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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Secretor status = offpring - Likehood?
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 11:28pm
I know it is an individual thing, but I wonder what the statistics say about secretors, producing secretors or non-secretors or vice-versa.

I am an A+ secretor, my husband is an A+ unknown.  My daughter is an A+ unknown.  What is the likehood of she being a secretor or non-secretor?

Do we know? :)
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 11:45pm; Reply: 1
nope
it s a recessive gene
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 2:40am; Reply: 2
Assuming a normal Caucasian individual there is about an 80% chance of being a secretor. Frequency of secretor status depends on where your originally are from (British Isles 74%, Sweden 80%, Italy 81%, ...), so you can look this up online for yourself and husband. Aboriginal Australians both are more likely to secrete (depends on tribe but often is around 97%) and secrete more blood type antigens than other secretors than most other secretors.

So not considering your secretor status daughter might have 80% chance of being secretor.




You have a 100% chance of being a secretor and your husband might have an 80% chance of being a secretor.

Since it is a recessive trait you could both be secretor and still have a nonsecreting child.

But the odds are such that she is most likely a secretor.






Posted by: Sharon, Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 8:04am; Reply: 3
I wonder, what parts of the world do non-secretors originate and what was the genetic reason that it became a genetic trait. Did secretors come first then non-secretors came after?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 6:03pm; Reply: 4
See "Secretion and Natural Selection" article:

http://www.drpeterjdadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/ABH_secretion_and_natural_selection
Posted by: Sharon, Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 7:04pm; Reply: 5
C-Sharp, thanks for the link. I read it and pulled out this quote which got me thinking.

Quoted from " Secretion and Natural Selection"

"One means of selection is through haemolytic disease of the newborn. Women, mostly of group O, become immunized to the A or B antigen of a fetus, and this or subsequent fetuses are at risk from haemolytic disease of the newborn. Affected fetuses are preponderantly secretors; this is probably a genetic consequence of all or most immunizing fetuses being secretors. Selection against the secretor factor as well as against blood groups A and B is thus liable to occur. Similar processes of selection seem to operate through fetal loss by early abortion. It is suggested that counter-selection favouring secretors may result from certain epidemic infectious diseases."


This excerpt makes me wonder if Non-secretors have a better chance of surviving in the womb of a mother who creates antibodies against the fetus or is incompatible with the embryo's blood type  non-secretors don't have  their blood type readily detected in salivia etc.  Therefore the mother may be able to cary a non-secretor if she has immune responses to secretors?
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, October 30, 2009, 1:22am; Reply: 6
Well now you've gotten me wondering about secretor status and pregnancy sickness.
Posted by: paul clucas, Saturday, October 31, 2009, 8:00pm; Reply: 7
Secretor / non-secretor survival rate, and the possible benefits of non-secretor status are often discussed in the Nonnie Clubhouse.  Secretors are very welcome to the discussion there!

Quoted from Sharon
C-Sharp, thanks for the link. I read it and pulled out this quote which got me thinking.

Quoted from " Secretion and Natural Selection"

"One means of selection is through haemolytic disease of the newborn. Women, mostly of group O, become immunized to the A or B antigen of a fetus, and this or subsequent fetuses are at risk from haemolytic disease of the newborn. Affected fetuses are preponderantly secretors; this is probably a genetic consequence of all or most immunizing fetuses being secretors. Selection against the secretor factor as well as against blood groups A and B is thus liable to occur. Similar processes of selection seem to operate through fetal loss by early abortion. It is suggested that counter-selection favouring secretors may result from certain epidemic infectious diseases."

This excerpt makes me wonder if Non-secretors have a better chance of surviving in the womb of a mother who creates antibodies against the fetus or is incompatible with the embryo's blood type  non-secretors don't have  their blood type readily detected in salivia etc.  Therefore the mother may be able to cary a non-secretor if she has immune responses to secretors?
Good point!  This would be a particular issue when a male Secretor is living in a largely Non-secretor population and is looking "to settle down".
Posted by: geminisue, Saturday, October 31, 2009, 10:23pm; Reply: 8
with my first a girl I was sick once every evening
with my second a girl I was sick nine times a day through pregnancy
with my third a son I was not sick, at all!
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