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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Gluten Sensitive?
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Posted by: l3asu, Thursday, August 27, 2009, 11:50pm
Are you wheat gluten sensitive? and if so how do you get your grains in this wheat gluten saturated world?
Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, August 27, 2009, 11:58pm; Reply: 1
Eating compliantly with the grains that I can have on GTD.  Basmati rice, quinoa, amaranth, millet.   And always, always checking the labels in this wheat gluten/sugar/corn/pork saturated world.

Debra :)
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, August 28, 2009, 12:05am; Reply: 2
I don't eat a lot of grains.  Rice, quinoa, amaranth, millet and buckwheat would be my
options when I do eat them.

It goes beyond wheat gluten.  Gluten is found in barley, rye, spelt, kamut, and oats although not really considered a gluten grain often are cross contaminated by gluten..

There are gluten free oats, but not all gluten intolerant individuals tolerate oats at all.

And then of course, you can use almond flour...any nut flour or compliant bean flour
in recipes.
Posted by: Chandon, Friday, August 28, 2009, 12:46am; Reply: 3
I have been gluten free for 4 years. I find it makes life easier in a way by eliminating a lot of food I could be eating that would be fattening anyway! I guess the BTD and GTD do that too. I eat rice, quinoa, wild rice, buckwheat, and amaranth and keep a wide range of different flours in my freezer to use. I used to eat a lot of popcorn, but it is a toxin on my SWAMI. I had a feeling it wasn't that great for me. We can also eat millet, although I don't tend to eat that. Things like beans, lentils, and peas are a really good option, plus root vegetables that are compliant. I haven't been eating oats, but I bought some gluten free oats to try out.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, August 28, 2009, 12:47am; Reply: 4
I make this type bread using my grains, seeds, legumes.....even sprouted if I feel like it
focaccia
http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/breads/r/flaxbasicfoc.htm

I do not use as many eggs though
Posted by: Roxanne, Friday, August 28, 2009, 1:34am; Reply: 5
I have only become gluten sensitive in the last few month.  Hoping when I have been on the diet for a while I won't be anymore.  I'm not getting a lot of grain, usually just with my cereal in the morning, occasionally I have peanut butter on gluten free bread.
Posted by: Plucky, Friday, August 28, 2009, 1:38am; Reply: 6
I pretty much just stick with rice, rice, and more rice.  Basmati rice, cream of rice, rice flour...  If I go out to eat I usually choose TexMex type food, since the corn doesn't bother me as long as I don't eat it very often.  I eat lots of black beans (almost every day, made into chili).  And when I feel like having a treat I make brownies with almond meal.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, August 28, 2009, 5:42am; Reply: 7
I use very little grain- a few servings pr week.
I am NOT a real Coelic but I do get sensitive if I eat too much spelt.
I tend to eat a  little ( less than one serving pr day ) oats, quinoa , millet and rice during the week- and then a little spelt based stuf in the weekend.
That is a  good balance for me.
I just eat veggies in stead of bread
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, August 28, 2009, 2:24pm; Reply: 8
Job's tears and quinoa for the most part. My SWAMI has me on very low grains with extra fiber from vegetables (live foods). Rice when eating out, as the best of what's available, if I have grain at all.
Posted by: RedLilac, Friday, August 28, 2009, 3:58pm; Reply: 9
The only grain I am truly sensitive to is corn.  I get stuffed up for 3 days and my face gets puffy. :-/

I love rice and always had since I was a kid.  That is my grain of choice and the one I eat every day. :D

At home for noodles and bread I use spelt.

When out & about, white bread doesn’t give my any negative reactions.  I stay away from whole wheat, mixed grains, and rye.  I can eat the standard Semolina noodles when I’m out without any negative effects.

I also eat millet, quinoa & oats.

I’m one of the lucky ones, I guess, except for that awful dreaded corn.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Friday, August 28, 2009, 4:11pm; Reply: 10
I voted yes, because of the white lines on my fingers. I have a lot of white lines and do my best to keep all grains including wheat at a minimun. My older sister has been tested and she shows sensitivity.


If I eat grains, I try to limit them to rice, brown being the best choice. I'm finding that I don't care for white rice as much anymore. Will occasionally have oatmeal and corn. Corn is not exactly good for me as an A nonnie, but found that it is better for me than wheat.
Posted by: Brighid45, Friday, August 28, 2009, 4:57pm; Reply: 11
I keep my consumption of grains to a bare minimum--mostly rice, gluten-free oats, amaranth, quinoa and millet, as well as the occasional slice of ezekiel bread--and eat the food plan as presented for Os in the BTD Arthritis book.

I try to stay away from processed foods of all kinds, and cook 99% of everything from scratch. Eating out is limited to three or four times a year, and I try to go to places where it's possible to get some kind of meal that's semi-compliant.

Reading labels is an absolute necessity. Any time I haven't done it, problems ensue.

It can be tough living in a world full of industrialized, adulterated food choices. You have to be patient, smart and willing to be inconvenienced to get what you want, but it's well worth it in the long run. I would NEVER go back to the way I used to eat. I love the BTD way too much to ever return to the SAD now! :)
Posted by: proto, Saturday, August 29, 2009, 7:48am; Reply: 12
I used to be sensitive to corn when I was on BTD but now it seems to be spelt and rye that I have to keep to a minimum. So if I want bread that will be my portion of spelt either that or some hard to find gluten free crumble-at-a-touch-thing only good enough for salad. I can make some porridge out of teff, quinoa, millet or buckwheat no problem. Occasionally some oats too. They have a technique how to make a decent sandwich from oats that doesn't crumble intolerably.
The symptoms I have had are bloating and nocturnal nausea - I wake up having to through up. Happens pretty rarely but I associate it having too much spelt or rye. So voted yes. Can't have any wheat at all as I get some instant reaction. My blood was screened for celiac some five years ago but that didn't lead into anything but I guess I didn't have much gluten at that time. Maybe some rye.
Oh yes I can have rice of any variety once a day.
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, August 30, 2009, 5:14pm; Reply: 13
Proto, how do you do with flax?  I bet you could make something non-crumbly-at-a-touch if you use a mix or rice, flax and oat flour.  

Have you tried this?

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1163

My little Explorer loves carob cake with almond butter spread on it.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, August 31, 2009, 3:10pm; Reply: 14
I also eat very few grains. I do have some rice and quinioa and cook with rice flour (sometimes with quinoa flakes mixed in.) I've  been meaning to try millet as well, but I haven't done so yet.

Since I'm not sure which of my kids are Os and which of my kids are Bs, I've decided not to introduce rye or buckwheat, as those wouldn't be good for the Bs. There are enough grains that are safe for both Os and Bs so I serve those to my family.

I've tried the GF oats in the past and I did NOT do well on them. I may try rye in the future (just for myself, for when the kids eat spelt challah) but for now I'm sticking with a gluten free diet.
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Monday, August 31, 2009, 3:44pm; Reply: 15
I'm not celiac, but don't do well with grains. At first I thought that Os could eat rye & oats, but they don't do well. SWAMI says no to them!
I eat rice, but have to be careful or I get cravings!  I should join the "No Grain Girls," but find a few portions a week are about right.
Posted by: proto, Monday, August 31, 2009, 7:21pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Ribbit
Proto, how do you do with flax?
Fine, but I think flax is an avoid for Explorers. Camelina would be better but it's a bit hard to get. Has probably too strong taste for a cake but I kind of like it. Must try it if I get my hands on it some time.
Posted by: Gale D., Monday, August 31, 2009, 7:34pm; Reply: 17
I have no idea if I am gluten-sensitive.

How does "gluten-sensitivity" feel? What are the symptoms?
Posted by: Lola, Monday, August 31, 2009, 8:15pm; Reply: 18
it varies depending on the individual....
use the search feature on the website main page....
read about other G Sensitive people s experiences and symptoms.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, August 31, 2009, 9:19pm; Reply: 19
Oh, no, is flax really an avoid for Explorers?!  I didn't realize that.  *sigh*  I should go back and review the list.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, August 31, 2009, 9:39pm; Reply: 20
I was happy to get it back in my swami! ;)
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 9:32pm; Reply: 21
I've been baking with it because I thought it was something we could all have.  I may have to go back to baking two batches of things again. *sigh*
Posted by: Gale D., Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 9:46pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Ribbit
Proto, how do you do with flax?  I bet you could make something non-crumbly-at-a-touch if you use a mix or rice, flax and oat flour.  

Have you tried this?

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1163


I want to copy that Recipe, but it doesn't continue with directions after "stir altogether quickly".

How long does it bake, and at what temp?

Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 12:46am; Reply: 23
Yeah, I'm sorry about that.  Somebody else pointed that out to me, but all my recipes are still packed from our recent move so I can't go edit it and make sure I have it correct.

I bake it at 350 till it's done, which kind of depends on what size/depth pan you use.  You know, 20-30 min. ....or if you're making muffins, about 15-18 min.  Just keep an eye on it.  It's worth making.  I do it in a bundt cake pan.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 2:47am; Reply: 24
I added that to your recipe..... :)
Posted by: Sharon, Friday, September 4, 2009, 9:26pm; Reply: 25
I get stuffed up if I eat wheat but I am very satisfied with my substitution foods.  It's a blessing in disguise to be wheat/gluten sensitive because it forces me to be creative with vegetables.  I eat sweet potatoes, rice, rice cakes, oats, quinoa, and amaranth.  
Posted by: Chandon, Friday, September 4, 2009, 10:46pm; Reply: 26
I was being the optimist and tried out gluten-free oats this week only to find that the nerves in my feet and hands were affected. Oh well, I do find I have plenty of other grains to eat.
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 1:26am; Reply: 27
Thanks Ribbit for the recipee, and Lola for fixing it. I'm printing it off and will try it out soon.  Can't wait to try the carob cake and almond butter combo, sounds beautylicious!  :) :D

I think I am gluten sensitive, but can't really tell since I have too much acid in my stomach quite often and get burning stomach after wholemeal bread (not eating that any more).  Since cutting down on wheat, doing explorer diet and adopting a more alkaline diet has cooincided it's hard to tell whether gluten was the problem.  

I will find out in the next few months with a colonoscopy I'm on a public waiting list for (so I'm still eating a small bit of bread / wheat and still having infrequent gastronomical problems).  Will vote when I know for sure!  
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 4:11am; Reply: 28
keep us posted! :)
Posted by: wildanimal1986, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 7:00pm; Reply: 29
WOW! Gluten is so dangerous! When i was eating gluten, i noticed that i was having paranoid, gone crazier, panic&anxiety disorder and rage.. I didnt know what's wrong with me.. And I found out that Psychotic disorder and paranoid has been linked to Wheat Gluten or Gluten. I stopped eating it and I am feeling better and peaceful alittle bit. But Pizza is my favorite! I can't eat it anymore I am sad :(. So watch out for Wheat Gluten or Gluten foods!
Posted by: Chandon, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 10:21pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Symbi
I think I am gluten sensitive, but can't really tell since I have too much acid in my stomach quite often and get burning stomach after wholemeal bread (not eating that any more).  Since cutting down on wheat, doing explorer diet and adopting a more alkaline diet has cooincided it's hard to tell whether gluten was the problem.  

I will find out in the next few months with a colonoscopy I'm on a public waiting list for (so I'm still eating a small bit of bread / wheat and still having infrequent gastronomical problems).  Will vote when I know for sure!  


A colonoscopy is not the way to get a biopsy for celiac disease, that is done through an endoscopy, via the stomach, since celiac disease affects the small intestines.

Posted by: Chandon, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 10:24pm; Reply: 31
Some people find out using blood tests, but you need to be eating a diet with plenty of gluten for months before the blood tests. Also, if you wait a few months while eating little gluten to get a biopsy, your intestines could begin to heal. Timing is important! Basically, you have to eat a "regular" not restricted diet to get meaningful results. The only exception is the stool test, which can be sensitive for a number of months after one reduces gluten in the diet. There is some controversy over this test though.
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 10:35pm; Reply: 32
Hi Chandon, Thanks for the advice.  I'm having a endoscopy as well to check out my acid reflux and stomach problems at the same time (sorry forgot to put that!).  

Thanks for confirming, I've still been eating small amounts of wheat to ensure that any problem with it will show.  I can up that when they set the date a month ahead probably.  White bread seems easier for me than wholemeal, so maybe it's a histone problem?  Been enjoying spelt bread as well (has lower amounts of gluten and some people that can't handle wheat germ aggluten can eat this ancient grain instead).  Have no burning or usual wheat effects after eating that!  :)

The blood test you are referring to is that an allergy test or for antibodies?  I've had the anti-gliandin antibodies and it was negative.  Apparently only 50% of celiacs are positive in that test.
Posted by: Chandon, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 10:42pm; Reply: 33
I never tested positive to the blood test. The first time, I was following the A diet and eating spelt and thus less gluten in general. The second time, I had stopped eating gluten for a few weeks except the most minute amounts before the test. Since my results were not low at all, maybe they would have been high if I were eating a lot of gluten. I don't know if eating gluten for a month will be enough to get conclusive results from the biopsy since you body could begin healing while eating less.

The clinical results of my not eating gluten were so dramatic, in terms of my nerves healing, that my doctor was sold on my essentially having celiac disease. She said that for some people it can take years of biopsies to finally get a positive one, so she didn't feel that going through that was necessary for me, nor getting the stool test, since the results would not affect my choice of what I was going to do, as I already knew I had to avoid all gluten. Even small amounts will affect my nerves.

Here is the link for the stool test: https://www.enterolab.com/Home.htm

I know that the regular medical community is not very supportive of this type of testing.
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 17, 2009, 11:45pm; Reply: 34
Great website thanks Chandon, the FAQ is enlightening.  So they test the stools for malabsorption?  That makes sense to me, why it wouldn't to the medical community is hard to fathom.  Maybe it's too cheap and easy?!  Interesting what it says about going dairy free and wheat free, that many people with gluten intolerance / celiac also have problems with proteins in dairy like casein and those with autoimmune problems especially arthritis should avoid those as well as nightshades.  Reminds me of someone..

I was amazed to see that according to that site "at least 81% of America is genetically predisposed to gluten sensitivity"   :o
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 12:56am; Reply: 35
Quoted Text
White bread seems easier for me than wholemeal,


lectins in many grains are contained in the seed coat
gluten and WGA are contained in whole wheat, and meal.
so no wonder white seems easier ;)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 18, 2009, 1:27am; Reply: 36
Quoted Text
The clinical results of my not eating gluten were so dramatic, in terms of my nerves healing

http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/personalized-medicine/?blog=24
scroll down to
Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets
Posted by: footprints, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 2:20am; Reply: 37
Hello,
I have a celiac disorder myself and I am glad I am not alone in this world of gluten intolerant folks, just wish their was a support group in my area where we could talk about our disorders, on the other hand, I was just thinking I might just start one on my own, Might not be a bad idea.
Anyway, off the record here, What is everyone's opinion about eating from canned foods? I will not eat from a can whatsoever, First of all, the can itself is made from metal and aluminum and aluminum can lead to alzheimers and other health issues. I do care about my health and would rather make my own soup from scratch and eat fresh foods, veggies and the like. I would rather eat fresh frozen veggies and steam them to keep the nutritional content in them, and I just love fresh pineapple and try to get that when I can. Further more, the metal and aluminum can leach into the food in the can and cause problems in the body when digested.
And since I have a gluten disorder, the ingredients in the canned soups, I cannot tolerate, they have regular salt which is high in content at times, and they have autolyzed yeast extract and I am trying to stay away from since I had a candida yeast issue at one time. Anyway, I know that Dr. D'Adamo highly advises that Type A's get their foods as fresh as possible, and whole is probably best if you can do that. I know that canned foods are not fresh, far from it.
So, if you have an opinion about this would really welcome your comments.
Thanks and God bless,
Footprints.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 7:21am; Reply: 38
there s nothing canned down here that does not contain citric acid as conservative. :X

hope you find better options
Posted by: Amazone I., Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 7:29am; Reply: 39
often we can see a gliadin & gluten sensitivity or intolerance in patients and here the culprit always is wheat..... :P
Posted by: Chandon, Friday, October 23, 2009, 3:12am; Reply: 40
Quoted from footprints
Hello,

Anyway, off the record here, What is everyone's opinion about eating from canned foods? I will not eat from a can whatsoever, First of all, the can itself is made from metal and aluminum and aluminum can lead to alzheimers and other health issues. I do care about my health and would rather make my own soup from scratch and eat fresh foods, veggies and the like. .


I agree. I'd rather not use canned foods, but I do sometimes have canned beans. I should take the time to cook beans myself more often. I tend to make just about everything myself, except for a few foods. It may be time consuming, but it really is gratifying. As for vegetables, I eat mainly fresh ones, but I buy some frozen ones and some include those with whatever lunch I am bringing to work. I have bad associations with canned vegetables from when I was growing up.

Posted by: colojd, Friday, October 23, 2009, 3:08pm; Reply: 41
My son, also a type B, used to get stomach and bowel movement problems and then after reading some of the information with the Eat Right, then we tried spelt. His problems disappeared quickly. We ended up buying a grain mill and the spelt grain and ground our own flour (cheaper overall than buying those little bags). My husband (an O) was raised on white pasta and bread, so he didn't understand how something that could be "comfort food" could be hard on your system. But once we began trying spelt, he had no problem with it. He still occasionally needs his white pasta, but overall we avoid white flour products.

Our son is now 18 and is at college, so eating through a cafeteria poses some challenges, but he said overall he has found in the last couple of years that he can eat some wheat products without problems.

The theory on problems with wheat is that it has been bred over the years to be nothing like its ancient ancestor. The plant specialists wanted to make a wheat high in protein, so that it could feed hungry nations by just using a grain. A worthy concept but I guess the protein overload in these developed grains is what causes our tummy aches.

Regarding corn, there is a lot of it out there that is the genetically modified grain, and the word is that this will evetually cause a lot of health problems eating these, among them lots of allergies that develop when you eat them. So you might want to try eating corn where the label says non-GMO and then see if you feel the same as with eating regular corn. You can find the non-GMO at a lot of the health food stores and some of the bigger chain food stores now.
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, October 23, 2009, 3:11pm; Reply: 42
I'm not horribly opposed to foods in cans....but all canned food I buy is organic and
maybe things like sardines/tuna/salmon that are kept for pantry items in case I don't
have access to fresher options.  I did find a flaked salmon packaged in one of those foil packs..and I switched to that...but my priority is usually to find the healthiest food source possible and I do try to eat more fresh than prepared foods.  I do use canned beans when
I don't have time to soak and buy many frozen vegetables for convenience.

That's my experience too, Chandon -- the canned vegetables when I was growing up.  I'm older than you and as I think back to going to the supermarket with my mother, there were so few fresh vegetables available when I was a child....lettuce, carrots, onions, celery and not much else and I never ever heard of or saw broccoli or cauliflower as a fresh vegetable until I was an adult.

As a kid, I ate canned string beans, peas and carrots, corn asparagus and beets.  Now that think back on it -- "ICK"....that was simply disgusting~  :)
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 3:33am; Reply: 43
Footprints and all - Reading a book about womens problems, it said that xenoestrogens are contained in the plastic lining they line SOME cans with.  So you may not have to worry about the metals, but plastic that you didn't even know was there!  Yuck!  

Quoted Text
Canned Foods

Two Spanish Scientists at the University of Granada decided to investigate the plastic coatings that manufacturers use to line the metal cans. The coating is added to avoid the metallic taste of metal in the food from the cans. These linings are present in about 85% of the cans. Fatima Olea and Nicolas Olea, an M.D., specializing in endocrine cancers worked with Soto and Sonnenschein. In a study analyzing twenty brands of canned foods purchased in the United States and in Spain, they discovered bisphenol-A, the same chemical that the Stanford researchers discovered, in about half of the canned food up to levels of 80 parts per billion. This is 27 times greater concentration of bisphenol-A needed to cause the breast cancer cells to proliferate in the Stanford Study.
from http://www.endo101.com/xeno.htm
Posted by: footprints, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 4:44am; Reply: 44
8) Hello Gee Whiz and Chandon,
     Thank you so much for your replies, I just think that fresher is much better than canned. Chandon, I was not aware of the study that the plactics lined insides cans pose a health hazard to women's health, you mentioned it was in some of the cans, well since I don't know which cans are lined and which aren't, I think I will just stick to eating fresh foods  and not eat canned ones.
    I do take time to make my own soup,(chicken and rice pasta soup). I use organic chicken broth, better for me, can use vegetable  broth if you like, and heat it for awhile, then I add some dill weed, a little grated lemon to enhance taste, shredded fresh carrots, and then add my pasta and cook it until tender, and finally add my chicken. usually get the kind that is all natual with no artificial ingredients.(chicken tenders). It is really good and homemade. I also take the time to soak and cook my own white beans, sometimes cook black beans too, but can be messy if you soak them in a pyrox(spelling, but you catch the drift) container. I make enough to put in the freezer and have for a leftover meal. They are really good made with  shredded carrots and the dill weed. So, I have learned to cook my own meals practically since I have the celiac disorder and have been trying to stick to the BTD.
As to women that used to can their own foods many years ago, remember they canned using the old mason jars, and stored then in the pantry for later use for their meals. Many people back then also grew their own vegetation, fruits and veggies, so they were smart and practical, did not have to worry about the pesticdes and herbicides that were sprayed on them They also got their eggs from the chicken coups that the chicken laid. So, no wonder times were a lot easier and better back then, look what we have to deal with nowadays.
Everyone take care and stay well,
Footprints.
Posted by: Symbi, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 9:31am; Reply: 45
Yum, Footprints your homemade soup sounds wonderful.  Just a bit of planning ahead and work and it's all worth it hey!  
Yeah I agree, the modern world is not what it's cracked up to be.  Though we have an advantage in education and information.  Funny enough we're learning the old ways were the best mostly!  :)

The Xenoestrogens aren't good for men either they say, causes breast enlargement, lower sperm counts. :P
Posted by: paul clucas, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 11:51pm; Reply: 46
It's true Ghee.

I have been told by a compounding pharmacist that the variable part of the xeno-estrogens are the part that binds to the estogen receptor in the body.  Xeno-estrogens have a warped “key”, so when they combine with the body's “lock” they get jammed in there.  The body is then convinced that there is more estrogen then there really is, since the release from the receptor cannot happen.  

Cholesterol is the base hormone from which all other hormone that the body produces are derived.  Hormones are converted from their precursor hormones.  Often there are more than one precursor, and often a hormone is a precursor to more than one other.  An imbalance in an one point will force a compensating response.  Think of it as a river delta; as one channel gets blocked the pressure will force open other channels to compensate.

Getting rid of the xeno's and finding therapeutic help to clear the stuck estrogen receptors is the best direction.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 25, 2009, 7:00am; Reply: 47
much like insulin receptors as well.....
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Sunday, October 25, 2009, 12:32pm; Reply: 48
Getting back on topic, I had to stop eating wheat again. The indigestion is just too much. I have acid reflux and heart burn, and burning when I eat wheat..and the other day I had some oats and they bothered me a little.  :-/ :(  So I'm back off wheat now. I've already dropped weight. I should have no problem now losing the extra weight.   Right now all I  can tolerate is small amounts of brown rice.  
Posted by: Chandon, Saturday, November 7, 2009, 3:03am; Reply: 49
I found a gluten free bar that is very low in sugars and it is perfect with my SWAMI. It is the Oskri Jalow Almond Cranberry bar (there are other flavors too. It even has buckwheat and amaranth plus a little puffed rice and is just 150 calories.
Posted by: footprints, Tuesday, November 10, 2009, 3:38am; Reply: 50
Hi Mayflowers,
In case you don't know, I have also been following a pH diet as well, but the BTD combines and concerns itself with this as well, but I printed out a pH diet some time back, and according to it, it says that wheat  is acidic, which is also true for type A's as well, I believe. Which is why you are probably having difficulties with the wheat. I have a celiac disorder and found out since last year and have disposed of eating it since, even eating a small amount can cause a problem with me, I think I may have a enzyme deficiency, since I get at times this horrible nausea feeling, I feel that if I had some ipecac on hand, and took it and help me to vomit, I think I would just feel better, it would  help empty my stomach of some icky stuff.
I feel as tho my celiac disorder has been brought on by other things that I may have had going on, this did not happen overnight, it was a long time coming. I just have to learn to adjust my diet, & try to heal myself naturally which is the way to go. The body has a miracuously way of healing itself only if we allow itself to.
Well, take care and be in good health,
Fotprints. 8) 8)    
Posted by: diffy, Tuesday, November 10, 2009, 3:52am; Reply: 51
I was diagnosed via stool test by Enterolab, about 4 years ago. It's truly been a blessing in disguise! I had been breaking out in rashes and hives and none of the 4 dermatologists were able to figure it out, they just kept prescribing creams....
I've been rash- and hives-free ever since.
Recently, I was on Synthroid for about four months and developed excruciating stomach aches. I said to my doc that I'll bet there's gluten in there. He checked into it and lo and behold Synthroid does contain gluten. At the same time he checked my blood for the anti-gliadin antibodies and they were slightly elevated, compared to the blood that was tested four months before...
Posted by: Cristina, Tuesday, November 10, 2009, 4:00am; Reply: 52
Quoted from footprints
...
As to women that used to can their own foods many years ago, remember they canned using the old mason jars, and stored then in the pantry for later use for their meals. Many people back then also grew their own vegetation, fruits and veggies, so they were smart and practical, did not have to worry about the pesticdes and herbicides that were sprayed on them They also got their eggs from the chicken coups that the chicken laid. So, no wonder times were a lot easier and better back then, look what we have to deal with nowadays.
Everyone take care and stay well,
Footprints.

I did not know you went to my grandma's ...   :) ;D
Posted by: cajun, Friday, July 9, 2010, 4:43am; Reply: 53
I am following a gluten AND yeast free diet...55 days today! I feel great...other than my chronic sinus/allergy/asthma condition. The diet has helped slightly.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, July 9, 2010, 5:30am; Reply: 54
http://www.sott.net/articles/show/205205
Posted by: 10111 (Guest), Friday, July 9, 2010, 5:51am; Reply: 55
Quoted from Lola


Thanks for the link...great article...It is good gluten sensitivity has become main stream...but too late for some.

After I was diagnosed with celiac disease I read what I could find and realized it can be hereditary.  My mother had had digestive issues as long as I knew her and then developed severe rheumatoid arthritis.  I realized she probably had gluten problems and tried repeatedly to get her tested or at
least try a few days gluten free.  My family just thought I was nuts and she didn't want to put up with their giving her grief over listening to me.  She was never tested and died 07/07/07.  

Posted by: Lola, Friday, July 9, 2010, 6:01am; Reply: 56
so sad to hear about your mom!

glad you know better!
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Friday, July 9, 2010, 7:57am; Reply: 57
99 % celiac as the pahologist who studied my jejunuscopy told and wrote.  Till three years old  I had always loose stools and after terrible colds and sinusitis till grown up. I had tonsil surgery at 5 years to attend better school and after always also strong eye allergy. Gluten free and  cow milk free 99 % better , Thanks Dr D, thanks BTD and BTD!
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, July 9, 2010, 8:19am; Reply: 58
yet it is in our Swami lists, in some cases as beneficial food, are we forgetting individuality?  ;) :o ??) :)
Posted by: 10111 (Guest), Friday, July 9, 2010, 8:49am; Reply: 59
Quoted from Maria Giovanna
99 % celiac as the pahologist who studied my jejunuscopy told and wrote.  Till three years old  I had always loose stools and after terrible colds and sinusitis till grown up. I had tonsil surgery at 5 years to attend better school and after always also strong eye allergy. Glkute free cow milk free 99 % better , Thanks Dr D, thanks BTD and BTD!


I have read that Italy tests all children for celiac disease before they enter school? Is that not true?
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Friday, July 9, 2010, 9:37am; Reply: 60
did not know any  chance of it, our italian diet is wheat based three times a day. I had a well known allergologist missing the celiac connection I was suggesting her in a good hospital  and in one of the better units!
So the diagnosis of celiac disease is suggested by very updated and smart pediatricians from 1968/70 and I was already 8/ 9 yeas old.  I was diagnosed by my second request 40 years old.  The founder of http://www.celiac.com waited 20 years to know better also in USA. Now in Italy there is a chance of gluten free meals in most of the schools canteens, but with ubiquitous corn for the benefit of O and B celiacs !  A rant should be in order...
Also some reastaurants are reaching out with celiac or wheat free recipes, not in the pastry or cakes matter.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, July 9, 2010, 4:00pm; Reply: 61
we are talking GE extraordinaire here!!! ;)
Posted by: cajun, Friday, July 9, 2010, 9:43pm; Reply: 62
Bongiorno Maria Giovanna,

I noticed we are the same blood type and secretor status. I, too, had my tonsils removed very young and have suffered with sinus allergies most of my life. My ND thinks I may have celiac disease due to a strong sensitivity to wheat and yeast. I have no other symptoms, though. Do you eat any form of yeast or foods containing yeast?

Grazi,
Cajun
Posted by: cajun, Friday, July 9, 2010, 9:46pm; Reply: 63
Thanks for the great link, Lola! :)
Posted by: Cristina, Friday, July 9, 2010, 10:04pm; Reply: 64
Ok, now I am starting to wonder, for those of us who are not gluten sensitive, or at least do not know we are yet, what is the good of eating gluten food? what are the benefits?  why include them in our lists at all?  ??)
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Friday, July 9, 2010, 10:18pm; Reply: 65
Hi Cajun, I do not  avoid yeast  and gluten free bread.  I eat seldom this but do not have problems with brewer yeast or any similar ingredient. Also candida has nothing to do with this kind of yeasts or mushrooms, which are not fungi. I must really avoid gluten plus dairy , this knock out  my immunological defenses and otitis, sinusitis and lot of inflamation. I avoid nearly at all common sugar  and all sweeteners if not a little of honey and black strap molass.  My eye allergy improved 99 % avoiding gluten and cow milk, not so my nose. However I do not need antibiotics and inhalation, just saline spray solution or neti pot. Hope it helps ! Maria Giovanna
Posted by: AKArtlover, Friday, July 9, 2010, 10:23pm; Reply: 66
I am still a little fuzzy, but I think the benefit from wheat may not be from gluten but WGA (wheat germ agglutinin). There is a lot on this lectin on this site, search WGA. I still don't have a clear picture of these two in my mind.

That's my guess on Dr. D's reasoning.

Wheat has some addictive properties. Chemical but probably also psychological. Also linked with sugar so sometimes hard to sort out. Cake, donuts, bread, etc. Pavlov, my mouth still waters.  ;)
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, July 10, 2010, 6:34am; Reply: 67
Quoted from Cristina
Ok, now I am starting to wonder, for those of us who are not gluten sensitive, or at least do not know we are yet, what is the good of eating gluten food? what are the benefits?  why include them in our lists at all?  ??)
I went looking for an answer to that question & in the process learnt some very interesting things re gluten sensitivity & celiac disease... Seems there is a skin version of celiacs ::) Could it be that I have it??!! However I am certainly not going to subject myself to the horrors, pain & torment of going back on a gluten diet just to find out ::)
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-gluten.htm   Seems you need to read for the bottom of the page, up... as in starting from post 1 (naturally)
This link uncovers a fascinating theory that the original harvesting of wheat, as per Biblical instructions separated the chaff from the grain, which doesn't always happen these days... In light of that, it is therefore interesting to also note that celiacs is a fairly recent development... There could well be a connection eh?
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, July 10, 2010, 6:49am; Reply: 68
in the allergies book, wheat gets bumped down, no worries.....

don t forget, not everyone is allergic.
to each their own issue. :)
Posted by: AKArtlover, Saturday, July 10, 2010, 1:06pm; Reply: 69
Yeah, I think the question she was asking is "why eat a certain food" versus why you shouldn't eat a certain food- what is beneficial about it? Most would answer taste or texture, I would think.

But dopamine is powerful and a hidden payoff. The protein in wheat isn't digestable by anyone but it can get through the gut and attach in other parts of the body. I used to get a wheat brain fog. I am wondering if the sprouting changes the digestability of the protein or actually changes the form of the protein from the other threads.

I like to think about if something is difficult to give up for people-- why? We have so many alternatives. Why consistently pick one over the others? Still, that hardwiring is there for me even though I have overcome the behavior. Interesting.
Posted by: cajun, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 12:06am; Reply: 70
Thank you for your reply, Maria!
I am pretty sure I am not suffering from celiac disease.
I do know that when I eat wheat OR yeast OR too much cheese....I cough/spit/blow nose, etc! Gagging and congestion follows, so.....No More Wheat or Yeast for me! ;)
I am able to eat very small tastes of compliant cheese once a week....yeah! :)  
Posted by: christaalyssaA+, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 10:16am; Reply: 71
Just realized myself how gluten intolerant I am. *pout* I've easily cut out meat, dairy and my other avoids. But for me... I just love bread. I worked as a bread baker one summer and really enjoyed it. I got 10 dollar worth of bread everyday to take home.

So now I need to actually cut out gluten from my diet completely and I need to start excising more. Instead of just calling a walk through the mall and grocery store exercise. lol I figure since I'm carrying my son the whole time it can be called a work out. haha
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 10:19am; Reply: 72
Quoted from christaalyssaA+
Just realized myself how gluten intolerant I am. *pout* I've easily cut out meat, dairy and my other avoids. But for me... I just love bread. I worked as a bread baker one summer and really enjoyed it. I got 10 dollar worth of bread everyday to take home.
Lucky your aren't still working there??!! Free food is hard to resist - unless I know it is gonna do me a lot of harm - which come to think of it, is most free/cheap stuff ::)

Posted by: cajun, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 4:36pm; Reply: 73
Christaalyssa, I hear you loud and clear! I LOVE good bread! That was the most difficult task for me on the BT diet! :-/ It is getting easier but I do still have temptations!  I just remind myself how congested/coughing/mucousy I get after eating it! :P
I think walking and carrying a child definitely constitutes exercise!  ;)
Posted by: christaalyssaA+, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 6:34pm; Reply: 74
The sad thing is I have kept trying to fool myself and tell myself that a little wheat wouldn't hurt me. I've been buying some amazing gluten free pasta and switching a few of the bigger things, It's just the cutting it out completely that is the more difficult part of it. And it also doesn't help that I make amazing cookies, pastries and breads! It's my last big hurdle! But I'm doing it. I'm too stubborn not to.
Posted by: Lin, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 7:28pm; Reply: 75
christaalyssa, you have my sympathy, when I first found out I was gluten sensitive I had a good cry, but over the years it has gotten easier and easier, so much good gluten free stuff now.  You'll find yourself feeling healthier and feel the rewards.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, 9:41pm; Reply: 76
Do you need to be 100% gluten free, or can you bake with spelt flour?

You can still do lots of baking even with GF flours. In a couple of years, you can have a lot of fun baking with your son (and even sooner than that, you can bake sweets that he can eat.)
Posted by: christaalyssaA+, Thursday, August 5, 2010, 4:08am; Reply: 77
That's true Ruthie. I need to stop being such an "all or nothing" type of person. I think that's one of my worst flaws. It might also be one of my best flaws though.

I used rice flour on my tofu and fried it up today. It was really good. I'm just going to have to get more creative. The thing about gluten is that because it is bad for me I also have a chemical addiction to it. I crave it! lol So whatever I make that will be non gluten will just not have the same "chemical addictive joy" to it. Which is a good thing. But I'm just going to miss it... for a short while and than I'll get over it.
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