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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  determinging blood type through parents
Posted by: wit, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 12:18pm
I have seen the answer to this somewhere either  in the books on on the website over the last ten years but cant find the answer. here's the question, if the father is type O and the mother is type AB, what blood type must their children be?

thanks to anyone who can answer.
Posted by: paul clucas, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 12:44pm; Reply: 1
Either A or B carring a resessive o:  Ao, Bo.
Posted by: geminisue, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 1:02pm; Reply: 2
Can they not, also be an O or an AB?  Why?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 1:14pm; Reply: 3
Because the O parent has two O alleles to pass along. The AB parent has an A allele and a B allele to pass along. Each sperm or egg has only ONE set of alleles; every other body cell has two sets.

When sperm and egg combine, the new baby has one set of alleles from each parent, making his or her unique genetic setup. So the baby can't get two O alleles from the O parent, nor can it get both an A and a B from the other parent. There needs to be one from each parent.

When a person has  two O alleles, that person is an O. When a person has two A alleles, or an A allele and an O allele, the person is an A. When a person has two B alleles, or a B allele and an O allele, that person is a B. When a person has an A allele and a B allele, that person is an AB.

Genetic mutations can happen at any time, so it is theoretically possible for this pattern to not always be followed. The child of the O and AB parents could have a mutated O allele that turns into an A and then a B allele from the AB parent, and then become an AB (or an O from the O parent and a mutated A or B that turns into an O from the AB parent, making him or her an O)- but the chances of this are so slim that nobody really thinks about it. If an O woman with an AB husband gives birth to an O baby, it's far more likely that the husband isnt' the  father than that there's a mutation in the blood type gene.

This is how I know my kids are all either Os or Bs. I'm an O, and their fathers are Bs. So my kids can only be Os or Bs (unless there's  been a weird genetic mutation or DS' father lied to me about his blood type, which would be far more likely than a mutation.)
Posted by: Fernando Boto, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 2:10pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Because the O parent has two O alleles to pass along. The AB parent has an A allele and a B allele to pass along. Each sperm or egg has only ONE set of alleles; every other body cell has two sets.

When sperm and egg combine, the new baby has one set of alleles from each parent, making his or her unique genetic setup. So the baby can't get two O alleles from the O parent, nor can it get both an A and a B from the other parent. There needs to be one from each parent.

When a person has  two O alleles, that person is an O. When a person has two A alleles, or an A allele and an O allele, the person is an A. When a person has two B alleles, or a B allele and an O allele, that person is a B. When a person has an A allele and a B allele, that person is an AB.

Genetic mutations can happen at any time, so it is theoretically possible for this pattern to not always be followed. The child of the O and AB parents could have a mutated O allele that turns into an A and then a B allele from the AB parent, and then become an AB (or an O from the O parent and a mutated A or B that turns into an O from the AB parent, making him or her an O)- but the chances of this are so slim that nobody really thinks about it. If an O woman with an AB husband gives birth to an O baby, it's far more likely that the husband isnt' the  father than that there's a mutation in the blood type gene.

This is how I know my kids are all either Os or Bs. I'm an O, and their fathers are Bs. So my kids can only be Os or Bs (unless there's  been a weird genetic mutation or DS' father lied to me about his blood type, which would be far more likely than a mutation.)



One of the best explanations I've come accross.

During my web surfing I came across this table that I think is also very useful, for those of us (laypeople) who are interested to acquire a bit more knowledge.
http://www.classkids.org/library/classqa/bloodtyp.htm

Scroll down until you find the table with all possible blood type combinations between parents and the possible, and impossible, offsprings' blood types.

Enjoy.

Posted by: Katsy, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 2:11pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Because the O parent has two O alleles to pass along. The AB parent has an A allele and a B allele to pass along. Each sperm or egg has only ONE set of alleles; every other body cell has two sets.....


Excellent summary!

I need to test my MIL's blood, though, because she's pretty sure she's an AB, yet my husband is an O. And there's no chance of it being a "switched at birth" thing, either, because he looks too much like his all his family (mother, brothers, maternal grandfather, etc.) for that to even be a consideration. I wonder what the absolute likelihood of her being an AB with my husband being an O is -- unlikely, sure, but one in a million? a billion?  :) More likely she mis-remembered or was misinformed, but still curious...
Posted by: geminisue, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 2:18pm; Reply: 6
That explains it all, Thank You so much, You explanation is superb.
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 4:10pm; Reply: 7
Quoted Text
When a person has two B alleles, or a B allele and an O allele, that person is a B


Quoted Text
This is how I know my kids are all either Os or Bs. I'm an O, and their fathers are Bs. So my kids can only be Os or Bs


Ruthiegirl,
I'm confused. If a person has a B allele and an O allele you say that person is a B, yet you know your kids are either O or B when they had to have received an O and a B. According to your explanation, they should be B since it sounds like whenever O is paired with A or B, the person is A or B, not O.

What am I missing?
Thanks!
Lisa
Posted by: joji732, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 4:17pm; Reply: 8
But if a child's father was a Bo, then it would be possible for the child to inherit the recessive O allele instead of the B allele.  It is only with an AB that there is no possibility of a recessive O cropping up.  (Or someone who knows that they are AA or BB, but most people don't know the actual alleles so a recessive o is possible.)
Posted by: Fernando Boto, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 4:35pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Fernando Boto



One of the best explanations (Ruthiegirl) I've come accross.

During my web surfing I came across this table that I think is also very useful, for those of us (laypeople) who are interested to acquire a bit more knowledge.
http://www.classkids.org/library/classqa/bloodtyp.htm

Scroll down until you find the table with all possible blood type combinations between parents and the possible, and impossible, offsprings' blood types.

Enjoy.



I posted this earlier on but it looks as though there were quite a few people looking and posting on this thread at the time.

Here it goes again.

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 6:44pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Wholefoodie




Ruthiegirl,
I'm confused. If a person has a B allele and an O allele you say that person is a B, yet you know your kids are either O or B when they had to have received an O and a B. According to your explanation, they should be B since it sounds like whenever O is paired with A or B, the person is A or B, not O.

What am I missing?
Thanks!
Lisa
What you're missing is that I don't know if their father is BB or OB- he might only have B alleles to pass along (making all my kids Bs) or he might himself be an OB, meaning that each of my kids has a 50% chance of being an O or a 50% chance of being a B.

Determining A, B, AB, or O is a quick, easy, and cheap blood test- I think it's $10 or $15 and sold on this website. I'm not really sure how to test for "AO vs AA" or "BB vs BO" genes- but it's certainly more complicated and expensive, and generally not done.
Posted by: Plucky, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 8:54pm; Reply: 11
Ruthiegirl, do your kids have traits that lead you to think they are either O's or B's?  I knew my boys had to be either A's or B's, since I'm an O and their dad is an AB.  One is very mild mannered, would live off ice cream if he could, tends to avoid meat, and always has sinus issues.  The other is very emotional, catches every bug that goes around and would eat chicken nachos every day if I let him.  Yep, the first is an A and the second is a B.  
Posted by: Katsy, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 12:05am; Reply: 12
Quoted from Wholefoodie
I'm confused. If a person has a B allele and an O allele you say that person is a B, yet you know your kids are either O or B when they had to have received an O and a B. According to your explanation, they should be B since it sounds like whenever O is paired with A or B, the person is A or B, not O.


I am a Type A; my husband is Type O. I could be either AA or AO, depending on the alleles I inherited from my parents (my mom is Type A; we're not sure what my father's was). My husband can only be an OO (since his blood type is O, and O is recessive). My first-born is a Type A, meaning I passed on my A allele (which is dominant), and my husband passed on his O (which is recessive). If I were AA, all of my kids would be Type A, since I couldn't pass on an O, and A is dominant over O. My younger son is Type O, which shows that I *must* have a recessive O to pass on, so I am AO.

Here's a webpage with a Punnett Square for blood types.

Let's pretend that I was Type A and my husband is Type B, and we didn't know what the allele was -- meaning, I could be AA or AO, and my husband could be BB or BO.

If I were AA, I could only pass along A alleles, while my husband (if BB) could only pass along B alleles. All of our children would then be AB. If I were AO and my husband were BB, I could pass along either a dominant A or a recessive O, while my husband could still only pass along a dominant B, and our children would have to be either AB or B (with a recessive O). If I were AA and my husband were BO, the reverse would be true -- our kids would be either AB or A (with a recessive O).

If I were AO and my husband were BO, our kids could be any blood type. If I happened to have an "O" egg while the fertilizing sperm happened to be "O", the child would be O; if it were O egg with B sperm, the child would be B; if it were A egg with O sperm, the child would be A; if it were A egg with B sperm, the child would be AB.

But the recessive O throws a monkey wrench into the situation. It could be passed invisibly on through the generations and only pop out when it happens to meet up with an O from the other parent -- like red hair that seems to come out of nowhere, with no redheads in either family as far as anyone can remember.
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 1:35am; Reply: 13
Thanks for the explanations! I was trying to figure out what blood type my cousin is. I know for sure now he can't be an O. His mother is AB and father was A, so he can be A or B or AB. He very likely may be saying goodbye to those hamburgers!
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 2:34am; Reply: 14
This is very interesting.  I have wondered for many years what my father's blood type is.

My mother is a B
I am type B
My brother is AB

Therefore my dad had to have been either A or AB

Am I correct?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 3:28am; Reply: 15
correct! ;)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 12:44pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Plucky
Ruthiegirl, do your kids have traits that lead you to think they are either O's or B's?  I knew my boys had to be either A's or B's, since I'm an O and their dad is an AB.  One is very mild mannered, would live off ice cream if he could, tends to avoid meat, and always has sinus issues.  The other is very emotional, catches every bug that goes around and would eat chicken nachos every day if I let him.  Yep, the first is an A and the second is a B.  
DD2 is so much like me that it's almost scary, plus she's lactose intolerant,- so I'm pretty sure she's an O. DD1 has a much smaller body frame, and a different ideal diet. She tried eating low-carb with me a few years ago, and realized that she needed dairy and lots of fruit in her diet to feel healthy. I'm pretty sure she's a B.

I just can't tell with DS. It's hard to know how much of his  personality is his "boyness", how much comes from his age, and how much might be from blood type. There also IS the possibility that he might be an A if his father (not the same father as the girls) was actually an A or AB (he told me he was a B, but he might have been misinformed or lying and I have no way of contacting him or his family.) Is there a book that describes "typical" blood type pesonalities in children? The ER4YB book only gives advice for pregnancy and the first year, right?

Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 12:48pm; Reply: 17
Are  you guessing again Ruthie :) :)?
If you call the people who delivered them ( midwife/doctors office) they should know the blood types or they can direct you to who has the information.

You might be able to get the birth records.

Or if you come for measuring I have kits for sale, at my cost from NAP.
Posted by: Plucky, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 1:30pm; Reply: 18
Ruthie, in the Live Right book there's a section under each blood type to describe their tendencies.  I think there's some of this in the Eat Right book, too.  It describes A's as being more introverted and analytical; O's as being driven, competive, Type A personalities; and B's as being unconventional, and impatient with linear thinking.  I'm an O and my second is a B.  Totally explains why I love the kid to death but he drives me absolutely crazy!  I think they were either in jr. high school or early high school when I tested them so it was probably easier to see their personality traits by then.

I used to take both of them berry picking.  The A was to help me pick and the B was to keep me amused while we did it.  They both have great senses of humor: the A's is very dry and a lot of people don't get it, but the B makes me laugh so much my face hurts sometimes.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 7:36pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Plucky
. .  It describes A's as being more introverted and analytical; O's as being driven, competive, Type A personalities; and B's as being unconventional, and impatient with linear thinking.

I used to take both of them berry picking.  The A was to help me pick and the B was to keep me amused while we did it.  They both have great senses of humor: the A's is very dry and a lot of people don't get it, but the B makes me laugh so much my face hurts sometimes.


My mother had such a hard time understanding me throughout my life, because I never fit into any mold or category that made sense to her.  Finally, one day in her later years, she looked at me with big eyes and said in an excited voice, "I've figured it out!  You're unconventional!!"   ;D  I think it finally brought her some peace about her unexplainable daughter!  lol!
Posted by: Wholefoodie, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 11:03pm; Reply: 20
Ruthie,
If you keep records, I found my kids' bloodtype on their birth discharge papers from the hospital. (Must give credit to DH for that one, he saves everything!)

So I knew for sure I had an O+ and an O-.
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