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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Kukicha Tea...is it magic?
Posted by: SoulfulLori, Thursday, January 21, 2010, 4:02pm
PT turned me on to Haiku Kukicha Tea.  (My hubby now walks around trying to say "Twig Tea" 3 times fast and laughs at himself...oy)  Anyway, I am still struggling with fatigue though much less and notice that after my 10:30 dose of Kukicha I am feeling more awake and interested in my work.  It does give me a mild headache but not in a bad way.  Regular green tea makes my head feel like it will explode.

What's with the tea?  Is it as good for you as regular green tea?

Fill me in.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 21, 2010, 5:16pm; Reply: 1
toasted green tea, that s what it is!

you get all the benefits from green tea, that s for sure!

you can use the search feature here and follow all that has been noted in the past, on the benefits of GT
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 21, 2010, 6:47pm; Reply: 2
Kukicha is made up from a good percentage of twigs from the tea plant, mixed with some leaves and then roasted.  It has the lowest amount of caffeine of any green tea, and I would guess that it has a little less of the good stuff that green tea has.  This is just my guess, but with most plants, the "goodies" are in the leaves rather than the stems.  It's still a very good tea and has the reputation in macrobiotic circles as having an alkalizing effect on the body.  

I used to love it and it was how I originally got off coffee.  But now it gives me heartburn every time I drink it.  I'm really not sure why that happens.  
Posted by: Kathleen, Thursday, January 21, 2010, 7:10pm; Reply: 3
Since, I'm not a fan of roasted green teas, I found a source for unroasted kukicha tea.  Delicious, I make my own tea bags, kukicha mixed with gingerroot.  It's a diamond superfood for me.

Quoted Text
having an alkalizing effect on the body


Victoria, didn't know that, great info, thanks.  That's too bad it gives you heartburn.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 21, 2010, 7:40pm; Reply: 4
Kathleen,
Yeah, funny thing about the heartburn, since green tea does not affect me that way at all.
Maybe it is the roasting of the tea, because now that you mention that, I remember that I don't care for roasted green tea in any other form either.
Posted by: SoulfulLori, Thursday, January 21, 2010, 9:16pm; Reply: 5
Thanks for the info Lola and everyone.

I will also try an organic form of regular green tea, maybe the one here because I really want all the benefits of green tea.  Maybe if I mix the two I won't get such an explosion in my head?  
Posted by: Eric, Friday, January 22, 2010, 9:19am; Reply: 6
Quoted from Kathleen
...I found a source for unroasted kukicha tea...


Interesting you mention that- I found some green twig tea at the local health food store here, and it's awesome!  Never seen it like that before.
Posted by: Golfzilla, Friday, January 22, 2010, 12:15pm; Reply: 7
Kukicha is the best tea I have had yet, hands down. Absolutely delicious, and it is a SF for me! ;D
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:25pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from SoulfulLori
PT turned me on to Haiku Kukicha Tea.  (My hubby now walks around trying to say "Twig Tea" 3 times fast and laughs at himself...oy)  Anyway, I am still struggling with fatigue though much less and notice that after my 10:30 dose of Kukicha I am feeling more awake and interested in my work.  It does give me a mild headache but not in a bad way.  Regular green tea makes my head feel like it will explode.

What's with the tea?  Is it as good for you as regular green tea?

Fill me in.

I love it because it has twice the intensity/strength/depth of flavor, but LESS caffeine than regular green tea.  This is because it is made with the twigs, as well as the leaves.  The twigs impart a wonderful depth of flavor, yet they contain less caffeine than the leaves.  I am very caffeine sensitive, so I really appreciate kukicha because I don't get withdrawal headaches over the weekends (I only drink tea at work for some reason *shrug*), and it jazzes/energizes me yet doesn't wind me up so much that I can't sleep at night, which even regular green tea can do.

Twig tea, twig tea, twig tea!

______________________________________

Edited to add:  now that I read down further in the thread, I realize I echoed a lot of what Victoria already said.  Oh well.  Great minds post alike.   :)

Edited yet again, to add:  check out this caffeine comparison chart:

http://www.healthytraders.com/natural-foods-teas-beverages-c-151_150.html

Posted by: Golfzilla, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:28pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Peppermint Twist

I love it because it has twice the intensity/strength/depth of flavor, but LESS caffeine than regular green tea.  This is because it is made with the twigs, as well as the leaves.  The twigs impart a wonderful depth of flavor, yet they contain less caffeine than the leaves.  I am very caffeine sensitive, so I really appreciate kukicha because I don't get withdrawal headaches over the weekends (I only drink tea at work for some reason *shrug*), and it jazzes/energizes me yet doesn't wind me up so much that I can't sleep at night, which even regular green tea can do.

Twig tea, twig tea, twig tea!

______________________________________

Edited to add:  now that I read down further in the thread, I realize I echoed a lot of what Victoria already said.  Oh well.  Great minds post alike.   :)



How is it pronounced..?
Posted by: SoulfulLori, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:31pm; Reply: 10
Is it koo-key-cha?  

Oh yay!  PT tried the tongue twister.  Stupid stuff like that tickles me.  

Yes, it totally makes me perky and clear of thought like nothing else.  I've used it to finish this painting I was stalled on and I swear I felt a flow of energy to just risk some stuff.  I don't get that from coffee and I know this is not in my head.  Something about my body likes this.

Twig tea, twig tea, twig tea.
Posted by: Golfzilla, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:38pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from SoulfulLori
Is it koo-key-cha?  

Oh yay!  PT tried the tongue twister.  Stupid stuff like that tickles me.  

Yes, it totally makes me perky and clear of thought like nothing else.  I've used it to finish this painting I was stalled on and I swear I felt a flow of energy to just risk some stuff.  I don't get that from coffee and I know this is not in my head.  Something about my body likes this.

Twig tea, twig tea, twig tea.


That is my guess...  ;D
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:42pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from History shows again and again how nature points out the folly of maaaaaaan:  GOLFZILLA!
How is it pronounced..?

Quoted from SoulfulLori
Is it koo-key-cha?  

Oh yay!  PT tried the tongue twister.  Stupid stuff like that tickles me.  

Yes, it totally makes me perky and clear of thought like nothing else.  I've used it to finish this painting I was stalled on and I swear I felt a flow of energy to just risk some stuff.  I don't get that from coffee and I know this is not in my head.  Something about my body likes this.

Twig tea, twig tea, twig tea.

To Golfzilla:  As Soulful said, but I'll add the syllable accenting via capitalization, it is pronounced (I think, anyway):  koo-KEY-cha.

To Soulful:  Something occurs to me:  you might benefit from supplementation with CoQ10.  If you need jazzing up/energizing/uplifting, I'm telling ya, a mere 30 mg of CoQ10 per day makes a diff for me in that regard, although I now take 60 mg per day.  I started out trying it for gum health.  I quickly realized it was the best energizer/anti-depressant/mood booster around, as well as helping with regulating my circadian rhythm (although it does not help my ability to spell "circadian"  ;)).  It became an instant fave of mine and one of the very few supps I take (I only take it and glucosamine sulfate on a daily basis).  Then, when I had my heart scare a few months back (and even now that the dust has settled from that but what we are left with is that I have LBBB and had thus better not take my heart health for granted), I upped it to 60 mg per day, as it is heart-protective, big time.  Before I knew that I had LBBB but after the initial EKG that the primary care doctor did which indicated that something(s) was WAAAAY off and that she (the primary care) erroneously (thank GOD it was erroneous) thought meant I had an enlarged, hypertrophic heart, I posted a freaked out thread on here and Dr. D., God bless him, popped into same to recommend that I take 60 mg of CoQ10 per day, so I instantly started doing that, i.e., I upped my daily intake from 30 mg to 60 mg.  And that is what I still take.

Anyway, something about your post and how much you appreciate the jazzing up/energizing effect of kukicha tea made me think that you may be a fellow potential benefitee from CoQ10.  Just sayin'.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:53pm; Reply: 13
koo - KEE - cha   8)
Posted by: SoulfulLori, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:53pm; Reply: 14
OOOOH PT that is huge!  Yes I do!  Since I am going to Dr. D I have been avoiding buying too many supps so that he can just start with a clean slate.  However, in the book he does suggest this for A's.  I always take D3 and now since someone said I take magnesium at night and twice a day Methyl B12 because of energy and sleep.  Well, I can tell you that though my sleep is not restorative yet I do sleep through the night now most nights which I have not done but a handful of times in my life.  Also, I think it was the B12 that fixed this but I have terrible tingling in my right leg when I tilt my head down (myelin issue on spinal chord) and now that is starting to go away.

Thanks so much PT!  Oh, I can't spell so I would never know the difference.
Posted by: Golfzilla, Friday, January 22, 2010, 6:58pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Victoria
koo - KEE - cha   8)


Ah ha, speaking of, it is time for a cup ;D
Posted by: Kristin, Friday, January 22, 2010, 7:32pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Victoria
koo - KEE - cha   8)


Actually... it's KOO-kee-cha (I watched a youtube video with someone explaining all the Japanese teas, I had thought it was koo-KEE-cha for the longest while.) Unless, of course, the video is wrong.  ;D But I doubt it, I don't think a tea distributor would pronounce the name incorrectly.

Also... Hoji-cha is the same way:  HO-jee-cha

Although genmaicha is gen-MY-cha

Actually...  pronunciations are really westernized and not sounding very much like Japanese at all. On the Japanese sites, they pronounce "cha" (which means tea) as "chaw"

And the Chinese teas... whoo boy... good luck with those! I can't even hear the sounds to replicate them!
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, January 22, 2010, 7:44pm; Reply: 17
Hey, Thanks Kristen!   ;D  Boy, I was even mispronouncing Genmaicha.   ;)

By the way, have you tried the green KOO-kee-cha?   :P
Posted by: Kristin, Friday, January 22, 2010, 8:04pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from Victoria


By the way, have you tried the green KOO-kee-cha?   :P


Yes I have and it's one of my favorites.  :P

;D :K)
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, January 22, 2010, 11:55pm; Reply: 19
from Den's teas?
Posted by: Kristin, Saturday, January 23, 2010, 5:43am; Reply: 20
Yes, from Den's tea. But I have found that green kukicha doesn't have a long shelf life. It loses it's flavor very quickly. It should have a bright fragrance like  fresh mown hay when opened... at least that is how I like it.
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, January 23, 2010, 7:08pm; Reply: 21
Thanks, Kristen!  You're a girl after my own heart!   ;D
Posted by: Kathleen, Saturday, January 23, 2010, 8:42pm; Reply: 22
Quoted Text
green kukicha doesn't have a long shelf life


Kristen, I didn't know that!!  Thanks.  I think I'll keep my open bag in the freezer.
Posted by: Kristin, Saturday, January 23, 2010, 9:52pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Victoria
Thanks, Kristen!  You're a girl after my own heart!   ;D


Aw shucks...  :B :K)

Posted by: Kristin, Saturday, January 23, 2010, 9:58pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from Kathleen


Kristen, I didn't know that!!  Thanks.  I think I'll keep my open bag in the freezer.


Actually, according to the teaheads, you do it the other way around. Keep your unopened and sealed green tea in the refrigerator (to prolong freshness) but once opened, keep at room temperature and use within one to two months. I can't remember why though... lol! I think it is that the moisture degrades the tea. But you can try it and see if it changes the flavor any. And also any tea that is purchased now to about May is from last years harvest so it will already have been in storage for awhile. The fresher the better for most teas!

Posted by: Kathleen, Sunday, January 24, 2010, 2:06am; Reply: 25
I do recall the flavor when I first opened my bag was more pronounced, deep and grassy, it seems there has been some flavor loss.  Thanks for all this great info Kristin!!!!
Posted by: paul clucas, Monday, January 25, 2010, 11:54pm; Reply: 26
Both Kukicha and Bancha are Diamonds (best Swami food category) that are universally Geno harmonic (Swami food combining category)

52 ozs of either will keep me going in the best mental shape possible for hours!

Can't work without this oasis of calm!   ;D
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, January 26, 2010, 12:17am; Reply: 27
Quoted from Kristin


Actually, according to the teaheads, you do it the other way around. Keep your unopened and sealed green tea in the refrigerator (to prolong freshness) but once opened, keep at room temperature and use within one to two months. I can't remember why though... lol! I think it is that the moisture degrades the tea. But you can try it and see if it changes the flavor any. And also any tea that is purchased now to about May is from last years harvest so it will already have been in storage for awhile. The fresher the better for most teas!

Ta...Great info there... :) It's the same with coffee (dare I mention that word??))
A lot of people freeze their coffee, but apparently, the moisture produced, doesn't mix well with the oils in the coffee ??)  Or so I was taught :-/ ;)
Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, January 26, 2010, 1:45am; Reply: 28
Quoted from Kathleen
I do recall the flavor when I first opened my bag was more pronounced, deep and grassy, it seems there has been some flavor loss.  Thanks for all this great info Kristin!!!!


You are very welcome Kathleen!!  :D


I think of preparing a good cup of tea as something of an art form... there is a timelessness to it and a connection to antiquity... a simple pleasure to be savored slowly.

I just read Pearl S. Buck's first novel "The Good Earth" over Christmas and I was quite moved at the beginning of the story where in the life of this poor Chinese farmer, a few tea leaves stirred into his morning water was considered a very special treat. Tea has a magic to it that is beyond description.
Posted by: Kathleen, Friday, January 29, 2010, 10:39pm; Reply: 29
Quoted Text
I just read Pearl S. Buck's first novel "The Good Earth" over Christmas


Kristin, thanks for mentioning this book!!  I checked it out of the library Tuesday and am very much enjoying it!  :)
Posted by: Kristin, Saturday, January 30, 2010, 6:10pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Kathleen


Kristin, thanks for mentioning this book!!  I checked it out of the library Tuesday and am very much enjoying it!  :)


You are welcome!  :D  After I finished the book I found out that Pearl S. Buck wrote all of her novels first in Chinese and then translated them into English. What a feat! And it gives her works in English an interesting rhythm, cadence, and simplicity that I think would be missing if she had written them in English first.

Posted by: LovetoRead, Monday, February 1, 2010, 1:56pm; Reply: 31
Is the tea that Dr D sells on his site Kukicha?  I am curious about that because the bag is written all in Chinese and I have no idea what it is...but I do love it.  I know it has rice in it along with the green tea.  Anyone know??
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, February 1, 2010, 6:26pm; Reply: 32
It is not Kukicha.  The tea with brown rice has no stems (Kukicha).  Kristen knows which type of green tea it is but I can't remember.  It's possibly Sencha, but I don't think so.

Kristen??  . . .(woot)
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, February 1, 2010, 7:55pm; Reply: 33
More info on the tea used in Mr. Itaru's tea.  It is most likely Mecha, according to Kristen.  This type of green tea with toasted rice added (Genmaicha), can be also made with Bancha.  It all depends on the company that does it.
Posted by: LovetoRead, Monday, February 1, 2010, 8:14pm; Reply: 34
Thank you!  I just tried my fist cup of Kukicha tea and really like it.  
Posted by: Lola, Monday, February 1, 2010, 11:07pm; Reply: 35
http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NP026
http://www.4yourtype.com/itaru.asp
Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, February 2, 2010, 2:09am; Reply: 36
Quoted from Victoria
More info on the tea used in Mr. Itaru's tea.  It is most likely Mecha, according to Kristen.  This type of green tea with toasted rice added (Genmaicha), can be also made with Bancha.  It all depends on the company that does it.


There are different names for it but it is the tea that is picked for sencha (high grade of Japanese tea from young leaves) but doesn't quite make it all the way through the deep steaming/rubbing process. So the leaves are a bit bigger than for sencha, and supposedly not as high in caffeine either. I read recently that Shohokuen (the tea company where NAP gets their tea) also uses hoji-cha for their genmaicha tea. So I'm not exactly sure which is in the Mr. Itaru's green tea that NAP sells as they use either hoji-cha or mecha leaves (which they call yanagi) according to the Shohokuen website. I think it is the yanagi since the tea is green, hoji-cha would be a deep brown.

Now I'm sure this is probably confusing and way more information than you would like to know but that is the nature of studying tea... the more you learn the more confusing it gets! Each region has their own names and ways of classifying their teas. And although cultivation methods are mostly similar for high quality teas, differences in altitudes, temperatures, rainfall, etc. all affect the tea leaves that end up in your cup. And like fine wines, there are good years and there are bad years...

Posted by: LovetoRead, Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 8:14pm; Reply: 37
??) :-/ There isn't a smily that has their eye's crossed...haha!  Thanks for the info.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 8:28pm; Reply: 38
Thanks, Kristen!  
It is a lot to take in, but I look at it a lot like fine wine.  There is green tea, and then there is {{{GREEN TEA}}}.

The more I know about green tea, the more impressed I am with the expertise that goes into the cultivation and preparation of all the different types.  It's a fine art that I am just beginning to peek into with eyes of wonder.   :o   ;)

Thank you again.  You have been a wealth of information.   :K)
Posted by: Kristin, Thursday, February 4, 2010, 4:34am; Reply: 39
You are so welcome, it is fun to share about tea!  :D

And I am finding that there are more and more people interested in fine teas. We have couple of locally owned tea houses here that really serve a quality product. It is fun to experiment and try new teas too.

And I agree, Victoria, there is an art to growing tea, plus a sense of timelessness. Tea has been cultivated for so many centuries I feel a connection to antiquity when watching the tea leaves dance in my teapot and cup. It is so beautiful to watch the dancing leaves through clear glass... although glass is not always the best vessel in which to brew tea.  :( Lovely to watch though...  :)
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