Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  What's so bad about genetically modified food?
Posted by: Gale D., Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 6:34pm
I understand what it means to our world when a single company wipes out use of different seed types and wants farmers to all plant a single, non-viable seed -- all for profit.

But I don't really understand how genetically modified food is bad for our health.

Without going into the political side of things, can someone with medical knowledge explain the reasons why we should avoid GMO's?

I'm thinking that if Dr. D. analyzes a GMO in the same way he does all foods, he will be able to tell us definitively whether it is OK to eat.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 6:41pm; Reply: 1
gm is done with precisely those lectins Dr D has advised us to avoid due to inflammation and other issues, leading in most cases to pathology.....

I recommend you first read erfyt and then continue with lrfyt, both great reads, setting the solid foundation of his BTD science.
Posted by: DoS, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 6:55pm; Reply: 2
There are a lot of reasons. Sometimes GMO's have been modified to have different bacterias or other chemicals naturally produced. I think you can guess the problem with that one.

Look up bioavailability. If bugs and what not can not digest or benefit from GMO stuff when modified to fend them off how can we?

If you want to apply physics how about for every action there is an equal but different reaction. There for for every bit of energy put into the qualities of GMO stuff there can be a retraction in other qualities in the same plant as well.

Have you tried any GMO food lately? It taste horrible. I think that should be a big enough indicator alone. Our bodies are pretty good at discerning those things sometimes.

Even without the details I think it is pretty easy to reason out - based on a couple simple conceptual ideas - how it could be bad. Statistically speaking it is obviously bad.

Perhaps you should considering reading some Michael Pollan books. They have a lot of interesting great information about many things. You could also check out "The World According To Monsanto"
Posted by: Gale D., Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 7:12pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Lola
gm is done with precisely those lectins Dr D has advised us to avoid due to inflammation and other issues, leading in most cases to pathology.....

I recommend you first read erfyt and then continue with lrfyt, both great reads, setting the solid foundation of his BTD science.


I purchased either ER4YT or LR4YT last year and read it several times (I've loaned it out so can't recall which book it is). I don't recall anything specific about GMOs, so I'll have to re-read it if I can remember who I loaned it to!

So... lectins, which we know are bad, are used in the process of creating a GMO, thereby rendering the resulting food negative for all Genotypes?
Posted by: Lloyd, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 7:58pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Gale D.




So... lectins, which we know are bad, are used in the process of creating a GMO, thereby rendering the resulting food negative for all Genotypes?


The resulting food would contain the bad lectin, etc. There are numerous other arguments for avoiding GMO's that do not rely on BTD reasoning.
Posted by: wag, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 10:26pm; Reply: 5
Also, we have co-evolved with certain plants for thousands of years to be able to metabolize them and their toxins.  It's why panda bears can eat bamboo leaves and we can't.  The fact that this is a slow process is thought to act as a check on the plant's safety and palatability.  When GMO proponents point out that we have been selectively breeding plants for millenia, they are totally right, but this is not the same as making sweeping changes to an organism without it having to pass the test of time.  Since expert advice is going to conflict about this, how about running a simple test on yourself?  How does it make you feel if you eat a bunch of GM vs. non-GM foods?  If you don't notice a difference after a couple of weeks, then who cares whether someone else says it is good or bad.

Disclosure:  I am very anti-GMO, after noticing that my "corn allergy" disappeared when I went to the south of Mexico, where they were using heirloom seeds.  I was very angry that Western medical practitioners placed the blame on my body, rather than the science experiment that is our industrialized food system.
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 10:54pm; Reply: 6
Lola, could you mail Dr. D some non-GMO, non-hybridized, non-everything, pure, old-line corn?  Maybe the status would be different.  I've wondered about blue corn.  My mom's allergist told her long ago that she could have blue corn but not yellow or white.  We started making blue corn bread and such.  
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:18pm; Reply: 7

Quoted Text
I don't recall anything specific about GMOs, so I'll have to re-read it

I thought you had not yet read all of Dr D s books......

it s about the lectin issue he mentions in general, not about GM....we all know it is not a good choice....

I m glad you ve read the books! :)
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:21pm; Reply: 8
wag,
You can help the other members of the forum help you by choosing a blood type shield to display beneath your name.

how to
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-ref/m-1219018887/

Welcome!
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 12:30am; Reply: 9
here Gale
http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Genetically_modified_food

use the search feature for more on GMO

like this old thread
http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archived/config.pl?read=123995
Posted by: AKArtlover, Thursday, April 25, 2013, 9:13pm; Reply: 10
Pulling a thread from the past. I think this is probably a good use of biotech- gene transfer from the same species to resist a weed with another of it's kind that's locally adapted. Still not sure about the lectin issues, but it seems much more conservative and wise to me than some of the things they are doing. http://www.worldfoodprize.org/en/laureates/20002009_laureates/2009_ejeta/
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, April 25, 2013, 9:26pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from wag


Disclosure:  I am very anti-GMO, after noticing that my "corn allergy" disappeared when I went to the south of Mexico, where they were using heirloom seeds.  

I was very angry that Western medical practitioners placed the blame on my body, rather than the science experiment that is our industrialized food system.



Perfectly summarizes my thoughts on this subject.

Posted by: Amazone I., Friday, April 26, 2013, 11:43am; Reply: 12
if you compare wheat of todays and wheat of some 40-60 years back... you see the difference..today it contains muchmore gluten (glue..glue...ten ;-)  ) and its plant
aminoacids don't fit at all almost with btO !
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, April 26, 2013, 1:00pm; Reply: 13
But the higher-protein wheats of today were produced through hybridization; the same kind of agricultural techniques that have been used for thousands of years. GMO is when scientists take DNA from one species and insert it into the cells of another. They don't even have to be related species- they've put eel genes in fish and human genes in rice! That's a far cry from taking two wheat plants (that just happen to have  grown with a lot of protein in them) and pollinating them together to try and breed an even higher-protein crop.

There's nothing fundamentally unsafe about GMO technology. But there's nothing fundamentally safe about it either. I'm sure that, of the hundreds of  GMO species out there, a few may actually be perfectly safe to eat. But the problem is that  GMO seeds are considered "the same thing" under United States law, which means that careful safety testing of each and every GMO variety is not being done.

Heirloom seeds have stood the safety test of time. Hybrid plants may be less nutritious than their parent plants,  but they're still the same species and are subject to natural laws. GMO technology bypasses these natural laws and creates things that simply couldn't have developed in nature. Then these plants are not tested for safety before being  fed to people or animals. Some of these plants MIGHT be safe- but others have been shown to cause cancer, infertility, and other ailments. Since they're not being tested individually, I'm doing everything in my power to avoid consuming any GMO food. The potentially safe ones are lumped in with the very-likely-dangerous ones.

Some GMO plants are designed to withstand heavy pesticide applications. These may or may not be safe to eat "as is" but they're usually grown with heavy amounts of pesticides, leaving heavy pesticide residues in the foods. Other GMO crops are designed to have pesticides "built in" and not need the outside application of pesticides- these  contain harmful pesticides in the very DNA of the plants. Human bodies are not THAT different  from insect bodies- what poisons them will poison us as well.

In theory, plants that have been genetically engineered to be drought resistant (but not with built in pesticides or pesticide resistant) shouldn't be unsafe to eat- but they have not been studied for safety. Most GMO plants actually use a lot more water than their conventional counterparts. GMO technology is NOT needed to feed the world.
Posted by: Amazone I., Friday, April 26, 2013, 8:31pm; Reply: 14
sorry to interfere here about wheat production.. r.girl do you really think that happens likewise ??) ;)... at the very first beginning yep I agree but later no... not here in Switzerland and thus they do also with mais products...as Lola mentioned with Monsanto.. but Switzerland isn't EU so far Monsanto got ...p..off ;) ;D... (smarty)(clap)(dance)coz of ch-laws  :D ;D(sunny) but perhaps might it be also a question of time and money over the accounter until ch-laws will ceed ??) !  :X
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, April 26, 2013, 8:43pm; Reply: 15
I'm doing everything in my power to avoid the use of GMO foods. I'm politically active on facebook- signing petitions, emailing legislatures and food companies, and posting on food company's facebook pages. I also  buy only GMO-free foods for my family. If something "might be GMO, might not be" I won't buy it- although I will use up what I purchased before I realized that.

While it's theoretically possible for some GMOs to be safe, the testing isn't being done and I won't risk my health or the health of my family. I can't, however, control what my kids buy on their own with their own money away from home.
Posted by: Eric, Saturday, April 27, 2013, 12:32am; Reply: 16
This is a great question.  As far as I can tell, the lectin crossbreeding issue is more speculative than verified.  Anyone have evidence of a specific case, or is it just a "what if"?
Posted by: D.L., Saturday, April 27, 2013, 2:34pm; Reply: 17
One of the problems with GE or GM foods concerns people with severe food allergies. BTW - Dr. Mercola has an interesting article today entitled "GE Trees May Be Even More Damaging to the Environment than GE Foods".
Posted by: D.L., Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 7:17pm; Reply: 18
Dr. Mercola has an article today on why GM corn is even worse than people thought.
Print page generated: Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 3:15pm