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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Research on food choices for all
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:05am
Cilantro vs Coriander.

Doing a search on the internet, makes these as equivalent, yet there might be a difference because my Swami, places Cilantro as a Diamond food and Coriander as a Neutral!! ??) ??) :)

Can we get Cilantro in Australia?

I am answering my own question here after posting above.  

The answer is yes,  under the name Coriander.  Doing a search by using the botanical name as depicted in the TypeBase database, got me there.  I leave it here because I have heaps more to ask.
Warning: ignore scientific name, seems to be a typo - read on next posts ... :(

So Coriander in US is Vietnamese Mint in Australia
Cilantro in US is Coriander in Australia

All this is according to Botanical names as depicted in the Typebase database.  (See following posts)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:15am; Reply: 1
cilantro is the herb
coriander is the seed
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:24am; Reply: 2
Lola, the typebase shows them with two different botanical names, based on that they are both different plants.  Or a typo on the database?
Posted by: Lola, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:39am; Reply: 3
http://www.healthdiaries.com/eatthis/13-health-benefits-of-coriander-seeds-and-cilantro-leaves.html
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:43am; Reply: 4
Quote from: http://www.horticulture.com.au/news/default.asp?act=detail&mode=&newsid=34

Quote
Friday, 15 April 2005  
Papaya Vs Papaw

Whats in a name? When it comes to the papaya/pawpaw/papaw debate, a lot.

Consumers have long been confused about the difference between these fruit and the fact is that while they are the same species Carica papaya, the fruit known as papaya looks and tastes quite different to the fruit known as papaw.

To make things easier for consumers the agreed understanding in the Australian industry is that the red-fleshed sweeter fruit is called red papaya, while the yellow-fleshed fruit is called yellow papaw.

American pawpaw (note the different spelling) on the other hand is an entirely different fruit not related to the tropical Carica papaya from which Australian red papaya and yellow papaw come. American pawpaw is also known as poor mans banana and is the fruit of the Asimina triloba tree.

To complicate things further, theres also green papaya, which is either red papaya or yellow papaw picked green. Green papaya is a sought after ingredient in Asian cuisine and is eaten as a vegetable.

Unquote

So
American PawPaw is an american fruit (not sure if we get it here)
American Papaya is our Papaya or red papaw, but we also have the yellow papaw.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, September 25, 2009, 1:04am; Reply: 5
so papaya is papaw
and pawpaw is not papaya!!!  now we can all relax! ;)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 1:08am; Reply: 6
Lola,
Ok the descriptions on the database are clear enough, they seem to be refering to the same plant in two different stages: seeds and plant.

But the Scientific names are different, since my confusion, so should we report it as a bug in the database?

So:

Cilantro in US is the coriander plant in Australia
Coriander in US is the Coriander seeds in Australia

I do not remember ever seeing cilantro/ seeds in the spice racks of the supermarkets here, but I have often bought coriander seeds.
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, September 25, 2009, 2:29am; Reply: 7
Thanks for starting this thread Cristina (clap) will put local food queries here now.

I've just been looking through Typebase for Hoki (fish) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_grenadier aka blue grenadier, blue hake, New Zealand whiptail, whiptail or whiptail hake, "Macruronus novaezelandiae".  
It is definitely not in there.  You can search by scientific name the entire website and the typebase value will come up.  Searched for Macruronus bought up nothing, so that common fish in Australia / from NZ is not listed!

Posted by: Symbi, Friday, September 25, 2009, 2:57am; Reply: 8
Blue Mackerel from New Zealand http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_mackerel aka Japanese mackerel, Pacific mackerel, slimy mackerel, or spotted chub mackerel, "Scomber australasicus"

On Typebase only one kind of Mackerel comes up - Atlantic http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?238

In GTD book there is Spanish Mackerel mentioned as well, both are avoids for Explorers.  

I guess we can put Australian Mackerel in the same boat?
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:15am; Reply: 9
This might be a stupid question but is a Cornish hen, American for Spring Chicken?

And the other concern of mine is the local Aussie Salmon. I have a feeling that they are mostly farmed. I couldn't believe the amount of little Salmon farms I saw in Tassie. Where else in Oz do Salmon run wild?

The other option is to eat John West canned Tuna as this is a canadian product and the Salmon is Alaskan, diamond food. But nothing beats a pan fried fillet of Salmon hey?
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:22am; Reply: 10
Quoted from Jumari
This might be a stupid question but is a Cornish hen, American for Spring Chicken?
...



Come on aussie come on!!  There is nothing stupid between mates!
I did not know that either.  Find this extract on the net, to confirm your suspicions:

quote

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Cornish game hen ready for the oven

A Cornish game hen, also sometimes called a Cornish hen, poussin, Rock Cornish hen, or simply Rock Cornish, is a young chicken sold whole. Despite the name, it is not a game bird, but actually a typical chicken that is slaughtered at a young age and therefore is smaller in size. Though the bird is called a "hen," it can be either male or female.
unquote
:) :)
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:36am; Reply: 11
So thats a yes then. Spring Chicken = Cornish hen. I can't help but picturing the young chickens though. They didn't get to live their full lives. Same with Lamb or Veal. Oh God how cruel. They've got no chance have they? Aside from Fish, all I have is Lamb, Turkey and Cornish Chicken. Have to find one before I discover that I'm a Fat Teacher or a Mini Warrior. :K) :D
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:39am; Reply: 12
Quoted from Jumari
...
And the other concern of mine is the local Aussie Salmon. I have a feeling that they are mostly farmed. I couldn't believe the amount of little Salmon farms I saw in Tassie. Where else in Oz do Salmon run wild?


The Department of Primary Industries in Australia has this website where they give an indication that at least the Eastern Australian Salmon is found in the continental shelf water of NSW, Victoria and Tassie.

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/research/areas/systems-research/wild-fisheries/outputs/2008/972/status_short/Australian-Salmon.pdf

I have been buying Australian salmon and using it as my diamond salmon but after reading this other link of a Salmon fisherman (read his first paragraph), I do not know ...

So is Australian Salmon, what US calls Salmon?  

http://www.spooled.com.au/Article:1752 ??) ??) :)
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:46am; Reply: 13
The important thing to note about the 2nd article on Australian Salmon is;

Aussie salmon have rather dark, strongly-flavoured flesh

The Salmon I buy is pink. I just know its farmed. But the farming method involves nets that are on the actual estuary or rivers. But I'm afraid they are probably still fed by humans.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:48am; Reply: 14
the fish market mongers are walking fish encyclopedias!!
I d ask them if I were you.... :)


read farmed salmon is fed GE soy beans.....
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:50am; Reply: 15
This Article here proves my point beyond the doubt

http://www.huonaqua.com.au/wild-farmed.php

The question is, Dr D can we have farmed Atlantic Salmon? Its not listed as a Toxin.
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 4:05am; Reply: 16
And this is what they are fed. At least they aren't drinking diet coke or bottled water. ;)

There is some flexibility in which ingredients go into the recipe to deliver that specified feed but all ingredients must go through a battery of quality checks before they can be used. Aside from fishmeal and fish oil, our diets may contain wheat, soya derivatives, corn gluten, meat by-product meal, blood meal and vitamin and mineral supplements very similar to those taken by people. In fact most of the ingredients we use are commonly used in the pet-food industry and our diets look very like dry pet food - albeit with a very different nutrient profile, higher in energy and more digestible.
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, September 25, 2009, 5:07am; Reply: 17
I find a CBS website explaining the different salmons and their Australian equivalents (if avaiable). From it I derived that the Chinook Salmon is the Australian Quinnat Salmon, (which according to fishnet.com.au in another article, is found in the wild.)

quote
Here are some relevant extracts from the CBS website:
...
The Atlantic salmon is the most popular species for fish farming or aquaculture and it is estimated that 98 per cent of the 300 million Atlantic salmon in the world are farmed fish.
...
Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)
The Chinook is the largest of the West Coast salmon (they can weigh up to 55 kg) and is also called "spring salmon" or "king salmon." It has a bluish-green back with light spots and is a favourite catch for anglers. In Australia, where the Chinook is an introduced species, it is called the Quinnat salmon. Its found in southern rivers, but is dependent on stocking programs for survival.
...
Sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka)
The sockeye is the most popular among the West Coast salmon with both anglers and commercial fishers and is reputed to be the best-tasting salmon. It is bluish-silver, and the most streamlined of the salmon. It weighs up to 3.2 kg. The kokanee, or sliver trout, is a land-locked subspecies of sockeye that never leaves fresh water.

The Australian salmon (Arripis truttaceus)
The Australian salmon are an ocean-dwelling species found along the south coast of Australia. Its silver with black spots and weigh up to 10 kg.
...
Unquote

Here is the full article from CBS website:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/salmon/

So I guess, next time we go to the fish market, or supermarket, we will ask the fishmonger if this is Quinnat wild Salmon or what.  I wonder how many blank looks we will get ...??  ??) :)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, September 25, 2009, 5:30am; Reply: 18
hope Jenny chines in, she s done a lot of studying on the subject.
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 6:04am; Reply: 19
I;m sorry to say it but most of the fish shop people I've come accross aren't the sharpest. You probably will get a stare or blank expression, or worse they will just pretend they know and tell you what you wanna hear.
Posted by: Jenny, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:37pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Lola
hope Jenny chines in, she s done a lot of studying on the subject.


I have only just noticed this thread and commend you all on your expertise..I feel like a first grader in comparison. However, if you want to see my fish print out, please email me and you will see where I have got to on a fish spread sheet..perhaps one or both of you would like to go on filling in the blanks, and keep us updated. Because most of our most popular fish do not swim in northern hemisphere waters close to the U.S. they have not been tested for typebase and until Dr D has a lab downunder it would seem unlikely that we will know for sure where our favourites lie in the spectrum. I have basically come to the conclusion that self testing on our own bodies is about as close as we are likely to get. :P
Posted by: Jenny, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:47pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Cristina
Lola, the typebase shows them with two different botanical names, based on that they are both different plants.  Or a typo on the database?



well spotted Cristina---I would definitely appreciate an explanation of the two different scientific names on typebase. I have always assumed them to be from the same plant, ie cilantro being the fresh herb, and coriander being the seeds and powdered seeds, but this cannot be so if they come from different species as implied in typebase. I think it is worth reporting/questioning as a bug.
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, September 25, 2009, 12:57pm; Reply: 22
Jenny I would love that fish list, can you mail it to me...Thanks.
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 3:01am; Reply: 23
Jenny, that makes sense that our local fish haven't been tested.  Could you please email your fish list to me too.  Saves me duplicating your work.  Thanks!
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 3:30am; Reply: 24
ditto Jenny, and thanks for chiming in ... :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 3:51am; Reply: 25
TypeBase Currants vs Aussie currants:

The berry type vs the grape type.  Can we get the berry type in Australia?
Posted by: Jumari, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 5:35am; Reply: 26
I actually did go to the Sydney fish market and found other fish that are not on the list. I had some Kingfish Sashimi which was delicious, not knowing if it is a Toxin. The other is Gem fish.

I did find some monkfish which is a diamond for me, regardless of genotype. So we bought a couple of fillets. Never had it before.
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 6:27am; Reply: 27
I suppose, as long as we stick to the type of fish SwamiXpress recommends for us, we may be OK.  Like my Swami recommends me to include the non-oily, white flesh category fish and to avoid the 'bottom feeding fish'.  Armed with these recommendations (at least in my case), we should be all right.

Were your recommendations similar? :)
Posted by: Jumari, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 7:54am; Reply: 28
Isn't salmon an oily fish?

I'm still not 100% about my final genotype so I can't anwer your question till after thursday.

I'm really happy about the fact that I found my prop taster strips after looking for days and have now confirmed beyond any doubt that I am a taster. Yippee.
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 10:21pm; Reply: 29
Commercial Mushrooms, Silver dollar mushrooms:

Agaricus bisporus
Extract From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Agaricus bisporusknown variously as the common mushroom, button mushroom, white mushroom, table mushroom, portobello mushroom, crimini mushroom, Swiss Brown mushrooms, also known as Cremini, Italian Brown, Italian mushroom, Roman Brown mushrooms, or cultivated mushroom is an edible basidiomycete mushroom native to grasslands in Europe and North America. A. bisporus is cultivated in more than 70 countries.[1]
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 10:55pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Jenny
Because most of our most popular fish do not swim in northern hemisphere waters close to the U.S. they have not been tested for typebase and until Dr D has a lab downunder it would seem unlikely that we will know for sure where our favourites lie in the spectrum. I have basically come to the conclusion that self testing on our own bodies is about as close as we are likely to get. :P

"You can search by scientific name the entire website and the typebase value will come up.  Searched for Macruronus bought up nothing, so that common fish in Australia / from NZ is not listed!"

Wonder where that leaves most of NZ produce??! As far as I know, they get things from both countries... :-/
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, September 26, 2009, 11:35pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Jumari
Isn't salmon an oily fish?



Yes, you are right, Dr D's program has ensured that we do get some oily fish in our diet as well, maybe for the essencial fatty acids absorbtion. I have found the following website that may explain further the choices of oily fishes in our lists:

http://www.skincancer.org/oily-fish-your-route-to-vitamin-d.html

Here is an extract from it:
quote
What Are Some Low-Mercury, Oily Fish?

The FDA and EPA advise at-risk populations to eat up to 12 ounces a week of low-mercury fish. Many oily fish are safe to eat, including salmon, sardines, herring, and Atlantic mackerel. Wild or canned salmon from Alaska are best, since they have lower levels of pollutants like PCBs and dioxins.
unquote

Dr D also recommends  that we should take special care to ensure that the source of fish is fresh and free of industrial toxins, which accumulate in the fat and we should avoid farm raised fish. :)
Posted by: Jumari, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 12:34am; Reply: 32
Thanks Ladies for all that hard work into the research. And thanks to Jenny for the list.

I have no choice but to just eat what is available and hope for the best.

My main choices are:

Barramundi - always available (not sure but its a  white flesh and non oily) , I feel strongly that this one is OK.

Farmed Atlantic Salmon (most fish shop people can't tell you which variety of Salmon it is) ,

Tuna - Same variety but depends on my GT. Only good for warriors.

Blue eyed cod (Jenny's list doesn't have a classification for it, hope its the same as the american cod, probably not, but I allow myself that one now and again),

Cod - on rare occasions I do find plain Cod and I snap it up quickly.

Red Snapper (only a neutral) ,

Ling Ling (not my favourite but its white flesh and non oily). Looking at Jenny's list, its a type of cod but don't think its been tested).

Monkfish is available and a diamond for me but a little hard to find.

Perch / Ocean Perch is pretty common as well. I wonder if that one is OK. Not in Jennys list.

John Dory - not in Jennys list.

The other one we get a lot of, and I'm not sure if my Tassie partner is right, is shark. She says that most fish and chips shops use shark and batter it. They don't label it as shark because they know that a lot of people would be turned off by it. On the fish shops, when you get fish fillets or just Flakes without a fish name, bet your bottom silver dollar its shark. We've asked the fish shop, thats one variety that they do know well around these parts. Please correct me if I'm wrong. As long as its not great white, I guess were OK. And thats a Black dot for all group A GT's.

Canned sardines are ofcourse easy to find. For me I had it in brine and didn't really enjoy it. I avoid them in tomato sauce (toxin) and I love them with Olive oil but that would take me over my portion of Fats and oils.

How can you tell which ones are bottom feeders?

Looks like were up S--t creek without a paddle.... :-/

:'( :'( :'(

I think a handy classification would be knowing whether your GT is better off with River fish or Ocean varieties.

Can NAP send a small team Down Under to test the rest? We'll be happy to be the Guinea Pigs won't we ladies? I'll even eat Witchetty grubs and Goana, but I don't think Ill be eating any Koala (diamond or no diamond).
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 12:54am; Reply: 33
Thanks for that Jumari, I still have not received the list from Jenny  :( :) :)
No Witchetty grubs and goana here!!  DH may be game though ...  But yes, I second the guinea piggy thingy for us.  Please, please NAP come and help us classify all this tucka from down under...

I think I read somewhere that the bigger the ocean fish, the longer time it had to absorb toxins in its body, so I wonder if this assumption will place Sharks in the avoid category?  


The internet free Wikepedia lists the following as bottom feeder fishes:

Bottom feeding fish include flatfish (halibut, flounder, plaice, sole), eels, ling cod, haddock, bass, grouper, bream (snapper) and some species of catfish and shark.

Bottom feeding invertebrates include shellfish, crabs, crayfish, sea anemones, starfish, snails, bristleworms and sea cucumbers.

The Wikepedia also explains that bottom feeders feed on or near the bottom of a mass of water (ocean, lake, river or aquariums). Some are grazing on the floor while others maybe hunters catching passing fish near the bottom.
(book2) :) :)
Posted by: Chandon, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 1:47am; Reply: 34
Hi,

I recall someone, maybe Lola, mentioned John Dory is a bottom feeder. The flat fish are bottom feeders.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 1:51am; Reply: 35
http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archive8/config.pl?read=40443
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 3:39am; Reply: 36
Thanks Lola, Chandon for the info :)  :)

Thanks Jenny, Jumari for the lists :) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 9:53pm; Reply: 37
We now have quite a bunch of disparate information in this thread re fish in Australia (and probably New Zealand I would guess). I would like to ask Cristina, Jumari and Ghee Wizz if any of you would like to be the ongoing compiler of this information, as it would be a shame for it to be buried on a remote page as time passes. If the general sheet could be expanded as information arises, then whoever is doing this editorial work could advertize it on the thread, thus bringing the thread to the surface again, and those interested could request the updated list.
What do you think? Any volunteer available? I'm slightly overwhelmed with life/work at the moment.
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 10:06pm; Reply: 38
Thanks for the suggestion Jenny... Great idea - I'm a bit overwhelmed with work etc too unfortunately...
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 10:38pm; Reply: 39
Great suggestion Jenny, and I do not mind doing it for the time being.  I am at home most of the time, retired and I really enjoy the learning and brain massaging opportunities this forum offers.  Coming from a high paced corporate computer based profession, I can do with the exercise.  We can combine efforts with whoever wants to jump in.

I think, I might edit my first post to contain a summary of the consensus for the different items on discussion further down the thread.  This way, users can avoid having to read endless discussions if all they want is to know the particular equivalent to a food product in their lists :) :).
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 10:50pm; Reply: 40
this thread has been stickied for you all! :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 11:03pm; Reply: 41
Thanks Lola!! :) :)

Rethinking my last post a bit.  Because of the limitations on posting capacity, I think it may be a better idea, to every now and then, post summary of food items in discussion where consensus have been reached.  Each summary will contain new items not shown in previous summaries.  The very first post in this thread will show the links to those summary posts.  Shall we give this a try and see how it works?

To start with, I will create a summary post showing resolutions for cilantro, coriander, pawpaw, papaya and a few others find in this thread so far.  Then I will reflect this by updating post number 1.  Give me a few minutes and let me know if you think it may work well .. :)

PS:  This may not work at all if there is a time limit to editing posts ...
Lola?
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, September 27, 2009, 11:56pm; Reply: 42
TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 1
TypebaseAU Equivalent Comments Countries
CilantroCorianderThe  herb
CorianderCoriander SeedsThe  seeds
PapayaPapaw,PawPaw or PapayaCommon Australian paw paw
Paw PawPoor Mans BananaA member of custard apple plant
Cornish HenSpring chickenYoung chicken,male or female
Currant Red/BlackBlackcurrant/RedcurrantNot the grape variety
Romaine LettuceCos Lettuce
ZucciniZucciniCourguette in UK version of Swami
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
RutagabaSweedesIs the yellow parsnip
EscaroleChicory LeafTaken from UK version of Swami
OrangeOrange
OrangeTangerine in Nepal only (check Kumar post below)Nepal
TangerineMandarin/Tangerine
AnchoviesAnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only
ScrodCod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
ShrimpPrawn
ButterfishButterfishSee warning Reply 68 on toxic substitutes

Summary continues on reply no: 95


Still adding to this ...
I will eventually put it in alphabetical category order.  Also post the link to next summary table, will try to do it before the 72hrs deadline ...
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 1:30am; Reply: 43
thanks so much for your offer Cristina, and to Lola for 'stickying' it. Would you prefer us to write to you privately so that you can do the additions yourself? For instance I have some new evidence re pawpaw that I want to share.
Posted by: Kumar, Monday, September 28, 2009, 1:49am; Reply: 44
As suggested by someone, this thread can also be used to clarify food recognition in other countries too. For example, in Nepal what everyone calls an orange is actually a tangerine! I learnt this only a few years back after coming in touch with ER4YT. Still, unless someone clarifies, almost all people will consider the commonly available tangerines as oranges and there are food value differences between these varieties.

We have a bean commonly eaten in northern Nepal. It looks like adzuki bean but is black. It is small (much smaller than the black-eyed bean) and is called a "maas" locally. Does anyone have experience with this variety of bean, which I am presently considering an adzuki bean (black variety)?
Posted by: Jumari, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:00am; Reply: 45
Jenny...I'm happy to volunter for that. I think a great place to start would be to eliminate the fish that can not be found in Australian and/or NZ waters, unless you have a private jet and are able to buy elsewhere. So I'm gonna post a fish list and if everyone agrees we can eliminate them from our list.

I've cut and paste from my Teachers Swami list. If I'm missing any just add them on.

* Fish not found In Aus or NZ marked NA (Not Available)
* Fish found in these parts marked A (Available)
* Sorry not in Alphabetical order these are divided into Superfood/Neutral/Toxin for Teachers.


Bullhead  = NA
Butterfish = NA
Carp = A
Chub =  NA
Cod  = A
Croaker  = NA
Cusk  = NA
Drum  = NA
Halfmoon Fish  = (I've seen this one, could also just be called Moon fish, not sure)
Mahi-mahi = NA
Monkfish  = A
Mullet = A
Muskellunge = NA
Ocean Pout  = (We have oceat trout probably not the same, not sure)
Parrotfish = (not sure)
Perch  = (Definitely have Ocean Perch, don't know if its the same though)
Pickerel, Walleye  = NA
Pike = NA
Pilchards = NA
Pollock, Atlantic  = NA
Pompano = Not sure
Porgy  = NA
Red Snapper = A
Rosefish = NA
Salmon, Atlantic, wild = Mostly Farmed
Salmon, Chinook  = Only canned variety, John West
Salmon, Sockeye = Only canned variety, John West
Sardine  = Mostly canned
Scrod  = NA
Sea Bream = Deep sea bream fillets and Silver Bream whole (are they they same?)
Smelt = NA
Snail, Escargot  = (probably, they serve them in french restaurants but I wouldn't know where to buy them.
Sturgeon = NA
Sucker  = NA
Sunfish, Pumpkinseed  =
Tilapia = NA
Trout, Sea = Ocean trout (fillets)-farmed                        
Tuna, Skipjack = Not Sure
Tuna, Yellowfin = A = Definitely
Turbot, European = Will double check
Whitefish  = Not sure



Herring = Not sure
Mackerel, Atlantic = Not 100 % sure
Mackerel, Spanish = not sure, maybe canned variety
Perch, Ocean = (Definitely have Ocean Perch, don't know if its the same though)
Trout, Rainbow, Wild = A = Definitely (are they farmed though?)
Trout, Steelhead, Wild
Tuna, Bluefin = Not Sure
Whiting = Not sure, Whiting (fillets) are they the same?
Yellowtail = Not sure



Anchovy = A = Canned variety
Barracuda = Not sure.
Bass, Blue Gill =
Bass, Sea, Lake
Bass, Striped
Bluefish = Not Sure
Catfish = Not sure, think I've seen this one.
Clam =
Conch = Not sure
Crab = A = Definitely
Eel = A = Definitely
Flounder = seen it somewhere. Under inverstigation.
Frog = lots of cane toads that for sure. Wouldn't know where to buy the edible variety?
Gray Sole
Grouper =
Haddock = Not sure
Hake = Not Sure -Under investigation
Halibut = Not sure
Harvest Fish = NA
Jellyfish, dried, salted = Plenty of deadly Jelly fish around these parts, don't know if they would be safe to eat?
Lobster = A = Definitely
Mussels = A = Canned
Octopus =  A = Definitely
Opaleye Fish = NA
Orange Roughy = A = Definitely
Oyster = A = Definitely = most of which are from Oyster farms
Scallops = A = Definitely
Scup = NA
Shad = NA
Shark = A = Most definitely = Flake = (Does everyone agree on this)
Sheepshead fish = NA
Shrimp = A = Called Prawns around here.
Skate = NA
Sole = Not sure
Squid, Calamari = A = Yes
Swordfish = A = Definitely
Tilefish =
Turtle = Yes but not don't know much about the edible variety.
Weakfish = NA
Wolfish, Atlantic = Not sure but we are in the atlantic = think I've seen it.

Please add any fish from the GT lists that are not on this list. The aim is to come up with a short list of those fish that are definitly not available in Australia or NZ.
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:16am; Reply: 46
Quoted from Jenny
thanks so much for your offer Cristina, and to Lola for 'stickying' it. Would you prefer us to write to you privately so that you can do the additions yourself? For instance I have some new evidence re pawpaw that I want to share.


Jenny, post it here, so we can all share that info, unless you considered it to be too big to post, in which case we can work out behind the scenes how best to post it in the summaries.  

Jumari, that is an excellent list and thanks for volunteering too.

Kumar I can add under the comments column the names of relevant countries, or add another column for it.  Check the summaries and let me know if that is ok for your country and post relevant comments. :) :)

Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:19am; Reply: 47
That's a great effort thanks Jumari

Jellyfish, dried, salted = Plenty of deadly Jelly fish around these parts, don't know if they would be safe to eat? Depends what they died of??!! :-/ :o
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:21am; Reply: 48
Thanks for the list Jenny it's a great layout, idea and you've put lots of work in.  Thanks for taking on editing Cristina and everyone for contributing.  I'm busy with child at home school holidays and more at the moment but could take on editing at a later time.  Also supposedly cleaning up after dust storm and possum oil attack (no offence) at mo!

Cristina, I like the summary idea to make sure that things are agreed on and final before they go into the list.  Great to have you on the team.

When editing the fish list is it going to expand to include Australia and New Zealand now (welcome and thanks Possum) so many other fish items may be added?  We may start with lots of blanks and fish that haven't been tested but that's okay.

On the list can we put a legend down the bottom like GT1 = Hunter. Bozos like me can't remember the genotype numbers.  Maybe we could also put the blood types on the list too?  May have to put a reference at the bottom to Dr D'Adamo too.

P.S. (warning: silly) Not everything's got an equivalent like the aussie saying "she aint no spring chicken" doesn't = "she aint no cornish hen"!  No offence intended. I'm glad I know what a spring chicken is now and won't eat one to let them have a bit of a life first!

P.P.S. is everyone current on the currants issue Cristina is referring to above.  The small dried grape type is a small dried grape not a currant. :( A currant is a largish berry never seen here (would that be in blackcurrant juice though?).  See http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1253598354/s-19/highlight-currants/#num19
Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:27am; Reply: 49
Quoted from Cristina
TypeBase Currants vs Aussie currants:
The berry type vs the grape type.  Can we get the berry type in Australia?

We had a currant bush when I used to live in Aus...I've always thought the packets of currants were the berry types?? The grape type are something else aren't they - can't remember the name but more gourmet/expensive? :-/
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:31am; Reply: 50
Fish lists combined:

Anchovy = A = Canned variety
Barracuda = Not sure.
Bass, Blue Gill =
Bass, Sea, Lake
Bass, Striped
Bluefish = Not Sure
Bullhead= NA
Butterfish = NA
Carp = A
Catfish = Not sure, think I've seen this one.
Chub =NA
Clam =
Cod= A
Conch = Not sure
Crab = A = Definitely
Croaker= NA
Cusk= NA
Drum= NA
Eel = A = Definitely
Flounder = seen it somewhere. Under investigation.
Frog = lots of cane toads that for sure. Wouldn't know where to buy the edible variety?
Gray Sole
Grouper =
Haddock = Not sure
Hake = Not Sure -Under investigation
Halfmoon Fish= (I've seen this one, could also just be called Moon fish, not sure)
Halibut = Not sure
Harvest Fish = NA
Herring = Not sure
Jellyfish, dried, salted = Plenty of deadly Jelly fish around these parts, don't know if they would be safe to eat?
Lobster = A = Definitely
Mackerel, Atlantic = Not 100 % sure
Mackerel, Spanish = not sure, maybe canned variety
Mahi-mahi = NA
Monkfish= A
Mullet = A
Muskellunge = NA
Mussels = A = Canned
Ocean Pout= (We have ocean trout probably not the same, not sure)
Octopus =A = Definitely
Opaleye Fish = NA
Orange Roughy = A = Definitely
Oyster = A = Definitely = most of which are from Oyster farms
Parrotfish = (not sure)
Perch= (Definitely have Ocean Perch, don't know if its the same though)
Perch, Ocean = (Definitely have Ocean Perch, don't know if its the same though)
Pickerel, Walleye= NA
Pike = NA
Pilchards = NA
Pollock, Atlantic= NA
Pompano = Not sure
Porgy= NA
Red Snapper = A
Rosefish = NA
Salmon, Atlantic, wild = Mostly Farmed
Salmon, Chinook= Only canned variety, John West
Salmon, Sockeye = Only canned variety, John West
Sardine= Mostly canned
Scallops = A = Definitely
Scrod= NA
Scup = NA
Sea Bream = Deep sea bream fillets and Silver Bream whole (are they the same?)
Shad = NA
Shark = A = Most definitely = Flake = (Does everyone agree on this)
Sheepshead fish = NA
Shrimp = A = Called Prawns around here.
Skate = NA
Smelt = NA
Snail, Escargot= (probably, they serve them in french restaurants but I wouldn't know where to buy them.
Sole = Not sure
Squid, Calamari = A = Yes
Sturgeon = NA
Sucker= NA
Sunfish, Pumpkinseed=
Swordfish = A = Definitely
Tilapia = NA
Tilefish =
Trout, Rainbow, Wild = A = Definitely (are they farmed though?)
Trout, Sea = Ocean trout (fillets)-farmed
Trout, Steelhead, Wild
Tuna, Bluefin = Not Sure
Tuna, Skipjack = Not Sure
Tuna, Yellowfin = A = Definitely
Turbot, European = Will double check
Turtle = Yes but not don't know much about the edible variety.
Weakfish = NA
Whitefish= Not sure
Whiting = Not sure, Whiting (fillets) are they the same?
Wolfish, Atlantic = Not sure but we are in the Atlantic = think I've seen it.
Yellowtail = Not sure
Posted by: Kumar, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:39am; Reply: 51
Wonderful Cristina. Go ahead with adding another column for the country. I am sure it is going to be very useful to all of us.
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:41am; Reply: 52
Hi Possum, did you read the link at the end of my last post?  Check the typebase:

Currants: http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?134 were they what you were growing?

Grapes: mentions ZANTE grapes which are small grapes dried to make currants http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?178

I really like the dried grape currants and note they don't seem to have preservatives added.  That makes it a black dot under grapes for me as explorer, not an avoid like most other dried fruit with sulphur dioxide preservative.  
Possum - do you know your genotype?

Added - I see we are all posting at the same time!  You probably didn't see that then Possum.  
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:45am; Reply: 53
Quoted from Symbi


P.P.S. is everyone current on the currants issue Cristina is referring to above.  The small dried grape type is a small dried grape not a currant. :( A currant is a largish berry never seen here (would that be in blackcurrant juice though?).  See http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1253598354/s-19/highlight-currants/#num19


GheeWhiz,  Thanks so much for your contributions to this thread too!!
Regarding the currant issue, it looks like we can get them in aussie too, at least in some parts and they may be seasonal too.  I find this link on the net:

http://www.froghollownursery.com.au/Fruit/Berries%20Currants%20&%20Figs.html

And yes, you are right, I believe they are in the popular red/blackcurrant juices sold locally.   :) :)
Posted by: Jumari, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:50am; Reply: 54
C-sharp...You the man. Thanks for that.


Well I've removed the obvious fish varieties and left behind anything I personally was not sure of. Would everyone involved kindly vote on the fish that are definitely not found in these parts so we can eliminate them.

Barracuda = Not sure.
Bass, Blue Gill =
Bass, Sea, Lake
Bass, Striped
Bluefish = Not Sure
Bullhead  = NA
Butterfish = NA
Catfish = Not sure, think I've seen this one.
Chub =  NA
Clam =
Conch = Not sure
Croaker  = NA
Cusk  = NA
Drum  = NA
Flounder = seen it somewhere. Under investigation.
Frog = lots of cane toads that for sure. Wouldn't know where to buy the edible variety?
Gray Sole =
Grouper = Actually this is definitetly available. Don't know about the US / OZ compatibility though?
Haddock = Not sure
Hake = Not Sure -Under investigation
Halfmoon Fish  = (I've seen this one, could also just be called Moon fish, not sure)
Halibut = Not sure
Harvest Fish = NA
Herring = Not sure
Jellyfish, dried, salted = Plenty of deadly Jelly fish around these parts, don't know if they would be safe to eat?
Mackerel, Atlantic = Not 100 % sure
Mackerel, Spanish = not sure, maybe canned variety
Mahi-mahi = NA
Muskellunge = NA
Ocean Pout  = (We have ocean trout probably not the same, not sure)
Opaleye Fish = NA
Parrotfish = (not sure)
Perch  = (Definitely have Ocean Perch, don't know if its the same though)
Perch, Ocean = (Definitely have Ocean Perch, don't know if its the same though)
Pickerel, Walleye  = NA
Pike = NA
Pilchards = NA
Pollock, Atlantic  = NA
Pompano = Not sure
Porgy  = NA
Rosefish = NA
Salmon, Atlantic, wild = Mostly Farmed
Salmon, Chinook  = Only canned variety, John West
Salmon, Sockeye = Only canned variety, John West
Scrod  = NA
Scup = NA
Sea Bream = Deep sea bream fillets and Silver Bream whole (are they the same?)
Shad = NA
Shark = A = Most definitely = Flake = (Does everyone agree on this)
Sheepshead fish = NA
Skate = NA
Smelt = NA
Snail, Escargot  = (probably, they serve them in french restaurants but I wouldn't know where to buy them.
Sole = Not sure
Sturgeon = NA
Sucker  = NA
Sunfish, Pumpkinseed  =
Tilapia = NA
Tilefish =
Trout, Rainbow, Wild = A = Definitely (are they farmed though?)
Trout, Sea = Ocean trout (fillets)-farmed                        
Trout, Steelhead, Wild
Tuna, Bluefin = Not Sure
Tuna, Skipjack = Not Sure
Turbot, European = Will double check
Turtle = Yes but not don't know much about the edible variety.
Weakfish = NA
Whitefish  = Not sure
Whiting = Not sure, Whiting (fillets) are they the same?
Wolfish, Atlantic = Not sure but we are in the Atlantic = think I've seen it.
Yellowtail = Not sure

Maybe someone can set up a way to vote these fish out or in. C-sharp are you free?
Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:50am; Reply: 55
Also supposedly cleaning up after dust storm and possum oil attack (no offence) at mo!
:-/ :o ;) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, September 28, 2009, 2:55am; Reply: 56
Thanks Cristina.  Mouth is watering after looking at the berries.  Went picking bush mulberries once and got red all over my mouth, chin and hands (don't know how it got near my mouth!)  :) :) ;)

Blackcurrant juice is yummy.  Gotto check for the added sugar though!

Just realised, in our garden right now we have many brazillian cherries on the tree.  http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/brazcherry.htm  If I leave some for the resident possums, don't see why I can't eat some in moderation (black dot).  They grow well around the sub-tropics and probably come under cherries  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?104
Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:01am; Reply: 57
Quoted from Symbi
Hi Possum, did you read the link at the end of my last post?  Check the typebase:Currants: http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?134 were they what you were growing? Yep those were the ones ;)
Grapes: mentions ZANTE grapes which are small grapes dried to make currants http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?178
I really like the dried grape currants and note they don't seem to have preservatives added.  That makes it a black dot under grapes for me as explorer, not an avoid like most other dried fruit with sulphur dioxide preservative.  
Possum - do you know your genotype? I could be either Gatherer or Explorer (I am waiting to get results of secretor test) and will depend entirely on that...It was a fineline between the two & if secretor that is what tips me into being an Explorer... ;) Nobody in NZ seems to do it here...and Australia Post managed to lose the one I recently sent to  Pathlab while I was over there:o
Added - I see we are all posting at the same time!  You probably didn't see that then Possum.  
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:02am; Reply: 58
OK a bit more rethinking in managing these postings.

I suggest we keep two different summary tables: one for those food items that have a typebase food equivalent and another one for those items that are specific to local areas that have not been tested by Dr D.  We should then specify our experiences with those items if they have been tested by forum members ensuring that we identify blood types, genotypes, or Swami genotypes from those experiences.

At the same time, we can check to see if those items have been added to the lists of food to be added to the typebase (there is an existing thread for that elsewhere in the forum), and add those items there.  If we keep checking the Typebase we may soon have the wonderful surprise of finding these food items there!!  It is all team work... :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:07am; Reply: 59
Good Idea Cristina.  Sea Bream I've been eating (was frozen from NZ) is a Super Bene for explorers and certainly feels like it.  It must be equivalent.

Possum, you can read my and Jenny's recent possum stories here http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1253660214/s-21/highlight-possum/#num21  It's all your fault! just kidding  ;)
Posted by: Jumari, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:13am; Reply: 60
Cristina, Happy to work as a team. Let me know what you need. Forgive me if I seemed to have been taking over. Just thought getting rid of the ones we know are not available would be a good start.
Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:20am; Reply: 61
Possum, you can read my and Jenny's recent possum stories here http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1253660214/s-21/highlight-possum/#num21  It's all your fault! just kidding  
rofl :B but not after I read your story!! :o Pesky aren't we??!! :-/
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:22am; Reply: 62
Quoted from Possum

We had a currant bush when I used to live in Aus...I've always thought the packets of currants were the berry types?? The grape type are something else aren't they - can't remember the name but more gourmet/expensive? :-/


Possum,
Thanks for your valuable contribution too.  No, the packets of currants, the dry fruit variety that you get in the supermarket are definitely the grape variety.  I have contacted the supplier (at least for Woolworths, but I think other big supermarkets use them too) and they phoned me back today to confirm that they are the grape variety.

And GheeWhiz, I agree with you, those berries look sensational!! (drool)
Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:43am; Reply: 63
Quoted from Cristina
Possum,Thanks for your valuable contribution too.  No, the packets of currants, the dry fruit variety that you get in the supermarket are definitely the grape variety.  I have contacted the supplier (at least for Woolworths, but I think other big supermarkets use them too) and they phoned me back today to confirm that they are the grape variety.

Glad you clarified that!!! Ta  ;) Cos here was me thinking, if I do turn out to be an explorer, I would be able to eat currants...as they are a diamond:o

Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 3:46am; Reply: 64
Are we busy bees.  We are all having so much fun!! our fingers are all getting a work out at the same time!!  This is great everyone!! :)

With this buzz of activity, we have to forgive each other for answering to things that have already been edited, or deleted, or whatever.  But, this is our forum, and everyone's ideas are welcomed. Just posting something here may inspire not only somebody else, but even ourselves to an even greater idea. So keep them coming.

Another management tip.  Because there is a 72hr restriction for editing posts, and to economize space, I will keep updating the summary tables, adding food to them (even from later posts) until I can edit it no more, in which case, we start a new table.
To quickly get to these tables, we can just use the search tab above here and  search for 'TypeBase Food choices Summary' or 'Local Food choices Summary'. You can see I started on the Typebase one, I am also working on the local one. ... :) :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, September 28, 2009, 4:32am; Reply: 65
Quoted from Symbi

Just realised, in our garden right now we have many brazillian cherries on the tree.  http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/brazcherry.htm  If I leave some for the resident possums, don't see why I can't eat some in moderation (black dot).  They grow well around the sub-tropics and probably come under cherries  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?104


Brazilian (Surinam) cherries are not related to regular cherries.

They are in the Myrtle family (along with cloves, guava, feijoa, allspice, and eucalyptus).

Cherries are in the Rose family (along with plums, peaches, almonds, and apricots).


Given this I think you have to consider them as neutral (unrated) and not a black dot.
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 4:37am; Reply: 66
It's not that easy with a fish list that uses common names, because you will find that when you look up these common names on a U.S. fish name base you come up with a scientific name that is usually unrelated to any fish, even the fish of the same common name here which has its own scientific name.
Also, when the Australian fish list is worked over  it might be good to delineate family and species.
It is a most frustrating business, and that is why I only came up with a handful of fish which are actually the same throughout the world. C sharp, have you seen my fish list or would you like it?
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, September 28, 2009, 4:55am; Reply: 67
Quoted from Jenny
I thought I would ask you to help me understand your list. I suppose that NA stands for not available, but what is A? Available (in Australia??),



* Fish not found In Australia or NZ marked NA (Not Available)
* Fish found in Australia or NZ marked A (Available)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 5:20am; Reply: 68
Regarding fish lists (I am compiling the tables, but I am also contacting official authorities to confirm our findings, if possible):

I have just finished talking to the Department of Fisheries in Qld, (132523) and they confirmed that we can get Butterfish in Australia, it gets fished in Australian waters.

I have also find the Australian CAAB Taxon report (CAAB Taxon code 37 363001) at this link:
http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.caab_report?spcode=37363001

Also, there is something to be awared of when buying Butterfish, particularly from fish and chips shops, we could get really sick with some substitutes.  The warning comes from Victoria, though it may also apply to other states too.  Notwithstanding this, the real Butterfish seems to be very tasty.

This link comes from the Bendigo Shire Council in Victoria:

http://www.bendigo.vic.gov.au/Files/Fact_Sheet_Butter_Fish.pdf
:) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 5:34am; Reply: 69
Quoted from Jenny
It's not that easy with a fish list that uses common names, because you will find that when you look up these common names on a U.S. fish name base you come up with a scientific name that is usually unrelated to any fish, even the fish of the same common name here which has its own scientific name.
..


Very true Jenny.  I first do a search on the Typebase scientific name and rely on it being correct.  I discussed with the department of Fisheries if American and Australian scientific names could be different.  He said that in general they should be the same if they referring to the same fish, but, that does not work like that all the time, and we may find different names for the same fish.  So the research has to cover everything, scientific names, latin names, common names, photos, descriptions ...  Feel?, touch?, taste? Phewwwww! Where is that Jet?  not easy with any list ....  We will get there eventually ... :) :) :)

Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 5:44am; Reply: 70
Also, on the subject of Butterfish, we may find them in Australia with the following scientific names:

Selenotoca multifasciata
and
Scatophagus multifasciatus
with the standard name being: Butterfish

Typebase scientific name: SELENOTOCA MULTIFASCIATA

Jenny, I am adding this info to the list you sent me.  Thanks Warior!! ;D
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 6:07am; Reply: 71
What I want to add to the pawpaw information is that I purchased a tin of PawPaw from my organic health food store, and found on opening that the flesh is red, quite unlike most of the fruit we buy here, although red pawpaws are slowly becoming available as well. I could not differentiate this tinned fruit from the red that I enjoy fresh. The product was grown in Sri Lanka, but certified under USDA organic rules. the brand is
Bare Foods, organic PAW PAW chunks in pineapple juice. No added sugar.

So my hopeful conclusion is that Paw Paw is the red one, and papaya is the yellow one. simplistic, but hey!
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 6:11am; Reply: 72
Quoted from C_Sharp



* Fish not found In Australia or NZ marked NA (Not Available)
* Fish found in Australia or NZ marked A (Available)


thanks C sharp, I deleted this query when I found just after posting that  it had come from another mailing earlier and had been defined. You were quick off the mark!!!

Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 6:12am; Reply: 73
Quoted from Cristina
Also, on the subject of Butterfish, we may find them in Australia with the following scientific names:

Selenotoca multifasciata
and
Scatophagus multifasciatus
with the standard name being: Butterfish

Typebase scientific name: SELENOTOCA MULTIFASCIATA

Jenny, I am adding this info to the list you sent me.  Thanks Warior!! ;D


good work detective, glad you are taking the scientific names into consideration; will you keep your master list going, and in a couple of weeks I will request an update from you?

Posted by: Jumari, Monday, September 28, 2009, 6:40am; Reply: 74
Jenny and Cristina...Here I found a site with Australian fish varieties that are commercially available with their scientific names. Many more varieties than we have discussed so far.

http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.fish_names_list

I once again would like to apologize if I was too quick off the mark. My aim is to help and not to confuse. Yes I agree that the scientific name is important. Like you say Cristina its a big task matching names, photos, etc etc. So I suggest that you divide the list between all those that are volunteering to help.
Posted by: Possum, Monday, September 28, 2009, 6:42am; Reply: 75
We have some fish over here that I haven't heard of... ;) Then there are more common ones but I'm not sure if they are the same as the Aussie ones??!! :-/ I'm assuming so...but have included their scientific names...
Grey mullet
Piper (Also known as a garfish)
Yellow-eyed mullet
Flounder
Wrasse (also called kelpie, guffy and paketi)
Red cod & Blue Cod
Groper
Hoki
tarakihi
red mullet
snapper
RAINBOW TROUT (Oncorhynchus mykiss)
CHINOOK SALMON (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)
Synonymy: Quinnat salmon, King salmon, Spring salmon
SOCKEYE SALMON (Oncorhynchus nerka)
Synonymy: Blueback salmon, Red salmon, Kokanee
BROWN TROUT (Salmo trutta)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 7:02am; Reply: 76
Paw Paw (american) = Asimina triloba, member of custard apple family
Paw Paw (australian) = Carica papaya also called Papaya in Australia

You are right Jenny, they use the PawPaw term in all possible combinations in Australia, but all tend to make reference to the Carica papaya plant, not the Asimina triloba plant of US.  My Swami list has PAW PAW (asimina triloba) as a diamond and Papaya (carica papaya) as a SF.  I will update the table to indicate that Paw Paw refers to american type of custard apple and Papaya is our pawpaws.

Who said the fish list was complicated?  Paw Paws / Papaya is not far behind ... :)
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 8:03am; Reply: 77
Quoted from Jumari
Jenny and Cristina...Here I found a site with Australian fish varieties that are commercially available with their scientific names. Many more varieties than we have discussed so far.

http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.fish_names_list

I once again would like to apologize if I was too quick off the mark. My aim is to help and not to confuse. Yes I agree that the scientific name is important. Like you say Cristina its a big task matching names, photos, etc etc. So I suggest that you divide the list between all those that are volunteering to help.

Glad we are on the same page; the site you mention above is one of the ones I used a lot initially. There are several other sites too, see the list called "fish base sites" if you have received an attachment from me..

Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 8:08am; Reply: 78

Quoted from Cristina
Paw Paw (american) = Asimina triloba, member of custard apple family
Paw Paw (australian) = Carica papaya also called Papaya in Australia

You are right Jenny, they use the PawPaw term in all possible combinations in Australia, but all tend to make reference to the Carica papaya plant, not the Asimina triloba plant of US.  My Swami list has PAW PAW (asimina triloba) as a diamond and Papaya (carica papaya) as a SF.  I will update the table to indicate that Paw Paw refers to american type of custard apple and Papaya is our pawpaws.

Who said the fish list was complicated?  Paw Paws / Papaya is not far behind ... :)

What is your opinion about the fruit in the tin I found Cristina? It looks and tastes like our red pawpaw,and has a U.S. stamp of approval., so it must be what they call PawPaw.
This is doing my head in! As yours are both in the good column it is really only of academic interest to you I suppose, but for me, papaya is only a neutral, so I don't want to waste the opportunity of using a better fruit. :-/
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 8:21am; Reply: 79
Jenny, if it tastes like banana custard then it has to be the american Paw Paw, if it tastes like our Paw Paws, then it is our paw paw, specially if it is red flesh.  The american one is only yellowish.  That is what it was reported at a previous thread on the subject.  ::) ??)
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 28, 2009, 11:13am; Reply: 80
Well, dang!!!
Pawpaw has suddenly disappeared from Typebase. Now there is only papaya.
Someone may be doing some sleuthing behind the scenes!!!
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 11:26am; Reply: 81
Yes, Jenny, I also noticed that a few minutes ago, but then I was not sure if PAW PAW was ever on the TypeBase database or it has allways only been in our Swami lists?  They are definately 2 different products.  Up late today too? I might give you a ring now if not too late ...
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, September 28, 2009, 5:18pm; Reply: 82
I have not tried using this setting, but Dr. D. noted that one can switch from US to UK food names in SWAMI. The UK names may be closer to Australian names, but still not fully the same.

Here is his instructions for setting SWAMI to the UK language variant:

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1247915915/s-new/#num42
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 9:33pm; Reply: 83
Thanks C_S, I am trying it now.
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 28, 2009, 10:28pm; Reply: 84
Well, now officially Cilantro is coriander leaves and coriander is coriander seeds.

But first things first.

no noticed any different in the meat category or eggs, except cornish hen now has added the word Poussin to it.

Fish and seafood:

Scrod became cod fillet
Shrimp added word prawn
Shad added River Herring

Vegetable Proteins
Lima Beans added Green Butter Beans
I think Litchi Nuts got substituted with Lychee stones?

Live Foods
Arugula is Rocket
Beet greens is Beetroot tops
Beet is Beetroot
Romaine Lettuce added word Cos in front
Escarole became Chicory leaf
Zuccini is now Courguette
Rutabaga is now Turnip (this is our Sweeds in australia
Turnips are Turnips

and there are a few others with added names to it

I did not notice any other major changes for my Swami, but I have only skimmed through it.   :) :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Tuesday, September 29, 2009, 12:31am; Reply: 85
Quoted from Cristina

I think Litchi Nuts got substituted with Lychee stones?

Lychee and Litchi are the same thing.

But do people eat the stones?

In the US while it is sometimes called a Lychee nut, people I know only eat the fruit part and leave the seed.

I have always assumed the entry for Lychee nuts should be the fruit and place under fruit rather than "vegetable protein".  Maybe Dr. Greenfield knows something about Lychee/Litchi that I do not.

I may have been misinformed, but I thought the stones were poisonous.
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, September 29, 2009, 12:48am; Reply: 86
I checked it on the internet, and I find that Lychee nut or stone, it is not the stone, it refers to the whole dry fruit

check this out:

http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/lycheefruit  :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, September 29, 2009, 12:59am; Reply: 87
Quoted from C_Sharp

Lychee and Litchi are the same thing.

I have always assumed the entry for Lychee nuts should be the fruit and place under fruit rather than "vegetable protein".  Maybe Dr. Greenfield knows something about Lychee/Litchi that I do not.

I may have been misinformed, but I thought the stones were poisonous.


On checking Typebase, I think it may have been put in the Vegie Proteins because 'people usually eat them as nuts'.  So obviously, the Lichi or Lychee stones under this category of food refers to the dry fruit.

The fresh version should be under fruits.  Does anybody has it there?

quote from typebase
When dried they're often referred to as litchi nuts because they resemble a nut — the shell turns a dark reddish brown and the flesh becomes brown and crisp. They're eaten as a snack, much in the same way as nuts or candy.
unquote

Remember to check reply 42 on page 2 of this thread for the updates to the summary table ... Welcome any editors ...

:) :)
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 29, 2009, 3:17am; Reply: 88
Quoted Text
Pawpaw has suddenly disappeared from Typebase


turns up in the GTD listings, but was never on typebase.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Tuesday, September 29, 2009, 12:24pm; Reply: 89
Just noticed this thread - Jenny could you please send me the list too!!

I come home to visit my family a lot (Brissie) and would like to eat right while I'm there and seafoods always high on the food list when I'm there  ;) .

Thanks

Andy
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 6:20am; Reply: 90
Thanks for the fish lists Jumari and C_Sharp and everyone for contributing (clever about changing Typebase!) especially Cristina for starting the summary on page 2.  Looks good so far.  It's a big project that everyone's trying to work on here, where to go from here!?  How can we help?  

I'm a bit confused though (easily really).  So we are not updating a fish list anymore? Are we just doing two lists now
1. of what's on typebase and equivalent or different here and
2. what is unique here (and New Zealand) and not on typebase.  
(most untested foods will be seafood and local bush tucker.)

Maybe I could research a few fish when I get a chance each time I get on here to help out.  There are alot of lists in this thread to be investigated.  I'll start through the alphabet of C_sharp and Jumari's list since we know seafood will be the biggest difference.

Barracuda - you can get it in Aus, though it's only neutral for GT4.  Same scientific name as in Typebase and picture looks the same http://www.fishnet.com.au/default.aspx?id=225&fishid=30 Typebase http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?48

BTW Maybe which genotypes can eat them shouldn't be on the list and I shouldn't even put them here because the food lists are copyright?

Maybe we should start another thread on items that aren't found in typebase to separate the two?  Then to make a summary on that thread (I guess it will never end as more food items will be found).  With summaries they could repeat throughout the thread as the edit time expires.  

It's hurting my head here!  Does that make sense?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 6:44am; Reply: 91
Quoted Text
BTW Maybe which genotypes can eat them shouldn't be on the list and I shouldn't even put them here because the food lists are copyright?

right, that info is not necessary, since with a tool like swamiexpress, GT lists become more personalized.......

and the purpose of this thread is to identify the fish species
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 6:50am; Reply: 92
Ghee Whiz,
It is OK, we will eventually get there.  Yes, as I mentioned earlier, it is better to have two separate lists.  The one summary I have already started with the equivalent food to typebase and our food lists, that includes fish as well.  As you can see I have included a few of those on the list.

We need to start another summary with those other food lists that are not part of the first one, that are unique to our local areas with suggestions on the comments area of who has try them and what their impressions were.

It is better to keep it all in the same thread so people knows there is the one place to come looking for these items and will not need to jump from one to the next.  Also, the items may jump from one summary to the other, from the unknown list to the accepted list, once Dr D's team get a chance to work on them and approve them.  

Also, although Barracuda may be neutral to GT4, according to the book, we do not know how it is placed for the rest of the individualized Swami lists.  We are so unique, that, all we can do is say that I am a and A+ SwamiXpress that is set to emphazize this and that and de-emphazize this and that in the diet, but eating Barracuda has not produced any adverced reaction on me.  If we get a few of those testimonies, then people may have an idea and decide if they want to try them or not. :) :)

I hope I expressed myself clear enough here, but I do not mind talking to you on the phone.  I love to get your help for a couple of things and we could be crowding this forum with ideas backwards and forwards ...
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 6:56am; Reply: 93
Quoted from Lola

right, that info is not necessary, since with a tool like swamiexpress, GT lists become more personalized.......

and the purpose of this thread is to identify the fish species


Yes's , Lola, exactly my point.  That is why I have not included anything related to blood type or gt in the summary, and I tend to be of the idea of identifying those species, making sure by consensus that they are unknown and non equivalent to Typebase or any of Dr D's lists and report them as such to be added to the typebase/swami lists ... :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 7:05am; Reply: 94
I have been looking at Perch for example, Typebase identifies a few different ones, but my swami list listed 3:

Perch (SF), Sea Perch (Neutral) and Orange Roughy or Deep Sea Perch (toxin).

On checking Typebase, I get the idea that this Super Food Perch in Swami refers to any Fresh river Perch, that it could be the white, silver or yellow.  We have those in Australia (I am breeding silver in my AP tank), yellow or Jade Perch native of Barcoo river is very popular and white Perch, I am sure we can get that.  

The Sea perch in Australia there are two variates, the inshore and the offshore.  The offshore Perch is the Orange Roughy, and it is a ground feeder at deep ocean depths.  The sea perch, is found in shallower waters around Australia.  

That is the sort of information I gather we may need to reach concensus in and decide if they go in the equivalent summary table or the unknown summary table. :)

A few of us can take a few of these fishes and do the background investigation for it, lists findings here and then we decide, yes, lets put it here or there ...
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 7:13am; Reply: 95
TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 2
TypebaseAU/NZ Equivalent Comments Countries
Meats
Poultry
Cornish HenSpring chickenYoung chicken,male or female
Eggs/Roe
Fish & Seafood
AbalonePauaNZ only - Reply 99NZ
AbaloneAbalone,Blacklip,brownlip or Greenlip (ex Muttonfish ) - Reply 99AU
AnchoviesAnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only
BarracudaShort finned (barracuda,pike,snook)Small barracuda, See  Reply 105  
ButterfishButterfishBanded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped Butterfish. See warning on Reply 68 about toxic substitutes
ScrodCod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
ShrimpPrawn
Dairy Products
Vegetable Proteins
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
Fats and Oils
Carbohydrates
Live Foods
ArugulaRocketTaken from UK version of Swami
BeetBeet RootsTaken from UK version of Swami
Beet GreensBeetroot GreensTaken from UK version of Swami
EscaroleChicory LeafTaken from UK version of Swami
Romaine LettuceCos Lettuce
RutagabaSweedesIs the yellow parsnip
ZucciniZucciniCourguette in UK version of Swami
Fruits
PapayaPapaw,PawPaw or PapayaCommon Australian paw paw
Paw PawPoor Mans BananaA member of custard apple plant
Currant Red/BlackBlackcurrant/RedcurrantNot the grape variety
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
OrangeOrange
OrangeTangerine in Nepal only (check Kumar post below)Nepal
TangerineMandarin/Tangerine
Spices
CilantroCorianderThe  herb
CorianderCoriander SeedsThe  seeds
Beverages
Condiments

This summary continues on or after Reply 129

See what else we are eating in the southern hemisphere that is not on Typebase by jumping to the summary table posted in reply 113.
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 7:19am; Reply: 96

Cristina, good list, but what about also adding these changes when you changed Typbase to UK version:

Shad added River Herring
Lima Beans added Green Butter Beans
Arugula is Rocket
Beet greens is Beetroot tops
Beet is Beetroot
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 7:38am; Reply: 97
I am doing it right now, I am adding the category names too to make it easier to find something and some sort of alphabetical order within the categories.  Sounds good?  Good work GW. :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 11:04am; Reply: 98
Some more research:

US Paw Paw vs AU Custard Apple,  they are from the same family, PawPaw being the only one in that family that suits temperate climate, the rest in the group including our Custard Apple are adapted to warmer climates.

It seems that they both have similar nutritional values, I am trying to find reliable sources of information, not easy.  So far I found
this website for American PawPaw (check tables 2 and 3 in the article):
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/pawpaw/cooking.htm

If we could only find a similar table for the Custard Apple, we should get a better idea to see if we could use it in place of PawPaw in the southern part of the world.  This is the best site I could locate for nutritional info on Custard Apples:

http://www.gardenology.org/wiki/Custard-apple

What do you think? ::)(book2) :)

PS:  I find a better one and it is tipping me over to give this fruit the thumps up for PAWPAW substitute here!!

http://www.custardapple.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=47&Itemid=54
and here:
http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/benefits-of-custard-apple-2171.html
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 1:14pm; Reply: 99
Research on Abalone:

http://www.fishnames.com.au/fishnames/fishnames.php?caab=24%20038006

Abalone = Paua in NZ
Abalone = Green or brown or black lip abalone in Australia.  Obsolete name in aussie is Muttonfish which may still be known under.

So this one goes into the equivalent summary. :)(book2)
Posted by: Jenny, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 9:12pm; Reply: 100
I shall offer my body to science, and test custard apple whilst repeating the mantra---this is the same as american pawpaw. I will report back (if I survive the experiment).
Excellent progress on this thread, thanks Cristina and everyone. ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 9:48pm; Reply: 101
Research on Barracuda:

Typebase warn us that the great barracuda that grows to about 100pds has toxic flesh, so it should be avoided, but the scientific name cited is precisely the one for the great ocen barracuda, both in US or Australia!

The description though seems to indicate that a smaller barracuda fish of not more than 4 to 8 pounds is the one to eat.  I wonder if this is the Barracudina? The pacific or indian pacific barracudina?
http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.caab_report?spcode=37126006&frames=Y

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Ribbon-Barracudina-Arctozenus-risso-Bonaparte-1840/ ??)
Posted by: Jumari, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 9:53pm; Reply: 102
I can see now why the Aussie Moonfish is not the same as the American halfmoon fish.

http://www.hooklinesinker.tv/gallery/2009/16_moonfish.jpg

Thats one we can eliminate.
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 10:05pm; Reply: 103
Jumari,  do you want to take that one on and post here your research?

It looks like a little devil, doesn t it? (evil) :)
Posted by: Jumari, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 10:59pm; Reply: 104
Cristina...Being of an A bloodtype as yourself. Fish is our main source of protein. And because of our location, the list we have is cut in less than half. My immediate goal, is to hopefully expand that list to have more options and remove those that are just adding to the confusion. We can take on the entire Australian fish species list (some of which are inedible) or look into the fish that are readily available at most fish shops.

Just yesterday, I noticed that they had Spanish Mackarel fillets for sale. I hadn't seen them here before. That and a whole bonito. I'm just hoping that we can prioritize on the edible fish and then continue on with the rest afterwards. There is perch, snapper, red snapper, blue eyed cod and  ocean trout that I'm currently avoiding because I don't know whether they are the same as the american variety.

One thing for sure. I do miss eating prawns, they are so easy to cook and find. Not to mention crab. Maybe next lifetime. :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, September 30, 2009, 11:01pm; Reply: 105
Barracuda Research:

I am coming to the conclusion that the equivalent of the small barracuda cited in the typebase is the australian Snook or      Sphyraena novaehollandiae

Check this fishnames website for snook entry:

http://fishnames.net.au/fishnames/printfriendly.php?title=&list=cat-12&type=&sort=standard&search (book2) :)

I think we can put this in the equivalent table.   :)
Posted by: Jenny, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 2:12am; Reply: 106
Quoted from Jumari
Cristina...Being of an A bloodtype as yourself. Fish is our main source of protein. And because of our location, the list we have is cut in less than half. My immediate goal, is to hopefully expand that list to have more options and remove those that are just adding to the confusion. We can take on the entire Australian fish species list (some of which are inedible) or look into the fish that are readily available at most fish shops.

Just yesterday, I noticed that they had Spanish Mackarel fillets for sale. I hadn't seen them here before. That and a whole bonito. I'm just hoping that we can prioritize on the edible fish and then continue on with the rest afterwards. There is perch, snapper, red snapper, blue eyed cod and  ocean trout that I'm currently avoiding because I don't know whether they are the same as the american variety.

One thing for sure. I do miss eating prawns, they are so easy to cook and find. Not to mention crab. Maybe next lifetime. :)


I agree, just go with the fish that we see in our fishmongers; my list was based on winter fish in the Canberra markets, so clearly there are far more all over the country, and with the change of season; that is why it is so good that many of us are taking an interest in this issue.
Jumari to eat prawns and crabs, what species do you think you will need to be reborn as?
;D

Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 3:01am; Reply: 107
How about we take all these local fishes and place them in a table indicating, common name, scientific name (if known), Location (Qld, Tassie, NSW, NZ ...) and a pointer to the testimonials indicating the number of the particular replies that recommended these fishes.  Then people will look for their local fish and be able to quickly find who has been eating them and if there have been any bad reactions to it or not.

The table could look something like this:
Non TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 1
Common Name   Scientific Name   Location   Testimonials  
Fish and seafood
Fishweird nameqld, tassieReply xx,yy,zz

We will not be saying this is good for ABO type A, or B or GT Teacher or Gatherer or others, but we will be striving to include in our replies as much information about our unique composition as possible.  Posting, I ate it, I like it will be good to know, but adding the other extra info that make us to be us, will be better.  We may then be able to spot a trend, without specifically recommending it is good for this or that ABO, after all we are no doctors and this is not a doctor supervised trial.  Everything is done at our own risk for the good of the community, with the best intentions and with a lot of fun!!
;D ;D :) :)

Jenny, Jumari, GW or others, will you like to start that table here? or do you want me to?  Either way I do not mind.  Team work, team work ...
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 3:28am; Reply: 108
Quoted from Jumari
...
Just yesterday, I noticed that they had Spanish Mackarel fillets for sale. I hadn't seen them here before. That and a whole bonito. I'm just hoping that we can prioritize on the edible fish and then continue on with the rest afterwards. There is perch, snapper, red snapper, blue eyed cod and  ocean trout that I'm currently avoiding because I don't know whether they are the same as the american variety.

One thing for sure. I do miss eating prawns, they are so easy to cook and find. Not to mention crab. Maybe next lifetime. :)


DH loves those praws and crab too, but so far he is using this lifestime to enjoy it, although I think he is a Teacher ...

Did you ended up buying any of those fishes? or are they toxins in your swami?  The spanish one is a neutral in mine, I do not have bonito ???
Posted by: Jumari, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 5:09am; Reply: 109
I'm not a very good cook but yesterday my partner taught me how to foil / wrap fish and oven bake them for just 20 minutes. We had a fillet of Barramundi (not tested) and Ocean Perch (not yet matched). Tastewise, the Barra was way better with just Olive oil and Garlic. I'm taking a gamble with that one but I don't think its a bottom feeder or oily fish.

Its good to know that John Dory is out for A's. By the look of the Ling Ling, that one looks suspiciously like a bottom feeder too as it is flat ugly thing with strange whiskers. The sort of thing you find at the bottom.

Spanish Mackarel was a good find. But it doesn't seem to be in the Typebase. But it is in Swami. And guess what its a black dot for me at the moment.

I have cut and paste the list of fish that Jenny found equivalents for. I hope you don't mind if I post that here. That way other Australians that come to the site can easily see them without having to ask someone for a list.

Common name  Latin name  nearest Latin name in U.S.         Common name in U.S.
Gold band snapper    lutjanidae                utjanus campechanus               nth red
Luderick (blackfish) girella tricuspidate     girella nigricans   0paleye fish                        
mullet (whole)            mugil cephalis             same flathead mullet /black mullet            
Orange roughy (deep sea perch)       hoplostethus atlanticus    same              same  
Rainbow trout   oncorhynchus mykis    same        - rainbow trout/coastrange trout                 Red snapper (fillets) (breams?)  sparidae    lutjanus campechanus         nth red snapper
Salmon tails (fillets) farmed         oncorhynchus        same     many different names      
Snapper (whole) (breams)  sparidae      lutjanus campechanus            nth red snapper  
Swordfish (steaks)     xiphias gladius                 same                     same/broadbill      
Yellowfin tuna sashimi (steaks)   thunnus albacares    same                            same    

  
Posted by: Jumari, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 5:15am; Reply: 110
Quoted from Jenny


I agree, just go with the fish that we see in our fishmongers; my list was based on winter fish in the Canberra markets, so clearly there are far more all over the country, and with the change of season; that is why it is so good that many of us are taking an interest in this issue.
Jumari to eat prawns and crabs, what species do you think you will need to be reborn as?
;D




To answer your question I think I'll stick to being human but not sure about blood type A. Which blood type has the largest selection of choices, I'll chose that one.

Looking at the above list, we haven't got many fish to chose from have we? Even after including those recent ones Cristina has added. Have any of you ever eaten Barracuda or seen it in the market?
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 5:26am; Reply: 111
That is great idea Jumari, I am adding those to the list.  I have been going back to the posts and answering the earlier queries, like your Mackarel.  I find some information and in the next few minutes I will be updating the summary with the matches and of course posting my research here first.
School holidays in aussieland and have been babysitting grandkids quite a bit the last few days, so apologies if I have been a bit slow here, but I have been researching in the background and posting as I go along.  Slowly but surely we get there. Keep on posting your research as you go along, with links to where the basis of your decisions come from. :)  Nice to have you in the team Jumari.
That fish sounds mouth watering.  I used to eat a lot of barramandi, but not since GT, I have been eating Perch, whatever I can get too and it is OK for both DH and myself (both A+ and Swami BTD/GTD Teacher.   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 5:31am; Reply: 112
Quoted from Jumari


Looking at the above list, we haven't got many fish to chose from have we? Even after including those recent ones Cristina has added. Have any of you ever eaten Barracuda or seen it in the market?


All in due course, by the time we finish here there will be heaps to choose from.  Have faith ...   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 5:43am; Reply: 113
Non TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 1
Common Name   Scientific Name   Location   Testimonials  
Fish and seafood
Barramundi(Lates calcarifer) Australia,NewZealandbarra,giant Perch, aussie seabass,silver jack - Reply 108,114,117
Blue MackerelScomber australasicus Australia,NewZealandJapanece or Pacific or Spotted Mackerel, Spotted Chub - Reply 8
Blue-eyed CodHyperoglyphe antarctica Australia,NewZealandAntarctic butterfish, deepsea trevally, blue eye trevalla, - Reply 31
GoosefishLophiodes naresiAustralia,NewZealand Shortspine, Smooth and Broadhead Goosefish. Edible fish in this group may be equivalent to Monkfish Reply 26,131  
HokiMacruronus novaezelandiae Australia,NewZealandBlue Grenadier, Blue Hake, Whiptail Hake - Reply 7
GemfishRexea solandriAustralia,NewZealand Also Hake,King Couta, Kingfish, Silver Kingfish and Southern Kingfish Reply 26, 128
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 5:44am; Reply: 114
Barramundi

http://www.nativefish.asn.au/barramundi.html

Some mouthwatering pictures here:

http://www.abfa.org.au/quality.html

Very popular in the aussie, NZ? cuisine, but ensure the source/supplier is reputable and it comes from clean waters.

The Wikipedia encyclopedia has the following warning:
quote
    Not to be confused with the Barramundi Cod or the Australian members of the genus Scleropages (which sometimes are referred to as Barramundis).
unquote

So I gather the one we want to eat is Perch Barramundi, or barra, or ... what else? I think I listed a few names on the summary (reply 113). :):)
Posted by: Jumari, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 8:42am; Reply: 115
Yes Cristina...A list of Aussie and NZ fish that have not been tested would probably also be beneficial to everyone.

I can't help but wonder how the testing phase is carried out. Does NAP just require a sample of the food and somehow mix it in with different blood samples or does it involve actual volunteers of differing blood groups that have to be tested over a period of time? Any NAP people care to give us a general description of how its done? For Example, what would be involved in testing  "Barramundi"?
Posted by: Jenny, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 8:54am; Reply: 116
Slightly off topic, but could be helpful to Sydneysiders or Melbournians----Gina, our very helpful friend in NZ will be in Australia for the mind/body/spirit festivals soon, with some NAP samples for sale I understand. I will copy her information for those of you who want to meet her.


Quote: The Sydney MBS Festival starts on Thursday 5th November until Sunday 8th November and the Melbourne dates are Friday 19th November until Sunday 22nd November.
The website is http://www.mbsfestival.com.au
Posted by: shells, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 12:16pm; Reply: 117
A very big THANK YOU to Christina, Jenny, Jumari and others who are putting all this hard work into the untested fish.  

"Flake" which is a commonly used name for shark and sold as battered fish in many fish & chip shops, would I assume, be an avoid for all GT's.

The reef fish are in plenty up here in Qld., coral trout, red emperor, barra etc. I have been eating these and would not know if I should but have not noticed any obvious effects.  What would a negative effect be?   ??)

Thanks for the currant tip...been consuming these daily for most of this year as I thought I was snacking on diamond food!   :X   :B   :'(
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 8:58pm; Reply: 118
Quoted from shells


"Flake" which is a commonly used name for shark and sold as battered fish in many fish & chip shops, would I assume, be an avoid for all GT's.

The reef fish are in plenty up here in Qld., coral trout, red emperor, barra etc. I have been eating these and would not know if I should but have not noticed any obvious effects.  What would a negative effect be?   ??)

Thanks for the currant tip...been consuming these daily for most of this year as I thought I was snacking on diamond food!   :X   :B   :'(


Thank you too Shell, by posting your thought here it serves as a testimony for these foods.  I will add your reply to the 'Not in Typebase' table.

I was disappointed about the currant tip too.  They were part of my survival package.  It is such a convenient yummy food and also, I did not notice any adverse effects, which is to expect, because, as doctor D mentioned:

Quoted from Dr. D
The sicker we are, the more sensitive to avoids our tissues become.


So, we are definitely in the progress path when we can afford to 'enjoy' these hidden avoids without noticing ill effects (but since I pushed them to the no no pile) ... :) ;D
Posted by: Jumari, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 9:21pm; Reply: 119
Hi Shells,

In my opionion, flake or shark is a neutral for some. If it is not mentioned as a superfood or toxin in your respective  Genotype fish list, its a neutral and OK to eat.

With regards to negative effects. I would say that they would vary from the obvious to the more subtle. Stomach pain, diarrhea, head aches and sometimes just lower energy levels. But wait till someone else confirms my observations before listening to me.

Good luck with your diet and welcome.
Posted by: Jenny, Thursday, October 1, 2009, 10:07pm; Reply: 120
Quoted from Jenny
What I want to add to the pawpaw information is that I purchased a tin of PawPaw from my organic health food store, and found on opening that the flesh is red, quite unlike most of the fruit we buy here, although red pawpaws are slowly becoming available as well. I could not differentiate this tinned fruit from the red that I enjoy fresh. The product was grown in Sri Lanka, but certified under USDA organic rules. the brand is
Bare Foods, organic PAW PAW chunks in pineapple juice. No added sugar.

So my hopeful conclusion is that Paw Paw is the red one, and papaya is the yellow one. simplistic, but hey!


Well, the second tin of the same product that I have just opened, whilst it has a picture of a red papaya on the label, turned out to be yellow, looking more like mango pieces than anything else, but, wait for it, with a slight taste of custard apple. Bingo.

Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 2, 2009, 2:10am; Reply: 121
Quoted Text
Any NAP people care to give us a general description of how its done? For Example, what would be involved in testing  "Barramundi"?


ok, you asked for it!!!  ;D
it ain t a piece of cake!!!

Quoted Text
Dr D
1.you must have the requisite
training in immunology, hematology, biochemisty, genetics and pathophysiology.


2. Understand the cellular dynamics of ABO sufficient to develop appropriate
technique.

Understand the molecular biology and elemental cytology behind ABH secretion,
gut glycosylation and membrane dynamics. Understand the mechanics of cell
membrane manipulation techniques, such as  basic cell washing techniques, DTT
de-antigenation and membrane electrical zeta potential. Understand and
execute capably various direct and indirect antiglobulin techniques (Coombs
testing).  Possess  basic cytology/histology apparatus (incubators, cell
culture materials) to propagate organ-specific cell lines.

3. Capably and reliably execute various ABO related serological techniques.


Understand and perform capably saline titration of anti A, anti-B and anti-AB
IgM antibodies with serum titer determination. Comprehend and perform
capably anti-A and anti-B IgG1-4 block (ala Kabat and Weiner) titration.

4. Develop proper extraction technique for lectins and other biologically
active food constituents.

Have access to an research grade electrophoresis device and understand
capably the techniques of gel immunoelectrophoresis and immuno-diffusion.
Possess a full range of cell growth adjuvants that allow in vitro lectins to
behave as in biological conditions.  Perform and understand various techniques
of lymphocyte blastogenesis and mitogen studies.  Undertand lectin
specificities and competitive inhibition techniques involving blocking sugars.





Now, on top of eveything else, do this for a minimum of five years.  Shorter
than that and I'm probably not going to believe your results.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, October 2, 2009, 3:32am; Reply: 122
Quoted from Lola


ok, you asked for it!!!  ;D
it ain t a piece of cake!!!



And this is for BTD.

Even more factors are considered in rating foods for GenoType and SWAMI diets.
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, October 2, 2009, 6:02am; Reply: 123
In other words a diploma in Rocket Science. Thanks for the explanation, I truly appreciate it. Where does that leave the humble Barramundi though? Can we send you one so we can maybe have results 5 years from now?
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 2, 2009, 6:10am; Reply: 124
Quoted Text
Where does that leave the humble Barramundi though?


you know the drill.....any unlisted food treat as neutral.....etc, etc
;)
Posted by: Dr. D, Friday, October 2, 2009, 11:00am; Reply: 125
So...

Where is the 'list' I can use to include some Aussie vernacular with the UK-English?
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 12:34pm; Reply: 126
Dr D, thanks very much for giving us hope by posting here!!

We have two summary tables going here.  A summary table (currrently on reply 95) where we list typebase food items with the corresponding names used in this part of the world.  The second table is a summary table dedicated to Seafood for those species popular in these areas but that have not been identified in the database yet. You find this table in posted Reply 113.

We are researching the net for scientific names and nutritional information for the local species and sometimes we have been able to match them to Typebase (then they get promoted to the first table).  If no match is found they will stay in the local summary or non Typebase table.
I have included a column with the posted Reply no. referencing the fish, so we can check if anyone has eaten the fish and what their effects have been.

Jenny's list is also posted here by Jumari on reply 109. Do you want us to e-mail it to you?  I am not sure if we can attach files in PM, but we can certainly use normal mail.  

Also, Dr D, in my search over the internet for Hoki fish, I came across a couple of links that seem to indicate that Hoki was included in your evaluations, but it is not listed in Typebase and it does not seem to list in our Swamis...?
By the way for Jhon Doe, Hake was a Beneficial and Hoki a Neutral according to his published Swami Pro.   ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 1:03pm; Reply: 127
Well, well, look what I found on the net, this may clarify and confuse us all.  I think it is a real eye opener and it demonstrates the difficulty of the task ahead for all of us, but particularly for Dr D. in his quest to make sense of our sea world.

I think we can use some of this info for our summaries.(book2)

Enjoy  ;D  and learn if you can, I am still trying:  (huh)

http://www.fishvictoria.com/pyoursay/tales/020521name.php
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 2:55pm; Reply: 128
Quoted from Jumari
I actually did go to the Sydney fish market and found other fish that are not on the list. I had some Kingfish Sashimi which was delicious, not knowing if it is a Toxin. The other is Gem fish.



sashimi Japaneese word meaning 'Pierced body'
The following link goes onto explaining how this applies to the any fish, like at the Sydney markets, here is an extract from it:

quote
One possibility of the name "pierced body" could come from the traditional method of harvesting. 'Sashimi Grade' fish is caught by individual handline, and as soon as the fish is landed, its brain is pierced with a sharp spike, killing it instantly, then placed in slurried ice.
unquote

So, Kingfish sashimi may refer to a Kingfish caught and killed in a special way.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sashimi

Now the following link from the Australian government, department of environment identifies the Eastern Gemfish ( Rexea solandri ) with the following other names: Gemfish, Hake, King Couta, Kingfish, Silver Kingfish and Southern Kingfish.  So the Kingfish sashimi you saw, could have been a confused Gemfish.

http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.pl?taxon_id=76339 (click on Taxonomy to get to the names part)

I am also throwing in the Australian taxon report link for gemfish and its equivalent american ITIS report:
http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.caab_report?spcode=37439002&frames=Y

http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt

And what Wikipedia has to say about Kingfish.  Take your pick:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingfish

... and of course, Gemfish is added to the non-Typebase summary.  Thanks Jumari for providing us with these entertaining fishes.  :) :)


Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 3:47pm; Reply: 129
Just find a website from the Australian Government, Department of Environment with the following information:

Quote
Species Selenotoca multifasciata (Richardson, 1846)
Striped Scat, Banded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped Butterfish
unquote

Selenotoca multifasciata is what the Typebase identifies as Butterfish, so Dory fish is now part of the equivalent table for Butterfish.

We love Dory, so now we will be eagerly looking for it!!
(drool) ;D

Here is the link:

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/abrs/online-resources/fauna/afd/taxa/Selenotoca_multifasciata
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 7:15pm; Reply: 130
Blue-eyed Cod Research:
Hyperoglyphe antarctica

ITIS code 172514
http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt

Australian CAAB Taxon report:
http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.caab_report?spcode=37445001&frames=Y

A nice Pic from the Australian DPI (Department of Primary Industries):
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/saltwater/sw-species/blue-eye-cod

More pics and descriptions from the Australian Museum.
http://australianmuseum.net.au/Blue-eye-Trevalla-Hyperoglyphe-antarctica-Carmichael-1818

In conclusion, the Blue-eyed Cod seems to be more of a Butterfish than a Cod. :-/ ;) :)  Placed it in the non-equivalent table on posted reply 113.
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:05pm; Reply: 131
Research on Monkfish:
Typebase sci name: LOPHIUS AMERICANUS  and its ITIS code is 164499
Common names listed at ITIS are : Goosefish, Monkfish
http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt

Lophius Americanus is also called American Angler being part of the angler family.  So, it may be safely to assume that its australian counterpart should be found in the same family, the Lophiidae  family.

http://foa.webboy.net/family/lophiidae

http://www.zoo-hoo.com/index.php?q=Angler_fish

All we need to confirm now is if this goosefish is edible like its american counterpart.

There are many other fishes we call Monkfish in Australian, like the very popular Angel Sharks, but they are not the same family as the one in typebase.

So, who knows Jumari, maybe the Monkfish you  took home was not the one intended to be  ??)

For the time being this one goes on both tables with a warning to await confirmation or report findings here.

:) :)


Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:36pm; Reply: 132
Note: Fish and Seafood category is now on a table of its own (check Reply 144)TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 3
TypebaseAU/NZ Equivalent Comments Countries
Meats
Poultry
Cornish HenSpring chickenYoung chicken,male or female
Eggs/Roe
Dairy Products
Vegetable Proteins
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
Fats and Oils
Carbohydrates
Live Foods
ArugulaRocketTaken from UK version of Swami
BeetBeet RootsTaken from UK version of Swami
Beet GreensBeetroot GreensTaken from UK version of Swami
EscaroleChicory LeafTaken from UK version of Swami
Mushroom/ChampignonWhite Mushroomsincl canned champignons, fresh button mushrooms, flat whites - Reply 139,145
Romaine LettuceCos Lettuce
RutagabaSweedesIs the yellow parsnip
ZucciniZucciniCourguette in UK version of Swami
Fruits
PapayaPapaw,PawPaw or PapayaCommon Australian paw paw
Paw PawPoor Mans BananaA member of custard apple plant
Currant Red/BlackBlackcurrant/RedcurrantNot the grape variety
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
OrangeOrange
OrangeTangerine in Nepal only (check Kumar post below)Nepal
TangerineMandarin/Tangerine
Spices
CilantroCorianderThe  herb
CorianderCoriander SeedsThe  seeds
Beverages
Condiments

This summary continues on or after Reply 145

See what else we are eating in the southern hemisphere that is not on Typebase by jumping to the summary table posted in reply 113.
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:49pm; Reply: 133
Research on Perches:

Ouch!! :o Fell off the perch!! (sleep)  Will continue with this one soon ...
(sleep);D :)
Posted by: Possum, Friday, October 2, 2009, 10:34pm; Reply: 134
Quoted from Cristina
Research on Perches:
Ouch!! :o Fell off the perch!! (sleep)  Will continue with this one soon ...
(sleep);D :)
:) :D 8)
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, October 2, 2009, 11:47pm; Reply: 135
I've been trying to find the instructions on how to access the UK Typebase.

Can someone just post a link to make it easy to get to?
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 12:01am; Reply: 136
Also, Dr D, in my search over the internet for Hoki fish, I came across a couple of links that seem to indicate that Hoki was included in your evaluations, but it is not listed in Typebase and it does not seem to list in our Swamis...?
Hoki is the one fish that is very affordable here in NZ so I buy it a lot...Its also a wonderful fish & has a mild to non "flavour" & a nice texture... so really hope it is good for type O's... :-/

Thanks heaps Cristina & all you others for all your work... :) (didn't  want to individually list you all, in case I forgot someone ;))  
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 12:33am; Reply: 137
that would be in your swami
Quoted Text
to change vernacular, select your choice from the
pull down option from Manage Account Screen.
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 2:48am; Reply: 138
Quoted from Lola
that would be in your swami

!
Lola, well done on the Swami spanish food lists!!  Felicitaciones!!
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 2:56am; Reply: 139
:)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 3:06am; Reply: 140
Good work everyone!  Thanks!
Going through the thread again and trying to complete some unfinished items.  It hurts my head to try and keep up with all on here though and keep my kid busy at the same time!

Quoted from Cristina
Commercial Mushrooms, Silver dollar mushrooms:

Agaricus bisporus
Extract From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Agaricus bisporus—known variously as the common mushroom, button mushroom, white mushroom, table mushroom, portobello mushroom, crimini mushroom, Swiss Brown mushrooms, also known as Cremini, Italian Brown, Italian mushroom, Roman Brown mushrooms, or cultivated mushroom —is an edible basidiomycete mushroom native to grasslands in Europe and North America. A. bisporus is cultivated in more than 70 countries.[1]


I was wondering if Champignons were okay to eat, we get canned here in Australia alot.  So I looked at a few websites with pictures of mushrooms including http://www.foodsubs.com/Mushroom.html.  When I looked it up in the Typebase (http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?502) I found that the french name for white mushroom is Champignon so I guess they are just small white mushrooms.  That may be helpful to someone though not aussie specific.
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 3:12am; Reply: 141
Thank you everyone for your hard work researching and compiling.  
Great Link Cristina about the fish names
changing http://www.fishvictoria.com/pyoursay/tales/020521name.php  
We're up against marketing wizards here and different names in different states, what are fish, criminals?

Jenny you were very bold to test the paw paw, thanks.  Everyone is
working so hard on this.  Sorry not much from me lately, busy with my little one at home at the moment.

Good research on the Barracuda Cristina.  

Did some searching of the Dadamo website for Barramundi:
Found this old post from the blood type forums.  

"Giant sea perch? 'Lates calcarifer?'

Posted By: ^heidi^ O+ ns iNFj
Date: Tuesday, 18 December 2001, at 12:37 p.m.

In Response To: barramudi (ROSIE 'downunder' A- ? sec nearly 30)

If that's what "barramudi" is, then I would think it is at least

neutral for As. Freshwater and sea perch are listed as good for both

secretor & nonsecretor type A.

http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archived/config.pl?read=133797

I hope Barra comes under Perch as it is so delicious and I've eaten it with no ill effects for a long time.  I'll vouch for it being good for A types too.



"
Deep sea fish are the least likely to have toxins - especially heavy

metals. Orange roughy, mostly caught in deep water off Tasmania, is

excellent! Wild barramundi is probably OK because the inland waterways

in the north are still pretty clean!

Avoid fish that are high up the food chain like shark (flake) and

couta (barracouta).

http://www.fishbase.org/search.cfm is a GREAT site, that lists common

names for over 25,000 varieties of fish -- and lists the scientific

names, so you can see if the fish are the same species, or same family

as the ones Dr D lists!

Good hunting!

Pat in Oz too
" from http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archivec/config.pl?read=108768

Here's a thread where Jenny explained more of how she made her fish
list: http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?v-print/m-1237141563/
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 4:28am; Reply: 142
Quoted from Symbi
Good Idea Cristina.  Sea Bream I've been eating (was frozen from NZ) is a Super Bene for explorers and certainly feels like it.  It must be equivalent.


Sorry it's actually called Ocean Bream aka tarakihi aka jackass morwong !  Maybe that's a good nickname for me now for getting the name wrong and trying to research this!

This is what it says on the label (1 advantage of buying frozen fish!):
Quoted Text
"Ocean Bream (nemadactylus macropterus) is also known as larakihi in New Zealand.  It is caught all year round (sic) with the largest catches from February to June.  The Flesh is whitish and has a firm texture.  It is suitable for most methods of cooking, including grilling, steaming and frying.  (It also has a picture very much like on the Fishbase page)"


http://www.fishbase.org/summary/speciessummary.php?id=10106
Quoted Text
(Note: distribution Indo-Pacific: St. Paul and Amsterdam islands in the Indian Ocean, southern Australia, including Tasmania, and New Zealand. Southwest Atlantic: southern South America.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarakihi

Sea or Ocean Bream (any kind of bream) are not listed as named in the D'Adamo Typebase. Sea Bream is listed in the Genotype Diet book though.  Searching the Dadamo site reveals Sea Bream is a common name for Porgy  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?322
Quoted Text
"Widely known as sea bream, there are many different varieties of this fish family in the United States and around the world. The most popular United States porgy is the scup, which is found in Atlantic waters. Porgies have a firm, low-fat flesh with a delicate, mild flavor. Although some grow to 20 pounds, most fall into the 1/2- to 3-pound range. They're available fresh and frozen, and are generally sold whole. The porgy is suitable for almost any method of cooking, including baking, grilling and frying."

The picture of the Porgy is quite different from the Tarakihi, though similarities in the body, different fins and eye location.  

Also found a different Typebase Entry for Scup with similar information, but it's different beneficially for different bloodtypes than the Porgy.  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?514

I see that Bream is a general term for many species of fish.  It is used to describe fish that are narrow, deep bodied species.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bream
Also, "The term sea bream is sometimes used for porgies (family Sparidae) or pomfrets (family Bramidae)"  

Looking at pomfrets there are many species under there not ours though, they are found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomfret.  Porgies look more similar to the fish but are in a totally different family so unfortunately, they don't seem to be related at all.  

I was about to say this is another unknown fish as the Sea Bream mentioned must be the porgy.  But checking the SWAMI for John Doe (created July 07) lists only Porgy (also scup, no pomfret).  However, the sample SWAMI for Jane Public (created March 08), lists both Sea Bream AND Porgy (and no pompfret, also lists scup (the most popular porgy type in a different category to porgy!).  So I guess Sea Bream must have been added later but not put in Typebase and could be many species of fish!!  

Cannot say if this is the Sea Bream listed in the GTD unfortunately.  Can say I've had no bad effects from eating it though!
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 5:25am; Reply: 143
Great work Ghee Whiz, studying your info to update the tables.  Keep them coming fellow researcher!
I feel with you regarding those beautiful boundles of joy, our kids, grandkids.  I had my grandkids quite a bit this fortnight with the school hols, so although my PC is on 24/7, I only got to work on it very little during the day.  Great progress last night though, got carry away and stay on all night!!!  Dr D' Protein blend for A's that I had for breakfast yesterday for the first time has done some magic trick, that and the fact that Dr D himself took time to post in our thread, spurred me on.  I slept most of the morning though.  Do not worry, I do not plan to do this again! :) ;) ;D the beauty of not having to go to work, you are your own time keeper ...
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 5:46am; Reply: 144
Extracted the Fish and Seafood category from the equivalent table to make them easier to manage.  We now have two dedicated tables for Fish, the equivalent and the local one.  Thanks everyone for these helpful suggestions and postings.  Great work!

TypeBase Fish and Seafood Choices Summary No 1
TypebaseAU/NZ Equivalent Comments
Fish & Seafood
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata )Paua ((Haliotidae Iris)NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata )(Haliotidae)Abalone,Blacklip(rubra),brownlip (conicopora) or Greenlip (laevigata) (ex Muttonfish ) - Reply 99
Anchovies (Engralis Mordax )canned AnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only (Engraulis encrasicolus)
Atlantic Cod(Gadus morhua)Atlantic CodSeafood Services Australia Reply 153  
BarracudaShort finned (barracuda,pike,snook)Small barracuda, See  Reply 105  
Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix)TaylorSeafood Services Australia See  Reply 153  
Bullhead(Ictalurus Nebulosus)NZ Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus)NIWA Atlas of NZ Reply 157  
ButterfishButterfishBanded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped Butterfish. See warning on Reply 68 about toxic substitutes
Carp(Cyprinus carpio)European CarpSeafood Services Australia Reply 153  
Herrings/Atlantic (Clupea Harengus Harengus)HerringsCaabTaxon code 37 085790 - Reply 156  
ScrodCod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
ShrimpPrawn
Silver PerchSilver PerchReply 133
Pollock (Pollachius Virens)ColeyCaabTaxon code 37 226796 Reply 162
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 6:42am; Reply: 145
Quoted from Symbi
Good work everyone!  ...
I was wondering if Champignons were okay to eat, we get canned here in Australia alot.  ...


I used to eat those tin mushrooms all the time, sauteeing them with cream and onion ... the bad old days.  Today I concentrate my efforts on the fresh varieties, there are always so many there!  But, we not always can get things fresh and it is good to have some canned reserves in the pantry.  Well now we can do it with piece of mind because I find this website too that seems to confirm that the champignon mushromms are indeed the same as the white mushrooms depicted in typebase.  They have the same Sci name.

Read on the mushromm descriptions from this 'How to grow, harvest etc' course on mushrooms:

http://www.acseduonline.com/courses/product.aspx?id=336

Does everybody agrees that the mushroom terminology in aussie/nz land is the same as the Typebase (Oyster, Shiitake, Enoki, Straw, etc mushrooms), therefore there is no need to post to these tables?  We are just concentrating on what is different, something that is here and it is not there (in the Typebase) or it is here under a different name and we are trying to match.  Any other mushrooms you came across that we do  not know how to place?
There are a couple in Typebase like the mitaake and black trumpet that I have never seen here, but then I have not visit any asian markets or specialty stores lately, that is the best bet to find these.
:) :)     Call to editors - Check Summary 3 Reply 131  
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 7:30am; Reply: 146
Yeah I agree that the names of mushrooms seem to be the same as in the USA (with relief)  :).  Only bought it up on here again in case other people using champignons have wondered where they come under.  I get them canned sometimes very convenient.  Of course fresh is best!

I've seen Mitaake mushrooms around.

Cristina - If they're alright on your SWAMI you could still saute them with Ghee or compliant oil with onion couldn't you?  As a side dish of course.

Thanks for adding them to the list, reckon we can leave mushrooms alone now!  :)  
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 7:39am; Reply: 147
GW, Your pickup on the champignons was excellent and it is on the table (not under fruit anymore, I do not think anyone notice though!). I was just referring to all the others, the terminology seems the same, so as you said, we can all breath now and close the mushy issue.  Unless of course, somebody else has something different to tell us.   ??)

The bad old days was referring to the bad old full fatty pasteurized, homogenized who know what else, full of additives cream .. :-/ Spoiling a perfectly good canned product.   :) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 8:06am; Reply: 148
Quoted from Symbi
Yeah I agree that the names of mushrooms seem to be the same as in the USA (with relief)  :).  Only bought it up on here again in case other people using champignons have wondered where they come under.  I get them canned sometimes very convenient.  Of course fresh is best!

I've seen Mitaake mushrooms around.

Cristina - If they're alright on your SWAMI you could still saute them with Ghee or compliant oil with onion couldn't you?  As a side dish of course.

Thanks for adding them to the list, reckon we can leave mushrooms alone now!  :)  


Where did you see Maitake mushrooms? I've been looking for them for years!!!

Posted by: Jenny, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 8:10am; Reply: 149
Quoted from Dr. D
So...

Where is the 'list' I can use to include some Aussie vernacular with the UK-English?

I would be more than happy to send my basic fish list but I don't think I can attach anything via the personal message system, but would need an email address to send to.

Posted by: Jenny, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 8:11am; Reply: 150
Quoted from Possum
Also, Dr D, in my search over the internet for Hoki fish, I came across a couple of links that seem to indicate that Hoki was included in your evaluations, but it is not listed in Typebase and it does not seem to list in our Swamis...?
Hoki is the one fish that is very affordable here in NZ so I buy it a lot...Its also a wonderful fish & has a mild to non "flavour" & a nice texture... so really hope it is good for type O's... :-/

Thanks heaps Cristina & all you others for all your work... :) (didn't  want to individually list you all, in case I forgot someone ;))  

I don't know where I got the following information, but I suspect that Hoki may be the same as Hake.

Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 9:12am; Reply: 151
Jenny, it looks like you survived the 'custard apple' experiment.  Have you tried them yet?  I have not seen any custard apples a the local shops yet, maybe it is too early, late? :)
Posted by: Jumari, Saturday, October 3, 2009, 9:20am; Reply: 152
Ladies, I've downloaded the Excell (xls) version of the CSIRO Fish list found on the link below and managed to find these matches so far. They have the same scientific name.

http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.fish_names_list


US Name (BTD)     Scientific Name               Aussie Equivalent

BLUEFISH                     POMATOMUS SALTATRIX      Tailor
CARP                        CYPRINUS CARPIO              European Carp
COD / ATLANTIC     GADUS MORHUA              Atlantic Cod


Also found that these are not the same fish;

(From BTD Typebase)
CATFISH     (ICTALURUS FURCATUS)
CHUB (KYPHOSUS LEMBUS)

not the same as the Australian variety;

Catfish (Arius spp)  or Freshwater Catfish - (Tandanus tandanus)
Chub Mackerel     (Scomber japonicus)

Let me know if you require further research. I will continue on with Scientific name matching with the rest of the BTD typebase. I also have a list of fish on the typebase that have no Austrailian counterpart, based on Scientific name.

Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 2:03am; Reply: 153
Well Done Jumari!
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 6:06am; Reply: 154
Quoted from Jenny
I don't know where I got the following information, but I suspect that Hoki may be the same as Hake.
Thanks Jenny... :)

Conveniently, one of my husband's colleagues has just left to take up a position with NZ Fisheries...so I may be able to source info from him in the furture re NZ species...
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 7:26am; Reply: 155
Quoted from Cristina
Jenny, it looks like you survived the 'custard apple' experiment.  Have you tried them yet?  I have not seen any custard apples a the local shops yet, maybe it is too early, late? :)


I suspect that they are summer tropical fruits, but I am keeping a look out. But the more I use the PawPaw in the cans that I mentioned earlier, the more I can taste a custard apple flavour. Which makes me think that the cans at least are genuine PawPaw, and not papaya. Which would be wonderful if true.

Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 7:51pm; Reply: 156
Research Herrings:
I have updated the equivalent fish table with Typebase Herrings, same in Australia.

Also, I have removed the country column and added scientific names to the summary.  Trying to pack as much useful info on these summaries as we can.

Jenny, I will be chasing those pawpaw tins on my next trip to the health shop.

Jumari, I have updated the equivalent fish summary with your info from reply 152.  Great work!!

Posum, we are looking forward to official reports from you backed up by Fisheries officials ... ;D

Keep up the good work everyone, continue doing research behind the scenes and posting here your findings.  :) ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 8:28pm; Reply: 157
Jumari, Possum,

I may have found a NZ equivalent for the Bullhead (catfish) according to this report from UNIDATA:

http://unidata.com.au/rc/freshwater/fishatlas/species/catfish

and this from the Australian Society:

http://www.asfb.org.au/pubs/2003/2003nz-13.htm#TopOfPage

So I am adding this Bullhead to the equivalent table.   :)
Posted by: Dr. D, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 9:05pm; Reply: 158
I can use any Excel type spreadsheet. Just two columns: Current SWAMI name and Australian/NZ terminology.

Can send to peter@dadamo.com *

* Before anybody gets any funny ideas, I almost never check this email :P
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 9:28pm; Reply: 159
Quoted from Dr. D
I can use any Excel type spreadsheet. Just two columns: Current SWAMI name and Australian/NZ terminology.

Can send to peter@dadamo.com *

* Before anybody gets any funny ideas, I almost never check this email :P


Cristina, could I nominate you to do this task please as you would probably have the most up to date collection of our information?

Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 9:31pm; Reply: 160
there is a thread on Live Right for an A type who is in Brisbane. Lola gave out the address of a naturopath on the Gold Coast who may be helpful.

David Bridgeman:
07 5570 1171 at Surfers Paradise. Spark of
Life Health Centers
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 10:29pm; Reply: 161
Research on Pollock:

US = Pollock
AU/NZ = Coley
Same scientific name for both: Pollachius virens

Australia Caab taxon report no: 37 226796

Pollock goes to the equivalent fish table.   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 10:34pm; Reply: 162
Quoted from Jenny


Cristina, could I nominate you to do this task please as you would probably have the most up to date collection of our information?



Ok Jenny, Obviously Dr D only wants the equivalent table which is still a work in progress.  I will create the spreadsheet with those two columns and send it over to him.  I may also add at the bottom all those other fishes from this thread and your list that do not have equivalent in Typebase.  Hopefully he will not think I am too cheeky!!   :o :) ;D

Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 11:04pm; Reply: 163
Quoted from Jenny


Where did you see Maitake mushrooms? I've been looking for them for years!!!



Hi Jenny,

It may have been part of an asian special at ALDI.  So it's not available all the time.  It would be at the asian speciality shop though.

HOKI AND HAKE

As far as Hoki being Hake it is known as blue hake.  Cristina's added it to the non-equivalent table at 112:

Hoki     Macruronus novaezelandiae      Australia,NewZealand     Blue Grenadier, Blue Hake, Whiptail Hake - Reply 7

The scientific name is not in typebase and is different to the Hake in Typebase (UROPHYCIS TENUIS) http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?192

Hake is my maiden surname!  Fishy hey!
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 11:16pm; Reply: 164
Quoted from Symbi

So I guess Sea Bream must have been added later but not put in Typebase and could be many species of fish!!  

Cannot say if this is the Sea Bream listed in the GTD unfortunately.  Can say I've had no bad effects from eating it though!


I wonder if we can find out the scientific name of the Sea Bream that is in SWAMI.  Since they do such extensive research on the food items that information is probably on a database somewhere?
Posted by: Jumari, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 11:18pm; Reply: 165
Heres something that might be worth looking at team.

Typebase Grouper - SERRANIDAE SPP.

First of all I just found out that SPP is an abreviation for species (plural form)

When I looked for Serranidae in the CSIRO spreadsheet I found all these matches of fish in the same family. We need to confirm with NAP whether they can be considered a type of Grouper, considering that the scientific name for Grouper on the Typebase is a generic one.

Aus / NZ name           Scientific Name
Bar Rockcod     Epinephelus ergastularius & Epinephelus septemfasciatus
Barramundi Cod     Cromileptes altivelis
Blacktip Rockcod     Epinephelus fasciatus
Coral Cod     Cephalopholis spp
Coral Trout     Plectropomus spp & Variola spp
Duskytail Grouper     Epinephelus bleekeri
Goldspotted Rockcod     Epinephelus coioides
Grouper                      Epinephelus spp
Longfin Perch     Caprodon longimanus
Longfin Rockcod     Epinephelus quoyanus
Maori Rockcod     Epinephelus undulatostriatus
Rankin Cod     Epinephelus multinotatus
Rockcod                      Aethaloperca & Anyperodon spp
Sixbar Grouper     Epinephelus sexfasciatus
Wirrah                      Acanthistius spp
Yellowspotted Rockcod     Epinephelus areolatus

Spreadsheet of CSIRO Australian Marine species available here;
http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.fish_names_list

BTW...Barramundi Cod is not to be confused with

Barramundi     Lates calcarifer     Centropomidae (giant perches)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 11:30pm; Reply: 166
Quoted from Jumari
Heres something that might be worth looking at team.

...
Barramundi Cod     Cromileptes altivelis
BTW...Barramundi Cod is not to be confused with
....
Barramundi     Lates calcarifer     Centropomidae (giant perches)


Jumari, have you checked reply 114?   :) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, October 4, 2009, 11:46pm; Reply: 167
Quoted from Symbi


Hi Jenny,

It may have been part of an asian special at ALDI.  So it's not available all the time.  It would be at the asian speciality shop though.

HOKI AND HAKE

As far as Hoki being Hake it is known as blue hake.  Cristina's added it to the non-equivalent table at 112:

Hoki     Macruronus novaezelandiae      Australia,NewZealand     Blue Grenadier, Blue Hake, Whiptail Hake - Reply 7

The scientific name is not in typebase and is different to the Hake in Typebase (UROPHYCIS TENUIS) http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?192

Hake is my maiden surname!  Fishy hey!


Hake was my maternal grandmother's surname...so maybe you and I are related? My sister has all our family trees dated back for yonks, so you could be interested in that if you wish.

Posted by: Jumari, Monday, October 5, 2009, 12:43am; Reply: 168
Cristina...The barramundi bit was not what I was referring to. It was the Grouper sharing the same scientific family name as all the other fish on my list.

The barramundi cod comment was just a note to avoid confusion.
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 5, 2009, 7:51am; Reply: 169
Quoted from Jenny


Hake was my maternal grandmother's surname...so maybe you and I are related? My sister has all our family trees dated back for yonks, so you could be interested in that if you wish.



That's amazing, since we're on a forum talking about fish here!   ;D :o
My grandparents including my father emigrated over from Somerset UK when my Dad was a little boy.  There aren't many Hakes around, most of my rellies are in WA, some in Darwin, or UK.  Was your Grandmother English?

In my previous job admissions for international students, I found that Japanese people like the Hake surname as a symbol for strength.  If someone was called Shark they'd like that too!  :P

P.S.  Thinking again I may have seen Maitake in Woolworths veggie section sometime?  sorry can't remember
Posted by: Possum, Monday, October 5, 2009, 8:02am; Reply: 170
So Hoki/Hake is the same as Blue Grenadier?? The latter sounds much more upmarket than Hoki or Hake!!! ;)
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, October 5, 2009, 10:35pm; Reply: 171
Quoted from Symbi


That's amazing, since we're on a forum talking about fish here!   ;D :o
My grandparents including my father emigrated over from Somerset UK when my Dad was a little boy.  There aren't many Hakes around, most of my rellies are in WA, some in Darwin, or UK.  Was your Grandmother English?

In my previous job admissions for international students, I found that Japanese people like the Hake surname as a symbol for strength.  If someone was called Shark they'd like that too!  :P

P.S.  Thinking again I may have seen Maitake in Woolworths veggie section sometime?  sorry can't remember


I found enoki mushrooms in Woolies yesterday. That was a good start for me. Possibly maitake are seasonal. Please let me know if you see any, anywhere, as most of my mushrooms are only neutral with the exception of maitake and enoki, and I really want to use them.

Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 5, 2009, 11:23pm; Reply: 172
Quoted from Possum
So Hoki/Hake is the same as Blue Grenadier?? The latter sounds much more upmarket than Hoki or Hake!!! ;)


Careful if you are you insulting my previous surname or Jenny's Grandmothers?  I might have to do the hoki poki on you!  ;) ;D
Posted by: Possum, Monday, October 5, 2009, 11:38pm; Reply: 173
Quoted from Symbi
Careful if you are you insulting my previous surname or Jenny's Grandmothers?  I might have to do the hoki poki on you!  ;) ;D
:D :D :D  :o I didn't think of that angle on it ::)
Now "Hoki Poki" is a whole different "kettle of fish" over here... ;) Its NZ's fave icecream only its called "Hokey Pokey"

Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 5, 2009, 11:40pm; Reply: 174
:) ;D
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 5, 2009, 11:41pm; Reply: 175
Quoted from Jenny


I found enoki mushrooms in Woolies yesterday. That was a good start for me. Possibly maitake are seasonal. Please let me know if you see any, anywhere, as most of my mushrooms are only neutral with the exception of maitake and enoki, and I really want to use them.



Glad to hear that, hope they are yummy.  Will keep my eyes peeled   :o
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 5, 2009, 11:49pm; Reply: 176
Quoted from C_Sharp


Brazilian (Surinam) cherries are not related to regular cherries.

They are in the Myrtle family (along with cloves, guava, feijoa, allspice, and eucalyptus).

Cherries are in the Rose family (along with plums, peaches, almonds, and apricots).


Given this I think you have to consider them as neutral (unrated) and not a black dot.


Sorry for the delay, catching up on things now.  Thanks for that info C_Sharp!  They are nice in moderation, taste a bit like cherries only sharper, not a major food so I don't think we have to ask Dr D to test them.  
Some people use lemon myrtle in cooking here, the leaves taste like really strong lemon, (they keep the mozzies away too  :)). Amazing how many foods from natures garden. Though more foods makes our and Dr job a bit harder!  (also not a major food).  There would be thousands of items of bush tucker from Australia that aren't tested.


Posted by: Symbi, Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 12:37am; Reply: 177
Quoted from Jumari
Heres something that might be worth looking at team.

Typebase Grouper - SERRANIDAE SPP.

First of all I just found out that SPP is an abreviation for species (plural form)

When I looked for Serranidae in the CSIRO spreadsheet I found all these matches of fish in the same family. We need to confirm with NAP whether they can be considered a type of Grouper, considering that the scientific name for Grouper on the Typebase is a generic one.

Aus / NZ name           Scientific Name
....


Sorry me again, back on the fish topic.
Good research Cristina finding equivalents and updating the lists, thank you.

Jumari, great research thanks.  Excited to think that all those fish could be sorted at once.

Have done some more research on it.

Just looked up the species wikipedia page at [url][/url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species (we all may need to bone up :) on the Order / Family / Genus / Species heirarchy)

Quoted Text
The authors use "spp." as a short way of saying that something applies to many species within a genus, but do not wish to say that it applies to all species within that genus. If scientists mean that something applies to all species within a genus, they use the genus name without the specific epithet.


So, SPP is an abbreviation for Genus group and refers to some but not all species under it.  However, Serranidae (Sea basses: groupers and fairy basslets) is a Family and not a Genus.

Quoted Text
Serranidae is a large family of fishes, belonging to the order Perciformes. The family contains about 450 species of serranids in 64 genera, including the sea basses and the groupers (subfamily Epinephelinae). From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serranidae


Quoted Text
Subfamilies Anthiinae, Epinephelinae (tribes Epinephelini, Niphonini, Liopropomatini, Diploprioni, Grammistini) and Serraninae (Ref. 39231)from http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/FamilySummary.cfm?id=289


Wikipedia page for Grouper is handy.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grouper  Says in Australia they are called Gropers.  It lists some of the species as well.  

On TypeBase it lists some examples, unfortunately they aren't all from Epinephelinae Genus.

Why couldn't they put all the groupers together in one Genus - that would be too easy?!  We may have to check each fish on Jumari's list to see if they are classified as Groupers and then we could assume they fall under the Typebase.  

Got to go childminding and housework calls!  Bit by bit we'll get there.
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 12:09am; Reply: 178
Aren't I silly, all that research yesterday and I was just confirming everything Jumari researched, sorry mate.

Here's a quick easy, and not so long one.  Our rockmelon = Typebase Cantaloupe http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantaloupeg
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 10:47am; Reply: 179
As sent to Dr D via e-mail:
TypeBase Fish and SeaFood Choices Summary No 2
             
Typebase AU/NZ Equivalent Comments
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) Paua ((Haliotidae Iris) NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) Paua ((Haliotidae Iris) NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) (Haliotidae)Abalone,Blacklip(rubra),brownlip  (conicopora) or Greenlip (laevigata)      (ex Muttonfish ) - Reply 99
Anchovies (Engralis Mordax ) canned AnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only (Engraulis encrasicolus)
Atlantic Cod(Gadus morhua) Atlantic CodSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Atlantic Salmon(Samo Salar) Atlantic Salmon
Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda )Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda ) Choose Only young  barracuda, See  Reply
Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) TaylorSeafood Services Australia See  Reply 153
Bullhead(Ictalurus Nebulosus) NZ Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) NIWA Atlas of NZ Reply 157
ButterfishButterfishBanded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped Butterfish. See warning on Reply 68 about toxic substitutes
Carp(Cyprinus carpio) European CarpSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha )Chinook Salmon
Herrings/Atlantic (Clupea Harengus Harengus) HerringsCaabTaxon code 37 085790 - Reply 156
Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus) Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus)
Mackerel,Spanish (Scomber commerson) Spaniards/Spanish Mackerel, (Scomberomorus commerson)
Mahi Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) Mahi mahi/ dolphinfish
Monkfish (Lophius Americanus ) Speckled Stargazer (Kathetostoma canaster) Replies 180, 186
Pollock (Pollachius Virens) ColeyCaabTaxon code 37 226796 Reply 162
ScrodYoung Cod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
Shrimp     Prawn
Silver PerchSilver PerchReply 133
Swordfish (xiphias gladius) Swordfish
Yellow Perch Murray Golden Perch/Yellowbelly
Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares) Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 11:30am; Reply: 180
I have been working behind the scenes and came up with a few additions for the equivalent table as posted above.  
These are some of the changes:

Atlantic Salmon:
Added Atlantic Salmon, same for both US and AU/NZ
Barracuda:
Changed Barracuda: Both the US and the Australian especies are the same, the catch is in the age of the fish:  we are recommended to eat the young only.  Barracudas as they grow old they accumulate toxins and should be avoided. Find evidence all over the net.  Will post in detail later.
Chinook Salmon:
Added it to the list. It is the same for both hemispheres.
Atlantic Mackerel:
Same for both hemispheres
Spanish Mackerel:
Same for both hemispheres, here we also use the coloquial term of Spaniards.
Check this cool website about it, nice pics (of course, they are from the Sunshine Coast) :) :
http://www.swanboathire.com.au/fishing-reports/fishingreports2009/101-fishing-report-26th-february-2009.html
Mahi Mahi
Added.  Same for both we also called them dolphinfish.
Monkfish
Yes! Finally find an equivalent. I even phoned one of the local fisheries to confirm if we had any in Australia and what could be called.  I received my reply today and located this website:
For those who hate reading long articles, skip to the second paragraph under Commercial Fishing where it refers to Monkfish:
http://www.reefwatch.asn.au/pages/bin/view/Publications/SamsccURANOSCOPIDAE
Yellowfin Tuna and Swordfish
Both added as per Jenny's list and both the same US and Southern hemisphere.
Yellow Perch
It is the wonderful Murray yellowbelly, it is a freshwater perch, as per typebase, one of many around. I gather it is near enough to the northern Yellow Perch.  We can always take it out if you do not agree.

I have noticed you all have been very busy with your research, do not feel sorry for doubling up. It works as a double checking.

Ok this is the equivalent fish table I e-mailed to Dr D.  I have also included a few non equivalent fishes like:
Blue Grenadier/ Hoki
Barramundi
Blue Eye Cod/ blue eye trevalla
Blue warehou
Australian Bonito
Calamari
Coral trout

That Hoki Poki thing, it turns out it is a Southern Hake, Blue Grenadier to be precise.  So for better or for worse, Hoki is a Hake (but it may not be an equal Hake)  ??)

Also, I have cc Jenny with my e-mail to Dr D, so there is a second record of it, besides posting here the exact table in 178.

Back to do some digesting of all this info ..,.(book2) ;D ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 2:38pm; Reply: 181
I will not change the post with the info sent to Dr D, hence, I am duplicating the table here to keep updating it:  :) :)

TypeBase Fish and SeaFood Choices Summary No 3
             
Typebase AU/NZ Equivalent Comments
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) Paua ((Haliotidae Iris) NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) Paua ((Haliotidae Iris) NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) (Haliotidae)Abalone,Blacklip(rubra),brownlip  (conicopora) or Greenlip (laevigata)      (ex Muttonfish ) - Reply 99
Anchovies (Engralis Mordax ) canned AnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only (Engraulis encrasicolus)
Atlantic Cod(Gadus morhua) Atlantic CodSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Atlantic Salmon(Samo Salar) Atlantic Salmon
Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda )Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda ) Choose Only young  barracuda, See  Reply
Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) TaylorSeafood Services Australia See  Reply 153
Bullhead(Ictalurus Nebulosus) NZ Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) NIWA Atlas of NZ Reply 157
ButterfishButterfishBanded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped Butterfish. See warning on Reply 68 about toxic substitutes
Carp(Cyprinus carpio) European CarpSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha )Chinook Salmon
Herrings/Atlantic (Clupea Harengus Harengus) HerringsCaabTaxon code 37 085790 - Reply 156
Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus) Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus)
Mackerel,Spanish (Scomber commerson) Spaniards/Spanish Mackerel, (Scomberomorus commerson)
Mahi Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) Mahi mahi/ dolphinfish
Monkfish (Lophius Americanus ) Speckled Stargazer (Kathetostoma canaster
Pollock (Pollachius Virens) ColeyCaabTaxon code 37 226796 Reply 162
ScrodYoung Cod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
ShadRiver HerringsTaken from UK version of Swami
Shrimp     Prawn
Silver PerchSilver PerchReply 133
Swordfish (xiphias gladius) Swordfish
Yellow Perch Murray Golden Perch/Yellowbelly
Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares) Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 2:44pm; Reply: 182
Added River Herring to Shad as per my post no 84 and GheeWhiz post no. 96.

Doing some catching up here ... :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 10:03pm; Reply: 183
Quoted from Symbi
Aren't I silly, all that research yesterday and I was just confirming everything Jumari researched, sorry mate.

Here's a quick easy, and not so long one.  Our rockmelon = Typebase Cantaloupe


Actually what you call a rockmelon is what I think in typebase and SWAMI terminology is called a "Musk Melon".  Rock Melon/Musk Melon is Cucumis melo reticulatus, This melon is called a cantaloupe in the US.  Type base entry is:  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255

What is called cantaloupe in SWAMI and Typebase is a type of melon that is rare in the US but available in Europe. It is a Cucumis melo cantalupensis. Type base entry is: http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?91

They may seem to be similar but for me one is superfood and the other is an avoid.



Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 11:04pm; Reply: 184
Quoted from C_Sharp


Actually what you call a rockmelon is what I think in typebase and SWAMI terminology is called a "Musk Melon".  Rock Melon/Musk Melon is Cucumis melo reticulatus, This melon is called a cantaloupe in the US.  Type base entry is:  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255

What is called cantaloupe in SWAMI and Typebase is a type of melon that is rare in the US but available in Europe. It is a Cucumis melo cantalupensis. Type base entry is: http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?91

They may seem to be similar but for me one is superfood and the other is an avoid.





Thanks C_Sharp, you are partially right.  This website clearly explains the different melons for sale in aussieland.  I see if I can find something else for NZ or our NZ researches will tune in with their input.

To make it easier, I am reproducing the relevant extract from the link:

quote
Melons can be grouped into four different types:

Watermelons: There’s an astounding array of sizes and flesh colours (yellow, white, orange and red), and the freakish Japanese square watermelons grown in boxes to make their shape more storage friendly.

Winter melons: The best known is the honeydew as it is prime in late autumn and the only type that continues to ripen after picking.

Muskmelons: Also known as netted melons, these include rockmelons, and are distinguished by their netted skin and usually orange flesh.

Cantaloupe melons: Similar to muskmelons but with a smooth skin. There are various types – Charentais, Ogen and Galia – all small in size with flesh ranging in colour from green and white to orange.
unquote

And this is the link:

http://www.homehints.com.au/seasonal+flavours+and+food/498/reading/ingredient+guide:+melons?gclid=CJ3v8p6BrJ0CFR5HagodNjRqjA


Thanks for helping us C_Sharp   :) :)

I am updating relevant tables
Posted by: Jumari, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 11:16pm; Reply: 185
Ghee Whiz...no need to apologize. I'm glad to see that we are on the same page.

Botton line is that if the scientific name on the typebase for Grouper is SERRANIDAE SPP and Serranidae SPP is a name used for a family, which includes all the fish I listed previously. Does this mean that all those fish on the list can be considered Groupers? Serranidaes are also considered as a variety of Rock Cods. See the CSIRO listing.

I think your reasearch was outstanding and like you say it refers to a family and not a genus.

One thing is for sure, if it hasn't been done yet. We should include Groper spelt without a "u" to the UK list, if it isn't already there.

Cristina, great work on the final typebase submitted.

Ghee Whiz, heres a question that is right down your alley according to your name. Does Ghee have to be refrigirated? The thing is that it is so hard to spread when I put it in the fridge. When I leave it out, it spreads like butter. I read somewhere that ghee is butter that goes through a special process where the milk solids are removed. If so, would it still go off?
Posted by: Jumari, Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 11:18pm; Reply: 186
Heres another confirmed discovery.

Monkfish are also known as Stargazers.

Stargazer     Uranoscopidae - undifferentiated
monkfish     Uranoscopidae - undifferentiated

We went to a fish shop and the asked about the Stargazer fish. The owner said, in actual fact they are also know as Monkfish, its written on the box. Sure enough after checking the CSIRO list there it is.
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 12:15am; Reply: 187
TypeBase Food Choices Summary No4                                                                                                                        
Typebase AU/NZ EquivalentComments
Meats
Poultry
Cornish HenSpring chickenYoung chicken,male or female
Eggs/Roe
Dairy Products
Vegetable Proteins
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
Fats and Oils
Carbohydrates
Live Foods
ArugulaRocketTaken from UK version of Swami
BeetBeet RootsTaken from UK version of Swami
Beet GreensBeetroot GreensTaken from UK version of Swami
EscaroleBroad Leaf EndiveTaken from UK version of Swami and replies 84,208,209,210,212
Mushroom/ChampignonWhite Mushroomsincl canned champignons, fresh button mushrooms, flat whites - Reply 139,145
Romaine LettuceCos Lettuce
RutagabaSweedesIs the yellow parsnip
ZucchiniZucchiniCourgette in UK version of Swami
Fruits
Melon, CantaloupeCantaloupe MelonsReply 184, 188
Melon, MuskHoneydew, RockmelonsReply 184,188
PapayaPapaw,PawPaw or PapayaCommon Australian paw paw
Paw PawPoor Mans BananaA member of custard apple plant
Currant Red/BlackBlackcurrant/RedcurrantNot the grape variety
Litchi/Litchi nutsLychees/dry Lycheesdry=Lychee stones in UK version of Swami
Orange     Orange
OrangeTangerine in Nepal only (check Kumar post below)
TangerineMandarin/Tangerine
Spices
CilantroCorianderThe  herb
CorianderCoriander Seeds The  seeds
Beverages
Condiments
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 12:30am; Reply: 188
Closure on the Melons:

Typebase Musk Melons = AU/NZ Honeydew and Rockmelons
Typebase Cantaloupe Melons = AU/NZ Cantaloupe Melons

:) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 1:02am; Reply: 189
Cristina, thanks for updating the lists and all your great research, glad to see so many more fish equivalents!  Though, there are a couple of typos on the TypeBase Food Choices Summary No4 - Zuccini should be Zucchini and Courguette should be courgette (I never knew how to properly spell zucchini either - quite the scrabble word)

C_Sharp and Cristina thanks for filling out the research on melons, I see why you are called sharp C_Sharp! or is that a musical name?

Thanks Jumari - monkfish and stargazers, and Grouper and Groper spotting - good job.  They sound like guru swami fish  :)
Ghee doesn't have to be refridgerated as it is pure oil with no dairy products left.  So long as you don't accidentally add water to it (use clean spoon) and the jar was sterilised before you put the ghee in there.  Check http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070706153209AAHharj

About the Gropers (Groupers), I reckon, like it said on the wikipedia Grouper page, if they're in the Serranidae family (also includes sea basses) in Epinephelus and Mycteroperca genera they are Groupers.
Epinephelus genus see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epinephelus (includes Nassau grouper and Red Grouper mentioned on Typebase under Grouper Mixed Species http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?184)
Mycteroperca genus see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycteroperca
(includes Black Grouper, Yellowfin (yellowmouth) grouper mentioned in Typebase).

I don't think we can say that all the fish in one Genus are alright, though.  We should check each one on Typebase to make sure they aren't poisonous first. So as long as they aren't poiosonous and they are in Epinephelus and Mycteroperca genera they are fair game under Grouper mixed species.  Do you agree?  

Posted by: Squirrel, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 6:05am; Reply: 190
Wonderful work folks!
May I just add that grouper/groper is also known as garupa in Asia?
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 6:18am; Reply: 191
Quoted from Squirrel
Wonderful work folks!
May I just add that grouper/groper is also known as garupa in Asia?


Hi Squirrel and thanks for droping in.  We have a wonderful team working here and now includes you too.  Welcome and thanks for your contribution!!
We will include that on the table once we finalize the groping   ;D  ;) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 6:36am; Reply: 192
Quoted from Jumari
...
Botton line is that if the scientific name on the typebase for Grouper is SERRANIDAE SPP and Serranidae SPP is a name used for a family, which includes all the fish I listed previously. Does this mean that all those fish on the list can be considered Groupers? Serranidaes are also considered as a variety of Rock Cods. See the CSIRO listing.


Although the Serranidae family includes many other variety of fishes (Rockcods, etc), the following description from Grouper Typebase makes me think that we should only concentrate on the Seabass variety.

Quote
The most popular members of this sea bass family are the black grouper, Nassau grouper, red grouper and yellowmouth (also called yellowfin ) grouper.
unquote

Quoted from Jumari
...

One thing is for sure, if it hasn't been done yet. We should include Groper spelt without a "u" to the UK list, if it isn't already there.



It is not there.  In the UK version of Swami, Groper is spelled Grouper, like Typebase. Once we put it in the equivalent table for us, we will make sure that Groper is also used.

Once again, great work guys!!  We are making great progress!!  :)
Posted by: Possum, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 7:02am; Reply: 193
Quoted from Cristina
Hi Squirrel and thanks for droping in.  We have a wonderful team working here and now includes you too.  Welcome and thanks for your contribution!!
We will include that on the table once we finalize the groping   ;D  ;) :)

:D :D :D
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 12:29pm; Reply: 194
On the subject of fish, while groping around, I came across this very useful website particularly regarding ways to cook your fish to retain the most nutrients.

Healthy reading:

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Fish (book2)

back to groping in the dark ...  8)(cool) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 9:59pm; Reply: 195
Quoted from Cristina
Closure on the Melons:

Typebase Musk Melons = AU/NZ Honeydew and Rockmelons
Typebase Cantaloupe Melons = AU/NZ Cantaloupe Melons

:) :)
,
Maybe I should go back and study the last few entries, but which of the above would you say are commonly sold in Australia, as I have always used rockmelon/cantaloupe as interchangeable semantics based on geography rather than type?  :-/
Posted by: C_Sharp, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 10:19pm; Reply: 196
Quoted from Jenny
,
Maybe I should go back and study the last few entries, but which of the above would you say are commonly sold in Australia, as I have always used rockmelon/cantaloupe as interchangeable semantics based on geography rather than type?  :-/


What typebase calls a cantaloupe is not what most people call a cantaloupe.  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?91

What most people call a cantaloupe or rock melon is a "musk melon" in typebase.  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255

Typebase also has an entry for honeydew. It is easily distinguished  because it has green flesh (A normal musk melon has orange flesh). I am not sure if this is what you call a honeydew in Australia. Honeydew is the common term in the US. Typebase entry for this melon: http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?201
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 10:27pm; Reply: 197
Quoted from Cristina
On the subject of fish, while groping around, I came across this very useful website particularly regarding ways to cook your fish to retain the most nutrients.

Healthy reading:

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Fish (book2)

back to groping in the dark ...  8)(cool) :)


Jenny, it is only the last couple of posts that this came about. Check the above website link.  I have seen around here melons listed as Rockmelons and also as Canteloupe, but of course I have not payed attention if they were making reference to the same type (I was not interested in any possible differences then).  But, the site is an Australian website, therefore, it must be right?   ??) :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 8, 2009, 10:33pm; Reply: 198
On the subject of Grouper/Groper:

I am going around in circles on the internet, I think I am starting to have Cyberspace motion sickness!  (unhappy)

So, I contacted the higher authorities in the subject (Seafood Services Australia) and invited them to tune in if possible or send me some suggestions via e-mail.

Hopefully, they will be helpful. :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 9, 2009, 12:49am; Reply: 199
Good idea Cristina to ask the authorities.  Hopefully they might say that if the common name includes "groper/grouper" then it can grope away!  That's one approach and then check each fish on fishbase to see if they're toxic.  

I'd give this one a miss for instance, http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?ID=4886&genusname=Plectropomus&speciesname=maculatus Spotted coralgrouper it has a Reports of ciguatera poisoning.  Did some research on Ciguatera poisoning:

Quoted Text
Ciguatera is a form of food poisoning. It is caused by eating those warm ocean water finfish that carry ciguatera poison..... What type of finfish cause poisoning.
There are no specific rules that can be followed to detect ciguatera carrying fish. Fish that live in warm ocean waters are potential carriers of ciguatera toxin. Fish like chinaman, red bass and paddle tail have, in the past, been involved in a large number of ciguatera poisonings and seafood marketers sell little of them. Today problems are encountered with coral trout, spanish mackeral, red emperor, reef cods and others like wrasse, trevally and kingfish.http://www.vmrgladstone.org.au/ciguatera.html


Quoted Text
Mackerel caught around mid October in Australia are a classic cause of the condition, as are some Great Barrier Reef and semi-pelagic saltwater fish including red bass, chinamanfish (chinaman cod), paddle tail, snapper, spanish mackerel, moray eels, wrasse, trigger fish, and queenfish. Even coral trout has been incriminated as an occasional carrier. http://www.fishingcairns.com.au/page8-2.html

Note it says that fish mongers
Symptoms are worse if you drink while eating the fish.  Surprised there's anyone left here!

The large Barracudas are also susceptible to this poisoning, this all fits with everyone's research before.

You can bet this is a reason why Dr D recommends more cold water fish not warm water reef fish!
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 9, 2009, 3:52am; Reply: 200
Extract from the University of Florida webpage:

quote
Ciguatera Poisoning

The ciguatera chain starts when herbivorous animals consume the dinoflagellates and their toxins, concentrate and transform the toxins in their tissues, and pass them up the food chain, usually with further accumulation and concentration accompanying each step. More than 400 marine species in 60 different families have been found to accumulate ciguatoxins (Brusle 1997). Among the most important because of their seafood value are barracuda; some snapper (for example red, dog, blackfin, and cubera); amberjack, kingfish; some grouper (for example red, Nassau, snowy, yellowedge, and speckled hind); and hogfish; (Figure 2). Rarely, some primary consumers including herbivorous fish and invertebrates also cause ciguatera poisoning.
unquote

As you can see, even fish especies listed in Typebase could have  members carrying the ciguatera toxins, but that does not mean that we have to write them off.  Red Emperor in Australia is one of the most popular fishes on the table, yet, in some websites it is listed as possible carriers of the disease. Mahi Mahi is in my superfood list, but it has also been listed as carrying disease.  

Like with everything else, know your suppliers, talk to your fish mongrels.  Fish is the one food I will not be buying off the street stall, but from a regulated, safety and quality compliant supplier who undergoes regular inspections.  I will also follow advice given by relevant authorities in the subject, like selecting the younger fish (less time to accumulate toxins), eating small portions (sounds familiar?  All of a sudden the 'size of the palm of your hand' in Swami, takes a new significance).  Above all, staying compliant and true to our type will give us the best chance of emerging healthy and fit if and when hidden toxins like these sneak into our bodies.

This is the link: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN742

By the way, ciguatera poisoning is not the only fish contracted diseace we have to be awared of.  There is something called Scombries or something like that (but that is another story).  So, which is the next fish on the list?  Back to research ... :)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 9, 2009, 11:45am; Reply: 201
I finally find time to set Jenny's list in table form here.  This is Jenny's original list we started from. Fishes from the list have been (and are being) placed in this thread Summary tables, as we progress with our research to match Typebase fishes.

Thank you Jenny once again for all your ground work. (clap) :)


Australian fish (available at the Fyshwick market, Canberra)            
Common nameLatin namenearest Latin name in U.S.Common name in U.S.
Atlantic salmon (whole gutted or fillets)salmo salar
Barramundi (whole or fillets)lates calcarifer
Blueeye cod (cutlets) hyperoglyple Antarctica
Blue warehou (fillets)seriolella brama
Bonito (whole)sarda spp.
Calamari tubeseuthoidea/loliginidae
Coral trout (whole)plectropomus spp & variola spp4
Deep sea bream fillets
Flake (fillets)
Garfish (whole)hemiramphidae
Gemfish (fillets)rexea solandri,  paristiopterus gallipavo & labiosus
Gold band snapperlutjanidaelutjanus campechanusnth red snapper
King George whiting (whole)sillinidae
Kingfish (fillets)
Leatherjacket (whole)monacanthidae
Ling (fillets)genypterus/ophidiidaeophidon eleongatusling cod/alaskan
Luderick (blackfish) (whole)girella tricuspidatesimilar to girella nigricansopaleye fish
Monkfish (fillets)
mullet (whole)mugil cephalissameflathead mullet /black mullet
Ocean trout (fillets)-farmedoncorhynchus mykiss&salmo trutta
Orange roughy (deep sea perch)hoplostethus atlanticussamesame
Rainbow trout (whole)oncorhynchus mykisssamerainbow trout/coastrange trout
Redspot whiting (whole)lethrinus lentjan
Red snapper (fillets) (breams?)sparidaelutjanus campechanusnth red snapper
Sardineslupeinae spp
Salmon tails (fillets) farmed oncorhynchussamemany different names
Silver bream (whole)
Snapper (whole) (breams)sparidaelutjanus campechanusnth red snapper
Swordfish (steaks)xiphias gladiussamesame/broadbill
Threadfin bream (whole)nemipteridae & hemiramphus robustus
Whiting (fillets)sillaginidae & acanthistius
Yellowfin tuna sashimi (steaks) thunnus albacaressame
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 9, 2009, 12:20pm; Reply: 202
Copying Non Equivalent summary from Reply 113 to continue the updates:
Non TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 2
Common Name   Scientific Name   Location   Testimonials  
Fish and seafood
Australian Salmon/Kahawai(Arripis truttaceus) Australia,NewZealandReply 8,9,12,13,15,16,17,181,207
Barramundi(Lates calcarifer) Australia,NewZealandbarra,giant Perch, aussie seabass,silver jack - Reply 108,114,117
Blue MackerelScomber australasicus Australia,NewZealandJapanece or Pacific or Spotted Mackerel, Spotted Chub - Reply 8, 213
Blue-eyed CodHyperoglyphe antarctica Australia,NewZealandAntarctic butterfish, deepsea trevally, blue eye trevalla, - Reply 32,130
BonitoSarda SppAustralia,NewZealand- Reply 215
Coral TroutPlectropomus sppAustralia,NewZealand- Reply 221
Warehou, blue Australia,NewZealand - Reply 214
HokiMacruronus novaezelandiae Australia,NewZealandBlue Grenadier, Blue Hake, Whiptail Hake - Reply 7
GemfishRexea solandriAustralia,NewZealand Also Hake,King Couta, Kingfish, Silver Kingfish and Southern Kingfish Reply 26, 128
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 9, 2009, 1:15pm; Reply: 203
Research:
Australian Salmon (Arripis truttaceus)

PS: Notice that the scientific name Salmo Salar is reserved for the Atlantic Salmon.

A comment from a NZ perspective:
quote
kahawai Superficially rather salmon-like, greenish to dark blue above
and silvery or white below. Small kahawai, less than about 30 cm, have a
number of brown spots and are sometimes called kopapa. The flesh of
kahawai is dark, rather reddish in colour (especially the band along the
outer middle of the fillet), medium to coarse in texture, with a
comparatively strong flavour. In Australia, where this fish is known as
salmon or Australian salmon, this fish is regarded highly when canned,
but in NZ it is under-rated, indeed often regarded with contempt, when
in fact is suitable for all cooking methods. Needs to be chilled quickly
when caught or deteriorates quickly. Often can be bought very cheaply;
highly recommended. Try it and thereafter you will be able to smile
patronisingly at the fools who, having never tried it themselves, tell you
it is “dry” and “flavourless”.
unquote

This NZ link makes good reading to get to know not only some local fishes terminology, but also comments about texture, taste and how to handle some of the fish.
http://www.cooknwithgas.co.nz/heritage/know.html

Also, this other link will be very useful for NAP food experts to judge the placing of the Aussie Salmon in our diets.  Check nutritional info.

http://www.australianseafood.com.au/species.php?f=3&v=f

Also, hints on how to pick the Aussie salmon when buying it:

http://www.nicechoice.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=29&Itemid=43


In conclusion:
Australian Salmon goes to the equivalent table with the common names of Australian Salmon and NZ Kahawai.
Australian Salmon can be found wild in many parts around the coast of Australia and NZ (Kangaroo Island, Rocky Point) check the web links. Commercial suppliers may be mostly farmed though, as Jumari found out in earlier posts.
Australian Salmon flesh varies from pale pink to brown (get lighter when cooked) and the younger the fish the better the taste.
Websites give an indication that it is usually reasonably price (cheaper alternative to the Atlantic, Chinook varieties?).

:)
Posted by: Sed, Friday, October 9, 2009, 1:20pm; Reply: 204
I am based in the UK, just wanted to share my findings on Escarole (in reference to reply 187 in thread).

I only found Escarole so far in the big supermarkets under the name  Batavian lettuce. I found this information on Waitrose website:

"Endive is a member of the lettuce family and is quite similar to chicory. There are two main types, batavian or escarole endive has a bitter lettuce flavour and has crisp, broad green leaves. Curly endive can be plain green or with a hint of red, it also has a bitter flavour and can grow to over 25cm in diameter"

So it seems that in the UK Escarole can be called Batavian, escarole or endive (possibly with the word lettuce added sometimes). The one I found was in Tesco and as I mentioned above was called Batavian lettuce. Just to make things even more confusing I did see lettuce that looked like Curly endive but it was called summer lettuce... I haven't seen any of these at farmers markets or in small vegetable shops yet, but I am keeping my eyes peeled.

We also have Chicory, but it it looks very different from the lettuce like Endive family. It is small and oval shaped with tightly packed yellow/white or red/white leafs.

Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 9, 2009, 3:08pm; Reply: 205
Good spotting Sed:
It is a bit comforting to know that the confusion is not just limited to aussie land.  It looks like escarole, endive and chikory are terms used to identify plants of the same chicory family.

According to the following link, the chicory you described (yellow white red), are the belgian endives and red belgian endives.

The escarole is the broad leaf endive and it is also referred as  chicory (or chicory leaf according to whoever designed the UK version of SwamiXpress).
Here is the only link I could find where it indicates that escarole may also be called chicory:

http://www.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t--33009/batavian-endive.asp

This other link has nice clear photos from someone who grows both, endive and escarole:
http://foodiefarmgirl.blogspot.com/2005/12/weekend-herb-blogging-9-endive_04.html

I think they are all part of the same family. I tend to agree with you, at least for the australian version of escarole, it is the broad leaf endive, rather than the chicory version.  The Australian Vegetarian Society tries to clarify the confusion in this link (refer to the 10th or 11th paragraph down the page):

http://www.veg-soc.org/cms/html/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=16

To our research team, this requires further study and we may have to change the equivalent table to something other than chicory leaf.  The UK version does use that term for escarole (I double checked).

:) :)
Posted by: Sed, Friday, October 9, 2009, 3:58pm; Reply: 206
Christina, the links you provided were all very informative, but the vegetarian society's explanation has clarified it best for me:

" Chicory and endive are closely related greens, whose names cause much confusion. Endive is an annual and includes curly leaf varieties as well as broad-leaved ones, sometimes known as escarole. Chicory is a perennial and includes a number of cultivars, including the confusingly named Belgian endive. Radicchio also belongs to the chicory family. Both chicory and endive are bitter leaved and can liven up a salad bowl. They can also be cooked like spinach."

Yes, the confusion seem to stem from the fact that they are closely related plant families therefore often categorised as one. And within each family (e.i. chicory and endive there are different varieties with interchangable names. Like in your other link:

"A crisp, broadleaf type of endive most often served as a salad green that is also known as escarole, broad chicory, or common chicory. This member of the chicory family has broad outer leaves with a crinkled shape. The leaves provide a slightly bitter taste, yet not as bitter as Belgian or curly endive. As the outer leaves are removed, the inner leaves display a paler green coloring with more white and a taste less bitter than the outer leaves. Escarole is popular as a salad green, eaten raw with mayonnaise or a vinaigrette dressing. When cooked, the greens are often served as a vegetable steamed or braised, and can be added to soups for flavoring in the later stages of soup making."

Thanks for the info.
Posted by: Possum, Friday, October 9, 2009, 9:37pm; Reply: 207
Quoted from Cristina
A comment from a NZ perspective: "kahawai Superficially rather salmon-like, greenish to dark blue above and silvery or white below. Small kahawai, less than about 30 cm, have a number of brown spots and are sometimes called kopapa. The flesh of kahawai is dark, rather reddish in colour (especially the band along the outer middle of the fillet), medium to coarse in texture, with a comparatively strong flavour. In Australia, where this fish is known as salmon or Australian salmon, this fish is regarded highly when canned,but in NZ it is under-rated, indeed often regarded with contempt, when in fact is suitable for all cooking methods. Needs to be chilled quickly when caught or deteriorates quickly. Often can be bought very cheaply; highly recommended. Try it and thereafter you will be able to smilepatronisingly at the fools who, having never tried it themselves, tell you it is “dry” and “flavourless” This NZ link makes good reading to get to know not only some local fishes terminology, but also comments about texture, taste and how to handle some of the fish. http://www.cooknwithgas.co.nz/heritage/know.html
Australian Salmon goes to the equivalent table with the common names of Australian Salmon and NZ Kahawai.
Australian Salmon can be found wild in many parts around the coast of Australia and NZ (Kangaroo Island, Rocky Point) check the web links. Commercial suppliers may be mostly farmed though, as Jumari found out in earlier posts.
Australian Salmon flesh varies from pale pink to brown (get lighter when cooked) and the younger the fish the better the taste. Websites give an indication that it is usually reasonably price (cheaper alternative to the Atlantic, Chinook varieties?). :)

Thanks heaps for this Cristina - and for all the hard work by all of you - sorry been a bit sick this week on my days off...as well as working on other days...;) Will have to check out "kahawai"... sounds very interesting, altho' I've certainly never seen it marketed here...not surprisingly, of course;)
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 10, 2009, 2:19am; Reply: 208
Well, before we forget, I have updated Summary Table No4 (equivalent) for Escarole:  it is now Broad Leaf Chicory Endive. Concensus? :D :)


Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 10, 2009, 6:39am; Reply: 209
I realized that since GW Reply 8, we have not posted much info about the sourthern Blue Mackerel, so for the record, here is some.

Check this out for a lesson on how to dissect a fish (using the Blue Mackerel as a specimen):

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Dissection-of-a-Blue-Mackerel-Scomber-australasicus

Useful info from Nice Choice and Sydney fish market.
http://www.nicechoice.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=28&Itemid=42

http://www.sydneyfishmarket.com.au/Information/SpeciesInfo/tabid/91/xmmid/620/xmid/1656/Default.aspx

The good thing about the Blue Mackerel is that, unlike its spanish cousin, it does not seem to have been involved in any cases of ciguatera or scroimbos.
:)
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 10, 2009, 12:01pm; Reply: 210
My Swami lists a lot of melons and all graded from SFs, neutrals, BDs and Avoids.  Persian, Spanish, Crenshaw, Honeydew, Musk, Canteloupe, Casaba, Canary, Christmas, Bitter, Honeydew ... Have I forgotten any?
??) :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, October 10, 2009, 5:12pm; Reply: 211
Quoted from Cristina
My Swami lists a lot of melons and all graded from SFs, neutrals, BDs and Avoids.  Persian, Spanish, Crenshaw, Honeydew, Musk, Cantaloupe, Casaba, Canary, Christmas, Bitter, Honeydew ... Have I forgotten any?


The melon that strikes me as missing is Watermelon.

The melon included that I would not include in a list of melons is "Bitter", since to me it is a vegetable (more like a squash, and not sweet like most of the other melons listed). I think it should only be listed under live foods and not listed both under fruit and live foods in SWAMI.


Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 10, 2009, 10:18pm; Reply: 212
Quoted from Possum

Thanks heaps for this Cristina - and for all the hard work by all of you - sorry been a bit sick this week on my days off...as well as working on other days...;) Will have to check out "kahawai"... sounds very interesting, altho' I've certainly never seen it marketed here...not surprisingly, of course;)


Oh Possum, I hope you are back to your usual self soon.  We miss you.  Also, Au and NZ are very much linked regarding food choices and it help us understand these choices better getting as much info as possible from both places.  Let us know how you go with your 'kahawai' research.  To be honest, I have never seen marketed here many of the food choices we are discussing, but in my case, it has been because I have not looked (if you know what I mean).  Now, it is like a whole new world of possibilities has opened up and every trip to the markets/shops is a gastronomy lesson to enjoy.  :) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 1:07am; Reply: 213
Getting back to PAWPAW---I just found the thread elsewhere which includes a magnificent photograph of a...well....custard apple like thing, which is so unlike the Australian pawpaw/papaya that I think the jury is definitely back on this one. whoopee.
Seriously awaiting custard apple season.
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 1:37am; Reply: 214
From our non equivalent summary:

Blue Warehou info:

http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/WebPages/RPIO-4Y98ZQ?open

with nutrition facts and cooking ideas:

http://www.australianseafood.com.au/species.php?f=158&v=f

:)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 2:01am; Reply: 215
From our non equivalent summary:

Bonito links:

http://www.sportsfish.com.au/pages/fishing/fish-saltwater/bonito.html
http://cs.nga.gov.au/Detail.cfm?IRN=182985
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/saltwater/sw-species/bonito
http://www.akff.net/wiki/index.php?title=Bonito
http://www.sydneyfishmarket.com.au/Information/SpeciesInfo/tabid/91/xmmid/620/xmid/1159/Default.aspx
:)
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 5:49am; Reply: 216
Quoted from Cristina


Oh Possum, I hope you are back to your usual self soon.  We miss you.  Also, Au and NZ are very much linked regarding food choices and it help us understand these choices better getting as much info as possible from both places.  Let us know how you go with your 'kahawai' research.   :) :)
Cheers Cristina!! All good now...:) ;)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 8:25am; Reply: 217
Brought over from Reply 181 to keep updating:

TypeBase Fish and SeaFood Choices Summary No 4
             
Typebase AU/NZ Equivalent Comments
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) Paua ((Haliotidae Iris) NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) (Haliotidae)Abalone,Blacklip(rubra),brownlip  (conicopora) or Greenlip (laevigata)      (ex

Muttonfish ) - Reply 99
Anchovies (Engralis Mordax ) canned AnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only (Engraulis encrasicolus)
Atlantic Cod(Gadus morhua) Atlantic CodSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Atlantic Salmon(Samo Salar) Atlantic Salmon
Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda )Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda ) Choose Only young  barracuda, See  Reply
Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) TaylorSeafood Services Australia See  Reply 153
Bullhead(Ictalurus Nebulosus) NZ Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) NIWA Atlas of NZ Reply 157
ButterfishButterfishBanded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped

Butterfish. See warning on Reply 68 about toxic substitutes
Carp(Cyprinus carpio) European CarpSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha )Chinook Salmon
Herrings/Atlantic (Clupea Harengus Harengus) HerringsCaabTaxon code 37 085790 - Reply 156
Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus) Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus)
Mackerel,Spanish (Scomber commerson) Spaniards/Spanish Mackerel, (Scomberomorus commerson)
Mahi Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) Mahi mahi/ dolphinfish
Monkfish (Lophius Americanus ) Speckled Stargazer (Kathetostoma canaster
Pollock (Pollachius Virens) ColeyCaabTaxon code 37 226796 Reply 162
ScrodYoung Cod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
ShadRiver HerringsTaken from UK version of Swami
Shrimp     Prawn
Silver PerchSilver PerchReply 133
Swordfish (xiphias gladius) Swordfish
Trout, Rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Rainbow TroutReply 218
Trout, Brown (Salmo trutta) Brown TroutReply 218
Trout, Brook (Salvelinus fontinalis)Brook TroutReply 218
Trout, Sea (Salmo trutta)Sea TroutReply 220
Trout, Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Sea Rainbow TroutReply 220
Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares) Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 10:16am; Reply: 218
Trout Research:

It looks like some freshwater trout in Australia are the same especies as the ones in US, at least according to Typebase description of Trouts.

Typebase freshwater     
rainbow trout,--Oncorhynchus mykiss)
steelhead or salmon trout--Oncorhynchus mykiss)
brown trout--Salmo trutta
Brook or speckled trout--Salvelinus fontinalis

US descriptions:
http://www.ncfishandgame.com/trout_fishing/trout-varieties.php

Equivalent AU links (common names only):
http://www.trout-fishing.com.au/

And now with the Scientific names:
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/freshwater/fw-species/brook-trout
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/freshwater/fw-species/brown-trout
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/freshwater/fw-species/rainbow-trout

Conclusion:
Rainbow, Brown and Brook Trout go into Seafood Summary 4 pot ready for cooking. :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 11:17am; Reply: 219
On the subject of fish and possible ciguatera poisoning I would like to record here Dr D's recommendation:

Quoted from Dr. D
RE: ciguatera food poisoning

Just an FYI for the chart. Responds incredibly well to 2000mg /daily pantothentic acid (B5) supplementation.


:)
I posted this here just as information since some of the fish we eat in our zone may be from ciguatera infected areas.  C_Sharp has created a specific thread on the subject and you may post further comments about it on his thread:
:)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 12:11pm; Reply: 220
Research on Sea Trout:

The veil uncovers.  Sea Trout is the sea version of the Brown Trout.  This link identifies the species in Australia:

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Brown-Trout-Salmo-trutta-Linnaeus-1758

Therefore Sea Trout goes to the equivalent table.  (It is a diamond in my Swami)

Another trout from Typebase and in our Swamis is the Steelhead trout, which is the sea version of the Rainbow trout, therefore it has earnt its place in the Au/Nz seafood summary 4 cooking pot.   (smarty)(drool) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 11, 2009, 12:37pm; Reply: 221
Research Coral Trout:

Not in Typebase or US (not that I could find)

This uniqueness may send the youngest and smallest of the species to the exclusive aussie cooking pot: 'not in Typebase Food choices Summary 2' at location 206.  

When and if we decide to throw this fish in the cooking pot, we will have to make sure that we 'pop' in a B5 in ourselves as per Dr D's instructions in Reply 219, because of the very last paragraph in this link:

http://www.reef.crc.org.au/research/fishing_fisheries/CoralTrout.htm

Stay safe.  (hand)(pray)(drool)(huh) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 12, 2009, 3:00am; Reply: 222
Hi, thanks for all the work everyone.  I've been busy with a surprise visitor for the weekend, and making spelt bread.  Yum!

Found some brochures here that I realised may be handy from the Brisbane Markets, Fruit and Vegetable guide to seasonal availability.  It has pictures of common fruits and veg on the back, scanned some of those as they may be helpful.

Also found out that they have a fabulous website and link to one in Melbourne too.  http://www.brisbanemarkets.com.au/cms/bpmgp-fruit-and-vege-info.html  It links to seasonal availability - search by month or fruit or veg item.  Great information on many fruits and veg.

On the papaw / papaya / custard apple question.  Is this right - papaya is in type base (our paw paw).  Papaya and Paw paw are in the Genotype Diet.  Custard apple is in neither - so that might have to go to the untested fruit section.  

The custard apple is of the same family but is very different to the american Paw Paw (our C_Sharp posted here http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1253310480/s-16/highlight-C_Sharp/#num16  





Also from the Bris Markets Fruit and Veg info for paw paw, see: http://www.marketfresh.com.au/produce_guide/product.asp?ID=88  "Common names for the fruit include papaya and tree melon, depending on the country in which it is grown. "

Also on custard apples http://www.marketfresh.com.au/produce_guide/product.asp?ID=43

The page for Papaya is blank unfortunately!
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 12, 2009, 3:04am; Reply: 223
paw paw is the custard apple.......guanabana down here

as opposed to papaw, same word for papaya
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 12, 2009, 6:10am; Reply: 224
Quoted from Lola
paw paw is the custard apple.......guanabana down here

as opposed to papaw, same word for papaya


Yes, we gather that much.  There are different varieties in Australia (for custard apple).  Unfortunately we will have to wait till March or thereabouts to see them in the markets. Jenny our guinea pig, is eagerly waiting for the occasion.  

So Lola, you have been using guanabana in place of american pawpaw?  If that is the case, then I have great news for all of us in aussie land:

Check this link up:

http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/cps/rde/dpi/hs.xsl/16_11747_ENA_HTML.htm

Jenny, and any other Sydneygoers, keep an eye for Guanabana and if we cannot get it out here, we may have to arrange for a consigment to be sent to Qld.  But, it is great that now we may have an official fresh american PawPaw equivalent, courtesy of our infalable Lola!!  (clap)(drool) :) :)

PS:
http://hubpages.com/hub/Medicinal-Benefits-of-Soursop
on the other hand we may go for the cherimoya:
http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/cherimoya.htm
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 12, 2009, 7:20am; Reply: 225
A note on cheeses:

I could get most cheeses but for Pecorino (Diamond) and Gorgonzola (SF), until today that is: find them hiding in the exotic area of the delicatessen at the local supermarket. Why can't they just put all the cheeses together in one place?

Anybody having any difficulties getting any of the cheeses in their lists? :o :)
Posted by: Jumari, Monday, October 12, 2009, 8:57am; Reply: 226
I just happened to buy Pecorino yesterday as well. I can also find Manchego in some good delis.

The ones that I'm not sure of are quark cheese and farmers cheese? Seen these around?
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 12, 2009, 9:48am; Reply: 227
yes Jumari, I have seen those at the Oasis organic fruit shop, Forest Glenn Sunshine Coast.  So, you should be able to find them at the big HFS in your area? :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 12, 2009, 11:58am; Reply: 228
GW, yes, those pawpaws, papaws, papayas, red,yellow are a tonge and mind twister.  Have another look at post no 4 and you will see that even the authorities do not know how to manage this one.

Thanks for those clear photos and valuable links.  I always like to have a pick at those to find food items available here.  I have not seen the Brisbane market one though.  I usually run into the Sydney one for the seafood, and i posted those here when relevant.

Let's see if Lola can confirm my post no.224 so we can rest this case happily. :) :)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 12, 2009, 8:00pm; Reply: 229
papa w,
papa ya
can you see the correlation? ;)

pawpaw is the custard called guanabana down here
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 12, 2009, 8:10pm; Reply: 230
guanabana and cherimoya are considered cousins......one is more elongated the other rounder, but in taste they re practically the same.....even same species I believe.....

so is pawpaw over there considered a cherimoya or a guanabana?

or is there another word for them? ::)


ooops did you just delete your last cherimoya post, or am I hallucinating?
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 12, 2009, 8:51pm; Reply: 231
Lola,

No, I did not delete them, the posts here grow very fast and get pushed down the pages.  The cherymoya posts are in posts 224.

PawPaw here is the same (exactly) as the Papaya in US. The Cherymoya and guanabana here are exotic fruits and they are cousins of our custard apples. There are many varietions of custard apples in Australia but most popular ones are the African pride and Pink Mammoth.

But, the guanabana and cherymoya are even closely related to the US PawPaw and with your blessing now, maybe our choice for substitution for PawPaw.  

Anyone out there can help us out by searching the internet for nutritional info on all these varieties and suggest which is the especies variety that most resemble US pawpaw in nutrition.

Thanks.   :) :) :)
PS: on babysitting duty today with DGD so no much time for research. Will stay tuned in and out though ...
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 7:26am; Reply: 232
Research on Porgy:
Porgy on Typebase = PAGELLUS BOGARAVEO

Family Bream in Australia, Porgie in US
Here is the link that ties them together, but I warn you, it is a loooong list (so do not go there yet, read on):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porgie,
so, which one of those species is the equivalent to Typebase Porgy? No way we could work that one out, but do not despair, 'rewards come to the one who persevere (or in this case, the one who searches)' and lo and behold, Dr D Heidi (see posts 238,240 243 to find out who she is) came to the rescue:

I picked up this extract from a conversation back in 2001 with someone in the UK who was trying to write a cookbook:

quoted from Dr D Heidi
Here’s our humble "porgy:" Chrysophrys auratus which our government would like us to call "squirefish" and which everyone calls "porgy" anyway. It is, for us, a Pacific catch, reaching so far west in its range that it has managed to pick up the nomen Australia Red Seabream ~
unquote

Link for Chrysophrys auratus:
http://www.julianrocks.net/fish/Perciformes/snapper/ChrysophrysAuratus.htm

Some other relevant links:

PS: edited to add this link at the front, by far the best on the subject, puts all the dots on is. Highly recommend to read it.

http://www.seamedia.com.au/pdf/previews/FSHING64_prev.pdf

Red Seabream = Pagrus auratus
http://www.marine.csiro.au/caabsearch/caab_search.caab_report?spcode=37353001

Red Snapper
http://www.westernangler.com.au/default.asp?action=article&ID=192

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australasian_snapper

So in conclusion we get another one into the equivalent table:

US Porgy = Australian Snapper or Red SeaBream (as per PS link posted here, too many other names to mention)   :) :)

I am posting a couple more researched fishes before updating the summary tables.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 3:43pm; Reply: 233
Quoted Text
PawPaw here is the same (exactly) as the Papaya in US

think you mean papaw, right? :)
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 8:37pm; Reply: 234
Lola, despite what I posted in page one of these replies about PawPaw, papaw, Papaya, the fact is that in reality everyone calls the Papaya here, PawPaw.  Papaya is also used, but the main point is that they both refer to the same fruit which is the one with the little seeds inside (US Papaya).

US PawPaw (the one with the bigger seeds) does not exist here per say, maybe in some gardens the lucky ones managed to get some seeds to grow it. I will certainly chase that up and see if I can grow it in my garden, provided it can grow in subtropical conditions.

Custard Apple, Cherimoya or Guanabana, it looks like those we can get here and they are the nearest fruit to the american Pawpaw we may have access to.

Of course, this is my understanding, Jumari, Cher, Jenny, GheeWhiz and others from these areas may like to confirm or deny this. :)
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 2:47am; Reply: 235
Lola, papaw is a misspelling of pawpaw (even the Brisbane Markets did it in their brochure it's different to their website).  Sorry to add more confusion, only noticed that after I posted and didn't even know what cherimoya was (listed in Genotype Diet but not on Typebase).  

Soursop (according to wikipedia is the same as guanábana
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanabana  

"Pawpaw is in the same family (Annonaceae) as the custard-apple, cherimoya, sweetsop, ylang-ylang and soursop, and it is the only member of that family not confined to the tropics."  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pawpaw
I hope we can find an equivalent to the american pawpaw here!

Will do some more research into it.

Here's a joke in very paw taste:
Q: Where does paw paw come from?
A: From the leg leg of a dog dog!   ;D :) ;)
Posted by: Jenny, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 3:10am; Reply: 236
I agree with you Cristina re the custard apple/pawpaw connection, and am looking forward to the season when I can get a box of them from a market.
Incidentally, that will enable me to make some classy strings of black beads to wear with my hawaiian outfit in ukelele gigs. ( my latest craze)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 3:19am; Reply: 237
good, now we know one thing for sure...
pawpaws are not papayas!! ;)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 3:33am; Reply: 238
Quoted Text
quoted from Dr D


http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2002/09/06/uk-food-qs-for-an-upcoming-cookbook?blog=9
not from Dr D, actually it s Heidi s... ;)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 4:18am; Reply: 239
Quoted from Lola


Jacquelyne, thank you for your questions... and the reminder! :-> Best of luck in your work, and DO keep in touch!! :-D

Sorry for the mistake, I took the ":-D" at the end of each answer was meaning Dadamo.  Who is Heidi? Excuse my ignorance .. ??) :) :)

PS: I can see the connection now, they meant to be smylies that for some reason do not show in that original article, not on my system anyway...

The information is valid though?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 4:23am; Reply: 240
Heidi left an excellent column named
On the diet....answered questions to many
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2002/04/07/about-heidi-merritt?blog=9
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 5:41am; Reply: 241
Quoted from Cristina
US PawPaw (the one with the bigger seeds) does not exist here per say, maybe in some gardens the lucky ones managed to get some seeds to grow it. I will certainly chase that up and see if I can grow it in my garden, provided it can grow in subtropical conditions.


Definitely grows subtropical!  My understanding is it is a little tricky to grow.  Where it is naturally occurs it is in the forest understory. So you need to have an established forest canopy for the trees to grow under. Needs multiple trees and varieties to pollinate. Varieties stagger pollination dates.  Male and female blooms on same tree open at different times to prevent self pollination.

I have not attempted to grow it.
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 6:05am; Reply: 242
Thanks for the insight on PawPaw growing C_Sharp :) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 7:18am; Reply: 243
Quoted from Lola
Heidi left an excellent column named
On the diet....answered questions to many
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2002/04/07/about-heidi-merritt?blog=9

I wish Heidi would pop in so that I could say thank you...she was such a support and help in the old days. :K)

Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, October 15, 2009, 2:07am; Reply: 244
Good research on the Porgy Cristina and like your new shield - lookin' good!  I also agree on the summary you made of the paw paw issue.  

I've found some nutritional info for the different relatives of American Paw Paw and hopefully will get time to compare them all together soon.
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 15, 2009, 11:20am; Reply: 245
Research on MSG:

It is a Black Dot in my Swami, but just in case anyone else has it  in their other lists options here is a must read from the NSW Food Authority in Australia.  They also cite NZ regulations.

http://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/_Documents/consumer_pdf/MSG.pdf

It is disconcerting to know that cafes and restaurant do not have to declare if they are using it or not in their foods.  But they are obliged to tell you if you ask.  So, watch out for these hidden flavor enhancing products.

:) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 15, 2009, 12:20pm; Reply: 246
EPAZOTE - (Chenopodium lambrosioides)
This is an Organic Aromatic herb which lists under Condiments and Additives. I could not find it in Typebase, so here is an interesting link to increase our knowledge of it.

http://www.rain-tree.com/epazote.htm

What I have got out of it, it is that it is a very useful plant for anyone, but particularly those of us in a 'bean type' diet.  We can use it to reduce the gassy effect of beans on us by cooking leaves with the beans. It has many other medicinal properties and the article in the link explores those in detail including researches and case citations.  

Only use leaves (not oil or seeds which may be harmful due to toxic concentrations of whatever makes the plant medicinal).  Three days is the maximum recommended to use for its medicinal purposes, unless your doc tells you otherwise.

Googling the internet indicates that in Australia, the seeds of the plant are readily available to grow in your garden or pot.  HFS my have the dry version of the herb.  I certainly have not seen them in the spice racks of the supermarkets.   :)

It is a neutral in my Swami.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Thursday, October 15, 2009, 7:37pm; Reply: 247
In the US the easiest way to get Epazote is to go to Mexican food stores (dried most often, but fresh sometimes). Where I see fresh epazote most often is at flea markets which draw a large Hispanic population.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, October 15, 2009, 10:19pm; Reply: 248
try some with melted cheese from your swami! ;)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 16, 2009, 9:55am; Reply: 249

Hopefully a straightforward yummy little one:

In Typebase & GT                 In Australia common name
Asian Pear (PYRUS PYRIFOLIA)     = Nashi Pear (Pyrus Pyrifolia)

http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/nashi.htm
Posted by: Jumari, Friday, October 16, 2009, 1:14pm; Reply: 250
Heres another one for the UK Typebase. Doesn't seem to be there.

Went to the vege shop and asked if they had Rutabagas

and Con the Fruiterer/veg guy said Root a what?

I said Rutagaga. He said never heard of it.

After doing some research and finding out that Rutagabas were from Sweden. I slowly put 1 and 1 together when I noticed Swedes in the supermarket. Sure enough if you check this site out.

Rutabagas are Swedes in Oz. And its a big diamond food for many.

http://www.gardenate.com/plant/Swedes
Posted by: Possum, Friday, October 16, 2009, 10:17pm; Reply: 251
Quoted from Jumari
Heres another one for the UK Typebase. Doesn't seem to be there.
Went to the vege shop and asked if they had Rutabagas
and Con the Fruiterer/veg guy said Root a what?
I said Rutagaga. He said never heard of it.
After doing some research and finding out that Rutagabas were from Sweden. I slowly put 1 and 1 together when I noticed Swedes in the supermarket. Sure enough if you check this site out.
Rutabagas are Swedes in Oz. And its a big diamond food for many.
http://www.gardenate.com/plant/Swedes

:D :D :D

Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 16, 2009, 11:39pm; Reply: 252
Quoted from Jumari
Heres another one for the UK Typebase. Doesn't seem to be there.

Went to the vege shop and asked if they had Rutabagas

...

After doing some research and finding out that Rutagabas were from Sweden. I slowly put 1 and 1 together when I noticed Swedes in the supermarket. Sure enough if you check this site out.

Rutabagas are Swedes in Oz. And its a big diamond food for many.

http://www.gardenate.com/plant/Swedes


Thanks Jumari, but, have you looked at the summary tables.  Since post 84, where we identified that Rutagaba were Swedes in Australia, they have been there.  I know it gets hard to keep up with everything, but if I cannot find something in the shops, I come to these summaries first before going into research.  It is good though that your research has confirmed our earlier findings, so I will add your post to it.  Good work Jumari and thanks for posting.   :) :)

Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 16, 2009, 11:49pm; Reply: 253
Just to assist with keeping track with the summaries, I am thinking of opening up a thread with just the summary tables, no other posts are to go there.  Any error, omissions or updates and research discussions will continue in this post.  And maybe Lola can stick that one too.  What do you guys think?
In the meantime, these are the current post for summary tables.  BTW, I am due to update a couple of them with recent findings.  Do it soon.

Food choices Summary 4 (equiv)              187 - page 8
Food Choices Summary 2 (non equiv)     202 - page 9
Seafood Summary 4 (equiv)               217 - page 9


PS: great idea GW about adding page numbers to this!!  :) :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 12:52am; Reply: 254
Jumari, con the fruiterer "a coupla days" he he!

Sounds like a great idea Cristina.  For now, could you please put which page number the summaries are on too, not just the post number please, that might help locating them.  I guess we'll end up with a few pages even in the summaries only thread!
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 4:08pm; Reply: 255
Quoted Text
maybe Lola can stick that one too

done! :)
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 10:15pm; Reply: 256
Thanks Lola :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 2:07am; Reply: 257
Hi Team:
C_Sharp has kindly volunteered to do the updates to the tables for me, so I do not have to create so many posts in the Summary thread due to the 72hr deadline normal users have. So the posted summaries will have the latest info from the research thread and there will only be the same 3 or 4 posts with the summary tables only.  Thanks C_Sharp.

The procedure will be for me to post an update request here (for record keeping) with an alert PM for C_Sharp, in case he is not tuned in (hardly ever!!) :). I will use the same blah code used for the tables, so all he has to do is copy and paste behind the scenes.  So nothing has really changed, but instead of me directly posting new tables in the Summary thread, C_Sharp will update the existing relevant table for me (using his admin privilege).  This will also ensure continuity of these very informative threads.  If I am away on holidays or something, somebody else can take over this 'updating requests' role.

In the meantime, I am reviewing all posts and making sure our tables as shown in the Summary thread are up to date before the 72hr close off.  Kindly check them up and let me know of required updates (according to what we have posted here so far) are needed (many pairs of eyes can see better than two).   :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 2:31am; Reply: 258
Navigational tip:

I was going to post a table with the start reply number for each page, to make it easier to get to referenced posts, when in doing so I realized that every page has exactly 25 replies, therefore to get to a particular page for a post number we can use the following formula:

divide the reply number by 25 and add 1 to the answer

Using an example, to find Food choices Summary table (equiv) that is posted in Reply 187:

187/25 =7 with a remainder of 12
7 + 1 = 8


The reminder gives an indication of where on the page is the Reply  we are seeking.  In this example, Food choices Summary4 (equiv) is in about the middle part of page 8.  :) :)

This will work as long as my assumption that each page only has 25 posts is correct.  It could all just be coincidence... in which case posting of a Start Reply no. for each page could still be useful ...  :) :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 2:59am; Reply: 259
Pages should have 25 posts, except for the page in a thread currently accepting new posts.

The first page in a thread contains the original post and replies 1-24.
Second page replies 25-49, ...

Anyway your math of dividing by 25 should work.
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 6:12pm; Reply: 260
Research on melons:

So far I identified the following Typebase melons:

Honeydew Melon = Honeydew Melon in Australian

Cantaloupe Melon (true european)= Charentais melon in Australia
Classified under specialty melons by the Australian Tropical fruits portal (Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry:

http://www.australiantropicalfruits.org.au/tropical_fruits/produce_types/melon/

Casaba Melon same in Australia as per these links:

Woolworths fact sheet for the fruit
http://www.wowlink.com.au/cmgt/wcm/connect/7f96a5004f02caa092ca9b64aa8be21f/Melon+-+Honeydew.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

Seeds availability in Australia:
http://www.beautanicals.com.au/casabamelon.html

Musk Melon (American Canteloupe) = Rockmelon

http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/muskmelon1.html

http://www.wildoaks.com.au/site/produce.php?pID=33

PS:
The wise geek gives nice, clear comparison of the different melon types.  

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-melons.htm
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 11:40pm; Reply: 261
A bit of lighthearted history about the 'Musk' not 'Canteloupe' melon saga in America:

http://www.mariquita.com/articles/None.dare.call.html    :)  ;D  :)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 19, 2009, 2:08am; Reply: 262
there are numerous older discussions
http://74.125.113.132/custom?q=cache:ei385_7ME-UJ:www.dadamo.com/forum/archivea/admin_config.pl%3Fread%3D74795+Musk&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 19, 2009, 2:12am; Reply: 263
Quoted from Lola


Thanks Lola.  I tried searching, but I cannot access those older discussions, whenever I click on them, I get a blank page.  Is this the same for everyone? :o ??) :)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 19, 2009, 2:23am; Reply: 264
try clicking on  Cached next to the address...that might work for now.....the glitch might get restored
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, October 19, 2009, 2:26am; Reply: 265
If you click on the link at the beginning of the google search entry, it should take you to a page.


Some browsers (like firefox) try to convert the URL listing at the end of a search entry into a clickable link.

If the URL is long google replaces a part of the URL with three full stops ...

URLs that have been changed in this way will not work!




So click on the link at the beginning of the search entry instead of the end and the links should work.
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 19, 2009, 2:49am; Reply: 266
Great maths there Cristina, that will help us navigating, thanks.

Here are some more of those pictures I scanned in (mostly fruit and veg that I'm personally not too familiar with).  Maybe the pictures  could go onto the food list, though if it would add too much to your workload, that's ok.  Pictures might make it easier to understand for the easily confused like me.  Though maybe we're going too far?  Well I scanned them in and here they are anyhow.

Still working on the paw paw and will post here sooon.  Also have some research on beans that I did for the BTD, will translate to GTD and put up here too soon.

Note it's got rockmelon and cantaloupe together that's where I got that wrong idea from, they look similar though





























Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 19, 2009, 3:16am; Reply: 267
Whitlof is interesting.  It is made by shooting from the Chicory Root (CICHORIUM INTYBUS).  The red leafed chicory and chicory root is in typebase / gtd but not the whitlof.  Is a close relative of Endive / Escarole (CICHORIUM ENDIVIA)http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?156

Quoted Text
Belgian endive is also known as French endive, witlof in the Netherlands, witlo(o)f in the USA, chicory in the UK, as witlof in Australia, endive in France, and chicon in parts of Northern France and in Wallonia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witlof

The red leafed italian chicory is Radicchio (also CICHORIUM INTYBUS) (in GTD & Typebase http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?336)

There is a previous thread including a recipee.  http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GC/m-1193143506/

Another thread about the FOS that this family contains: http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GC/m-1189437707/

Also found this great list of different names for food including whitlow = chicory http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2004/06/28/a-rose-is-a-rose-is-a?blog=13
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 19, 2009, 3:21am; Reply: 268
nice pictures! :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 19, 2009, 9:03am; Reply: 269
Great work GW!!  Thanks for all the info on the Endive, Chicoky, Escarole saga.

It started back in post 84 with the Swami UK version that calls escarole, Leaf Chicory

Then Sed identified the tongue twister between Chicory, Endive, Belgian Endives  back in posts 205 and continue with 206,208 with me changing the Escarole name a couple of times in the table from Chicory leaf, to broad chicory leaf, then to the current naming as a mixture of both: chicory leaf/broad leaf endive.

Thanks for taking it on, your posts clarified this issue. I try to summarize this information in the following chart:
TB=TypeBase

                                    Genus Chicory
                                          |
            ____________________|______________________
           |                                                                    |
         Endive                                                          Chicory
  (CICHORUM ENDIVIA)                                   (Cichorium intybus)
                                                                    Leaf                 Root
              |                                          (var. foliosum)        (var. sativum)
              |                                                      |
    _______|_________                            ________|__________
   |                        |                           |            |               |
Curly Endive (TB) Escarole (TB)     (TB)Radiccio   Sugarloaf   Witlof
(var crispum)    (var latifolia)            Red endive                 Belgian Endive (TB)  
                       Bavarian,                Red chicory                 Endive (TB)
                       Batavian or
                       Broad Leaf Endive

(Based on Wikipedia genus breakdown:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicory).
Do notice that in the chart above it should be clear that what we call Witlof in Australia and Belgian Endive or chicory in UK and Endive in France is what TypeBase refers to as Belgian Endive, but lists under Endive.

The scientific names I used in this chart are according to Wikipedia, but TypeBase groups Witlof under the Endive scientific name instead of the Chicory scientific name, like in Wikipedia.

Endive, Escarole and Chicory are three different Live foods which sometimes are rated different in our lists.  So hopefully after this team research the information is clear enough for everyone to be able to shop accordingly.    :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 19, 2009, 10:00am; Reply: 270
Glad to help!  Great chart there Cristina, makes it clear.  Why does everyone have to use different names all over the world?!

Anyway, after posting I realised that in the GTD book there is Chicory Root and there is also just Chicory.  What about in SWAMI?  Could Chicory be referring to Whitlof as well?
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 19, 2009, 11:09am; Reply: 271
Chicory, Endive, Escarole, Radiccio conclusion:


TypeBaseAU/NZ Comments
Chicory (Cichorium intybus)Chicory Reply 84,205-08, 268-9, 273-4
Endive/ Belgian Endive(Cichorium Endivia)Witlof (Cichorium intybus)  Reply 84,205-08, 268-9, 273-4
Endive/Curly Endive(Cichorium Endivia)Curly EndiveReply 84,205-08, 268-9, 273-4
Escarole(Cichorium Endivia)Escarole, Broad Leaf Endive Reply 84,205-08, 268-9, 273-4
Radiccio(Cichorium intybus)Red ChicoryReply 84,205-08, 268-9

The University of Melbourne in Australia produced this collection of common and scientific names under the chicory genus, listing the common names for all languages: english, dutch, japanese, Italian, Espanol, French, ........ .  it includes links to relevant photos too.

Very useful. (book2)

http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Cichorium.html#endivia-endivia

:) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 19, 2009, 11:23am; Reply: 272
Quoted from Symbi
Glad to help!  ...
Anyway, after posting I realised that in the GTD book there is Chicory Root and there is also just Chicory.  What about in SWAMI?  Could Chicory be referring to Whitlof as well?


GW, after your post I also checked BTD and although it only lists it under Chicory Root, the description talks about the plant (leaves) too.

Quoted Text

This relative of the ENDIVE has curly, bitter-tasting leaves that are often used as part of a salad or cooked as greens. In the United States, curly endive is sometimes erroneously called chicory.


So, my conclusion is that Chicory in GTD and  SwamiX (where is a diamond for me), refers to the Chicory plant that is grown for its leaves.  The same plant is sometimes grown mainly for its roots to make chicory coffee.  Check the university of Melbourne link above, it has all the possible chicory variations in the world listed there in every language.  It includes of course, Radiccio, Escarole, chicory, endive ....
:) :)


Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 19, 2009, 12:18pm; Reply: 273
Food for thought:


There are obviously at least 3 ratings for the Endive, Chicory and Escarole. I have not seen Belgian Endive or Witlof listed individually.

So, my understanding is that when we see Endive listed in our SwamiX or GT books, we can use either Belgian endive or Curly endive as per chart in post 269. They are both listed together in Typebase, so equal rating.

Escarole is on its own as Escarole or Broad Leaf Endive or whatever other translations are in other languages. And it has its own rating in our lists.

Chicory, is the chicory plant, not to be confused with the curly endive.  It has its own rating.

Chicory Root is listed on its own in our Swami lists and therefore it has its own rating.

I do not think we have any problems in identifying Radiccio which has its own placing in our lists.

Hopefully, we can reach consensus on this ...   ;D :) :)
Posted by: Jenny, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 9:44pm; Reply: 274
Wonderful research gang! I salute you all, especially Cristina   :K)
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 10:00pm; Reply: 275
Hi C_Sharp,

I think that we are ready to close the Chicory, Escarole, Endive issue, thanks to a great team effort.  Thanks to Ghee Whiz, Jumari, Jenny, Shed and others who are keeping the research up.

The contents of the table summary on reply 271 here are ready to go to the Equivalent Food choices, Summary 5 table, Reply 1 in the Summary thread (alphabetical order).   Thanks. :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:05am; Reply: 276
Hi Jenny, thanks for your encouraging words.

Every trip to the shops these days become a culinary lesson.  We are learning so much!  I am really enjoying all this.  I hope it is the same for everyone.

From my trip to the shops yesterday (woolies), came home with 3 pre-packet salad mixes, mainly to check a couple of greens that made the mixture and I have not heard of before:  Mizuna and Tatsoi

Googling determined that:
Mizuna is a Japanese mustard green with dandelion-like jagged edge green leaves with a mild, sweet earthy flavor.
Here is a link to DPI (Queensland Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries) on Mizuna and another related plant Mibuna:

http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5305.html

Tatsoi also known as rosette bok choy although very different in appearance to bok choy (bunched, white fleshy-stemmed Asian vegetables a little like short, bulbous leeks in appearance). Tatsoi has glossy, tight, dark curly leaves a little like a short silver beet. It has a similar flavour however to bok choy.

Also from DPI:

http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/7922.html

Other links:

http://www.coolibahherbs.com.au/boxed-products/mizuna

http://www.coolibahherbs.com.au/boxed-products/tatsoi

:) :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:22am; Reply: 277
you ll be quite the food expert by the time you ve reset those genes of yours!! ;)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:22am; Reply: 278
Research on Dandelion Greens:

I think this link summs it all, but let me quote something from it before, which I think is spot on!!

Quoted Text
It is 'universally considered a noxious weed that destroys lawns' - we think it should be rephrased as: 'lawns should be considered noxious environments because they encourage mowing which destroys valuable plants like Dandelions'.


(clap)(clap)(clap)

http://middlepath.com.au/plant/Dandelion_Taraxacum-officinale.php

So Dandelion Greens from Typebase is the same as our Dandelion greens and unless someone posts something to the contrary, will soon go to our equivalent summaries.   :) :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:25am; Reply: 279
those are the ones alright!!
so detoxing!
great for the liver and an excellent diuretic
http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NP044

newest NAP addition
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:45am; Reply: 280
Well, let me tell you my own story with dandelion.  When we moved to this acreage, trying to go back to my roots, back to the land, we had to start from scratch because the many years of urban living has completely erased any early knowledge of nature's gifts.

Many weeds, shrubs, plants are here we know little to nothing about. Then, we got the chooks (hens and one rooster), they have been free ranging around the property from the begining, foraging everywhere, but going particularly mad about this weed in the lawn (quite large lawn which since we have been working on reducing with garden beds).  We always wonder what was so good about that plant that the chooks enjoy so much.  Now, we know, it is the Dandelion growing wild in our property!!   :) :)

Well, I guessed, we at least have been getting the benefits through their yummy eggs, Thanks chookies for being so clever!! :) :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:49am; Reply: 281
I bet those chicken livers are all organic and healthy!!! ;)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 9:22am; Reply: 282
Research on Asparagus Peas:

First to all I want to point out that Typebase sent me in wild goose chase   >:(  by using the scientific name PERSEA AMERICANA which refers to the avocado plant.  ??) On reading the description and observing picture, I changed focus to the plants below: 8)  8)

I do not think we can get these Asparagus Peas in Australia, although I did find this website from NSW flora on line:
http://pngplants.org/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Lotus~tetragonolobus

From that website I noticed two things:
1.- common name used for it: Winged Peas, so at least we can conclude that in Australia Asparagus peas are referred to as Winged Peas.
2.- and that it is cultivated, naturalized near Macksville, NSW

Jumari and anyone else living in NSW may be able to come across these in their areas.  Possum in NZ?

I also came across some forums that discussed the difficulties of getting these seeds in Australia because they may be considered noxious weeds and therefore stopped stocking them ...

I may need to go for an exploratory trip of my land to see if I find any of these "noxious weeds" to eat (SFs in my Swami).

Here are some interesting and colorful links from other parts of the world:

http://www.maltawildplants.com/FABC/Tetragonolobus_purpureus.php#BUY
http://www.bbg.org/gar2/topics/kitchen/2004su_asparaguspea.html
http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Lotus.html

Not to be confused with winged bean,  which we can easily get in aussie land, at least through permaculture groups and organic nurseries.  Some illustrative links:

http://www.answers.com/topic/winged-bean
http://cpws.cqu.edu.au/FCWViewer/view.do?page=6827
http://www.stockfood.com.au/results.asp?inline=true&image=197847&wwwflag=3&imagepos=2

(book2) :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 9:36am; Reply: 283
Quoted from Lola
I bet those chicken livers are all organic and healthy!!! ;)


Lucky for them, they are only my pets, no hunters, explorers or nomads around here ... ;D ;D ;D

This warrior is putting her shield to good use by holding the rooster at bay while robbing the girls eggs every afternoon.  ;D ;D ;D

Posted by: 7005 (Guest), Thursday, October 22, 2009, 11:19pm; Reply: 284
Christina,

Great job cross referencing names etc for us Aussies.... Just wondering if you have this listed somewhere for easy reference?

Thanks
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 23, 2009, 12:18am; Reply: 285
Hi Maurice,

Nice to see another Aussie on here, welcome!  How long have you been on the diet?  

Everyone is welcome to post any findings about finding BTD/GTD food in Australia and Cristina has been kindly summarising the information into the tables.  More researchers are welcome!

This thread is the research thread and the lists are posted on this thread: Summary tables only from Aussie Food Choices - http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-xpress/m-1255756515/

You can also find both threads by going to the SWAMI Xpress forum, they are stickied there.
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 23, 2009, 12:36am; Reply: 286
Cristina,

One that I think has been left off the summary tables, Ocean Bream (nemadactylus macropterus) is also known as larakihi.  I talk about it at post 164 and 142.  I still wonder if we can ask Dr D's team to reveal the scientific names behind new foods they added in SWAMI including this one?  Aka Sea Bream.  Probably too difficult.

Just did some more searching, found that Sea Bream in the USA is likely to be Pagrus Pagrus - Common Sea bream http://www.fishbase.org/summary/SpeciesSummary.php?ID=1756
or a relative in the Pagrus genus http://www.fishbase.org/nomenclature/SpeciesList.php?genus=Pagrus

Pagrus are not found anywhere near Australia.
Guess it has to go on the food to be tested table.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, October 23, 2009, 1:24am; Reply: 287
Quoted from Cristina
I bought Quark today for the first time and I have not had time to think what to do with it yet. I have not even looked at it yet, it is in a glass bottle, all organic.  Can you tell me more about your dressings?  Maybe I should post this in my SwamiX.  Do not want to hijack this thread. ...

Cristina:

Tell me a little more about how quark is like in Australia.

In the US and in Northern Europe is is more like soft cream cheese and is usually packed in plastic tubs. Sometimes it is as soft as yogurt but it can also be as firm as regular cheese (and some place between these two consistencies. Firmness seems to depend on country. I have never seen it liquid enough that you could pour it from a bottle.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 23, 2009, 1:30am; Reply: 288
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?514
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?322

both also widely known as sea bream....
Posted by: 7005 (Guest), Friday, October 23, 2009, 1:55am; Reply: 289
Hi Gee_Whiz,

Thanks, glad to be here.

I've only been reading the GTD the last couple of weeks. I've completed most of the strength tests except finger prints and secretor status.

My secretor status will apparently tell me if I am Gatherer or an Explorer. I'll get around to that soon.... Hope I'm a Gatherer, if not that will cause me some grief.  

Anyhoo, cya 'round
  
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 2:27am; Reply: 290
Hi, Maurice, and welcome to the forum!!  Glad you  find this information useful.  If you think of any food item you want to discuss, join us right in. One of our very active team member in this thread, Jumari, is also from Sydney.  We have people tuning in from all over Aussie and Nz land, not to mention all over the world, so you are in good company.

GW, I am trying to think how we left that one out!!  I think that it got entangled with the Groupers, Gropers, Porgy = Red Sea bream, Snapper research and my request to fisheries back a few posts, which I am still waiting a reply for!!  It looks like we will have to figure this one out ourselves.

I have also mentioned to Dr D in the e-mail I sent him that we are interested in getting access to the scientific names for all the food listed in the Swamis.  I am sure we will hear from him on this issue, in due time.

Between statements like "Porgy in US, Breams in Australia" and the disparity in species between the two countries, gets difficult to make decisions one way or another.  I think Jumari also had some posts on it too.  I'm having another look at any bream threads to rule out any equivalences and we will get that ready for the non-equiv, maybe.
PS: my son arrived safely from Las Vegas/Los Angeles this morning.  We were on the highway 4:00am this morning to meet his arrival at 6:00am.  Back home now.  Come back to this soon.

And Ghee Whiz, thanks a million for your research!!  Very throughout!!  Keep it up girl (clap) :) :) :)!!
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 2:42am; Reply: 291
Quoted from C_Sharp

Cristina:

Tell me a little more about how quark is like in Australia.

In the US and in Northern Europe is is more like soft cream cheese and is usually packed in plastic tubs. Sometimes it is as soft as yogurt but it can also be as firm as regular cheese (and some place between these two consistencies. Firmness seems to depend on country. I have never seen it liquid enough that you could pour it from a bottle.


Hi C_S, I bought Organic Ivyhome Quark cheese that comes in a glass jar with black lid, it is like a jam jar, except it has the cheese inside.  It has a creamy consistency, like cream cheese.  I had some spread on a rice cake with a bit of almond paste. Yummy!!  I tried to find you a picture on the internet, but not luck, lots of threads on it, but no photos.

I also bought Paneer cheese.  That came in a plastic wrap.  It is a Lennos Paneer organic cheese.  It has the consistency of Feta cheese, very crumby when I grated some over my rice with red sauce (based on beetroots rather than tomatos).  It complimented the rice dish very well. Yummy. :) :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 23, 2009, 3:23am; Reply: 292
Thanks Cristina!  Your research and checkings things before adding to the lists is right on.  Make those google servers hum!   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 3:53am; Reply: 293
Further on the Quark, Paneer cheese:

Pound for pound Paneer cheese seems to be more expensive than Quark cheese: Paneer (180g, 200g package) = AU$9.15, Quark (300g jar) = AU$6.95.

Also, I asked for Barley Malt, but all that was available was bottled Barley Syrup.  I checked the contents and it is 100% barley and water.  So, $7.45 later I came home with this Lotus Organic Barley Malt Syrup.  I have to figure out what to do with it.

Also I came home with a packet of Torula yeast (AU$11.90), which is the same as nutritional yeast: NO!!  I googled it and it looks I got it wrong again.  So now I have at home a packet of Brewest and a packet of Torula yeast.  I think I may start growing mushrooms with them ... What else can I do with them?  Cook? No wheat here ...

Tuned into a forum in the net, and it looks like what we should be getting is the Lotus Nutritional Yeast, or Savory yeast flakes.   There are other brands, but everyone seems to agree that Lotus is the best without extra salt or sugar.  This Lotus nutritional yeast is hard to get, so if anyone can source it, post it here to help us.

:) :)

Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 6:50am; Reply: 294
Nutritional yeast = Savory yeast flakes

I located a local supplier of Nutritional yeast or 'Savoury Yeast Flakes' as called here in australia.  It is a HFS in Marcoola Beach, just a couple of suburbs up the road.  The owner/manager lives just around the corner from my place.  I invited her to pop into this forum too.

Here is a website that has a good description and photo of what I bought.  Maybe, like the doggies our hair and skin will be beautiful too!!

http://erinrac.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2372

And this one describing Nutritional yeast, posted many times before in other threads, but, put it here for the record:

http://vegetariancuisine.suite101.com/article.cfm/benefits_and_uses_of_nutritional_yeast

It is yellow, flakety and I have not tasted yet, but I am planing on using it with fried tofu or patties tonight.  I should be cooking now!   :) :) :)

Torula and Brewer's yeast are powdery and a lot darker in color.  (book2)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 8:59pm; Reply: 295
Another very valued bit of information that got left behind, sorry Jenny:

Quoted from Jenny
,
Maybe I should go back and study the last few entries, but which of the above would you say are commonly sold in Australia, as I have always used rockmelon/cantaloupe as interchangeable semantics based on geography rather than type?  :-/


Jenny, yes, you are spot on!  I have in my fridge half a Canteloupe/Rockmelon as stated on its label (from  Woolies).  In one my investigative shopping trips, I asked the IGA greengrocer yesterday what was this fruit (holding a rockmelon) and he said that is the Rockmelon, so (smarty me) I asked him what is a Canteloupe?  Ahh, that is what the Victorians called the Rockmelon.  I left it at that, because he is also right.  Like you said, the distinction is more geographical than typing.  But, in saying that, some specialist fruit shops may know the difference as described in the australian wesite I cited back in reply 184.  Guided by it, we should clarify on the equivalent summary table that the Typebase Canteloupe, is the Australian Smooth skin Canteloupe Rockmelon, instead of just Canteloupe? The effect this will have will be at least, to intrigue people enough into browsing the referenced Replies to find out more and in doing so, increase their chances of grabbing the right melon for their type.

So far this season, I have seen watermelons, Rockmelons and Honeydew melons.  No smooth rockmelons canteloupes.

I have an idea, my sons girlfriend will be here on the 6th.  She lives in Las Vegas.  I may send her an e-mail, to make sure, she goes to the shops and has a good look and feel for the different muskmelons/ rockmelons/canteloupes and any other melons she comes acros in Las Vegas.  Then, when she comes here, after she gets over her jetlag, I will take her in one of my shopping trips, so she can partner the aussie melons with the american ones. She is an O- and I am also tempted to ask her to take the secretor status before she comes here.  She may stay for a while ... :) :)

extract from the website:
Quoted Text

Cantaloupe melons: Similar to muskmelons but with a smooth skin. There are various types – Charentais, Ogen and Galia – all small in size with flesh ranging in colour from green and white to orange.


and this is the link:
http://www.homehints.com.au/se.....6BrJ0CFR5HagodNjRqjA
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 9:13pm; Reply: 296
Quoted from C_Sharp


What typebase calls a cantaloupe is not what most people call a cantaloupe.  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?91

What most people call a cantaloupe or rock melon is a "musk melon" in typebase.  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255

Typebase also has an entry for honeydew. It is easily distinguished  because it has green flesh (A normal musk melon has orange flesh). I am not sure if this is what you call a honeydew in Australia. Honeydew is the common term in the US. Typebase entry for this melon: http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?201


C-S, I am not sure if we answered your question, going through the replies now, but just in case, while on my face, here is an answer:

Yes, Honeydews in Australia has a green flesh and they are the same as described in Typebase.  That is one we can be sure of.   :) :)
PS: It is like in these photos:

http://www.produceoasis.com/Items_folder/Fruits/Honeydew.html
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, October 23, 2009, 9:34pm; Reply: 297
Quoted from Cristina

I have an idea, my sons girlfriend will be here on the 6th.  She lives in Las Vegas.  I may send her an e-mail, to make sure, she goes to the shops and has a good look and feel for the different muskmelons/ rockmelons/canteloupes and any other melons she comes across in Las Vegas.  


I can tell you the reaction I would get if I asked in a
grocery store in my area of North Carolina:

If I asked for cantaloupe, I would get handed a muskmelon.

If I asked for muskmelon, I would probably get handed a muskmelon (That is unless I asked a teenager or new employee, If I did this I might get told they do not have them or I could talk to the produce manager about special ordering it. They would recognize hearing the muskmelon name, but not realize that it is the same as what they call a cantaloupe.)

If ask for rockmelon, I am likely to get a blank look and a shrug. Without any recognition of what type of melon I want.




No matter what I ask for, I will not get a "true" cantaloupe as described in typebase.
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 23, 2009, 9:49pm; Reply: 298
My gosh!! There is no hope!!   :o ??)  I better spare the poor girls nightmare! Back to the pictures.  Where is GW and her camera?  :)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 3:01am; Reply: 299
:) Sounds a bit suss, Cristina, your friend is coming over and you're asking her to feel melons ha ha.  Just kidding!  

No seriously, you'll love helping someone and you'll learn heaps more.  Many people around me don't know their blood types (roll eyes)

The melons are being confusing again !  arrrggh
If you want to use those pictures I posted, you may need C_Sharp's expertise to put them straight into the summary tables for us.  He may have to copy each URL by right-clicking on each one and posting a new image tag.  Knowing him, he'll find a more clever way of doing it, probably use the page HTML and copy the tags out of there or something!

I vote for pictures!  of the food that is (wink)
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 5:03am; Reply: 300
The only thing with that is that there is only so much room to fit it all in and the Summary tables may become too crowded.  It may be better to post any pictures here, or better still to find links to good URLs and post them here, or both.  The summary tables can then hold the reference numbers for the researched replies. :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 9:41am; Reply: 301
You're right there, Cristina, they will take up space, unless the summary tables may need to be converted into tables (if that can be done on the forum.)  Then the pictures or any other pictures we find could go beside the info!

C_Sharp is that possible?
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 12:54am; Reply: 302
The summary tables are in table format, using the blah code table feature.  There will not be enough room there to include photos.  Even deciding what type of photo we publish could be a decision to ponder on. What is more descriptive?  The leaves, the whole plant, the roots?  Should we include descriptions?

But, if what you are talking about is a database type of table, like Typebase, where you click on something and expands into a full blown article of the food in question, then that may be outside the scope of this research.  That is all we are doing at the moment, researching local food items, getting as much information as possible on what we eat and what it looks like, and so on, so that Dr D and his team can eventually integrate these food choices into their Typebase database with a special vernacular for the southern hemitsphere.   :) :)

PS: I have not forgotten the Bream, Porgy, Snapper isue.  It has been DD's 25th this weekend and between DS arrival from LA, babysitting DGkids and family get togethers, I have been using my time very briefly on easy to answer posts.  :)
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 1:32am; Reply: 303
Quoted from Symbi
:) Sounds a bit suss, Cristina, your son's friend is coming over and you're asking her to feel melons ha ha.  Just kidding! (wink)
Better than asking your son to feel melons... :-/ :D ::) especially on this occasion :D
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 2:56am; Reply: 304
Hi Cristina,
No worries about the pics.  I didn't know it's already in table format and you're right there probably isn't room.  Oh well.  I also have a lot to do with full time child minding parenting ;) (except 2 days kindergarten), housekeeping and cooking, spring cleaning, lots of appointments next week, and am usually coming on here for 30 minutes or so spurts.  We've all had the flu this week after an appointment with my ENT last Monday (I have hyperaccusis!) where we shared germs  :( at the hospital and medicare office.  Hello, put all the sick people together and see what happens  (:B

Will get the papaya research finished I hope soon!  Bit by bit, working together, we'll get there!  :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 3:23am; Reply: 305
Quoted from Symbi
:) Sounds a bit suss, Cristina, your friend is coming over and you're asking her to feel melons ha ha.  Just kidding!  


Quoted from Possum
Better than asking your son to feel melons... :-/ :D ::) especially on this occasion :D


Funny girls.   :) ;D ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 3:34am; Reply: 306
Also, for all of us, another thing to consider is the copyright issue, the site could be liable if it could be proven that any photos here are copyrighted.  That is why it is usually better to post links to websites with photos.  Otherwise we have to go through the trouble of taking photos of good quality, get them published in some website and then arrange to post them here ensuring we keep the paperwork or some sort of proof to easily demonstrate that they are really our photos.  In my opinion, not worth the risk.

GW I know you are super reliable and working on the nutritional values of PawPaws custard apples available in aussie land to decide which will be the closest nutritionally wise to US PawPaw.  Take your time, and if you feel you cannot get any further with it, that is also OK, we can only do what we can, we are all volunteers and we have to make sure that the fun aspect of this research is not lost.  We do not want to make it a chore, the real goal here is to not lose track of resetting our genes... but we all know that.   :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 4:04pm; Reply: 307
Research on SeaBream (this is a big one):

American Porgies = Australian Breams
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porgie_fishing

We established in Reply 232 from historic records in this forum (Heidi's column) that at least a species of Porgy in US has the scientific name of Chrysophyrs auratus or Pagrus Auratus.  This is also commonly known as the Red Porgy, Hawaian Red Porgy, or Red seabream.  Our Snapper (in Australia, shares the same scientific name. Therefore it is safe to arrive to the same conclusion as reply 232:

Typebase Porgy (Chysophyrs Auratus)/Red Porgy or Red seabream = Au/Nz  Snapper.

Typebase also describes another Porgy under the scientific name of PAGELLUS BOGARAVEO  which is the Black Spot seabream, commonly known as just Seabream.

I believe that this is the Seabream listed in our Swamis.  At least in my Swami it has the same classification as Porgy.  Typebase has not yet given it its own rating.  In close examination of the descriptor in Typebase under Porgy, we can read:

Quoted Text

Porgy
Scientific Name PAGELLUS BOGARAVEO

General Description:

Widely known as sea bream, there are many different varieties of this fish family in the United States and around the world.

In other words, Typebase is telling us that Pagellus Bogaraveo is the species commonly known as Sea Bream  within the Porgy family.  Unfortunately we do not have identical scientific names in the southern hemisphere.

Scup is the other species getting a mention in Typebase under Porgy and then again on its own.  This is because of the many species under Porgy family, Scup has a different enough composition to deserve its own rating.  Notice that Typebase Scup has the wrong scientific name of PARALICHTHYS DENTATUS which is the Summer Flounder.  The real scientific name for SCUP is Stenotomus chrysops . (I wondeer if this has been reported as an errata for Typebase?).

So, of the fishes listed as Porgies in Typebase we have determined just one with identical name in Australia: the Snapper.

But, Porgy encompases a group of fishes in Typebase, the descriptor makes that clear.  Each country has its own best species for this group, the ones that are the best eats.  The link I listed at the top of this reply list the most popular species not only in America, but also European and for our southern hemisphere.

I believe that it should be safe to assume that we can place our best eating quality bream in the same category as the Porgy group in Typebase.  The Typebase descriptor is not restrictive to Seabream, or Scup, Heidi saw that when she included the Red Seabream (and our Snapper), therefore, at least the species listed in Wikipedia if they are considered good eating quality in our countries, could be included in our diets as equivalents to Porgy.

In regards to the nutritional level of Australian fishes compare to the American ones, including the Black Bream, I found the following study from the Chemistry Department of the University of Melbourne in Australia:

http://www.biochemj.org/bj/031/0248/0310248.pdf

The study concludes that the Vitamin A content of Australian fish liver oils is higher than the fishes in the northern hemisphere.

I will summarise these findings in table form in my next post.

:) :)


Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 10:05pm; Reply: 308
My Research as posted in Reply 307 can be sumarized as follows:

Equivalent Fish & Seafood Table
TypebaseAU/NZEquivalentComments



Porgy (group)Bream (group)Local edible breams - Reply 307



Porgy, Red Porgy or Red Seabream
(Chrysophyrs auratus/Pagrus Pagrus)
SnapperReply 232, 307



Porgy/Swami Seabream
Pagellus Bogaraveo
Not availableListed in Swami as Seabream - Reply 307



Porgy/Scup
(Stenotomus chrysops)
Not availableReply 307



Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:33am; Reply: 309
Cristina - thanks for the kind words  :), I'll stop asking about the photos, you're right there could be a copyright issue.  To get those on the net I had to put them up on photobucket.  If I see an inspirational fruit or veg I may take some photos of them and put them on here though  :)  

BTW that's dandy having dandelions growing around your place and chooks and eggs.  Also about yeast - it's going to take more than a black dot to take my Vegemite away from me!  :) :)  Though I don't eat it when I have active yeast infections  :'( which will be a thing of the past now  ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:48am; Reply: 310
Closure of some Melons, Dandelion Greens, Aparagus Pea, Chesses (Quark, Peccorino, Manchego, Paneer, Farmer), Nutritional and Bakers Yeast:

Equivalent Food Choices Summary



Dairy Products
Quark, Farmer, Paneer
Pecorino, Manchego
Same vernacularReplies 225-7,291,293



Live Foods
Asparagus Pea
(Tetragonolobus purpureus)
Winged PeaReply 282



Dandelion Greens
(Taraxacum Officinale)
Dandelion/
Common Dandelion
Reply 278



Fruits
CanteloupeSpecialty Melons:
Charentais Melon
Reply 260



Casaba MelonHoneydew CasabaReply 260



Musk Melon RockmelonsReply 260



Condiments
Bakers YeastBrewers/Torula YeastReply 294



Nutritional YeastSavory Yeast FlakesReply 294
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:51am; Reply: 311
GW, actually the copyright issue was a PM reminder from C_Sharp.  Always making sure we stay in the straight and narrow/sharp.   :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:53am; Reply: 312
Typebase also describes another Porgy under the scientific name of PAGELLUS BOGARAVEO  which is the Black Spot seabream, commonly known as just Seabream.
I believe that this is the Seabream listed in our Swamis.  At least in my Swami it has the same classification as Porgy.  


Thanks for your research!  I checked the sample SWAMI available on the internet here (Jane Public, Explorer O - March 08) and unfortunately Porgy is a Super food while Sea Bream is a Diamond Super Food.  Interestingly the earlier Doe John SWAMI (July 07) has Porgy listed but no Sea Bream.  So I don't think we can say that they are the same fish in the Genotype Diet.  :(

Good find on scup being the wrong species, I wonder if there's a thread to report typebase errata somewhere for that.

I believe that it should be safe to assume that we can place our best eating quality bream in the same category as the Porgy group in Typebase.  The Typebase descriptor is not restrictive to Seabream, or Scup, Heidi saw that when she included the Red Seabream (and our Snapper), therefore, at least the species listed in Wikipedia if they are considered good eating quality in our countries, could be included in our diets as equivalents to Porgy.

I agree with that, though still wonder if there could be variation in those fishes that hasn't been tested, especially since Bream are essentially bottom dwelling fish and being a wide term including many genuses and species.  But if they are considered top eating though, like you say in their countries, yes, I'd eat em.  (Unbelievable how many fish in the sea and it is nigh impossible for Dr D's team to try and study them all - Scientists are probably still finding new species as we type)

Like the porgy fishing page on wikipedia.  The Southern Black Bream makes me  :) and mouth water.  First fish I caught, aged 5, just set up fishing with Great Grandma at estuary near Bunbury WA.  Asked to hold fishing rod while Mum goes back to car.  Jerk, jerk, what do you know, he bit right down on that hook.  He was lovely pan sized, best fish i ever ate.  Bream is like that, a lovely shape in the frying pan!

In regards to the nutritional level of Australian fishes compare to the American ones, including the Black Bream, I found the following study from the Chemistry Department of the University of Melbourne in Australia:  
The study concludes that the Vitamin A content of Australian fish liver oils is higher than the fishes in the northern hemisphere.


Lucky to be an Australian!  We also have lower levels of contamination I believe.
In that study they were examining the oil found within the liver of the fish only though:
Quoted Text
Oily fish have oils throughout the fillet and in the belly cavity around the gut, rather than only in the
liver like white fish.
according to Dr D in the GTD book.

:) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 26, 2009, 2:30am; Reply: 313
Back on the hunt for the elusive Sea Bream they are talking about in GTD / SWAMI.  When at post 286 I though it was Pagrus Pagrus Common Sea bream that was incorrect I believe now, you're right about that Cristina.  I was using the scientific name and common name and distribution and that may have been too easy.  ::) (fun at the same time this hunt is :) Us knowing fingerprinting now and research we could solve crimes you know  ;))

Found this:
Quoted Text
Perhaps the most common variety of fish referred to as sea bream is the European sea bream, scientifically called the Pagellus centrodontus. ...It is commonly found in oceans surrounding Europe ..
BTW Pagellus Centrodontus is aka Pagellus Bogaraveo aka blackspot sea bream. (same one you found Cristina!) http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?id=890


But then it says:
Quoted Text
..There are a number of sea bream that are also commonly found in the western Atlantic, off the coasts of the United States and in the Caribbean. These include the western Atlantic sea bream (the archosargus rhomboidalis), and the fish commonly known as the sheepshead. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-sea-bream.htm  


Looking up the Western Atlantic Sea Bream.  Found this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Atlantic_seabream it says:
Quoted Text
Within their native range, Western Atlantic seabream are also known as the Seabream,[1] Nelson, J.S., E.J. Crossman, H. Espinosa-Pérez, L.T. Findley, C.R. Gilbert, R.N. Lea and J.D. Williams 2004 Common and scientific names of fishes from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. American Fisheries Society, Special Publication 29, Bethesda, Maryland.
Unfortunately Fish base is busy and I can't open it's page, it may be http://www.fishbase.org/summary/speciessummary.php?id=1219

I think the academics have found the the Sea Bream that Dr D has in SWAMI!  The European Sea Bream (blackspot sea bream - Pagellus Bogaraveo) is in the typebase under Porgy.  So I propose that since Porgy has a different value to Sea Bream in the GTD, and since the Western Atlantic Sea Bream (Archosargus Rhomboidalis) is according to the above academics known as Sea Bream in their native range, this is the Sea Bream in GTD / SWAMI.

Dunno why I'm excited since we can't get that fish here! I hope we can finish the Sea Bream issue and :) that we can eat local Sea Bream like you said Cristina.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, October 26, 2009, 3:00am; Reply: 314
I have not really looked into the issue. I presumed that Porgy in GTD was "Pagrus pagrus" which is found off the Atlantic coast of the US. I think that is what people usually call them in the states.

Sea bream in GTD, I presume is "Red" Porgy found in the Meditarian and the European Atlantic coast. Species identification as noted earlier is also "Pagrus pagrus."  I do not think I am clarifying anything here.

In any case, I avoid any fish called porgy or sea bream because of the risk of ciguatera food poisoning.  Since I have had cigautera food poisoning, I am supposed to either test sea bream/porgy before eating it (testing is more expensive than the fish) or determine that the fish was caught far enough North.
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, October 26, 2009, 3:49am; Reply: 315
Gee C_Sharp, that's harsh that Cigautera poisoning.  You may like some of the Bream we get around here, like the Southern Black Bream from only the south of Aussie, or the Tarakihi (Ocean Bream) from New Zealand. :)
(Though you probably can't get those there, you must miss the good food you used to get over here.  I went to USA and the mainstream meat is shocking compared here, hormones and all)

Don't meant to hog this thread lately, but I was going to say a funny story about SCUP.  I sent my hubby shopping yesterday, bad handwriting.  He had the manager and assistant searching the whole shop for SCUP.  The manager said, he was sure that he'd heard of it and maybe it was a fish.  DH realised it actually was SOUP near the end of the search.   :) :)  Well we know you can't get SCUP here anyway!   ;):)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 26, 2009, 4:47am; Reply: 316
Quoted Text
Dr D
The Jane Public is not a real SWAMI printout. There were just a bunch of filters and switches thrown arbitrarily so as to get a printout.
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 26, 2009, 6:59am; Reply: 317
Thanks Lola, but C_Sharp spoiled the plot by posting two different values for the two, I was hoping that the Sea Bream under Porgy, was the Swami Sea Bream, just to give it an identity.  But nope. Obviously they are two different breams.

GW, I like your photo!!   :)  Maybe we should substitute the Scoup Scup for Soup! It should be easier ... Cheers!!   :) :) I think I am still under the effect of this anesthetic ... or is it the wine?   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 26, 2009, 8:20am; Reply: 318
Hey, I just had a thought.  Just because Swami SeaBream and Porgy have different values in Swami, it does not mean that Pagellus Bogaraveo is not the Seabream listed in Swami.  Porgy can still be the group, and Porgy/Seabream be the Swami Seabream.  Typebase also mentions Scup and others in the descriptor of Porgy.

I am glad we have consensus on the yummy Breams ...

Some good news regarding my inquiries to various experts/authorities in the subject.  This morning I received an e-mail and phone call from Seamedia publications, they are the ones who run and publish the monthly boating and fishing magazine, where the Snapper article from Dr Geoff Corey was published.  That article made a reference to a previous edition where Breams were discussed.  That edition is not freely available on the net, at least I could not find it, but they promised to follow it up and somehow get it to me. Well, guess what, they came true to their promise and e-mailed me access to those editions!!  Thank you Seamedia in the name of good health!  They are very helpful, do check their website.   :) :)

Got some reading to do tonight ...(book2)
Posted by: Possum, Monday, October 26, 2009, 9:23am; Reply: 319
Quoted from Cristina
I think I am still under the effect of this anesthetic ... or is it the wine?   :)
I didn't know you could drink with anesthetic :-/  ;)

Posted by: Cristina, Monday, October 26, 2009, 9:34am; Reply: 320
I did not either, but I forgot I had the needle at the dentist, although part of my cheek was still a little bit numb, not much, compare to what I had to go through the previous two times.  All I wanted to do is put my feet up, and have a pre-dinner drink.  Only a little bit, my warrior portion.  It was so good... Early night tonight, had late night last night ... :)
Posted by: Possum, Monday, October 26, 2009, 9:40am; Reply: 321
Have a good night!! I'm off to bed too for an early night... :) Sleep well ;)
Posted by: Symbi, Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 3:13am; Reply: 322
Quoted from Cristina

GW, I like your photo!!   :)  Maybe we should substitute the Scoup Scup for Soup! It should be easier ... Cheers!!   :) :) I think I am still under the effect of this anesthetic ... or is it the wine?   :)


;D :) Thanks, you were an inspiration for putting a photo up, it's nice to have a face for a name.  Maybe scup soup, no scupper that!  :D

Hope you are feeling ok today, no sore head or gums?  Bet you slept well though (sleeping).  We had a great rain here finally last night (1st in 4 months ::)) (pray)(happy)(woot) Did you get some?
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 3:29am; Reply: 323
Yes, much better today, good sleep last night, I needed.  I will not be here much though today.  Busy doing tax for hubby, due tomorrow!!  Talk later ... :)
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 2:29am; Reply: 324
At 267 I linked to this list.
Quoted from Symbi

Also found this great list of different names for food including whitlow = chicory http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2004/06/28/a-rose-is-a-rose-is-a?blog=13


Quoted Text

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet....
..There are times when it is difficult to establish a foods status on the BTD because foods are called different things in different parts of the world.

There are lots of foods with dual personalities and lots with names to make them acceptable to the consumer; I guess a lot of it goes back to its place of origin...

Snow Peas Mange-tout

Eggplant Aubergine

Zucchini Courgette

Hazelnut Filbert

Peanut Groundnut

Parsnip White Carrot

Swede Rutabaga
(done)

Rocket Arugula

Endive - Witlof (got that one)

Green Bean French bean, Runner bean, Climbing bean, Snake bean, Snap bean,

Broad Bean Fava Bean, Faba Bean

Pea Green Pea, English Pea, Shell Pea

Capsicum Bell Pepper, Sweet Pepper

Shark Flake

Cow/Steer/Bull/calf Steak, Beef, Veal

Pig Pork, Ham, Bacon

Sheep Lamb, Mutton, Hogget

Fish Too many

Sausage Mystery bag


Paul A is correct there are too many fish, though not enough on my fishing line lately  :)  ;)
We've got a lot of these on this list already, good work everyone (clap) but this list may give some more ideas to research.
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 5:47am; Reply: 325
C_Sharp, it looks like we can update summaries with the contents from reply 310.  Thanks.  :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 6:22am; Reply: 326
GW,  thanks again for posting the list, you as usual, are right, we should clear this list too.  So going down the list:

In Australia/NZ (unless Posum or somebody else from NZ tells us otherwise):

Snow Peas = Snow Peas (mangetout sounds french)

Eggplant = Eggplant  (augerbine french?)

Hazelnut = Hazelnut
Peanut = Peanut
Parsnip = Parsnip
Green Beans = Green beans (stringless beans, flat beans, round beans, snap beans, runner beans, snake beans) in other words easily recognizable in the greengrocers even under this plethora of names.

So far so good?  The rest to follow ...
:) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 8:40am; Reply: 327
Here is the info in both formats:

Quoted from Cristina
Closure of some Melons, Dandelion Greens, Aparagus Pea, Chesses (Quark, Peccorino, Manchego, Paneer, Farmer), Nutritional and Bakers Yeast:

Equivalent Food Choices Summary



Dairy Products
Quark, Farmer, Paneer
Pecorino, Manchego
Same vernacularReplies 225-7,291,293



Live Foods
Asparagus Pea
(Tetragonolobus purpureus)
Winged PeaReply 282



Dandelion Greens
(Taraxacum Officinale)
Dandelion/
Common Dandelion
Reply 278



Fruits
CanteloupeSpecialty Melons:
Charentais Melon
Reply 260



Casaba MelonHoneydew CasabaReply 260



Musk Melon RockmelonsReply 260



Condiments
Bakers YeastBrewers/Torula YeastReply 294



Nutritional YeastSavory Yeast FlakesReply 294



Typebase EquivalentComments
Dairy Products
Farmer, Paneer, Quark,
Peccorino and Manchego
same vernacular Replies 225-7, 291,293
Live Foods
Asparagus Pea
(Tetragonolobus purpureus)
Winged pea Reply 282
Dangelion Greens
(Taraxacum Officinale)
Dandelion/
Common Dandelion
Reply 278
Fruits
Canteloupe
Specialty Melons/Charentais Melon Reply 260
Casaba MelonHoneydew Casaba Reply 260
Musk Melon
Rockmelons Reply 260
Condiments
Bakers Yeast
Brewers/Torula Yeast Reply 294
Nutritional Yeast
Savory Yeast Flakes Reply 294
Posted by: Possum, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 9:20am; Reply: 328
Fantastic work!!! :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 1:08pm; Reply: 329
Quoted Text
I think the academics have found the the Sea Bream that Dr D has in SWAMI!  The European Sea Bream (blackspot sea bream - Pagellus Bogaraveo) is in the typebase under Porgy.  So I propose that since Porgy has a different value to Sea Bream in the GTD, and since the Western Atlantic Sea Bream (Archosargus Rhomboidalis) is according to the above academics known as Sea Bream in their native range, this is the Sea Bream in GTD / SWAMI.

Dunno why I'm excited since we can't get that fish here! I hope we can finish the Sea Bream issue and that we can eat local Sea Bream like you said Cristina.



GW, I completely missed this!!  Sorry,  I think the amalgaman removal effects had me in their grip then!!  I am prepared to give this one up too, at least until Nap or some official authority decides to reveal the Swami Seabream identity.  In the meantime we seem to have consensus in:

Porgy = Breams concentrating in good eating quality ones
Porgy/Red Porgy = Snapper (C-sharp comment included)
Porgy/Blackspot Seabream = Not Available
Porgy/Scup = Not available
Swami SeaBream = Not available

Good work team!!   :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 10:27pm; Reply: 330
Research on Cassava:

I brought this from another thread because I think it is also relevant for our research on food choices.  Query from Mayflowers and my reply:

Quoted from 815
Are these all one in the same vegetable?  My SWAMI has Cassava as a neutral but in the Carbohydrates section, it has Tapioca, manioc, Cassava as a black dot?


Cassava in the 'Live Food' section refers to the Casava Tubers

The Cassava in the Carbohydrate section refers to the Cassava flour which you make by grating the tube, squeezing the juice out of it, and letting it dry, or freezing.  Sorry, it has been a while since I made one.  Got a few plants in my backyard that need harvesting.  The cassava flour is excellent to making pancakes.  I will post some more when I get around to doing it again.  

They are both black dots in my Swami though.    :) :)  
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 10:53pm; Reply: 331
I didn't put another list on here to annoy anyone, just thought it is relevant (somewhere in the world anyway) and it's good someone has already done research on equivalent foods.

Interesting about Cassava thanks Cristina.  So they make Tapioca flour out of it, I wondered what that was!  :) Glad you know what you're doing with it to get rid of the arsenic.

Found this info http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassava

I hope we find out which Sea Bream is in GTD Book / SWAMI! Until then, I agree, we can only guess.
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 11:15pm; Reply: 332
Research on Cassava:

WARNING! Cassava can be poisonous!!

I have done a permaculture course some time ago, and that is the issue with the Cassava tubers.  There are two main varieties: the yellow or sweet  and white or bitter Cassava.  The yellow variety can be boiled like potatos (although I would never try that, read on).  The white variety seems to have concentrations of cyanide.  It is always recommended to grate it and ferment it first.  According to what we learnt at this course, eaten like this (grated and fermented) makes the tubers safe.

If growing cassava, it is better to get the younger sweet tubers of the yellow varieties, although our Perma teacher has harvested white variety tubers from eight years before, but made sure she fermented them well before eating.  

When harvesting it, they must be processed within 24 hours, as they become more toxic with time.  I do not harvest unless I am ready to process them.  The least time the tubers are exposed to the air, the safer they are.  If you see purplish, grey streaks throughout the tuber, that means the toxics have developed and needs to be discarded.  I suppose it is a bit like growing potatoes, you must keep potatoes away from light, or they go greenish and become toxic with alkaloids!!

I know people eats them boiled, but I have heard that with time, they tend to get accumulation of cyanade in their bodies because the boiling alone does not render the toxic safe.  When I ever eat cassava I do it fermented way.  I know a few people who has been eating it this way for many years without ill effects.

BTW, the name of the sickness people may die off from eating these tubers is Konzo.  I will edit this post with some relevant links soon.  Just want it to place this warning sooner rather than later.   :) :)  It is a stable food for many cultures in the world, when treated properly, like with everything in life.  Knowledge is power and joy.  You get to enjoy culinary variety in your diet ... (book2)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 11:29pm; Reply: 333
It is great you posted it, it gives us direction.  Spot on girl (with the posting and work, but cross that comment).  You are also right about other parts of the world benefiting, I sort of had that intention when I first posted the summary tables with the name of 'Summary of Food choices ...' without using the word aussie, but someone changed the title of the thread adding the word 'aussie' to it.  

You see, some of our research, as you and everyone working here realize, applies to other languages, cultures too.  It seems such a waste to not make them aware of it.  The tittle of the thread seems a bit exclusive, maybe we should change it to just Research on food choices, and make it a repository for any food enquiries from all over the world. And the Summary tables can be adapted, combined or new ones created for the different languages.  At least they will all be under the one place, easy access for everyone. :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, October 29, 2009, 11:46pm; Reply: 334
Thanks Cristina, just me being a bit of oversensitive I guess, don't worry.  It's hard to tell the tone over the internet.

How fast do you type anyway!?

Some of the food terms in Australia will be similar in UK and probably other commonwealth countries I guess.  I think we have alot of work just to sort out Australian/NZ (thinking of Possum and yes I do like them in my garden and wouldn't have to heart to electrocute them just was upset with the oil spill - exxon valdez incident in our garage!) food though without taking on the whole world yet!  If you can keep up with that, you're good.  :)

Sick of having the flu here, had it for over a week now.    :P
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 30, 2009, 12:00am; Reply: 335
GW, sorry to hear flu is lingering at your place.  Make sure you get plenty of rest and look after yourself, as you know, usual: supplements and no avoids.  My son who came back from America where everyone seems to have it according to the news here, started showing some signs of it.  Dear D also came the other day complaining about feeling the flu signs creeping in.  I gave DD 10 of my ProBerries capsules for her to have 2 twice daily and gave the same dosage to my son for a few days.  They both seemed to have hold it at bay.  Both being As, I also advice to stay away from dairy and wheat, at least for a few days (you guessed it well, not following diet yet).  

I wonder if Proberries will be good for you too?  Have you got any? It was a tip from Lola a way back that got me into them (when we had the dust storms).  You had the storms worse than at my place, so you may be paying the price now.  Hope you can get Proberries or something similar to speed your recovery.  Get well soon!!   :)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 30, 2009, 12:15am; Reply: 336
Thanks hon!  :)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 30, 2009, 1:55am; Reply: 337
hope you like the title now :)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 30, 2009, 2:29am; Reply: 338
My, my Lola, is that fast service or what!!   ;D ;D ;D  I think it is more inclusive now, it is not just aussies.  Hope it pleases everyone else too.  Thanks again lady from the city of Eternal spring, always springing into action!    :) :)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 30, 2009, 3:29am; Reply: 339
you are all so diligent and we re all benefiting! ;D
Posted by: Agathe, Friday, October 30, 2009, 6:07pm; Reply: 340
It is a GREAT idea to have changed the title. I feel more... invited   :D

Cristina, what is Proberries ?
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 30, 2009, 6:26pm; Reply: 341
You are most welcomed!!

Regarding Proberry:

http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NP014

One of the supps from the store.  Cheers  :)
Posted by: Agathe, Friday, October 30, 2009, 7:43pm; Reply: 342
Thanks for the link.
A very interesting product for my present concerns.
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 30, 2009, 10:43pm; Reply: 343
I have some posts under 'Cristina's Swami Xpress' thread, which I think they should be better under this thread since they pertain to research on Nutritional/Bakers Yeast and Yerba Mate food items.  

These are the post numbers in question:  53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60.

Is this possible?   :) :)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 30, 2009, 10:48pm; Reply: 344
you can delete those and copy paste them right here instead.

Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 30, 2009, 11:23pm; Reply: 345
Relevant research posts brought over from 'Cristina's Swami Xpress' thread:

Nutritional/Bakers Yeast:

Quoted from Cristina
My Swami has Nutritional Yeast as SF and Bakers yeast as Neutral.  I have a packet of british Brewers Yeast which is what I used for my breakfast above.  What rating shall I give this?   :)

Quoted from Lola
I only get brewer s down here powdered .....
think baker s is synonymous of brewer s, cause I wouldn t think of supplementing with yeast used for making bread!! lol
no one has heard of nutritional, down here, unfortunately.

Quoted from Cristina
Regarding Brewers Yeast:

On reading the ingredients:
quote
Dried yeast with added thiamin (b1) and riboflavin (B2). ....Classed as a nutritional, non-baking yeast.
unquote

So, is it substitution for Nutritional yeast here?  The brand is Soland (packed in Australia) and bought it at a HFS.  They did not seem to know about nutritional yeast per say.
??) :) :)

Quoted from Lola
as I previously mentioned, swami has both ratings
Yeast, Bakers
Yeast, Nutritional

I consider the first to be the equivalent of brewer s.

so to answer your question, no, brewer s is not to be considered nutritional,
it is less sweet than nutritional.

nutritional grows on sweet tubers like beets.
there are many sites explaining the differences.
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, October 30, 2009, 11:37pm; Reply: 346
Relevant posts brought over from 'Cristina's Swami Xpress':

Research on Yerba Mate:

Quoted from Cristina
Something else I gained in my food lists is Yerba Mate, as a SF.  This is the traditional drink where I come from and grew up drinking it.  I have not tried that for the last 15 years or so.  Where I am in Australia, you cannot get it.  I think I may have to order it from Sydney or Melbourne.  

Jenny, Jumari is that something you can get in Camberra, Sydney, if you know of any good suppliers let me know.

I believe these days you can get them in tea bags, but we used to drink them in these special gourds with a metal (silver) straw.  I suppose we were getting then a double health boost: the goodness of the Yerba tea and the benefits of silver (I think there is info in the net about silver being good).  I still have both the gourd and metal straw.  It will be nice using them again, walking the ancestral path... :)

And Lola, thanks for the lesson on blood grouping nomenclature, fixed info under shield ... :) :) :)

Quoted from Jenny
I have recently found Yerba Mate in teabags at my HFS in Griffith, ACT. They also have loose 'mate' tea which the owner says is the same. The teabags are rather expensive, the loose reasonably cheap.

Quoted from Symbi
Try the great Ironwood Cottage in Sandgate.  It's not far off the M1 and you could enjoy a walk around the lagoon near there too and enjoy the quaint shops, not far from the nice foreshore there too.  http://www.startlocal.com.au/retail/healthfood/qld_brisbane/Ironwood_Cottage_1424799.html

They have wholesale flours (1/2 price compared to supermarket!), dried fruits (including preservative free), baked breads, free-range organic hormone-free meats, free-range fruit and veg.  Biggest range of orgran products I've seen.  
Big range of healthy snacks and lots of things I've never seen before.  Helpful staff too, you could give them a call and find out if they've got Yerba Mate.  I bet they have!

Quoted from Jumari
I found some Yerba Mate today at a place called About Life. And over priced organic shop here in Balmain, NSW. Its incredibel how the word organic just ups the price instantly. Do you have the About life franchise over there?

Quoted from shells
Hi Christina,

Before going off hunting for Yerba Mate give a couple of Woolworths a ring to see if any are in stock.  I have found packets of 25 teabags made by 'Lotus Peak' packaged in W.A. (www.lotuspeak.com.au) just here in my local supermarket!

Was so excited to see them by accident only to find out that they are only neutral for me.  These were found in the tea section of the supermarket but you may want to check in the health section (store variation).  Lotus Peak also make a gentle white tea which I have had in the past and the Yerba Mate was alongside this tea.  

Good luck   :D

Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 2:07am; Reply: 347
Like the new thread name!  Are you ready for this, long awaited research comparing Soursop and USA Paw Paw and Cherimoya.  Finally finished (clap) maybe?  (book2)(eek)(smarty)(cool)  Still haven't looked at custard apple though which is easy to get in Australia.



These fruits are all part of the huge tropical Annonaceae family (custard apple family).  They all produce different amounts of annonaceous acetogenins which are being recognised for their medical (anti-tumour, anti-malarial, anti-viral) and pesticidal benefits.    See the articles below under Soursop that confirm this.
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 2:08am; Reply: 348
Soursop  (Annona muricata)
Common names: Graviola, Paw-Paw, Graviola, Guanabana

Is the most tropical and largest fruited in the family, widespread over the tropics and can be found in Australia.  
http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/soursop.html

"The Annonaceous acetogenins are promising new antitumor and pesticidal agents that are found only in the plant family Annonaceae." From An article in The Journal of Natural Products (1999) http://www.wholeworldbotanicals.com/herbal_graviola
Also on that page note research has been done by 3 separate research teams since the 1940s on different species in the Annonaceae family including on Annona Muricata native to PNG:

Quoted Text
"Annonaceous acetogenins are only found in the Annonaceae family (to which graviola belongs). In general, various Annonaceous acetogenins in the plant family have been documented with antitumorous, antiparasitic, pesticidal, antiprotozoal, antifeedant, anthelmintic, and antimicrobial activities. Mode of action studies in three separate laboratories have recently determined that these acetogenins are superb inhibitors of enzyme processes that are only found in the membranes of cancerous tumor cells. Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Indiana, has conducted a great deal of the research on the acetogenins, much of which has been funded by The National Cancer Institute and/or the National Institute of Health (NIH)"
http://www.cancerplants.com/medicinal_plants/annona_muricata.html

(also note the warnings on that page about not using if pregnant, low blood pressure, taking MAO inhibitors / antidepressants.  If using for more than 30 days probiotic or digestive enzymes are advisable because of antimicrobial properties!)

Looks like it can be grown in the subtropics, shield from frosts and cold winds though http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/soursop.htm

Also found a few negative studies about links with parkinsons disease with daily ingestion http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/110576358/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0


Cherimoya (Annona Cherimola)

It appears as an also ran in the acetogenins race.  It's mentioned it has acetogenins at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf9018239
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 2:10am; Reply: 349
US Paw paw, Asimina Genus

There are 8 species of the Asmina Genus relatives of the tropical Annonaceae family, native to the USA.  The most common and northern reaching temperate species is Asimina Triloba (Common Paw Paw) (also the largest native fruit USA produces)  There has been lots of research done on USA Paw Paw and the annonaceous acetogenins they contain and the potential for becoming a popular fruit.  Chemotherapy drugs have been made from some of the acetogenins.

Paw paw and cancer: annonaceous acetogenins from discovery to commercial products.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18598079
"Extracts of paw paw ( Asimina triloba, Annonaceae) are among the most potent of the 3500 species of higher plants screened for bioactive compounds in our laboratories at Purdue University."
Unfortunately, they do not compare the concentration of Acetogenins from other plants in the Annonacea family for us.

Paw Paw Fact sheet
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/cropfactsheets/pawpaw.html

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba): A "Tropical" Fruit for Temperate Climates (Describes growing conditions etc.)
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1993/v2-505.html

The potential of paw paw as a popular fruit in USA
http://news.uns.purdue.edu/html3month/1990-9/9402.Karahadian.pawpaws.html

Map of where it grows and pictures & more
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ASTR
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 2:11am; Reply: 350
Nutritional Facts

There's a good comparison of US Paw Paw to Banana Apple and Orange.  It's superior in Vitamin C, protein, Niacin, Magnesium, Phosphorous, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, high in amino acids too.  
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/pawpaw/cooking.htm#a2

Here's a basic comparison of some tropical fruits including Cherimoya and Soursop.  You can see that basic nutrition wise they seem very similar except Soursop has more Vitamin C and Fibre and less folate (see per 100 g bottom table) http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/nutrition_facts.htm
From that, I think we can say that Soursop may be given the equivalent rating as Cherimoya or be considered neutral until further testing in GTD / SWAMI.

Unfortunately I couldn't find compatible nutritional information to compare Soursop and Paw paw directly (couldn't find much for paw paw).  Also found varying results and they didn't always reference where the testing was done.
Soursop different data: http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Soursop_Nutrient_Chart_-_100_grams and http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/2063/2

Comparing Soursop and US Paw Paw.  Soursop was always higher in Vitamin C than Paw Paw, lower in calories, less carbs and fat, less fiber, less vitamin A, more Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, less minerals (Potassium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese).  Amino Acids (lysine similar, less Methionine, more Tryptophan, lacking amino acids of other kinds which Paw Paw has).  So Paw Paw seems to be much richer in amino acids and minerals, an amazing fruit.

Recipees for US Paw Paw

http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/Recipes.htm
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 2:20am; Reply: 351
Conclusion:

I thought that would be all I could find (I didn't read ALL that stuff btw!).  There was no evidence of the different acetogenins or their the differing amounts found in USA Paw Paw and Soursop.  Then I lucked on this website:

Graviola is Inferior to Paw Paw as a Cancer-Fighting Supplement.  Here's Why http://www.pawpawresearch.com/graviola-inferior.htm
Quoted Text
The reported use of graviola as an anti-carcinoma treatment has gone back for decades.  While some people have no doubt seen some success with graviola, it is important to note the differences and understand why it is not even close to an equivalent substance to paw paw when used for this purpose.

Tests were done under the direction of Dr. Jerry McLaughlin on two leading graviola products on the market.  The first one had a cyto-toxic potency level of about 4% of the potency of paw paw--in other words, paw paw had about 24 times the potency of this product.  The second leading graviola product had a potency level of 2% that of paw paw; so paw paw was about 50 times as potent as that product.  These results should be unacceptable to those serious about using a product of this nature to fight cancer.

As will be further explained below, there are two big differences between graviola products and paw paw.  First, and probably most important, is the chemistry structure.  The chemistry structure of the graviola compounds does not allow it to be as potent as that of the paw paw acetogenins.  Second, the manufacturing process of graviola products is inferior in that it is generally consists of grinding powder from leaves, twigs, or other parts of the plant.  With this type of very unsophisticated manufacturing process, the amount of active acetogenins will vary widely by batch, and the amount in any selected bottle is unknown to the consumer.  


From this I think we can say that Soursop cannot be seen as equivalent to US Paw Paw, in our GTD/SWAMI Diets.  US Paw Paw is superior with higher amino acid and mineral content and volume of acetogenins which have proven medicinal purposes including fighting cancer.  
Perhaps Soursop can be considered neutral or the same value as Cherimoya in our GTD/SWAMI diets until further testing.
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 4:06am; Reply: 352
GW, (clap)(clap)excellent work!!!

OK, I agree with you regarding Soursop (ie: Graviola, Guanabana)in that according to those publications it is medicinally/nutritionally inferior to  US PawPaw, but, that may or may not mean that its rating for us will be inferior to PawPaw in our food lists.  If there is a range of goodness, this fruit may be up there with the US PawPaws.  Lola may be into something when she said she uses this fruit as a substitute for Paw Paw, I wonder if this is how she arrived to this conclusion.

US PawPaw is not in Typebase.  It would have been interesting to see what the descriptor had to say about this fruit and possible equivalents.

I do not see Soursop or any of its names alternatives, either in Typebase, GT or Swami lists, so to be in the safe side of things, for the time being, I agree with you in placing this fruit in the Non equivalent Summary table to be used as a neutral with great caution, particularly after reading the Contra indications listed in your cancerplants link for soursop.  This will be our official recommendation.

By the time I finished writing this you probably posted a few more researched info on it, which is great.  I will read and study them all with the aim of compiling a nutritional table from your research showing these fruits side by side.  It will then make it easier for us to place them in our diets in the right food groups.  That will be at our own discresion after digesting this information.  We are helping people make educated guesses. But the untested fruits will have to remain in the non-equivalent table until Dr D's team tell us otherwise.

Great work detective  GheeWhiz ...!!! :) ;D    
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 4:47am; Reply: 353
cherimoyas and guanabanas are quite similar in fact.

as are all the sapote types, including mamey....
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 4:58am; Reply: 354
Further on growing US pawpaws here:  I could not get my PawPaw plants the other day because according to the nursery person, the plant is, at the moment, in dormant state.  I should be able to get them by the end of November.  They reckon they are slow producers, he has plants that are 5 years old and still not giving any fruit.  But I have got C-Sharp's sound advice up my sleeve and I reckon I should have them producing a lot sooner.  Of course part of that first crop whenever it happens, will find its way down to Brissiland and Sydney to the home of certain explorers, and Camberra to the home of a certain warrior, and we will invite our furry friend from across the Tasman to join us in the harvest feast of this well researched fruit!! I am not daring to count the number of posts on it!!  Of course we are not forgetting our far away team members, they will at least get the photos of our celebrations!! By then, we would have reached our goals of getting to the ideal weight for me and all of us resetting our genes, so, let s remember this date!!
(dance)(woot) :)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 5:03am; Reply: 355
typebase pawpaw aka papaya was before GTD pawpaw aka cherimoya came about

now we know that papaw is what you use for papaya
and pawpaw is cherimoya or guanabana....apple custard, whatever! :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 5:10am; Reply: 356
Quoted from Lola
typebase pawpaw aka papaya was before GTD pawpaw aka cherimoya came about

now we know that papaw is what you use for papaya

Correct!!
Quoted Text
and pawpaw is cherimoya or guanabana....apple custard, whatever! :)

This is what we are trying to work out.  We have access to these fruits but not the US PAW PAW.  These fruits are all different, cherimoya is different to guanabana, which is different to Custard Apple, ..., they are all member of the same family, but different species.  We have been trying to figure out which is the species that resembles the true US PAW PAW the most.   :)

Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 5:22am; Reply: 357
guanabana might just take the lead......unless C sharp can give us a clue... :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 5:44am; Reply: 358
Not much clue here. I agree with Ghee Whiz's species identification.

The species/fruit that we do not no about can be added to the list of foods the we would like included in the next SWAMI release. No guarantee they will actually be included in the product.
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 6:31am; Reply: 359
Thanks everyone for the feedback.  (woot)(hugegrin) You're right Cristina and Lola USA Paw Paw is not in Typebase so I corrected that ((think) I didn't mean to write a (book2) !)

I really look forward to tasting some Cristina, that's so nice that you want to share it with everyone.  ;D By the sound of it, with your green thumb growing it shouldn't be a problem (tricky though they sound).  Are you getting the Asimona Triloba or one of the more tropical Asimona's (US Paw Paw)?

Lola - I don't think the Mameys are related, they're not in the same Annonaceae (custard apple) family http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamey_sapote.  Do they taste similar?
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 6:45am; Reply: 360
no, I meant those are all related, just like mameys and sapotes are related to themselves as well.... ;)
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 6:46am; Reply: 361
Now I relate!   ;)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 6:48am; Reply: 362
same as we all relate! ;D :K)
Posted by: Mohairandsilk, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 6:49am; Reply: 363
:D  :D  :D

what a great work !

Bravo !

... and I like the new title too  :D
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 7:05am; Reply: 364
Welcome!! More french, more french to the list ....(dance)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 7:11am; Reply: 365
Quoted from Symbi
...  Are you getting the Asimona Triloba ,,, (US Paw Paw)?



Yes, the real thing (Asimina triloba ).  At least that is what I am ordering.  We will see by the end of the month when they deliver. :)
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 7:19am; Reply: 366
That's great Cristina!  :)

Lola - We are family!  :K)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 7:27am; Reply: 367
Quoted from Cristina
Some more research:

US Paw Paw vs AU Custard Apple,  they are from the same family, PawPaw being the only one in that family that suits temperate climate, the rest in the group including our Custard Apple are adapted to warmer climates.

It seems that they both have similar nutritional values, I am trying to find reliable sources of information, not easy.  So far I found
this website for American PawPaw (check tables 2 and 3 in the article):
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/pawpaw/cooking.htm

If we could only find a similar table for the Custard Apple, we should get a better idea to see if we could use it in place of PawPaw in the southern part of the world.  This is the best site I could locate for nutritional info on Custard Apples:

http://www.gardenology.org/wiki/Custard-apple

What do you think? ::)(book2) :)

PS:  I find a better one and it is tipping me over to give this fruit the thumps up for PAWPAW substitute here!!

http://www.custardapple.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=47&Itemid=54
and here:
http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/benefits-of-custard-apple-2171.html


GW, what do you think about these links for nutritional info for Custard Apple.  I posted this a few weeks ago, but did not have time to analyse it further.  There maybe enough info there to compare. Custart Apple seems to be higher in some nutrients but PAWPAW still has a lot more iron and other things.  Working on memory here, I have not even look at it again.  You may make more sense of it ... :)
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 8:08am; Reply: 368
They're good links.  Custard Apple seems similar to Soursop and Cherimoya, though they don't list the amino acids.  I saw on your first link: "In Britain Custard-apple refers to cherimoya (Annona cherimola). " Oh no more different names again!  :P

The Custard Apple Growers assoc, nutritional composition only lists water?  Maybe it's my Firefox not getting on with that page?

Found one website that lists most of the family:
Custard Apple http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1881/2
Soursop http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1881/2
Wow they're got Cherimoya too: http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1860/2

I linked to soursop on their website in my research above, and searched for Paw Paw (not there  :-/), didnt' think to search for the other rellies.  If we join up it's possible to compare two foods or more on that website, pretty cool.  

Hang on, it has Papaya http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1985/2  But is it the USA paw paw?  Just searched the FDA and no http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/cgi-bin/measure.pl it's actually our orange fleshed Paw Paw (Carica papaya).  That whole website seems to be based on the FDA: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/ it seems.  Could be useful to know!

Will look at it more tomorrow GTG!  
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 8:49am; Reply: 369
Quoted from Symbi
I think we have alot of work just to sort out Australian/NZ (thinking of Possum and yes I do like them in my garden and wouldn't have to heart to electrocute them just was upset with the oil spill - exxon valdez incident in our garage!) food though without taking on the whole world yet!  If you can keep up with that, you're good.  :)

Sick of having the flu here, had it for over a week now.    :P
Hope you are feeling better soon & thankyou for the mention ;D Did you get some Proberry?? Hope so
and we will invite our furry friend from across the Tasman to join us in the harvest feast of this well researched fruit!! Cute!! Thankyou!! I look forward to it Cristina & to meeting you all one day ;) ;D

Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 10:52am; Reply: 370
Look where I found Possum hiding, in the middle of these PawPaws, (7th row),  disguissed as OPossum PawPaw:   8):o  :o


http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/pawpaw/table2.htm

;D ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 1, 2009, 7:21pm; Reply: 371
Quoted Text
"In Britain Custard-apple refers to cherimoya (Annona cherimola). " Oh no more different names again!


they re all slowly coming together as one, right? ;D
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, November 2, 2009, 12:13am; Reply: 372


Found this page with pictures of Australian paw paw and papaya!  http://www.australianpapaya.com.au/productInfo.php
    *  Papaw: Distinct yellow flesh and tends to be a larger fruit
    * Papaya: Orange to red flesh and usually a smaller oval or pear shaped fruit

:o :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 12:58am; Reply: 373
That is OK GW, there is so much to take on!!  How I find now easy to identify them is by the seeds inside the fruit:

The US Paw Paw has a few large seeds inside, the Australian Paw Paw and Papaya, both have lots of little seeds inside, but who is counting?
:) :) ;D ;D
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, November 2, 2009, 5:13am; Reply: 374
Quoted from Symbi
Thanks everyone for the feedback.  (woot)(hugegrin) You're right Cristina and Lola USA Paw Paw is not in Typebase so I corrected that ((think) I didn't mean to write a (book2) !)

I really look forward to tasting some Cristina, that's so nice that you want to share it with everyone.  ;D By the sound of it, with your green thumb growing it shouldn't be a problem (tricky though they sound).  Are you getting the Asimona Triloba or one of the more tropical Asimona's (US Paw Paw)?

Lola - I don't think the Mameys are related, they're not in the same Annonaceae (custard apple) family http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamey_sapote.  Do they taste similar?


You know, the odd thing  is that roughly the day before we all started our research on the meaning of the word paw paw, I am dead certain that there were two entries in Typebase, one was for papaya, and the other for paw paw. then bingo, one of them disappeared. Unless I am suffering from dementia which is always possible, but I can even remember that one was a fullsome entry, and the other, much more limited.
So hopefully someone in a dark backroom is doing the research as we speak. 8)
Posted by: Possum, Monday, November 2, 2009, 5:24am; Reply: 375
Quoted from Cristina
Look where I found Possum hiding, in the middle of these PawPaws, (7th row),  disguissed as OPossum PawPaw:   8):o  :o
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/pawpaw/table2.htm
;D ;D ;D ;D
;D :D

Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 5:50am; Reply: 376
Hi there Jenny, I have the feeling that I saw a descriptor on PawPaw somewhere too.  Maybe these genes are playing tricks on us ...

Well at least now we uncovered the  real identity of those blood type O ferry paws across the Tasman:  O Possum PawPaw  8)  ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Lola, Monday, November 2, 2009, 6:23am; Reply: 377
nope,
swami has the pawpaw and the papaya as two seperate entries
typebase has papaya and mentions it being also called pawpaw
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?281

check your swami
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 7:00am; Reply: 378
O well, my genes were partly right, I saw PawPaw in a descriptor somewhere: The Papaya one ;)

These two warriors always knew these fruit have separate entries in Swami, is the Typebase entry that had us puzzled. ??)  Maybe deep down we believe that a fruit with such a high nutritional ranking in our diet, should have been there by now. Wishful thinking though, everything takes time and effort.  I am convinced now, my genes have now digested your info and recorded US Paw Paw as never being in Typebase.  :X  

Back to the Nutritional values table I am working on for PawPaw and its relatives, thanks to GWs clever research, hope to post that soon.  (book2)

Thanks again Lola.  
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 12:48pm; Reply: 379
Annonaceae Nutritional Value comparison table

Nutritional
Element
US Paw Paw
(A. Tribola)
Papaya
(C.Papaya)
GuanabanaSweetsopAtemoya
AU Custard Apple
CherymoyaBullock's Heart
A.Reticulate
Thiamine.01g.03mg.11mg.11mg.08mg.091mg.0097mg
Vitamin A1.5 IU1094 IU2 IU6 IU15 IU1mg
Riboflavin.09g.03mg.05mg.113mg.1mg.135mg.131mg
Niacin (B3)1.2mg.3mg1.28mg.883mg.8mg.95mg.859mg
Iron7.2g.5mg.64mg.6mg.7mg.65mg,78mg
Protein1.4g.4g1.0g2.06g4.3g1.9g1.82g
Zinc.9.3mg.1.1mg2.7mg
Magnesium120g14mg21mg21.0mg88mg
Copper.6.086mg.086mg2.4mg
Potasium368g257g278mg247mg578mg.375mg
Sodium149.0mg14mg
Calcium76g14mg24mg22mg27mg
Vitamin C20.9g61.8g20.6mg36.3mg43mg45mg29.7mg
Phosphorus53g27mg27.7mg32.0mg33mg23.4mg


VAlue sources:

Asimina tribola = US Common Paw Paw
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1993/v2-505.html#Table%201

Carica Papaya = Papaya/AU PawPaw
http://www.australianpapaya.com.au/productInfo.php#vs
http://www.thefruitpages.com/chartpapaya.shtml

Annona muricata - soursop, Guanabana, Graviola
http://newcrop.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/soursop.html
http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Soursop_Nutrient_Chart_-_100_grams

Annona squamosa - Sweetsop
http://www.quantobasta.com/do/getNutrDataAction?ndbno=09321

Annona Atemoya - Australian Custard Apple
http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/benefits-of-custard-apple-2171.html
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/monitoringandsurveillance/nuttab2006/onlineversionintroduction/onlineversion.cfm?&action=getFood&foodID=06D10220

Annona Cherimola - Cherimoya
http://www.quantobasta.com/do/getNutrDataAction?ndbno=09062
http://cherimoya.orconhosting.net.nz/pages/eat_nutri.html

A. Reticulate - Bullock's Heart
http://wapedia.mobi/en/Custard-apple

... :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 8:22pm; Reply: 380
Research on official Australian Custard Apple:
The links below indicate that the variety annona atemoya is the official australian custard apple for domestic and exporting purposes.  We do have all of the other varieties (but US PawPaw), but maybe we should find the nutritional values for this one.  If you find a relevant site with it, please post it here to save me time.
I will replace one of the varieties in the nutritional table with this one.

http://www.custardapple.com.au/
http://australiantropicalfruits.org.au/tropical_fruits/produce_types/custard_apple/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atemoya
:) :)

PS: adding this quote here from the Australian Growers Association website in case they change location or later delete it:

Quoted Text

What are Custard Apples?       
The fruit
Custard Apples
Custard Apples are a sub-tropical deciduous tree belonging to the Annonaceae family. This family contains over 2000 members spread throughout the world. Of this family, it is the atemeoya, a hybrid of the Annona genus, that Australia's commercial cultivars derive from.
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 10:00pm; Reply: 381

Research on Australian Custard Apple:

Ok , Find it! This site has the information I need.  I will be working in pasting these values to the nutritional table.  Let you know when I am finished.

http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/monitoringandsurveillance/nuttab2006/onlineversionintroduction/onlineversion.cfm?&action=getFood&foodID=06D10220 :) (book2)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 2, 2009, 11:14pm; Reply: 382
Research Annonaceae nutritional values (Reply 379):

Since Atemoya is the hybrid cross between Sweetsop and Cherimoya, I thought it will be useful to see their comparisons, so instead of replacing any, I just squeezed it in between the two parents.  ;)

I have not proof read these values, I see numbers floating in front of me everywhere, so if someone wishes to help and check the links cited, that will be great.  Also, the blank values indicate I could not find the listed element for that particular fruit.  Maybe is hiding in the info from the links under some other name, like Ash and many other elements these links have listed.  Someone with more chemical knowledge can guide me here and tell me where to put what.  I went for the easy ones I understand.   :)(book2)
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, November 3, 2009, 1:20am; Reply: 383
Research on nutrients (or their lack ) in plants that could affect our food:


Came across this link which I am printing to pdf and keep it very safe for future reference.  The link should be of particular interest to the green thumbs amongst us:

http://www.phoenixtropicals.com/vitaminNutrientDeficiencySymptomsPlants.html   :) :)
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 3, 2009, 1:25am; Reply: 384
this one is nice too
http://www.whfoods.com/nutrientstoc.php
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, November 3, 2009, 1:46am; Reply: 385
Quoted from Lola


Very useful information Lola, thanks.  Even though our Dr D has already got all the nutrients we need worked out in the food he lists for us, it is useful to know what to grab when looking to boost a particular nutrient, and your link is giving us that. Very nice!

I have edited my post though, to be more specific.  It refers to growing plants and how to identify any deficiencies they may have.  Very useful info, but mainly for the green thumbs amongst us.   :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 2:39am; Reply: 386
Quoted from Cristina
Research Annonaceae nutritional values (Reply 379):

Since Atemoya is the hybrid cross between Sweetsop and Cherimoya, I thought it will be useful to see their comparisons, so instead of replacing any, I just squeezed it in between the two parents.  ;)

...  Also, the blank values indicate I could not find the listed element for that particular fruit.  Maybe is hiding in the info from the links under some other name, like Ash and many other elements these links have listed.  Someone with more chemical knowledge can guide me here and tell me where to put what.  I went for the easy ones I understand.   :)(book2)


When more than a value is given (like in a value range or from two different links) I have listed the highest value in the table.  So, we are comparing the maximum values known for each fruit. Also, Beta Carotene A  if known I tend to combine under Vit A value.  That is how Papaya as over 1000 units of Vt A: about 950 from beta carotene and the rest from Vit A equiv, but even when we take either of these values individually, it still has a huge power pack of Vit A, well above the rest.

By looking at these values, Atemoya (we call it Custard Apple in Australia), seem to have highest nutrient values, surpassing US PawPaw in some of them.  This information, is of course, not complete, but it can serve as a guide when choosing any of these fruits to include in our diet.  The rule of thumb of 'if not on your list, treat it as a cautios Neutral' still applies.  

Hopefully I did not, but, please do not hesitate to point it out to me if you find any typos in the chart.  

BTW, except for the elusive PAW PAW (US one), we can get any of the others in Australia, some easier than others.  The Papaya or Australian PawPaw and the Custard Apple Atemoya we get in the supermarkets, most of the others may be found in specialty stores.  Of course, they are seasonal, so they only appear during the right season.  Enjoy  
(drool)   :)
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 6:43am; Reply: 387
Wow  :o thanks for all the research Cristina.  The Australian Custard Apple (annona atemoya) rocks! (nutritionally speaking). and it looks like a rock a bit too.

I was (think) wondering if the acetogenins that Asimona Triloba trumps the other relatives on is considered in SWAMI.  It doesn't appear to be a variable, see this thread where Dr D lists all the variables on food that SWAMI/GTD works off on http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GTDdiet/m-1202698596/#num13  No acetogenins listed there that I can see.  

Will be exploring shops for custard apples.  I see that the next season starts in February though - something to look forward to after Christmas and my littlely starting school next year  :'( :( :) ;D - mixed emotions! http://www.custardapple.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=50&catid=16&Itemid=57
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 6:44am; Reply: 388
I forgot to mention that the values in bold indicate the highest value for that particular nutrient.  US PawPaw and Papaya were excluded from this comparison because they are unique on their own way and they already have their own placing in our food lists.  The other species in the chart are more closely related and most of them do not have a rating in our food lists.

Chart is on reply 379.  :)  
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 7:07am; Reply: 389
Hi GW, thank you.  There is another important value to consider, which is in the graphic charts you PM to me.  I will try to get to them tonight and post them here.  Pitty not all the species get represented there.

Dr D and Dr Yellow discussion link: I think he may not have listed all the variables there, it was just a post trying to prove his point.  In his proper study, may be he did consider that.  

Thanks for pointing us to the Seasonal link for the Custard Apples, good to know.  Weather is changing so much though, that we may even start seeing them a lot earlier in the shops.

So, kids grow up so quick!! School next year!!!  We all go through the missed emotions, I feel them with you.  What a great moment in your lives!!   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 10:20am; Reply: 390
Research on Grape Leaves,
Hojas de Parra in spanish
Feuilles de Vigne:

I have these in my Swami and I have not eaten them before.  I have a couple of young grape vines producing their first crop, I know what to do with the grapes (drool) when they are ready for picking.  As for the grapevine leaves, they are getting my special attention for the first time.  Which ones to pick, what to do with them?  I believe they are popular in Greek and middle eastern cuisine, so I went googling and find this useful link:

http://www.ellenskitchen.com/recipebox/dolmas.html

  
Algunas recetas en espanol:
http://www.cocinavegetal.com/index.php/rollitos-de-hoja-de-parra/
http://www.cheeef.com/2177/recetario/2525/

francais (Reply 394):
http://www.recettesdecuisine.tv/recette-i93-f3/feuilles+de+vigne/recette+feuilles+de+vigne.html

:)
Posted by: Agathe, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 11:30am; Reply: 391
I see you've worked hard lately, Cristina, about the annonaceae...
Congratulations !
In french: "Chapeau!"

It's quite interesting even if, for the time being, I'm not attracted by those fruits.

I also have grape leaves (feuilles de vigne) as benefical but I never cooked them up to now. But it happened that I ate some, that were wrapped around rice.

I'm going to ask my Greek sister-in-law if she knows about traditional ways to cook them. Of course I could search on the internet but it's like I understand better when she explains a recipe to me    ;)

What I already know is that they must be picked when young. Otherwise they are chewy.

Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 11:38am; Reply: 392
Hi Agathe, thanks for the french tip, I am updating the post to include the french translation and if you find some good french links with recipes we can include those there too.

The link I posted above does have recipes, it tells you how to pick and when to pick the fresh leaves, how to store them dry or brined and recipes on what to do with them. Good info, but of course is in english.  Over to you for the french versions.  I have started to include a bit of the spanish too.   :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 11:45am; Reply: 393
Quoted from Agathe
I see you've worked hard lately, Cristina, about the annonceae...
Congratulations !
In french: "Chapeau!"

Thank you!! GheeWhiz is also researching and posting a lot in this thread, while juggling young kids and other commitments.  Congratulations too mate.  I am very thankful to her and anybody else posting, researching and giving feedback, like yourself now.  It all helps ...  And, it is also part of the therapy, making sure all muscles get a workout, including our brains ... ;)  :)
Posted by: Mohairandsilk, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 12:22pm; Reply: 394
:D Hi !

feuilles de vigne (for the translation of grap leaves)

Domas... feuilles de vignes farcies... veeeeeeeeeery delicious... with olive oil and lemon.... ohlala !
And I think it is all compliant !

I found a link with recipes but do not know if great or poor...
I just take in mind that the leaves are boiled (short time), then let cool and dry... Prepare the mixture (with rice for example), "half-cook" it (if necessary)... then make the rolls and cook in water 1/2h - 3/4h ... Eat it cold... with oil, lemon or what you want !

:o too late !!! leaves are red and yellow here !!!
Let us know and enjoy a lot !!!
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 12:43pm; Reply: 395
merci mon amie.   :) Updated the link.   :)
Posted by: Munchkin76, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 1:01pm; Reply: 396
Cristina

This is an brilliant piece of work you're doing - biggest thanks  ;D!!

Where would I find the latest tables for Australian food please?  I'm flying home to Brissie on 10 December and would like to bring a copy so I can be compliant when I'm home.

Many thanks in advance

Andy  :D
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 1:26pm; Reply: 397
I could give you the link, but then it will get buried again in more posts.  I tell you how to find it all the time:  Click on the forum tab above, scroll down to Swami Xpress, then select either this Research thread, or the Summary thread.  Hope that helps.  There are a few recently discussed food items we need to post there, like the Anonna fruit family and others ...

Generally, food items not listed assume they have same vernacular as either US or UK english, but it could also mean that we have not investigated them yet.  Have a look at the list and if there is anything else in particular that is in your Bene lists you like to have often and we have not discuss it, post it here.  I should be able to tell you the likehood of finding them in aussie land or not.

If you have access to internet while in brissie, stay tune into this forum or send me an e-mail if you get stuck with any food items.  Hope you enjoy your time in Brissie.   :)
Posted by: Munchkin76, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 2:19pm; Reply: 398
Thanks Cristina will do a search for it!

Yep, really looking forward to Christmas at home in the sunshine this year  8)!!

Andy  :D
Posted by: Agathe, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 2:52pm; Reply: 399
Thanks for the grape leaves recipes site in french, Mohairandsilk   :D
I bookmarked it.

I'll try a few of them...

:-/       ...next spring !!        

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, November 5, 2009, 4:59pm; Reply: 400
Yaman has the best recipe for those....
wrapped sardines!!
nerde sen Yamancim??? ;)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, November 6, 2009, 8:46am; Reply: 401
Quoted from Cristina

Thank you!! GheeWhiz is also researching and posting a lot in this thread, while juggling young kids and other commitments.  Congratulations too mate.  I am very thankful to her and anybody else posting, researching and giving feedback, like yourself now.  It all helps ...  And, it is also part of the therapy, making sure all muscles get a workout, including our brains ... ;)  :)


Thanks for mentioning me Cristina.  We have to use it or lose it hey?! Muscle and brains and all, though we have to do the oppposite for the carpal tunnel / tendonitis sometimes.  :)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 6, 2009, 8:55am; Reply: 402
Quoted from Cristina

I am very thankful to her and anybody else posting,  ... ;)  :)


Ooops, that is what I meant, but you all know it ... I edit the post though.   :)

Hope you are not having the wrist problem! with kids and all, and all this typing ... I feel guilty ...   :-/   :)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, November 7, 2009, 3:05am; Reply: 403
You are very helpful too Cristina, so that was not a worry.   :)  I've edited my quote.

Hey I didn't mean to get the violins out.  But while they're out..

The left arm has been good lately as my autoimmune problems have been not so bad lately thank goodness.  If it's not good I don't do much typing that day don't worry  ;).  It's a hangover from broken wrist as a kid and typing jobs for many years and un-known autoimmune problem.  

Going to see a Rheumatologist in January to hopefully get diagnosed (probably Oral Lichen Planus I believe had since 2001  ::)).  Last test my ANAs were 320 (80 is indicative of lupus), but I think that was exacerbated by Lysine I was taking a few months to keep cold sores away (not taking anymore).  Now I know that cold sores are a sign of acidosis from my kidney problem (they are impaired  :(.) So I'm working on acid/alkaline balance daily.  

As you may know, I'm also waiting for a colonoscopy and and endoscopy for my acid reflux (related to too much acidity I believe) and ?irritable bowel problem.  Also have women's problems.  Lucky I have the support of my partner at home he helps alot and the internet and you guys  :).

I do go on the computer more when I feel too fatigued to do much else.  The friendship and brain stimulation and things I've learned on here are priceless.  The hope of getting better is the best (sunny) that Dr D gives us.  

Physio told me not to bend the wrist while tensing it, that's really helped.  Washing up used to bother me more than typing.  He's also helped me with my left knee which has dislocated knee cap that clicks and mucks around and nerve catch in my left hip. My left side is definitely not my best side!

Physios really are worth their weight in gold, like Naturopaths.  (angel) and Cristina for organising this thread for the whole world!  Also the moderators on here and everyone who contributes to this fantastic community (hugs) to everyone.
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, November 7, 2009, 8:38am; Reply: 404
Quoted from Cristina


Ooops, that is what I meant, but you all know it ... I edit the post though.   :)

Hope you are not having the wrist problem! with kids and all, and all this typing ... I feel guilty ...   :-/   :)


Don't feel guilty is what I was trying to say on my last post.  I would probably be typing or on the computer even if this thread wasn't here.  I'm writing the story of Georgia's birth as well and research alot of health info on the internet lately.  

This forum is the best and I love contributing, it's alot more joy than pain.   :)  How was anyone to know my health condition unless I put information on here like I just did?  Gotto go and cook dinner now, have been on here alot today while hubby and DD are out, very fun.  :-)
Posted by: Cristina, Saturday, November 7, 2009, 11:05am; Reply: 405
GW, you are a jewel, shining for everyone in the middle of those personal predicaments!!  Hope everything will resolve for the best very, very soon.  Not hope, I know because we are all here.   :)
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 8, 2009, 3:15am; Reply: 406
Thanks Cristina!  With all my ailments and everything I still think I'm lucky to be here and to have found alot of healing through Dr D and this way of life.  

Last word on my health conditions - I was also recently diagnosed with hyperacusis and tinnitus, no cure  :(.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperacusis  

I have nerve damage to my right ear after ruptured ear drum many years ago after tropical ear and sinusitis (blowing my nose did the damage) (had a hole in my eardrum for many years after that too).  I get buzzing in response to loud and especially high pitched noies and daily pain and pressure in response to noise levels.  Wearing an ear plug most of the time and that fixes it mainly though looks really silly!  8)(funny)(grin)(clown)(whistle)(shy)(bunny)

At least one ear is normal though!

Totally explains my panic attacks and anxiety due to loud noise and amazing hearing (don't whisper something around me  ;))  We Unfortunately live on a main road too  ::)

Also been fighting Candida.  Though thanks to the explorer diet now I'm winning and women's problems have improved remarkably!

Sometimes I do get sorry for myself, but mostly I feel lucky to be alive.  ;)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 8, 2009, 5:22am; Reply: 407
Quoted Text
diagnosed with hyperacusis and tinnitus, no cure


a friend of mine cured his, eliminating wheat

sorry to hear yours is due to rupture..... :-/
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, November 8, 2009, 5:46am; Reply: 408
Wow, that's great that your friend got over it! Thanks Lola
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 8, 2009, 6:00am; Reply: 409
his had to do with inflammation......BTD took care of that
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 8, 2009, 7:58am; Reply: 410
GW:  (hug) (hug)  :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, November 9, 2009, 7:21am; Reply: 411
(hug) thanks mate

A rose by any other name (or a fish)..

I've changed my name to Symbi because I'm not really a Ghee Whiz that was just a silly pun.  Symbi is a nickname for symbiotic (not idiotic I know someone in the peanut gallery is thinking that), which is a state I have with someone close to me  ;)

About Tinnitus. Saw this supplement in a chemist brochure http://www.tebonin.com.au/
Supposed to increase circulation and reduce tinnitus and vertigo. It is an extract from Ginkgo biloba.  Will try it one day if that's alright for my type.

Lola - Maybe when I give up wheat again after the colonoscopy (don't want to again till then so problem will show up) that will help it.  Does seem to go up and down with inflammation (not inflation) so there is some hope there :)

Sorry to go off topic here lately, will get back to more research soon.  Watch out smelly topic of beans are next!
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 9, 2009, 9:14am; Reply: 412
GW, ooops, Symbi (hard to break habits), you deserve everyone's full attention instead of hiding in here.  There are many out there, particularly experts who know their food very well and may not get anywhere near this thread, but may have invaluable info for you.  I am sure moderators will be willing to shift any posts that started here to your new 'Symbi asking for assistance' type of thread.  Only if you want, I just want you to look after yourself and give yourself the attention and help you deserve.   :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 12, 2009, 6:37am; Reply: 413
Research on Yam and Sweet Potato and Taro:

I have picked up on a few posts around here indicating that there is still some confusion with these, so they deserve a research of their own.


http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?458

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?323

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?416

Quick pickup:
Sweet Potatos: Rich in Vit A and C
Yams: Sucrose richer and hormonal balancing elements
Taro: Poisonous Raw but cooked leaves are powerhouse of Vit A! Corns (also soaked overnight or cook please) have Vit E and Magnesium.

Grouped a few useful links that may explain the different values for each in our food lists:

Sweet Potato:
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=64
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2666/3
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_potato

Yam:
Scroll down to the weigh control section in this link.  I love the author's comment about mother nature.
http://www.regenerativenutrition.com/anti-stress-hormones-neuralgic-hrt-menopause.asp
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=113
http://www.africanfoods.co.uk/yam.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yam_(vegetable)#Nutritional_value

Taro:
http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5224.html
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2674/2


(book2)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, November 13, 2009, 1:42am; Reply: 414
Nice work Cristina (clap).  We have elephant ears (taro) growing in our garden, but haven't done anything with it.

Notice on here there was a thread about Butternut Squash.  I think that's american for what we call in Australia, Butternut Pumpkin.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butternut_squash
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_%28plant%29

I notice squash is a different food item for Pumpkin in SWAMI.  And there's many kinds of squashes. Even Zucchini is related to squash.

What sound would a squash make if you squished it?(hehe)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, November 13, 2009, 4:19am; Reply: 415
Quoted from Symbi
We have elephant ears (taro) growing in our garden, but haven't done anything with it.


Before you do, be sure to look at how to prepare.  

Nearly every part of the plant can be eaten if prepared correctly.

Raw The fruit, leaves, stems, and tubers all contain a poison.

Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 13, 2009, 4:26am; Reply: 416
thanks for the warning C_S.   :o

From Wikipedia:

In its raw form the plant is toxic due to the presence of calcium oxalate,[3][4] although the toxin is destroyed by cooking[5] or can be removed by steeping taro roots in cold water overnight.

Take care Symbi.   :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, November 13, 2009, 10:09am; Reply: 417
Thanks, I had looked that up and get worried about little one playing with the leaves, cos it oozes white stuff that has oxalic acid in it !   :P  Kind of turns you off the plant.

Also how do you tell when the tubers are there and ready to pick?  
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 13, 2009, 2:41pm; Reply: 418
The corns or tubers growing in the ground need about 8-10 months to mature, usually from spring to autumn. By the time the cooler days arrive the plant would have lost most of its leaves and will look pretty sad.  That is the time when you can harvest the corns.  Lift the plant carefully and slice the corms off from the plant.  Leave the original plant with most of the leaves sliced off, except for a young centre leaf so it can re-grow again for next harvest in another 10 months.  Actually at the top of the corms could be baby suckers that you can divide and plant in pots.

If I remember well, when planting taro, it is better to do it in spring and to let it sit in the ground for two summers, then harvest it in autumn.

Actually this plant requires further investigation.  I just notice is also related to the Xanthosoma saggitifolium which is in our food lists too. ...

Some other time, too late now to do research .... :)(sleep)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, November 14, 2009, 1:38am; Reply: 419
Thanks mate,
Will try that next autumn.  DH grew up in PNG and his eyes lit up  :o like anything when I told him we have taro.  Thanks for the directions, you're very handy to know!  ;)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 15, 2009, 8:06am; Reply: 420
Research on Essene bread:

Wheat is a no-no in my swami, yet I have been happily eating this pure bio-dynamic sprouted Essene Bread, in moderation of course.

here are the ingredients:

Quoted Text
Bio dynamic certified wheat and Rye sprouted.  With filtered water.

Cooking aid: Organic Sunflower oil (Trace amounts.  Used to release loaf from baking pan)

Not bad for a bought bread.  And believe me when I tell you it tastes delicious, honey delicious!!!!!!

It is the PURE LIFE sprouted bread.

(drool)  :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 15, 2009, 8:41am; Reply: 421
For the lucky Sydney btders:

http://www.theorganicgrocer.com.au/eshop/SubCategory/Sprouted-Bread.aspx

and the lucky ones in Qld Brisbane:
http://www.groceriestoyourdoor.com.au/store/index.php?manufacturers_id=589

This is where I get mine from:
http://www.coolum.com.au/display_listing.asp?id=1205

Lets not forget our friend from NZ:
http://www.essene.co.nz/
:)
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, November 15, 2009, 8:53am; Reply: 422
Quoted from Cristina
Lets not forget our friend from NZ:
http://www.essene.co.nz/ :)
Aww gee thanks;)

Posted by: Possum, Sunday, November 15, 2009, 8:59am; Reply: 423
Nice work Cristina (clap).  We have elephant ears (taro) growing in our garden, but haven't done anything with it.  Oh I remember them when we were kids...such nice soft leaves...didn't know that's how taro grew - or even at that stage what taro was... :-/ ;) - it's popular here in NZ - the Islanders use it a lot...

What sound would a squash make if you squished it?(hehe)  rofl ok what sound does it make??!! :-/ ;D ??)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 12:56pm; Reply: 424
Research on nightshades Bell Peppers and Pimento:

Green/Yellow Bell Pepper TypeBase
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?292
Australian New Zealand Food Standards government site:
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/monitoringandsurveillance/nuttab2006/onlineversionintroduction/onlineversion.cfm?&action=getFood&foodID=13A10817

Red Bell Pepper TypeBase
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?294
Australian New Zealand Food Standards government site:
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/monitoringandsurveillance/nuttab2006/onlineversionintroduction/onlineversion.cfm?&action=getFood&foodID=13A10819

Pimento Typebase:
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?308

In summary:

Bell Peppers = Capsicums

Pimento = Pimento (only because I have seen it as such in a supermarket here).  I cannot find websites in australia with clear indications that this is the US Pimento.

Requires further study.   ??) Comments?   :)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 7:52pm; Reply: 425
Typebase says that pimento is

CAPSICUM ANNUUM LONGUM

Capsicum Annum includes most pepper varieties

To me Longum is a long pepper that is hot and not a pimento is a squat sweet pepper.

I have been ignoring the scientific name in typebase and going with what I consider a pimento to me.  Which is the type of pepper stuffed into green olives.

I cannot buy fresh pimentos in grocery stores near where I live. I can buy it in jars with vinegar or citric acid (I avoid both). So I grow my own pimento peppers.  

I eat the pimento peppers while green (immature) and red (takes longer to get to this stage). I am not sure if the rating in the GenoType book and SWAMI only applies to mature pimentos or to both mature and immature pimentos (There has been prior discussion on the forums over this issue).
Posted by: Jenny, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 8:02pm; Reply: 426
Jenny's anecdotal evidence......a couple of years ago when I mistakenly thought I was an A2 I got obsessed with pimentos, and started to notice them here and there in f & v shops......they are thicker fleshed than capsicums/bell peppers, and squatter in shape, actually quite heart shaped. I tried to grow them from seed,  but the possums got to them first. Anyway, when it became clear that I was actually A1, the obsession faded.
Now on my swami diet, they are neutral, so I use capsicums/pimentos occasionally for colour and to prevent the feeling of restriction which occasionally bears down. Even when they are (in my estimation) pimentos, they will be labelled as capsicum in the shops.
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 8:03pm; Reply: 427
Thanks Kent, las night when I was researching via scientific name, everything came up as the  hot type pepper for it, but the descriptor of pimento clearly states that it is the sweet pepper, heart shaped one, which BTW I have seen in the shops somewhere here: it was an 'aha'moment, 'that is the Pimento from the lists'.  I say it must have been the result of somebody growing it locally and making it available to the shops.  I will report when and if i see it again.  Thanks (book2) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 8:08pm; Reply: 428
Hi Jenny, thanks for your feedback, yes that is my experience too, stokier and heart shaped.  I also have them as neutral. Nice to have you here as usual coming in the nick of time to get us out of trouble.  It will be easier now to finalize this one.  

I will add them to my list of things to grow at home, at this rate, there will not be much of a lawn left here ... ;D :)
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 9:08pm; Reply: 429
Research on Onion family:

After studying the links below these are my conclusions:


:)(book2)


Lets start with a neat summary from this website:
http://members.iinet.net.au/~msheaton/Organic%20Gardening%20Down%20Under/how_to_grow_onions.htm

Scallion TypeBase:
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?370
Scallions Local sites:
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/monitoringandsurveillance/nuttab2006/onlineversionintroduction/onlineversion.cfm?&action=getFood&foodID=13A10875
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/monitoringandsurveillance/nuttab2006/onlineversionintroduction/onlineversion.cfm?&action=getFood&foodID=13A10878

Shallots TypeBase
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?372
Shallots Local sites:
http://www.taste.com.au/how+to/articles/930/french+shallots
http://www.greenharvest.com.au/Plants/shallots_info.html
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/vegetables/commodity/shallots-chives

Leeks TypeBase
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?221
Leeks local sites
http://www.organicfood.com.au/Content_Common/pg-leeks-information.seo
http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5236.html

Onions TypeBase
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?272
Onions local sites:
http://www.organicfood.com.au/Content_Common/pg-onions-information.seo
http://www.onionsaustralia.org.au/TraderHomeWithQuotation.aspx

Garlic is pretty obvious to everyone, so I did not post lists (added as edition).
Posted by: Jenny, Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 9:14pm; Reply: 430
Since my gorgeous moggie died recently I have a redundant carry cage which is now going to serve as a plant raising venue for small pots, and maybe my remaining pimento seeds will have a chance to germinate and thrive there.
I've been busy lately with the birth of my second grandson (on my birthday!) but grandson no 1 and I still have lots of time in my garden which he (aged 2) works in like a true gardener."Granma....hole...spade...dig....water... hose...." etc etc. ;D
Posted by: Symbi, Thursday, November 19, 2009, 6:22am; Reply: 431
You got it all figured out about peppers / Capsicums, Cristina.  Good one!  I remember looking that up a few years ago when I started BTD - but forgot to add here  ::).

Haven't seen any pimentos around except ground up in paprika, where did you see those?  Would like to try them and notice they are neutral for all types unlike capsicums.

Capsicum is one of the foods that I really love and hope I am non-secretor so I can keep eating them!!  Did stop for many years but have started them again recently thinking I'm a nonnie.

Thanks also for the essene bread info, Cristina!  Sorry haven't been online as much lately.
Squash would squish I think Possum? :) ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 19, 2009, 6:29am; Reply: 432
Ok Symbi   :)
Posted by: Possum, Thursday, November 19, 2009, 8:07am; Reply: 433
Quoted from Jenny
....I got obsessed with pimentos, and started to notice them here and there in f & v shops......they are thicker fleshed than capsicums/bell peppers, and squatter in shape, actually quite heart shaped. I tried to grow them from seed, but the possums got to them first.

oops wasn't me :X... was my cousins ;D

Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 19, 2009, 9:05am; Reply: 434
;D
Posted by: Cristina, Thursday, November 19, 2009, 2:57pm; Reply: 435
Research on Pumpkin and Squash

Quoted from Symbi

Notice on here there was a thread about Butternut Squash.  I think that's american for what we call in Australia, Butternut Pumpkin.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butternut_squash
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_%28plant%29

I notice squash is a different food item for Pumpkin in SWAMI.  And there's many kinds of squashes. Even Zucchini is related to squash.



My conclusion after studying the links below:

Working on the premises that Typebase Squash and Pumpkin share the same Scientific name and guided by references in the links below I believe Squash are mostly young pumpkins, or soft skinned pumpkins, while the pumpkins referred to the thicker skinned squash varieties that have been allowed to mature longer in their vines.

Except for the small button squash, generally speaking, in Australia/NZ, we tend to call them all pumpkins, while in America they use Squash instead for the same species as per Symbi's quote.

To translate these findings as food ratings in my Swami and for the time being until otherwise proven, I will place under Pumpkin all the winter variety Squash ones as well as the orange skin 'Halloween' type larger pumpkins.  The summer type squash goes under Squash in my ratings (unless of course they have a rating of their own, like the zucchini).

Check this site from a supermarket:
http://www.homeshop.com.au/website/product/product_list.jsp?level1_folder_id=2,534,374,302,037,962&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302038899&level2_folder_id=2,534,374,302,038,090&level3_folder_id=2,534,374,302,038,899&bmUID=1258659964200

Typebase Squash and Pumpkin = CUCURBITA PEPO

Squash
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?399

Button Squash that can mature into pumpkin ...
http://www.beautanicals.com.au/buttonsquash.html

Sites with photos showing various types:
http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/Vegetable/VF8.pdf
http://www.flavours.com.au/Articles/Squash.pdf


Pumpkin
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?328

seeds with photos all varieties
http://www.twenga.com.au/dir-Garden-DIY,Seeds-and-bulbs,Pumpkin-seeds

How to tell them apart
http://www.thebegavalley.org.au/bvsspumpkins.html

butternut cup is not pumpkin:
http://www.annettemcfarlane.com/Stories/Pumpkin.pdf
http://www.marketfresh.com.au/produce_guide/product.asp?ID=103

Butternut squash recipes thread
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1257278159/  (book2)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, November 20, 2009, 2:08am; Reply: 436
Good research Cristina!  Never knew the squash was a baby pumpkin, how cute.  Makes sense the summer ones are baby thin skinned and the winter are the fully grown hard skinned pumpkins.  I couldn't believe the picture on market fresh's website, that's an old pumpkin that I wouldn't buy a the market!  Learning more new things every day.

So does butternut squash go under Squash in your SWAMI or Pumpkin)?  Are there different values for those two items on anyone's SWAMI?  

Thanks for the Pimento info from Jenny before too.  I saw some info in Women's Health magazine that the top popular vegetables people are growing in their gardens are tomatoes, followed by capsicums.  Probably popular with possums too  ;)  I'm worried, we haven't seen our local ones for a while and we heard a cat bell one night.  :(
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 20, 2009, 3:18am; Reply: 437
Hi Symbi, thanks.  According to Typebase Butternut is listed under Squash, as a winter squash variety.  Many of the links I listed, not just the australian ones, but the american ones too, indicate that these varieties are referred to as 'pumpkins'.  So cutting a long story short (and I should have been more clear in my Conclusion wording, sorry), I place any of the thicker skins winter squashes and the large orange skined (halloween type pumpkins) under the category Pumpkin (diamond in my Swami).  The little, soft skin pumpkins that you can easily eat the skin when steamed, I consider them as 'Squash' and therefore a neutral in my Swami...


In other words, the Squash varieties are those small soft cushioning ones that they used to lay in front of Cindirella for her to walk on when she got out of the strong, thick skinned pumpkin carriage she was travelling on!!   ;D ;D. (They forgot to tell us that in the Cinderella story ...  ;) )

I will edit my previous post to make this clearer.

Hope this helps.  Enjoy your pumpkin journey princess.   :) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 20, 2009, 5:50am; Reply: 438
Research on Baking Soda:

Quoted from Symbi
... In another thread too, about your DH being stung by a bee, you found out that Baking Soda (US) = Bicarbonate of Soda (Aus).  Are you going to put that on the summary tables?  It isn't in SWAMI though as far as I know? ...


Thanks Symbi for that reminder PM, I appreciate it.  :)

Baking Soda is in my Swami, in the neutrals under 'Condiments'.  In Australia is usually marketed as Bicarbonate Soda, a term that Typebase uses to describe it.  It did not occurred to me then to check typebase when some of you guys were telling me to use it on DH bee sting!!  It is there plain an clear.  I keep the stuff at home all the time.  When used in conjunction with vinegar and a silk pantyhose, it becomes an excellent aid for cleaning.  I have not used it for baking, but since it is a neutral I may try it on the odd cake, maybe in thanksgiving fare.

Here is the TypeBase link:

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?602   :) :)

Just to make it clear, in conclusion:

Baking soda = Bicarbonate of soda

PS: some good brands even describe that on their packaging.  I usually buy the cheapest I can get my hands on, because I only use for cleaning, not for baking.  This cheap brand does not mentions anything about bicarbonate of soda.  It is woollies Home Brand (less than $1 per packet), beats laundry, dishwasher and oven cleaners $$$$$.   ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 20, 2009, 5:55am; Reply: 439
Agathe, MS, I know we had a pumpkin late evening for you, early morning for me, discussion a few weeks ago.  Where is your french thread? I did a search could not find it.   ::) :) :)
Posted by: Agathe, Friday, November 20, 2009, 6:10am; Reply: 440
The french thread is in the "TypeBase4" section, Cristina.

(I'll come back to this thread later. Now I must leave for work.)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 20, 2009, 6:24am; Reply: 441
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1254418748/s-61/#num61
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 20, 2009, 7:56am; Reply: 442
Ok Agathe and thanks Lola for the link.
From the French translation thread:
Quoted from Cristina

For what I can gather a general rule of thumb, will be that pumpkins are the thick skinned ones (any will do in that category, unless specifically identify in the list as Jack, or Butternut, or whatever) and squash are the thin skinned ones that you can eat the skin and varieties here include your courgette (which has its own rating).

:) :)  I am making it up as I go here, rushed research trying to help while I sip a cup of coffee.   :)


Phewww!  it is obvious I reached the same conclusion then, as in this research.  I just needed to make sure there was no contradiction.  The more I read websites around the place, the more convinced I get that this is the right interpretation of these two food items...   :) :)
Posted by: Agathe, Friday, November 20, 2009, 4:53pm; Reply: 443
Hi again, Cristina !

I went through the discussion about pumpkin / squash in this thread as well as in "French translation" once more.

The least one can say is that it's really difficult to disentangle all these varieties of cucurbitaceae !

Your idea of distinguishing squash from pumpkin out of whether it is a summer squash (young) or a winter squash (older) seems relevant to me. (I read the wikipedia english page for squash.)

But I stop here my investigations about squash. As it is neutral for me anyway and as I'm not used to eat them, excepted courgette, I'll rather focus on pumpkin that is beneficial.

As I understand, squash is a generic name for all cucurbitaceae. The equivalent in french is courge. I'm sure that if I asked ten persons "for you, what is a courge ?" I would get ten different answers. In fact, nobody really knows what a courge is !!!

::) I just think about something : french seems to confirm your hypthesis : a courgette is a small courge   :)

Bye bye

Agathe
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, November 20, 2009, 11:20pm; Reply: 444
Research on Rice:

Just a collection of relevant information, nothing different to identify from our lists.  Northen and Southern hemispheres are at sync on this one.  :) :)

TypeBase Rice, white, brown, basmatic
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?346

TypeBase Rice, wild
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?347

Scientific name oryza Sativa
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oryza_sativa

General information
Brown rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_rice
White rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_rice
Wild rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_rice

Some information from Australian supplier:
http://www.sunrice.com.au/education/growing-rice-in-australia
http://www.organicroad.com.au/organic/flour-grains-rice/p/103

Patent on rice  :o
If you are interested in knowing how the genomes, chromosomes, genes and  genetic preservation relate to intellectual property involving Mosanto, Du Point and other big players,  regarding our humble rice grain, then you will relish in this link:
http://www.patentlens.net/daisy/RiceGenome/3648.html   :)
(book2)

Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, November 21, 2009, 12:02am; Reply: 445
Good job Cristina!  I agree that butternut should be considered a pumpkin, it's so similar to the other winter (hard skinned) varieties.  One thing I know is, they're all yummy!  Not much time today, we're camping over my MIL FILs place as our place is getting painted!  Thanks for the thank you!  ;)
Posted by: Jenny, Saturday, November 21, 2009, 10:15pm; Reply: 446
Symbi's question..........Haven't seen any pimentos around except ground up in paprika, where did you see those?  Would like to try them and notice they are neutral for all types unlike capsicums..........................................................................

I see them in a big store in Canberra called SupaBarn, but even though i know they are pimentos by the appearance, they are generically labelled capsicum. Years ago I used to see them in a health food store with the same mistaken identification, so just for fun you might consider doing a "food crawl" around all your local fresh food outlets. Once you have found the genuine article you will always know them by appearance. Few people outside our select group will see the need to label them correctly, so we just need to be independent of their mistaken labels. ;)


Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 22, 2009, 3:51am; Reply: 447
Brought over as a result of a question regarding the source of peccorno cheese (sheep, cow) and the distinction between Peccorino and Peccorino Romano.

Quoted from Cristina
Well, I am hoping that Peccorino refers to the way the cheese is made which can be done with either sheep or cow's milk.  At least in Australia (as well as other countries as seen below), Peccorino cheese  is sold without specifying that it is made from sheep.  On checking the websites below, they are actually advertising some as being made from cow's milk.  So I hope this one will be like the Feta cheese that can be made from either goat or cow's milk, but it has the same rating in our lists as Feta.

So, whether from sheep or cow, I hope that 'Peccorino' is rated the same in our food lists.

http://www.lacasa.com.au/qa.htm#8


Websites advertising Peccorino cheese made from cow's milk:
http://www.clover.co.za/content/235/pecorino/
I get access to this one in my local store:
http://www.trueorganic.com.au/products.php?pid=48
and to this fresh one:
http://www.lacasa.com.au/freshpecorino.htm
:)

PS: Regarding your question as to Peccorino and Romano being the same, they are not, they are two different types of cheeses, one is the plain Peccorino which can be fresh or matured and the other one is the Peccorino Romano, which is similar to Parmesan cheese in texture.  (book2) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 22, 2009, 4:02am; Reply: 448
Further Research on Pimento:

I bought these today at Wollies in Kawana waters.  They were in the fruit and vegie section, in a pack of six, disguised under the name of: Baby Red Capsicums.   :)

http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/look-pimento-peppers-100956

PS: edited to say, those baby red capcicums, are just that, baby capcicums and not the Pimento we are talking about. So this post, although it has a relevant link to real pimento pictures, it is not relevant from the point of view of buying it at the supermarket.   :(   8)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 22, 2009, 8:24am; Reply: 449
Research on Malanga, Tannier, Xanthosoma
Spanish: Oreja de Elefantes, bituca,
Hojas de Bore (Chequear el pie de esta pagina)

Not in TypeBase, but in our Swami lists

Quote from http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Xanthosoma.html

Quoted Text
Xanthosoma sagittifolium  (L.) Schott

SYNONYM(S) :   Arum sagittifolium L.,  Caladium sagittifolium (L.) Vent.

CHINESE :  千年芋    Qian nian yu  (Taiwan).

ENGLISH :  Ape (Hawaii), Arrowleaf elephant's ear, Elephant ears (USA), Green arrow elephant ears, New cocoyam,  Tania, Tannia (Caribbean Islands), Yautia.

FRENCH :  Chou cara�be,  Malanga marron, Tanier (Caribbean Islands), Tannier, Tanyove (Guyana), Tayo tyo (West Indies), Taye, Tayove (Guyane).

GERMAN :  Tania.

MALAY :   Kimpool (Indonesia).

PORTUGUESE :  Mangar� mirim, Mangareto, Mangarito, Mangar�s (Brazil), Taioba (Brazil).

SPANISH :  Gualuza (Bolivia), Malanga (Antilles), Malanga amarilla, Malanga blanca (Cuba),  Malanga malangay, Ocumo (Venezuala), Ocumo cuman (Venezuela), Quequesque (Guatemala), Quiquisque, Tiquisque blanco (Costa Rica), Yaut�a amarilla, Yaut�a blanca, Yautia bravi� (Puerto Rico) .

A few nice photos in this link:
Http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/xanthosoma_sagittifolium.htm

The Malanga is very similar to the Taro plant, they are both Elephant ear plants, so how do we tell them apart without digging and checking their corns (which are quite different).  The main difference on the outside, is the way the stem connects to the leaf.  In the Malanga the stem meets the leaf at the join of the top of the leaf (the top vertix in the ear). Observe the photos in this link:

http://michaels4gardens.com/Xanthosoma.html

In the Taro, the stem meets the leaf towards the middle of the leaf, not at the top joint.  Check the photos on this link:

http://michaels4gardens.com/Taro.html

This is a previous thread where Malanga was discussed:
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GTDdiet/m-1252585126/

You will find a neat summary of Elephant ear plants across various genera (including Taro and Malanga) in this link where Taro (old Cocoyam) is  in the Colocacia genera and Malanga (new Cocoyam) is in the Xanthosoma genera.
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/elephant-ear-plant.html

These are also good relevant links (when they are working)
http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/malanga
http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/taro!opendocument&startkey=taro

Spanish link:
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xanthosoma
Spanish article translating Malanga to Hojas de bore:
http://www.lrrd.org/lrrd18/7/rodr18091.htm

Both these plants are toxic when raw, they need to be cooked in salty water for at least 15 minutes. Proceed with caution particularly when first introducing them to your diet.  When treated properly they can be  a very nutritious addition to your diet.  Malanga is a SF in my Swami and Taro is neutral.
:)
(book2) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 22, 2009, 8:32am; Reply: 450
Research on Tubers and their toxicity level:

Nice illustrations on various tubers:
http://www.foodsubs.com/Tubers.html

List of toxic plants and their toxic ratings:
http://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/ce/king/PoisPlant/Tox-COM.htm
Elephant's ear     Colocasia spp.     = Taro plant
Elephant's ear     Xanthosoma spp.     = Malanga plant
:) (book2) :)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 22, 2009, 7:30pm; Reply: 451
malanga, Oreja de elefante, or bituca

elephant ears is pretty abundant down here
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, November 22, 2009, 8:07pm; Reply: 452
Thanks Lola, edited post.   :) :)
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, November 23, 2009, 12:24am; Reply: 453
What a busy forum here,  :o thanks for all the excellent research Cristina.  (clap)

Jenny, sorry about your cat  :'(, I'm sure he had a great life with you as his Mum.  A food crawl is a great idea! Now I know what to look for, thanks Cristina for the great picture.  :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, November 23, 2009, 12:57am; Reply: 454
Quoted from Jenny
Since my gorgeous moggie died recently I have a redundant carry cage which is now going to serve as a plant raising venue for small pots, and maybe my remaining pimento seeds will have a chance to germinate and thrive there.;D

Quoted Text
Quoted from Symbi:
Jenny, sorry about your cat


Ahh, I was not sure what moggie was, read the post in a hurry, I thought Jenny was talking about some exotic plant!!  Sorry Jenny!  I second Symbi about you being a great mum too!!   :)  

Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, December 13, 2009, 11:12am; Reply: 455
Research on Kudzu:


Quoted Text

Relevant information:

    Active Ingredients:    
    Kudzu root contains: Phytoestrogens including the isoflavonoids genistein, daidzein, formononetin and biochanin-A. Kudzu root is also rich in isoflavone glycosides, such as daidzin and puerarin.  Depending on its growing conditions, the total isoflavone content varies from 1.77-12.0%, with puerarin in the highest concentration, followed by daidzin and daidzein. Kudzu also contains many other flavonoid-type antioxidants and is rich in protein.


http://www.florahealth.com/flo.....tm#ActiveIngredients

Quoted Text
    
    Women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors should exercise caution in the use of daidzein/dadzin-containing supplements and should only use them if they are recommended and monitored by a physician.

    Daidzein/daidzin intake has been associated with hypothyroidism in some.


http://170.107.206.70/drug_info/nmdrugprofiles/nutsupdrugs/dai_0089.shtml

Quoted Text

    Kudzu: Kudzu is an herb that has been used in Chinese medicine for many years. Traditionally, kudzu has been used to treat hives. However, there is currently no scientific evidence on the safety and efficacy for this use.
    No well-designed studies on the long-term effects of kudzu are available. Avoid if allergic or hypersensitive to Pueraria lobata or members of the Fabaceae/Leguminosae family. Use cautiously with blood thinners and blood pressure-lowering agents, hormones, antiarrhythmics, benzodiazepines, bisphosphonates, diabetes medications, drugs that are metabolized by the liver's cytochrome P450 enzymes, mecamylamine, neurologic agents, and methotrexate. Avoid if pregnant or breastfeeding.


http://www.wellness.com/reference/allergies/latex-allergy/prevention-and-treatment
Posted by: mel1111, Saturday, March 20, 2010, 1:48pm; Reply: 456
part 2 Huon, Australia Q & A on farmed salmon
Q.What are the fish fed?
A. Turning to the natural resources being used to feed our fish, farmed salmon in common with all other meat producing animals must receive balanced nutrition if they are to develop normally, remain healthy and provide a high-quality end product. The diets that we buy are made for us specifically. Tasmania is a unique environment and our fish are truly a special breed, so our diets here have to meet some specific requirements. Our diets have to supply two main requirements; firstly they need to provide the fish with enough energy to live and thrive; secondly they must supply all the nutrients (proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals) to grow. After many years of research we have a pretty good understanding of what the relative amounts and balances of each nutrient need to be in the range of environmental conditions we experience. This generates a specification for our diets for each stage of the salmons growth and our suppliers manufacture to this specification. There is some flexibility in which ingredients go into the recipe to deliver that specified feed but all ingredients must go through a battery of quality checks before they can be used. Aside from fishmeal and fish oil, our diets may contain wheat, soya derivatives, corn gluten, meat by-product meal, blood meal and vitamin and mineral supplements very similar to those taken by people. In fact most of the ingredients we use are commonly used in the pet-food industry and our diets look very like dry pet food albeit with a very different nutrient profile, higher in energy and more digestible.

All of the ingredients combine to provide all of the nutrients that our fish need to grow properly in Tasmanian conditions. I will give an indication below of the main contribution each ingredient type makes to the diet and why this is important to the fish:-

1)      Fishmeal source of protein and oil in the diet, very balanced source of essential amino acids helping the fish to grow and repair, enhances palatability of the diet.

2)      Fish oil source of oil in the diet, used by the fish for energy, good source of marine omega 3 oils which have direct health benefits for fish and are stored in the flesh of the fish making our product a very healthy food choice for people.

3)      Wheat source of carbohydrate in the feed to give the pellet structure, not used very much by the fish they make carbohydrate by digesting and converting protein mainly.

4)      Vegetable glutens source of protein in the diet, good source of some essential amino acids helping the fish to grow and repair.

5)      Blood and meat and bone meal source of protein in the diet, very digestible source of essential amino acids, especially Histidine that are very important during summer.

Salmon are amongst the most efficient converters of protein and energy much better than birds and land animals. Im sure that youve read articles stating that it takes many kilos of capture fishery species to produce 1 kg of salmon. In reality on an edible flesh basis it takes around 1Kg of anchovies to produce 840g of Huon salmon and we are working hard to reduce this further. Why is our number lower than the numbers reported in the media? Often the numbers reported are many years out of date or come from sources that have taken worst case views and used them to argue a particular point.

Q. Do you use antibiotics with the fish.  Is this a standard practice?
A. I can confirm that we have not used any antibiotics in our marine farming operations for almost two years. We put our fish first and are committed to preventative health measures. We produce the highest quality Tasmanian salmon for Australian and International markets and we are proud of our animal husbandry and welfare record. Our improved husbandry and breeding program is eliminating even the occasional use of antibiotics on our production farms - a critical part of what we call the Huon Method.  

In the past when Huon has had to medicate individual pens it was for short periods of 10 days or less.  Even then antibiotics were only used under the strict prescription and supervision of a veterinarian and only in response to specific isolated health issues, as with all livestock reared for food production. In keeping with the Australian and New Zealand food safety standards and world's best practice in aquaculture, any fish treated with antibiotics are not harvested until the antibiotic has cleared their system. So if antibiotics were ever used we made sure that there were no residues in the fish that we harvested.

Looking ahead we are actively supporting and funding vaccine development in co-operation with other farming companies to further help our fish deal with environmental stressors and opportunistic bacteria that can make them unwell.

I hope that this goes some way to helping you make your judgement on whether to buy Huon Tasmanian salmon.

Please contact me if you need any further information or if you want me to expand on any of the points covered above.

Thank you,
Danika

Customer Service Support Officer   |   Huon Aquaculture Group Pty Ltd

Posted by: mel1111, Saturday, March 20, 2010, 1:50pm; Reply: 457
Farmed Salmon in Australia - and Huon Australia Q & A part 1
I have been researching Australian farmed Salmon.  I thought that i would write to the company whose product i had previously enjoyed eating the most, Huon, (previously called Springs).  They sent me a detailed response to my queries,  pls find (an edited version) it below.  I am wondering if anyone has comments on the Huon farming approach described.  If you have the time/interest it would be great if you could pls take a look and comment.

It sounds like this farmed salmon product could be ok for us to use even though it is farmed, anyway i am hoping so!! especially as we are unable to purchase wild salmon.

Their are a number of threads i have found in other forums which helped me formulate my questions to Huon.
(Posted By: joachim, AB- Date: Friday, 19 October 2001, at 2:11 a.m.)  http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archived/config.pl?read=124404 is extremely critical of farmed salmon.  , the practice Huon describes is rather different to the North American practices that are described by Joachim.

One specific concern i did not ask about was the colour of the fish.  but there is considerable discussion of this issue in another thread http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GC/m-1259637147/. So i have written back to them to ask them about dye.

Recently i was in Aldi, and i saw and bought the Salmon which comes from Marlborough Sounds in NZ so i am interested in investigating that now------------------------------------------------------------------
Q from me & A from Huon - (Note that Huon produce fresh salmon & smoked salmon.)

Q. is fresh wild salmon available in Australia
A.I agree that youll find it difficult to find fresh wild Atlantic salmon in Sydney, its only caught in very limited commercial coastal net fisheries on the North sea coasts and by recreational anglers in the northern late summer and autumn (July-October). The wild stocks of this fish have been in decline for almost sixty years well before salmon farming started. The seasonality of supply and the scarcity have often led to unscrupulous retailers passing off farmed salmon as wild fish to exploit a perception that wild fish were somehow more sustainable, flavoursome or in some way better.

Youre absolutely right in that Springs was rebranded as Huon smoked salmon a couple of years ago. Its definitely the most authentic smoked salmon that is produced in Australia. We use traditional kiln smoking for at least 24 hours to let the smoke infuse gently and preserve the delicate flavour of our fish.


Ive tried to answer your specific concerns and questions below, we are in the process of providing general information on the web site on the topics youve raised but I thought it might help to cover these issues in my reply.

Q. Would you say your farmed fresh salmon differs from US practice.   (I note that your website talks of fallowing etc.)
A. Its a little difficult to do a direct comparison with overseas producers as the environment and conditions that they farm under are different to ours. We believe our salmon are superior because we put the fish first. Huon farms have the lowest stocking densities in the world, in fact the fish occupy less than 1% of the volume of our net pens. We maintain clean nets, a healthy environment and work hard to reduce stress, all to ensure healthy fish.  Huon's own selective breeding programme produces fish which are ideally suited to our Tasmanian conditions. We have a very strict regulatory framework that ensures that our operations are sustainable. We must report production inputs and outputs per hectare and our farms are surveyed by the government on an annual basis to verify that we are working within the environmental impact limits allowed under our lease conditions. All farm sites in Tasmania are leased from the Department of Primary Industry, Water and the Environment and must operate with no detectable impact on the sea bed within 35 metres of the lease footprint. These are amongst the tightest standards in the world.

Q. Would you say your farmed fresh salmon differs other locally produced (eg Tassal)?  
A. Again we believe that we produce the best fish in the world. Our fish a selected from our pioneering pedigree broodstock so that we start with high quality juvenile fish (smolts) reared in state-of-the art freshwater hatcheries that grow the fish under ideal conditions whilst having minimal environmental impact. The smolts are transferred to our pristine marine sites, fed balanced diets made to our specific formulations, protected from predators and carefully nurtured. They respond to our care by growing strongly, with minimal variation, good deep body shape and excellent flesh colour and texture. The are harvested at night and processed in the early morning  so that they arrive on the market a day earlier than other producers.  

Q. What happened to fish waste in the pens?
A. Our salmon need a maximum of 6.9Kg of fish feed to grow to 5Kg.
There are two types of waste that we need to consider. The first is waste feed. We use a patented feed management system that we helped develop in the mid nineties. The system uses a sensor which indirectly measures the appetite of the fish, this means that the fish tell us when they are hungry and the sensor controls a feed distributor that delivers an amount of feed to satisfy the appetite of the fish without wastage. Salmon unlike us will not eat more than they need to live and grow so by ensuring that no extra feed is fed we are eliminating the risk of feed waste.

The second type of waste is excretory products. Fish digestion works in a completely different way to humans or farm animals. Fish excretory products pose no danger whatsoever to humans because they do not contain E-coli or any of the other potentially pathogenic bacteria or viruses that are found in human or farm sewage. After all, fish have been swimming about in the sea for countless millennia and the marine ecosystem has evolved to deal with their excretory products as part of the natural cycle of life in the oceans. The vast majority of the small amount of nitrogenous waste produced by fish is actually excreted from the gills of the fish as ammonia and it dissolves rapidly in the water and is carried away by tides and currents. Having said that salmon farms do produce some organic waste and it can have a negative impact on the seabed directly under the cages. This is overseen by the Marine Farming Branch of the state governments Department of Primary Industry, Water and the Environment. All Huon farms are monitored and if there is any detectable impact from our operations within 35m (less than the diameter of one of our large pens) of the edge of our lease area then we must stop operations at that pen site.

It is also worth pointing out that Huon farms are removed or fallowed for several months of the year and this allows the seabed to revert back to exactly how it was before the farm was ever there. Our footprint is tiny and easily reversed. The very definition of sustainable farming.

Q. Are the fish ever shot?
A. Not sure what you mean by this. Our farming systems and methods are built to ensure that the fish live as stress-free a life as possible. If your question relates to how we harvest our fish then we use a specially designed system to kill the fish by percussive stunning. The system was invented in Australia and again we were involved in the development phase. It has since become the worlds best practise harvesting system and has won an award from the RSPCA in the UK for the humane manner in which it operates.  
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, March 20, 2010, 7:56pm; Reply: 458
seems all this farmed salmon species need is yoga for their blood glucose and viscosity levels! :P
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, March 21, 2010, 8:18am; Reply: 459
Thanks for your research Mel!

Great to see this thread is back to life.  I should try some salmon soon now it does sound good.   :)
Posted by: teri, Tuesday, March 23, 2010, 10:11pm; Reply: 460
mel1111, I'm so glad you've done some research on this subject. I am also a believer that farmed salmon is a very healthy food. Everything that you've found out about farming practices in Australia is also done here in BC. Regarding antibiotics, the majority of fish make it to market without ever receiving any treatment at all. Only sick fish are treated, not the whole site, and only for a short period of time, as you say, "10 days", and cleared before harvest. The industry here is very highly regulated, much more so than farmed land animals in North America. I won't eat non-organic beef or poultry, but I won't hesitate to eat farmed fish from BC. The whole campaign against farmed salmon in North America is entirely a political one and based on skewed data. It's all about money. If anyone cares to delve deep enough into the subject (bypassing mainstream media) that is what they will find. I have no doubt that if Dr. D had a fresh whole farmed salmon from BC (or Australia) in front of him to examine, he'd give his approval. :)
Posted by: Symbi, Tuesday, March 23, 2010, 11:23pm; Reply: 461
For Aussie budget conscious beef eaters, you may be interested to know.  Big Surprise  :o!  I got preservative-free beef sausages from Woolworths the other day.  That was after asking a butcher about preservatives in sausages, he said, "they all have them and the meat comes with the preservatives already in as well".  

I'd heard that some gourmet butchers make them preservative free, but didn't expect to find them in Woolies tho!  They also have gluten free sausages and lots of meats and flavours as well (with preservatives tho).

Here are the ingredients:
Beef (71.5%), Water, Rice Flour, Salt, Mineral Salts (450, 451, 452), Dextrose (Tapioca or Maize), Food Acids (262, 331), Soy Protein, Natural Flavouring, Antioxidants (301, 316), Spices, Dehydrated Vegetables, Natural Colour (160c), Vegetable Oil, Edible Collagen Casing.

Checking the ingredients in the MBM food additives guide (http://mbm.net.au/health/guide.htm)
E262      Sodium acetate and anydrous, ok
E331      Sodium citrates, ok
Mineral salts ok
Maize - dodgy for some
Soy - dodgy for some
Natural flavouring - could be MSG?

E301      Sodium ascorbate, ok
E316      Sodium erythorbate, no known effects

E160(c)      Paprika extract, capsanthin, capsorubin      Capsanthin, found in paprika extract, is a red to orange coloured spice derived from the pods and seeds of the red pepper (Capsicum annuum). Contains vitamins A, B, C and traces of Zn, Cu, Se, Co, Mo, etc. Paprika extract also contains capsanthin. Capsanthin may be added to poultry feed to enhance egg yolk colour.
Typical products include eggs, meat products.
Not listed in Australia.   Avoid it.

Vegetable oil - could be anything

So other than the veggie oil, possible corn, soy and paprika colour that could be spicy for some, they're pretty good.  They were the least fatty of any sausages I've ever cooked btw.  :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 5:38am; Reply: 462
make your own....at least you know what goes in them!
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, April 16, 2010, 6:45am; Reply: 463
Finally got around to it and now I have SWAMI Xpress, am using the very useful list to write local equivalents next to food items.  Very handy, thanks to everyone who contributed to the list.

Some corrections I noticed though, for the Summary tables only from Food Choices.  Can someone please second these updates and then update, please kind Admin people. :-)

Rutagaba     Sweedes     AU, NZ
It is the yellow parsnip

Should read it is the yellow TURNIP
Also SwEdes - only has one e
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutabaga

Just bought some today (diamond food) and the veggie shop had turnips (the white ones) and Swedes next to each other and the same price.

Also noticed      Sweet Potatos should have an e "sweet potatoes"



New Research to check and add:
Swiss Chard is known as Silverbeet or Mangold in Australia
http://www.gardenate.com/plant/Silverbeet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_chard

Scallion is known as Spring Onion in Australia but also known as a salad onion, onion sticks or green onion in many countries
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scallion

If I find anything else I'll put more research on here. Will get to the bean research I promised so long ago.  Where have you bean all my life?  ;)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, April 16, 2010, 7:13pm; Reply: 464
Quoted Text
Also noticed      Sweet Potatos should have an e "sweet potatoes"


either that or take away the s

thanks!
will email Bob and guide him to your post.
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, April 18, 2010, 10:01pm; Reply: 465
Quoted from Lola
seems all this farmed salmon species need is yoga for their blood glucose and viscosity levels! :P


Nice one Lola...fabulous work Mel. So are you only going to buy Huon?

Posted by: Symbi, Monday, April 19, 2010, 4:55am; Reply: 466
G'day Jenny!

Admins -
Here's another one to add to the list:

Chayote, Pipinella, Vegetable pear is known as Choko in Australia and probably around the world?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chayote

Had some last night and it's nice baked, though the skin went quite tough - you can skip that bit.
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, May 2, 2010, 1:26am; Reply: 467
Research on Tahitian Spinach Xsnthosoma brasillience:
This is a variety of the Taro plant grown mainly for its edible leaves, rather than for  its  Taro roots.

The Tahitian Spinach is the ideal leaf to use of the Taro family species because they have the least amount of the irritating potassium oxalate crystals which can produce life threatening throat irritation.   Taro species leaves always need to be throughly cooked first before eating.  A rapid boiling of at least twenty minutes is advised and after cooking throw the water away.  Although this method of cooking may seem to remove nutrients from these vegetables, there is still great food value left in them to provide goodness per serve. (from Pemaculture training course).

http://www.gardening.eu/arc/plants/Apartment-Plants/Xanthosoma-brasiliense-Desf.-Engl/73352/.
In our lists it may appeared listed as 'Taro leaves, shoots' rather than common spinach.
(book2)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, May 2, 2010, 5:03am; Reply: 468
Malanga, Tannier, Xanthosoma
and
Taro leaves, shoots

wish I knew the difference :-/
Posted by: Cristina, Sunday, May 2, 2010, 8:09am; Reply: 469
Reply 449 in this thread helps a little bit.  I tried to post as many official explanations and photos as possible about the different ones I could think of then ...  Nothing beats seeing them all in person to grasp the differences.  I personally have not seen all the varieties, and I am a bit scared of trying them out (with the issue of the crystal toxicity!!  Well, I am glad I have plenty other options to indulge my taste buds with  ;D ;D ;) :)
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, May 3, 2010, 12:09am; Reply: 470
Research on Sardines:

This is a very good link explaining the different varieties and genera of the Sardines: Atlantic, Pacific and others:

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-xpress/m-1253837147/

Got to compare this with Typebase info.  You are welcome to jump on this research too!  :) :)(book2)
Posted by: DenverFoodie, Monday, May 3, 2010, 3:54am; Reply: 471
Research on Kiwi Fruit:

Is There Any Difference Except the Color?

Kiwi not only comes in the familiar bright green variety, but also a sunny golden color. They both look about the same outside, with a fuzzy brown skin. Cut open, you can see the difference, but is the color the only
thing that separates the two? No, the green and golden kiwi taste different, and have a slightly different texture. They were developed for agricultural production at different times.

Kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) is more properly called Kiwifruit to distinguish it from the New Zealand bird, but most American's simply call it Kiwi. It is also known as the Chinese Gooseberry. That name reflects its botanical origins, as its seeds were collected in 1904 by Isabel Fraser in the upper regions of the Yangtze River in southern China.1 Fraser was on vacation from teaching school in New Zealand, and returned home with the Kiwi seeds which propagated, and gave birth to an entire industry. Until very recently all commercially produced Kiwi came from vines grown from that original stock of seeds.

The familiar green variety, whose name is "Hayward," was developed in 1924 in New Zealand. In 1940 commercial growing and marketing of the fruit began. In the 1970's they began to be grown in California and are now commonly available in the United States. Currently, Italy is the largest producer of Kiwi in the world, followed by New Zealand, Chile, France, Greece, the United States, Portugal and Spain. 2

The golden "Chinabelle" is a more recent cultivar that took eleven years to develop. Some unusual kiwi fruits from China were discovered with small yellow fruits, and these were hybridized with the green variety. This was accomplished by the New Zealand Crown Research Institute.

Outside, you can tell the two varieties apart if you pay attention. Both are about the size of a large hen's egg with brown skin. The green kiwi is slightly fuzzier, and symmetrically oval. The golden kiwi has a smoother skin and a small nub or point on one end.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, May 3, 2010, 5:01am; Reply: 472
Purple Kiwis are also available in some places (with smooth or hairy skin).
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, May 3, 2010, 8:11pm; Reply: 473
Quoted from Vicki
Dead mold or live mold - the same effect when eaten?

Here's some guidelines for mold on different types of foods:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/molds_on_food/


Thought this info will be handy to have in this thread, Good spot Vicki!!!
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, May 28, 2010, 3:08am; Reply: 474
Quoted from Jenny
Symbi's question..........Haven't seen any pimentos around except ground up in paprika, where did you see those?  Would like to try them and notice they are neutral for all types unlike capsicums..........................................................................

I see them in a big store in Canberra called SupaBarn, but even though i know they are pimentos by the appearance, they are generically labelled capsicum. Years ago I used to see them in a health food store with the same mistaken identification, so just for fun you might consider doing a "food crawl" around all your local fresh food outlets. Once you have found the genuine article you will always know them by appearance. Few people outside our select group will see the need to label them correctly, so we just need to be independent of their mistaken labels. ;)


You were right Jenny, to keep those peepers open and look around.   :o I found some pimentos in Woolworths!!!  They are sold in a pack of four under the name Capsicum Baby Red 250g (wee little things - used two in stir fry last night).  
They taste sweet like paprika unsurprisingly and didn't give me the burps which other capsicums do!   (neutral on my SWAMI)  :)


Posted by: Symbi, Monday, June 21, 2010, 12:10am; Reply: 475
On the forum lately there was talk of the dirty dozen.  That is, not the excellent movie, the vegetables and fruits that are most likely to be contaminated with chemicals that you're recommended to buy organic.  Not all of us can afford organic all the time.   :(

Here's a summary of the list for the USA:  http://focusorganic.com/produce-dirty-dozen-and-clean-fifteen-updated/?utm_source=feedburner
and a more detailed explanation for each dirty food why: http://alexandermorentin.com/food-matters/the-dirty-dozen-top-12-foods-to-buy-organic/

Contamination may be different in your country.  Found this list for Australia, it is similar to the USA one, but I notice a diamond food Carrots is cleaner than in the USA  :)
http://www.btoxicfree.com/healthy%20eating.htm  (Scroll down to Level of pesticides in fruit and vegetables / chemicals in food).  

Tried organic celery and was amazed how yummy  :D.  Maybe I could taste the pesticides on the dirty ones all along.  Guess the bugs find celery tasty too.
Posted by: Patrick H, Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 9:29pm; Reply: 476
How about white tea?

Less fluoride + caffeine :)
Posted by: Patrick H, Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 9:30pm; Reply: 477
It would be nice if it could be added. Just to be sure.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 9:40pm; Reply: 478
a search on white tea
http://www.google.com/custom?q=white+tea&cof=AH%3Acenter%3BAWFID%3A4452213b291e6613%3B&domains=dadamo.com&sitesearch=dadamo.com
Posted by: Cleo, Thursday, January 26, 2012, 12:08am; Reply: 479
I am still waiting for my Sec. Status but I learned I was a Warrior. Will my Sec. status change my food list? My other question is I can't understand the food combination schedule at the end of the SWAMI report.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, January 26, 2012, 2:30am; Reply: 480
Quoted from Cleo
Will my Sec. status change my food list?

My other question is I can't understand the food combination schedule at the end of the SWAMI report.

It is possible that the food list will change some with the secretor test input.

I assume you are talking about the Genoharmonic combination table...  If so, the text describes what this list of Genoharmonic combinations will do, if utilized.  To utilize them, choose a food from the left column and then pair it with one or more foods from the list to the immediate right in the table.  The start rating tells you how strong combinations using that food are...

I hope this clears up the confusion somewhat...
Posted by: C_Sharp, Thursday, January 26, 2012, 2:32am; Reply: 481
Quoted from Cleo
I am still waiting for my Sec. Status but I learned I was a Warrior. Will my Sec. status change my food list?


Some--If you want to know how much run SWAMI with it set to nonsecretor and compare the food lists.

Quoted Text
My other question is I can't understand the food combination schedule at the end of the SWAMI report.



For the Geno-harmonic combinations: For the food listed on left select one or more of the foods listed on the right. You do not need to do all of the ones on the right at the same time. You do not have to combine foods that would not normally be eaten together just because the computer lists them.
Posted by: Cleo, Saturday, January 28, 2012, 5:41am; Reply: 482
Thank you AB Joe and C_Sharp. I need to know if there are foods on the food list that might help control my appetite. I am a bread/Pasta lover. I love Italian food and found a way to create you own white pasta sauce, lol.
Posted by: Cleo, Saturday, January 28, 2012, 5:53am; Reply: 483
I need to ask; how did you receive your Sec. Status results? Do they mail them or e-mail them?
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, January 28, 2012, 6:19am; Reply: 484
Quoted from Cleo
I need to ask; how did you receive your Sec. Status results? Do they mail them or e-mail them?

I got mine electronically...  I think I logged into their site to read the results, although they may have mailed them as well...

I think it is a choice you can make when you fill out the paperwork with the test...
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, January 28, 2012, 6:22am; Reply: 485
Quoted from Cleo
I need to know if there are foods on the food list that might help control my appetite. I am a bread/Pasta lover. I love Italian food and found a way to create you own white pasta sauce, lol.

Eat more protein and vegetables with less carbohydrates is often a way to balance your diet.  Of course, the only idea is that you say you love bread and pasta, so I'm guessing that you may be eating too much of them. ;)   ;D
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, January 28, 2012, 6:29am; Reply: 486
Saliva secretor results are posted at:

https://www.gdx.net/secure/nap/nap.html
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, December 5, 2012, 3:29am; Reply: 487
Not sure if this is the right place to post -

Calling all Aussies!

They have Spelt Pasta now in Woolworths!  
It's San Remo, available in Spirals or Spaghetti, cost $3.98 for 250g.  
That 'aint cheap but I'm sure it will be worth it!  :D

It's imported from Italy.  Aka in Italian "Farina di Farro Integrale"  
I've looked near and Farro for it!  Where have you been all my life?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, December 5, 2012, 2:26pm; Reply: 488
Symbi- you might want to re-post that information in a fresh post, so the information is easier to find.
Posted by: Kath5yDE, Saturday, March 15, 2014, 6:31am; Reply: 489
I will shortly.
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