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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Nut Butters
Posted by: 7087 (Guest), Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 1:26am
I really have no idea if this topic was already brought up, but I did a search and nothing much came up.

I have found that nut butters are EXTRAORDINARILY expensive when and IF you can even find them!  They are rare and a price example (that I find as an outrageous form of robbery on the stores part) is Walnut butter, perhaps 3/4 cup to 1 cup for a whopping 12 DOLLARS!!!! :o :o :o

Are you kidding me!??  Thanks but no thanks, I'd prefer to buy a bag of nuts in bulk (3 or 4 lbs) at a wholesale place like Costco's and make my own FRESH nut butter.

For those that are not familiar with the process, I will describe it (I just made a pint of super-yummy walnut butter that probably cost me 3 bucks! :)

You can do with with any nut or see product, I just did it with walnuts because they are superbeneficial for Type O and also a Diamond food for a Hunter!

!.  I use a food processor for this and feed some nuts in batches and grind until they stick to the sides of the processor.  You'll know this when the ground nuts don't "cave-in" on the blade any more.  Open, scrape down the sides and then run it again.  Check the consistency now... it should be soft and relatively finely ground, but not "buttery" yet.  

2. Put the ground nuts/seeds into a bowl and do another batch.  Repeat until you have the amount that you find acceptable.

3. Transfer the whole thing to a mixing bowl and whir at top speed with electric mixer (I use a Kitchen Aid mixer Paddle... God I love that thing! ;)  )  I recommend the Kitchen Aid with the paddle attachment if you have one, but if you do not I THINK a hand mixer would work, too.  If you try let me know!

4.  Blend it top speed until it becomes creamy.  There is technically no reason that you would NEED to add oil to the mixture, as nuts have enough of their own natural oils in them.... they just need to be pulled out (that's why the mixer in the second step is needed).

5.  Mix in any desirables, such as salt, sweeteners, and spices (if wanted).

6.  You've got your very own super cheap specialty nut butter (they make superb gifts as well).  ;D
Posted by: creativeclaire, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 1:30am; Reply: 1
I make my own Pecan Butter - diamond for me.  It's not sold all over and it is very expensive.  

I plan on making small jars and giving it for Christmas.  
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 1:38am; Reply: 2
try a pumpkin seed butter next!
you ll love it!
specially good for men and prostate health! ;)

almond butter, tahini......you name it!
Posted by: 7087 (Guest), Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 1:42am; Reply: 3
creativeclaire:  mmmmm.... Pecans have got to be my favorite nut!  I'm hooked on them.  It's so much better to get everything cheaper and make your own superfresh nut butters, isn't it? :)

Lola:  You know, you just reminded me that I have had a bag of pumpkin seeds in a container hidden away.  I do believe I will put that advice to good use! ;)
Posted by: diffy, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 2:34am; Reply: 4
Do you make the pumpkin butter from the store-bought roasted pumpkin seeds, or from fresh pumpkin seeds straight out of the pumpkin? I think pumpkin is superbennie for me but I find the ones in the store are a tad rancid.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 2:39am; Reply: 5
the shelled ones I buy at the market are very fresh.....
I do toast them first......before turning them into butter.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 3:38am; Reply: 6
Yeah, the thing about fresh pumpkin seeds is that it's nearly impossible to get those shells off, one at a time!   ;)
Posted by: Sed, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 7:36am; Reply: 7
Quoted from 7087


4.  Blend it top speed until it becomes creamy.  There is technically no reason that you would NEED to add oil to the mixture, as nuts have enough of their own natural oils in them.... they just need to be pulled out (that's why the mixer in the second step is needed).



Always wondered how the shop bought gets so smooth without added oils. Tried making at home many times but never got what I wanted. I now know why! Thanks.

Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 8:14am; Reply: 8
Good tips :) Thanks; esp about the creaming;) I've always made my own nut buters but didn't know about the creaming step:)
Posted by: Rex, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 11:37am; Reply: 9
Interesting...I will definitely try this.  Thanks for the information.
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 4:52pm; Reply: 10
Nut butters from a stand mixer? This is very interesting! How does the mixer cream it? I usually use my Vitamix and end up over heating it.  :-/ :)
Posted by: wwbailey, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 5:10pm; Reply: 11
What a mess!  scrapping the sides and getting it off the blades!  wow... i can't imagine it.  
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 7:08pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from wwbailey
What a mess!  scrapping the sides and getting it off the blades!  wow... i can't imagine it.  



Really annoying. I'd be scraping forever..I hated making it in the Vitamix.  
Posted by: wwbailey, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 10:26pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from 815



Really annoying. I'd be scraping forever..I hated making it in the Vitamix.  


I know!  more power to those who have the patience for this!!!  :P
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 11:31pm; Reply: 14
Well I just bought sesame seeds to try to make Sesame Tahini. I can just imagine the trouble those little buggers are gonna be! My son has a life threatening nut allergy and most "seed" butters all have a cross contamination warning.

I also bought pumpkin seeds, I better start with them. I was thinking the same thing, they are going to be all over the paddle! Not picturing them getting crushed but we'll see.
Posted by: 7087 (Guest), Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 2:07am; Reply: 15
Mayflowers:  I throw the dry ground nuts in the mixer and then let it run for a while at top speed on it's own.  I tried it with the whip attachment, but I found the paddle to be better.

I refridgerated it and when I pulled it out this morning before work, it had a very slight pool of oil on the top.  I guess, also, that if you'd like the oil, you can make the butter and let it sit for a week or longer in the fridge and then spoon whatever oil comes up off and store it.  It's exceptionally fresh, unlike most store bought oils and butters.

I tried using the food processor only the last time and I was near to tearing out my hair in frustration because I had to scape the side over and over and over!  >:(

This time I went part way with the processor and then just finished with a mixer that would grab the stuff off the sides by itself without me fussing over it every 30 seconds.  I have zero patience (actually even less than zero).  ;D

WholeFoodie:  The Tahini is my next project (after the pumpkin seeds of course).  For some reason, though, I fear that the sesame seeds might be more obnoxious.  they are so small that I am not sure that the blades will catch them to grind them up.  Let us know if it comes out!
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 5:50pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from 7087
Mayflowers:  I throw the dry ground nuts in the mixer and then let it run for a while at top speed on it's own.  I tried it with the whip attachment, but I found the paddle to be better.


Wow..this is so interesting..so you use the dough kneeding paddle? I have it somewhere...
How many minutes on top speed? For almond butter?  do you roast the almonds first or make it raw?
Posted by: 7087 (Guest), Thursday, November 19, 2009, 12:42am; Reply: 17
Mayflowers:  you can use toasted or raw, I do not know how much of a difference it would make.  I would guess that toasted nuts MIGHT be more difficult to grind finely enough.  I am not sure on this, however, so don't quote me on it, lol.

Nope, not a dough hook (although I have one of those, too) but a paddle.  The attachment looks like this:  http://www.kitchenaid.com/product/KN256BBT.uts

I just beat it until it looks good, walk away check on it every few minutes (stop it and check the consistency, taste it ;)  )


I do not time it.  We have a saying in the kitchen when somebody asks how long 'till it's done:  It's done when it's done! ;)  

I would guess, though, ROUGHLY 5-10 minutes?  I just look go by the consistency.  If it looks and feels like nut butter then I am satisfied :)
Posted by: Katsy, Friday, November 20, 2009, 2:40pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from 7087
For those that are not familiar with the process, I will describe it ....


Thanks for this! I tried making some with just my food processor, was afraid I would burn up the motor, added quite a bit of olive oil and/or ghee, and it *still* was crumbly (although it was smoother the next morning). I'll try this next time!
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