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BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  PCOS and Gluten Free Diet?
Posted by: Bethysue, Monday, April 12, 2010, 2:45am
Hello Friends,

I am just wondering if any of you ladies that have PCOS are on a gluten free diet? I was doing some reading about PCOS online and came across a study that 85% of women that were tested in the study had a gluten intolerance. So I am curious as a PCOS gal, if anyone could weigh on thier personal experince.

BethySue :K)
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, April 12, 2010, 3:20am; Reply: 1
Quoted from Bethysue
Hello Friends,

I am just wondering if any of you ladies that have PCOS are on a gluten free diet? I was doing some reading about PCOS online and came across a study that 85% of women that were tested in the study had a gluten intolerance. So I am curious as a PCOS gal, if anyone could weigh on thier personal experince.

BethySue :K)


Can you please share the study you read so I and others can get a sense of the research you're
speaking about...  I am gluten intolerant...Many of my family members have PCOS...blood type A...wondering if they too are gluten intolerant but it's not manifesting in their guts in any obvious way as it did in mine......but that gluten is doing major damage in a hormonal way for
them...  I have read that people with PCOS have insulin issues. I don't know if gluten intolerance is related to insulin issues as well.

Posted by: Eric, Monday, April 12, 2010, 8:09am; Reply: 2
I hope you get some replies, because I could definitely send some info to my buddy's wife... Type O & recently diagnosed with PCOS :/
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, April 12, 2010, 10:04am; Reply: 3

Glutenfree might not be enough- you need to be carb concisous

I know serveral ladies who has PCOS ( differnt BT- but 1 is B, 2 A and  1 O- last unknown)
and they have all had great sucess with avoiding most grains
Only eating small amounts of whole grain ryebread( 1 slice pr day)
no pasta, rice, white bread
Max 1 fruit a day
no sugar, sodas, sweets and fruitjuice
a maxium of 30 % of calories from carbs
lots of protein minimum 30 %
30- 35 % of calories from fat ( dairy,nuts, fishoil and olive oil)

They all attend a danish fertilty doc
and 4 out of 5 are pregnant right now ( just by diet ;D)
and the last (B type) have finally regular periods after 10 years without.

His therory is that at least 10 % of all danish women have so high insulinlevels that it keeps them from getting pregnant.
And that the low fat high grain diet we recommend people are really are killer for theese women.


Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, April 12, 2010, 10:05am; Reply: 4
BTW I do not have PCOS - but when I am carb consious ( eat almost no grains and sugar) I get very regular periods but when I eat regular healthy diet my peiods get slightly unregular.
Posted by: marjorie, Monday, April 12, 2010, 1:51pm; Reply: 5
Henriette

Very interesting.. so I am type -o and I am hunter.. I had one rice cake today and I bet that is all I will have for the day..

this is normal? sometimes, I go without fruit or grains at all.
Posted by: Bethysue, Monday, April 12, 2010, 2:07pm; Reply: 6
Here is the article I read
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art1507.asp
Posted by: Lola, Monday, April 12, 2010, 4:28pm; Reply: 7
here s Dr D s advice
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/blog6.php/2004/09/12/caloric-restriction-linked-to-improvemen

people I ve helped with this issue have done well following the diabetes guidelines and lists, if not able to do a swami.
Posted by: mikeo, Monday, April 12, 2010, 11:39pm; Reply: 8
"Where PCOS is associated with overweight or obesity, successful weight loss is probably the most effective method of restoring normal ovulation/menstruation, but many women find it very difficult to achieve and sustain significant weight loss. Low-carbohydrate diets and sustained regular exercise may help . Some experts recommend a low GI diet in which a significant part of total carbohydrates are obtained from fruit, vegetables and whole grain (maybe not) sources.[30]"

Low GI(glycemic diet) Type O diet...like the Gatherer diet...



Posted by: Bethysue, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 2:12am; Reply: 9
So there in lies my problem as an A & Warrior with PCOS. How am I supposed to eat low carb? :)
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 2:25am; Reply: 10
Quoted from Bethysue
So there in lies my problem as an A & Warrior with PCOS. How am I supposed to eat low carb? :)

You need to focus on the foods that are higher protein and fat, leaving the highest carb. foods out for awhile...  Most of the vegetable protein foods has some carb. content, so it is easy to get adequate amounts.  Mostly this means limiting the fruit and low-protein grains...
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 8:59am; Reply: 11
Quoted from ABJoe

You need to focus on the foods that are higher protein and fat, leaving the highest carb. foods out for awhile...  Most of the vegetable protein foods has some carb. content, so it is easy to get adequate amounts.  Mostly this means limiting the fruit and low-protein grains...


Excactly - I agree.
Posted by: balletomane, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 9:14am; Reply: 12
I have an ovarian cyst. Is it considered PCOS?

Geez, I love fruits, both fresh and dried!
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 10:19am; Reply: 13
It could be

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders affecting approximately 5%-10% of women of reproductive age (12-45 years old) and was once thought erroneously to be one of the leading causes of infertility.[1][2][3][4]
The principal features are obesity, anovulation (resulting in irregular menstruation), acne, and excessive amounts or effects of androgenic (masculinizing) hormones. The symptoms and severity of the syndrome vary greatly among women. While the causes are unknown, insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity are all strongly correlated with PCOS.
Not all women with PCOS have polycystic ovaries (PCO), nor do all women with ovarian cysts have PCOS[citation needed]; although a pelvic ultrasound is a major diagnostic tool, it is not the only one.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 4:03pm; Reply: 14
eat the fresh fruit, not overdoing the frequency values, but avoid the dry!
it has a higher glycemic number, unless you dehydrate your fruit at home



more reason to eat right, adapt a lectin free approach and help clear up our insulin receptors
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 8:46pm; Reply: 15
This is important research related to PCOS...You all might learn something new from it.

First of all, the youtube video...explaining PCOS and D chiro-inositol's relationship.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I82OtKb4jtA

Next, the research behind it.  Studies which lead to pub med studies.
http://www.chiralbalance.com/d-chiro-inositol-research-studies/

I've done lots of research on this subject for my sisters and their PCOS daughters.  It seems to
run in my family big time with infertility issues.

And information about a natural (B vitamin) product that might be useful.
http://www.chiralbalance.com/category/knowledge-base/

And reasons why eating buckwheat, specifically farinetta (from buckwheat hulls) is helpful for PCOS.
http://www.minndak.com/Nutraceuticals.htm
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 1:44am; Reply: 16
again, apply BT/GT specific guidelines when choosing compliant grains

Buckwheat would only help raise my blood sugar levels!!! :-/
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 1:56am; Reply: 17
Quoted from Lola
again, apply BT/GT specific guidelines when choosing compliant grains

Buckwheat would only help raise my blood sugar levels!!! :-/


Buckwheat happens to be a diamond food for me although I don't eat it often due to its
crazy high carb count.

It's farinetta I'm speaking about..which is a specific part of the buckwheat outer kernel that is important...and it's high in chiro inositol or myo inositol as is carob, grapefruit, green beans, cantaloupe, peanuts, great northern beans. For people who have  PCOS, this type of inositol is now in supplement form and is created from soy and carob. It has been shown to normalize
the issues for people with PCOS.

But I agree buckwheat, the grain is high in carbs.


Posted by: christaalyssaA+, Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 3:39pm; Reply: 18
Okay... this is a topic I know all too well. *deep breath*

With PCOS you are looking at sugar imbalances and wheat intolerances will definitely show up as sugar imbalances. The medical system likes to use a diabetic drug to try to help women with PCOS, it's called Metphormin. This seems to help some women on a short term scale but not in terms of being able to get pregnant. Even though I'm totally against pharm. drugs completely, I was so desperate that I actually took Metphormin and gained more weight and felt even worse. They told me a side effect of taking Metphormin was that I would lose weight. lol I wasn't that surprised though.
I was married for 5 years and had 9 miscarriages. My PCOS was blamed for this over and over again. At the time I was following the AB blood type diet ( I had been incorrectly blood typed). I am about to have my first child in about 3 weeks! What shifted it? I fasted for 17 days on water. Not something I recommend to everyone. But as an A blood type it helped me to reset my bodies clock and give it a chance to heal. And WOW did it ever heal me! lol *rubbing my belly*

With that time away from sugar... even gluten and all other things that were causing me to have PCOS, I lost my sugar and bad carb craving wheat addiction. Now that I'm following my blood type faithfully because I know what it REALLY is, I feel better and better every day.

So to make this clear. I may sound like an extremist, nut job for water fasting, but really if you have the BTD and the GTD and you know your blood type just follow it. Something I heard Dr. A'Adamo say on a youtube clip was that ND's used to cut out foods and cut out foods until the health problems went away. I just did the extreme of that, which is also a spiritual practice for some, but that's how badly I wanted to be a mother and to be healthy. We all have our own paths and for all of you here following your blood and genotype you will have the same results as I did without the pain of not eating for 17 days. Honestly though, I wouldn't wish away that experience, because whatever doesn't kill us makes us stronger.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 4:09pm; Reply: 19
follow your diet, you ll be very pleased :)
Quoted Text
Dr. Natalie Colicci

Quite a few studies have been conducted with Maitake mushroom and PCOS.  I am
currently using it with a patient that has PCOS and is trying to conceive.  
PCOS.

-http://pcos.about.com/od/callingyourdoctor/a/diabetes.htm

-If you've been diagnosed with PCOS, you should be asking for a glucose tolerance test and then
-understand the relationship between elevated glucose and the hormonal imbalances it causes.
And here's a website that might be helpful Bethysue

http://www.pcosupport.org/

Dr D s health series are great tools as well, for those not into swami
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 9:41pm; Reply: 20
Consider taking Glycosia for blood sugar imbalances.

http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NP056
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