Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Race/Ethnicity
Posted by: veewhee, Friday, August 21, 2009, 10:51am
I was just reading LR4YT, and I was thinking, since blood type determines so much about our bodies, what about our ethinicities/race? There must be some foods that are more generally beneficial or allergic for a certain race. Over the years with what traditional cuisine includes in each country or culture, I was wondering if our bodies have sort of changed and tailored to them?
Posted by: Dr. D, Friday, August 21, 2009, 11:56am; Reply: 1
It is a addressed a little in ER4YT and a lot in GTD.
Posted by: Katsy, Friday, August 21, 2009, 12:52pm; Reply: 2
It may also be that certain foods became prominent in ethnic diets because people in those locales could tolerate them or thrive on them. Or simply that people who couldn't thrive on the diets either didn't live to reproduce or were sicker and produced less well offspring who likewise died out; and those that were already intrinsically tolerant of the diet could have lots of children and be in great health. It would only take a generation or two for this to be seen, with every successive generation becoming even more strongly adapted to the local diet. And people who couldn't make it on that diet may have been impelled to leave the region to find foods more fit for them. Something like this is likely what caused the change in skin color we see -- darker-skinned people may have not been able to tolerate the low-light regions of the Northern Hemisphere, so either died out (diseased with rickets, for example, or some other disease related to not enough Vitamin D) or migrated south, while lighter-skinned people may not have been able to tolerate the high-sun regions of the equator and died at a higher rate of skin cancer. Those who could tolerate the more extreme levels of sunlight, either high or low, would live to pass on their genes.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, August 21, 2009, 11:43pm; Reply: 3
take corn for instance, in America, north, central and south!

not a good choice.... ;)
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2009/08/10/types-o-b-ab-and-corn?blog=27
Posted by: veewhee, Saturday, August 22, 2009, 12:28am; Reply: 4
Yup. Interesting indeed. I also heard some articles saying how Japanese used to have the longest lives until recently they have adapted more of a "western" diet and started eating more meat based and more dairy and their cancer rates are soaring up.

But corn's definitely a good example. I needa work harder to avoid them!
Posted by: Katsy, Saturday, August 22, 2009, 12:30am; Reply: 5
Quoted from Lola
take corn for instance, in America, north, central and south!


Oh, this reminded me of something I saw a few years ago on some TV show like Dateline NBC or something. Basically, an ethnic American Indian had adopted the Standard American Diet, and was rapidly losing health and even became diabetic (or perhaps pre-diabetic), and finally went back onto the traditional Native American diet of his people (along with the rest of his family, who were all suffering ill effects from the SAD), and his health turned around, particularly the diabetes went away. I'm not sure what tribe he was from, nor what his "native" diet was, but I'm sure it didn't include processed "foods"! :)
Posted by: RedLilac, Saturday, August 22, 2009, 4:06pm; Reply: 6
If you are lucky enough to have only one or two nationalities in your ancestry, then following your Great Grandparents diet might be a wise thing to do.  But if you are like me (6 different) and my son (8 nationalities), it is not very accurate.  Swami is the way to go for mutts like us.  Still I find myself wondering where I get my tastes from.  
Posted by: Katsy, Saturday, August 22, 2009, 7:26pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from RedLilac
If you are lucky enough to have only one or two nationalities in your ancestry, then following your Great Grandparents diet might be a wise thing to do.  But if you are like me (6 different) and my son (8 nationalities), it is not very accurate.  Swami is the way to go for mutts like us.  Still I find myself wondering where I get my tastes from.  


Yep. My dad was full-blooded Dutch; but my mom is anyone's guess. They've researched ancestry on both sides of her family, but haven't gotten very far with her mom's side. We seem to be a "truly" American family -- i.e., a melting pot of many different ethnicities.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, August 22, 2009, 7:57pm; Reply: 8
Well I have always wondered why I needed so much omega 3 from fish,
why dairy was a VERY good choise for me
- now I know why:
My ancestors where dependent on fish = high omega 3 - they didnīt eat much emoga 3 from plant sources
and most of my ancestors where used to losts of dairy
and the beauty of it
- while I tested gatherer - my swami reflects it
lots of fish and dairy  :D
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, August 22, 2009, 8:25pm; Reply: 9
My great-grandparents ate a lot of pork and corn.  American heritage.   ;)  I'd have to go back a lot further to get out of the country.  We've been here on both sides of the family since the Revolution.
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, August 23, 2009, 2:19pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Ribbit
My great-grandparents ate a lot of pork and corn.  American heritage.   ;)  I'd have to go back a lot further to get out of the country.  We've been here on both sides of the family since the Revolution.


I have ancestors that arrived in America from 1635 to the late 1880ís.  My uncle who died at 91 & the one who lived to 103 ate pork all their lives while my aunt on the other side who lived to 103 never ate pork.  I donít buy it for my home or order it in a restaurant, but if Iím at a dinner or party, then Iíll indulge.  Last night I was at a pig roast.  I could not resist.  It was delicious.  But corn, no way, I know Iíll suffer from that!
Print page generated: Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 12:56pm