients.  

There are people that swear by mineral makeup.  I have a girl friend in Oregon that won't wear anything but mineral makeup and she looks great in it.  It is fantastic for people that have sensitive skin and can't wear anything else.

I should also mention that many of these are touted as natural from natural sources.  Many of them were originally from natural sources, but now are lab created.  And when you are talking organic in pigments such as minerals, mica's, oxides, iron oxides and zinc oxide, it is important for you to know that organic doesn't mean organic like we think it does.  Organic pigments are synthetic and inorganic pigments were from natural sources, at one time, and are now lab created.  Many make the assumption that  organic pigments are like an organic food, not the same at all.  This is very confusing and if you are interested in knowing more about this let me know and I will post in more detail.

With Respect,
Frosty
Posted by: balletomane, Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 2:39pm; Reply: 6
Wow, Frosty, how do you "airbrush" the makeup on? Just curious!

The part about organic and inorganic ingredients is really tricky. Can you give us more details?

I hardly use any foundation at all even though I do put on some mineral foundation powder ever so occasionally. The makeups I use most often are eyeliner and eye shadows and recently I ordered an "organic" eyeliner and mascara. I always feel sensitive toward mascaras so I'm curious if an "organic" one would feel alright on me.
Posted by: balletomane, Friday, May 21, 2010, 9:33am; Reply: 7
Another question that I'd like to throw out is: if a lib balm contains some "avoid" ingredients like orange or honey, is it better if I stay away from it?
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, May 21, 2010, 3:12pm; Reply: 8
Bare Minerals used to contain parabens.  They now make a paraben-free formula.  I've been
using B. Minerals for over 10 years and still love it.  The trick is in the application and having
good brushes and how you prepare your skin before you apply the powder.  I always use rose hips oil on my skin and allow it to soak in for 30 minutes before mineral make up application.  My skin is naturally oily rather than dry and I feel this type of makeup looks completely natural.  In fact, it doesn't look like I'm wearing much of anything...except that it evens out my skin tone very well.  
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Friday, May 21, 2010, 3:55pm; Reply: 9
OMG, I hate mineral makeup.. I swear it is the reason for my skin developing wrinkles suddenly. It just sucks the moisture out of the skin! Not only that, it makes my face itch terribly especially when I sweat. I have very sensitive skin so I thought for sure I'd be able to wear mineral makeup.. nope.

But, it does make you look good, I must say. Specially when you wear it in photos., It makes your skin look so healthy and makes you look younger.

Frosty, tell me more about the air brush makeup. I was thinking of getting that.  I read some bad reviews of one that was on an infomercial. Luminese?
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Friday, May 21, 2010, 3:58pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from balletomane
Another question that I'd like to throw out is: if a lib balm contains some "avoid" ingredients like orange or honey, is it better if I stay away from it?


I'd say yes because you'll eat it and that's the same as eating avoids.  
Posted by: Lola, Friday, May 21, 2010, 4:35pm; Reply: 11
again, listen to your body, if susceptible to avoids.....this is a very personal matter, specially if so close to your mouth cavity
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, May 21, 2010, 8:02pm; Reply: 12
I read that the average woman consumes something like 6 pounds of lipstick in her lifetime.  Ick~
Posted by: Frosty, Friday, May 21, 2010, 9:05pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from 815
Frosty, tell me more about the air brush makeup. I was thinking of getting that.  I read some bad reviews of one that was on an infomercial. Luminese?


I bought a dinair airbrush system several years ago at a beauty show.  It was to do HD makeup for bridal makeup.  The bridal makeup I was doing was just flawless and beautiful.  So, I thought well dang I am going to start airbrushing my own.  I decided to buy a mini system for myself and I have to say I LOVE, LOVE LOVE IT!!!!  1 oz of foundation will last you 4-6 months maybe longer and you can use just about any foundation you like, it will just need to be dispersed accordingly.

http://www.dinair.com  

On the front page you will see the mini compressor, it is so small and easy to travel with. It takes up less space than my old makeup bag.  

If you wear makeup daily, this to me is a must have item.  It's quick, it's easy and VOILA! You look great!
Posted by: Frosty, Friday, May 21, 2010, 9:08pm; Reply: 14
Make your own lip balm guys, it's super duper easy!!!  You only need three ingredients.  Beeswax, a butter and a carrier oil.  I flavor mine with essential oil and stevia, yummy!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, May 21, 2010, 10:08pm; Reply: 15
I don't use cosmetics at all, but I have two teenaged daughters who  have some interest in makeup (one occasionally uses the cheap conventional stuff, the other doesnt' use any at all but may change her mind about that in a few years.)

Frosty- I'm interested in the "what does organic really mean with makeup?' information.
Posted by: marjorie, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 2:05am; Reply: 16
I am trying some of the holistic recipes for skin care that Frosty suggested. So, I  was making a mask this evening, however, one of the ingredients was gram flour which I could not find ANYWHERE! Thank Goodness  WF juiced my cucumbers for me to use as cucumber juice because that was nowhere to be find, either.

Now, my mission to get a good cleanser. I must say it feels nice to use only natural products on my face.. no more worries:)
Posted by: Frosty, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 4:27am; Reply: 17
It's a lot of work making your own stuff fresh, but it is a real treat.  Some people make stuff up every few days and keep it in the fridge.  Guess it is like us with the BTD/GTD and prep for meals and such.

Gram flour also know as Chana flour.  It is ground chick peas.
Posted by: Frosty, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 5:18am; Reply: 18
Ruthie,

It is not so much the makeup, but the pigments that give our makeup color.  There are basicly two kinds of pigments organic and inorganic.  Organic is not like the term organic like we know for our fruit, veggies, meat etc. When pigments are called organic this term comes from the reference of organic chemistry.  Inorganic pigments are iron oxides from mineral compounds.

I know the basics of organic vs inorganic, but it is a lot to try and articulate.  I am copying some reference material so you can better understand the two.

Organic Pigments
In Organic pigments, the molecules are made of carbon atoms along with hydrogen, nitrogen or oxygen atoms. Organic pigments can be subdivided into two subgroups:

Natural Organic Pigments- Pigments of this category are derived from animal products and plant products. The use of these pigments are rare due to their poor lightfastness property.

Before the beginning of the modern era, the natural organic pigments were considered as an important part of the historical pigments. Earlier these are used for bodily ornaments, textile dyeing and cosmetics.

But, today a large number of the natural organic dyes have been replaced by the synthetic organic dyes. Therefore, today, these pigments are remembered by theirs quaint historical names. These pigments are being adopted by the modern commercial paint companies to lend romance in their traditional mixtures.

Synthetic Organic Pigments- Pigments of this category are carbon based and these are often made from petroleum compounds. Most of the Synthetic Organic Pigments except Carbon Black are not stable and they will wear away at the time of using as a pigment.

Under intense pressure or heat, carbon base molecules are manufactured from petroleum, acids, and other chemicals and Synthetic Organic Pigments have been formulated from these molecules.

Why a large number of modern pigments are Synthetic Organic in nature?

The entire concept of organic chemistry mainly depends on carbon's atoms. These atoms have amazing flexibility and ability to form many different structures. Due to this attribute, they are able to form different combinations with other carbon atoms or atoms of other elements or with other compounds. This facilitates it to form almost limitless molecular variations. Out of these large number of carbon made molecules, intense color variations attribute will come in these synthetic organic pigments. Pigments which are formed out of these molecules, are the least toxic and economically beneficial.

Inorganic Pigments
Those Pigments that are made up of mineral compounds are known as to be Inorganic Pigments. These minerals are mainly oxides, sulphides of one or more than one metals. To impart colors in different compounds, inorganic pigments are applied.

Sources of Inorganic Pigments

Inorganic pigments may be obtained from vivid naturally occurring mineral sources or minerals which have been obtained synthetically, which is how most pigments are made these days

Advantages of Inorganic Pigments

Inorganic pigments are considered better over their organic counterparts. These inorganic pigments can withstand the impact of sunlight and chemical exposure in better way. They have also good opacity and thus these can protect other objects by preventing the light. These pigments also increase rash inhibition, abrasion resistance and rigidity to the molecules. These pigments are available at low cost in respect to the organic pigments. These pigments have more durability.

Shortcomings of Inorganic Pigments

Color comes from inorganic pigments is comparatively less brighter. These pigments are also seemed to be less rich and pure than the organic pigments. As these pigments have low tinting strength so a large number of pigments are required to produce the desired effects.

Availability of Inorganic Pigments in the market

Inorganic pigments are available in the market in different forms. These different forms are powder, pastes, slurries and suspensions.

The Inorganic Pigments are again divided into two sub types:

Natural Inorganic Pigments
Natural Inorganic Pigments are the earth colors in natural form like ochers, umbers etc. These color pigments are extracted from the earth bed. Iron oxide and hydroxide which are present in the soil. These two compounds are responsible for the coloration of these color pigments. Clay, chalk and silica are also present in these pigments in varying quantity.

Azurite- Actually these kind of natural inorganic pigments are copper carbonates having greenish blue shading. From a very long period, azurite has been using as a pigment. But, often these pigments have been replaced by synthetic pigments or used to paint the expensive ultramarine as under paintings.

Red earths- These pigments are the most diverse kind of natural inorganic pigments. These are made from clays and they have a large amount of iron oxide. The color varies from dull yellow to dull deep yellow or from dull orange to dull red or from dull dark brown to dark brown.

Yellow earths- These are natural earth containing silica and clay. These pigments are present in hydrous form of iron oxide. These pigments also contain gypsum or manganese carbonate. In all over the world, these pigments are available and have been using from the prehistoric period.

Synthetic Inorganic Pigments
Synthetic inorganic pigments are manufactured in the laboratory. These pigments consists of metallic compounds like manganese violet, cobalt blue. Synthetic inorganic pigments can also be produced by the replication of the natural earth colors like Mars Red or Yellow. As these pigments are manufactured in the laboratory, so they are found in pure form having fine particles.

Reference: http://www.dyespigments.com
Posted by: SoulfulLori, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 11:47am; Reply: 19
Wow...great info.  I really can't find the time to do this but maybe some time in my life I can.  I've been switching to all natural products here and there and seeing a difference so next I would like to use makeup that is less toxic.

Frosty...how about Aubrey Organics stuff???  Is there makeup ok or at least better?  I use their shampoos and found a great difference in less breakage and now I don't get little bumpy things at the base of my scalp.  I probably need to switch to their hairspray too.  I don't use much but now and then it is necessary.
Posted by: grey rabbit, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 12:53pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Frosty
Make your own lip balm guys, it's super duper easy!!!  You only need three ingredients.  Beeswax, a butter and a carrier oil.  I flavor mine with essential oil and stevia, yummy!


Like maybe coco butter and walnut oil?
Posted by: battle dwarf, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 6:10pm; Reply: 21
how would you keep it on your lips? you would be licking it off all the time! LOL still i like the idea, what ratio do you use?
Posted by: Frosty, Saturday, May 22, 2010, 10:05pm; Reply: 22
Grey Rabbit - Both of those would work, but be sure to temper your cocoa butter otherwise it will crystalize and your lip balm will have a gritty feel.

Battle Dwarf - The ratios are as follows.  1-part beeswax  2-parts butter (shea, mango, avocado or cocoa) and 1-part oil.  If you add a little castor oil to your batch it will give your lip balm a nice shine.

So to make a small amount you could do,..

1 Tblsp of beeswax
2 Tblsp of butter
1 Tblsp of oil  (or 1/2 Tblsp of jojoba and 1/2 Tblsp of castor oil for shine) ;)

SoulfulLori - I don't know about Aubrey Organics, I have never used it.  I will take a look at it and give you my opinion if you would like via private message???  
Posted by: grey rabbit, Sunday, May 23, 2010, 2:03am; Reply: 23
Do you temper cocoa butter the same way you temper chocolate?
Posted by: Frosty, Sunday, May 23, 2010, 3:17am; Reply: 24
Yes that is right...
Posted by: SoulfulLori, Sunday, May 23, 2010, 10:56am; Reply: 25
Yes please Frosty...any advice on cosmetics is a help.  My skin has been looking so much better and I want to keep helping it.  I got testers of Dr. D's stuff free with my last order and I looooooove his stuff.  Not sure I can afford it.  I'm on the fence there as they really do make my makeup sit nice.
Posted by: LovetoRead, Thursday, June 3, 2010, 12:01pm; Reply: 26
I have extremely sensitive skin and makeup always made me itch and break out.  Low and behold, many makeups contain gluten ingredients.  When I started using mineral makeup, I had read about B Minerals causing itching and searched for another alternative.  The two that I have used are "Everyday Minerals" and "Monave".  Both are excellent....Everday Minerals are all gluten free and Monave tells you exactly which products "still" contain gluten (they are working towards all their products being gluten free).  I like Monave because they have a liquid makeup that is really nice and contains shea butter...VERY moisturizing.  

I have found the key to any good makeup application to be your moisturizer.  My favorite product is 100% Pure Organic Healing Moisturizing Balm.  If you tend towards dry skin, this stuff is FABULOUS!!!  I will caution that it will seem "too" greasy when you first put it on, but it totally absorbs.  I just keep gently rubbing my face (like a little facial massage!) until it is absorbed.  The moisture lasts all day...it's amazing stuff.  The ingredients are all natural and "certified" organic (not many products are actually certified.) (www.100PercentPure.com)  

I've never heard of airbrushing....haha...I guess I'm not quite the makeup enthusiast, huh???  But it sounds really interesting and I'm going to check it out!
Posted by: LovetoRead, Sunday, June 13, 2010, 10:00pm; Reply: 27
So how do you make your own makeup for the airbrush????
Posted by: Frosty, Sunday, June 13, 2010, 10:12pm; Reply: 28
If you use a liquid makeup you can put it directly into the airbrush and spray it on.  If your liquid makeup is thick and creamy you may have to dilute it down with some distilled water or a dispersal solution  A good antibacterial dispersal solution is witch hazel and glycerin.  You can use that to dilute down accordingly also.

I only put about 10 drops of makeup into the airbrush and it more than does my face and decollete.  
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Sunday, June 13, 2010, 10:23pm; Reply: 29
Quoted Text
Gram flour also know as Chana flour.  It is ground chick peas.


If it's ground chick peas, look for garbanzo bean flour. You can find it in health food stores and some supermarkets. Bob's Red Mill makes it.
Posted by: LovetoRead, Monday, June 14, 2010, 11:47am; Reply: 30
Quoted from Frosty
If you use a liquid makeup you can put it directly into the airbrush and spray it on.  If your liquid makeup is thick and creamy you may have to dilute it down with some distilled water or a dispersal solution  A good antibacterial dispersal solution is witch hazel and glycerin.  You can use that to dilute down accordingly also.

I only put about 10 drops of makeup into the airbrush and it more than does my face and decollete.  


You mean like vegetable glycerin??  So I would use a 50:50 combo of glycerin and witch hazel and mix it with the makeup??  The liquid makeup I use right now is thick due to it having shea butter in it.  But I also do use a mineral makeup powder sometimes...can I make that into a liquid the same way??

Also....have you tried Dinair's makeup line.  I didn't see anywhere on their site where they had an ingredient list and was wondering how good their stuff is.  What do you think?

Thanks so much for the info!!  I haven't decided to buy an airbrush yet, but am considering all my options as I would love a cleaner look.
Posted by: LovetoRead, Tuesday, June 15, 2010, 12:36pm; Reply: 31
Well, I just got a list of ingredients from Dinair's line and they are loaded with parabens, talc and stuff that I know would irritate my face.  So that's an out...

I'm totally curious, for those who make their own makeup...how do you do it?
Posted by: honeybee, Saturday, August 11, 2012, 3:00am; Reply: 32
Reviving this thread as I recently became interested in 'safe' 'organic' cosmetics and skincare again, after pretty much giving up since allot of the lines contain allot of essential oils which I have heard are photosensitising for facial skin...

I am interested again since finding this site for Gourmet Body Treats - http://gourmetbodytreats.com

Has anyone used there products? They have extensive ranges of make-up & skin/haircare...
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, August 28, 2012, 3:34pm; Reply: 33
Eight Chemicals In Skin & Hair Care Products You Should Never Use

Listed below are the 8 chemicals on the ""most wanted" list -- the 8 chemicals we most want to see OFF labels of skin and hair care products.

Avoid these harmful, toxic chemicals.

1. Propylene Glycol

This is a cheap, synthetic petrochemical used as a emulsifying base in creams and lotions to make the skin look smooth, but ultimately it ages the skin faster. The Material Saftey Data Sheet tells you to avoid skin contact with it because it's a skin irritant!  It can denature the skin's protein, leading to poor, saggy skin.  It can be absorbed through your skin and potentially cause allergic reactions, and liver and kidney damage.

2. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS)

This harsh, caustic detergent is used because it's cheap and sudses well. It's used as an engine degreaser and garage floor cleaner but you'll also find it in shampoo, soap, facial cleanser, etc. Research shows that SLS has a degenerative effect on the cell membranes and denatures protein such as in hair or skin.  This can damage skin or hair, leading to aged skin and poor hair.  SLS can corrode hair follicles and inhibit hair growth, contributing to hair loss.  SLS has the potential to cause cataracts (through skin absorption, even without direct eye contact). SLS can denature the protein of the eyes and delay the healing time of the eyes.  From skin contact, SLS can be absorbed into your circulation and concentrate in your organs, such as your heart, liver or brain. This is potentially dangerous since SLS is a mutagen, capable of changing the information in the genetic material of our cell and organs.

3. Mineral Oil

This cheap, petroleum-based oil clogs the skin’s pores and enlarges them, leading to poor, saggy skin. It decreases the ability of the skin cells to exchange nutrients and waste products. Those allergic to petroleum products may develop skin irritations.

4. Fragrance

When the word "fragrance," is listed on a label, it means a synthetic fragrance made in a test tube from any of over 200 synthetic chemicals. These ""chemicals, which can bio-accumulate in your organs, can cause many symptoms, such as headaches, lung problems, skin irritation, dizziness, memory impairment, rash, and more. They are very cheap, toxic imitations of real herbal scents.

5. Parabens (Propyl, Methyl, Butyl, or Ethyl)

These cheap preservatives are used to inhibit microbial growth in skin care or hair products even though they are known to be highly toxic. They have caused many allergic reactions and skin reactions.

6. Imidazolidinyl and Diazolidinyl Urea

These are the most commonly used preservatives after the parabens. They are an established cause of contact dermatitis (American Academy of Dermatology) and release formaldehyde (a toxic chemical).

7. Synthetic Colors

Synthetic colors are used in a skin cream or shampoo to make it colorful. Avoid them at all costs, along with hair dyes (with the exception of some henna products). They can cause allergy, skin and nerve problems. Synthetic colors are labeled as FD&C or D&C, followed by a number and color.

8. Triethanolamine (TEA)

Often used in the base of a product and to adjust the pH. TEA causes allergic reactions including eye problems, dryness of hair and skin, and can be toxic if absorbed into the body over time.
Posted by: honeybee, Thursday, August 30, 2012, 3:19am; Reply: 34
That is a good list Chloe.

Fragrance or parfum can be used on labels in a variety of ways I found out - there is a preservative called Naticide that is a trademarked product, and they instruct users to list it as fragrance/parfum when labelling.

Makes you wonder!
Posted by: Dianne, Thursday, August 30, 2012, 12:17pm; Reply: 35
I have not purchased it yet but the Cindy Joseph product line 'Boom' looks promising. All natural and she has video tutorials...you'll recognize her face : she's was a make up artist who was spotted on the street for her lovely hair that she stopped dyeing and asked to consider a modelling career which she did.  :)
Posted by: finding sunshine, Saturday, September 8, 2012, 3:46am; Reply: 36
Quoted from Chloe
Eight Chemicals In Skin & Hair Care Products You Should Never Use

Listed below are the 8 chemicals on the ""most wanted" list -- the 8 chemicals we most want to see OFF labels of skin and hair care products.

Avoid these harmful, toxic chemicals.

1. Propylene Glycol

This is a cheap, synthetic petrochemical used as a emulsifying base in creams and lotions to make the skin look smooth, but ultimately it ages the skin faster. The Material Saftey Data Sheet tells you to avoid skin contact with it because it's a skin irritant!  It can denature the skin's protein, leading to poor, saggy skin.  It can be absorbed through your skin and potentially cause allergic reactions, and liver and kidney damage.

2. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS)

This harsh, caustic detergent is used because it's cheap and sudses well. It's used as an engine degreaser and garage floor cleaner but you'll also find it in shampoo, soap, facial cleanser, etc. Research shows that SLS has a degenerative effect on the cell membranes and denatures protein such as in hair or skin.  This can damage skin or hair, leading to aged skin and poor hair.  SLS can corrode hair follicles and inhibit hair growth, contributing to hair loss.  SLS has the potential to cause cataracts (through skin absorption, even without direct eye contact). SLS can denature the protein of the eyes and delay the healing time of the eyes.  From skin contact, SLS can be absorbed into your circulation and concentrate in your organs, such as your heart, liver or brain. This is potentially dangerous since SLS is a mutagen, capable of changing the information in the genetic material of our cell and organs.

3. Mineral Oil

This cheap, petroleum-based oil clogs the skin’s pores and enlarges them, leading to poor, saggy skin. It decreases the ability of the skin cells to exchange nutrients and waste products. Those allergic to petroleum products may develop skin irritations.

4. Fragrance

When the word "fragrance," is listed on a label, it means a synthetic fragrance made in a test tube from any of over 200 synthetic chemicals. These ""chemicals, which can bio-accumulate in your organs, can cause many symptoms, such as headaches, lung problems, skin irritation, dizziness, memory impairment, rash, and more. They are very cheap, toxic imitations of real herbal scents.

5. Parabens (Propyl, Methyl, Butyl, or Ethyl)

These cheap preservatives are used to inhibit microbial growth in skin care or hair products even though they are known to be highly toxic. They have caused many allergic reactions and skin reactions.

6. Imidazolidinyl and Diazolidinyl Urea

These are the most commonly used preservatives after the parabens. They are an established cause of contact dermatitis (American Academy of Dermatology) and release formaldehyde (a toxic chemical).

7. Synthetic Colors

Synthetic colors are used in a skin cream or shampoo to make it colorful. Avoid them at all costs, along with hair dyes (with the exception of some henna products). They can cause allergy, skin and nerve problems. Synthetic colors are labeled as FD&C or D&C, followed by a number and color.

8. Triethanolamine (TEA)

Often used in the base of a product and to adjust the pH. TEA causes allergic reactions including eye problems, dryness of hair and skin, and can be toxic if absorbed into the body over time.


THIS IS AWESOME. THANK YOU. NOW I AM WONDERING WHICH PRODUCTS DO NOT HAVE ALL THIS STUFF. I LOOKED IN ULTA, ONLINE ORGANIC/ HERBAL STORES, BUT THEY ALL HAVE 1 OR 2 OF THESE ABOVE COMPONENTS. I DESPERATELY NEED TO UNDO THE DAMAGE I HAVE DONE TO MYSELF IN THE PAST 12 YRS.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, September 8, 2012, 6:32am; Reply: 37
how about these??
http://www.4yourtype.com/_splash_genoma.asp
Posted by: BHealthy, Friday, September 28, 2012, 5:50am; Reply: 38
I used to have gorgeous, thick hair.  As I got older, it got thinner and thinner but I had so much it didn't concern me until about 3 years ago when it was falling out in droves and looked terrible unless I pulled in into a ponytail.

At that time, I realized that the body care products I was using need to be replaced with healthier alternatives.

I started using Key's Mangrove Shampoo https://www.keys-soap.com/ostore/product.php?productid=219 and, almost immediately, the hair loss stopped.  It took three years for new hair to grow but now my hair is thick again.  It's not as full as when I was younger but it's at least twice as thick as when I started using this product.  It's not organic but there are only  4 ingredients:



The next 'issue' I addressed was my dry itchy skin.  Even immediately after a shower and slathering myself with moisturizer, it was burning and it itched all day long.

It took a while to find a solution but here's what works for me:


I buy the moisturizer in bulk when they put it on special (some flavors are on special now but I prefer the unscented medicinal version) and have some in every bathroom.  When I wash dishes, I slather some on before putting on the dish washing gloves and let the heat from the water give me a mini-hand treatment.  

TRFW also sells my favorite lip balm.  It smells so good you do have to make sure you don't eat it off your lips: http://www.therawfoodworld.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=0&keyword=hurraw&x=0&y=0

Make-up.

I wear very little makeup during the week but I do like to glam it up a bit when we go out.  I'm unable to wear mascara -- I have never found one that doesn't irritate my eyes -- but I CAN wear false lashes.  Not the ultra-thick strips that look really fake, the individually applied ones.  They're made from real hair and the adhesive is latex.  They take me about 20 minute to apply and look very natural.  Once they're on I totally forget about them, they are so comfortable, and I can wear them for 7-10 days before I need to re-do them.

I use the eye makeup and mineral blush made Jane Iredale.  Jane Iredale is more forthcoming about their ingredients.  Most of their products are rated as 2 or less on the SkinDeep database.  

Airbrushing has interested me for years but I didn't think it was compatible with toxin-free products.  I'll have to look into 'making my own' per Frosty's instructions.  

Great thread...
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