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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Would Ghee Equate Coconut Oil In Health Benefits
Posted by: HJ, Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 8:15pm
I was reading on the net about the health benefits of coconut oil for treating health issues like candida, parasites,dry skin and hair, eczema and leaky gut etc.and also has MCT's for super energy but it's an avoid for Type-O's and so i started researching ghee/butter and i see it has many of the same benefits and so i was wondering if adding it to my diet would be like having coconut oil and it's health benefits.

Thankyou!
HJ
Posted by: DoS, Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 10:43pm; Reply: 1
They both have some very good - for intestines - short fatty acid chains. I am sure Ghee could do a lot for you.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, August 6, 2009, 2:19am; Reply: 2
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?2
neutral for you as far as I can tell! ;)
Posted by: Amazone I., Thursday, August 6, 2009, 7:22am; Reply: 3
I remember that somebody once wrote about using coconutoil would give inflammations  in arteries and veins....::) :-/....hhmmm.....(think)....
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, August 6, 2009, 2:47pm; Reply: 4
coconut oil and ghee are slightly different in their fatty acid profile.

Coconut oil contains medium chain fatty acids such as lauric (C-12), caprylic (C-10) and myristic (C-14) acids. Of these three, coconut oil contains 40% lauric acid, which has the greater anti-viral activity of these three fatty acids. Lauric acid is so disease fighting that it is present in breast milk. The body converts lauric acid to a fatty acid derivative (monolaurin), which is the substance that protects infants from viral, bacterial or protozoal infections. This was recognized and reported in 1966 (Jon Kabara). Work by Hierholzer and Kabara (1982) showed that monolaurin has virucidal effects on RNA and DNA viruses, which are surrounded by a lipid membrane. In addition to these RNA and DNA viruses, in 1978, Kabara and others reported that certain medium chain fatty acids, such as lauric acid have adverse effects on other pathogenic microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast and fungi. These fatty acids and their derivatives actually disrupt the lipid membranes of the organisms and thus inactivate them (Isaacs and Thormar 1991; Isaacs et al. 1992). This deactivation process also occurs in human and bovine milk when fatty acids are added to them (Isaacs et al. 1991).

Fats can be sorted into two major categories: saturated and unsaturated. Saturated fats can further be divided into long-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Long-chain fatty acids (most animal fats) cannot be completely metabolized by the body and can lead to cancer and blood clots. Short-chain fatty acids, on the other hand, are assimilated and metabolized so that they release energy.

Unsaturated fats can be further categorized into two kinds: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Monounsaturated fats, like olive oil, are healthy, while polyunsaturated fats are not. The latter become oxidized and create free radicals, which damage the cells of the body. Most vegetable oils such as sunflower, safflower, corn and soy belong to this category.

To these four naturally occurring fats, modern technology added hydrogenated fats e.g. margarine, which contains trans-fatty acids that also increase free radical production and LDL cholesterol.

So where does ghee stand in the battle of good versus bad fats? Most of ghee's saturated fats are short-chain fatty acids, which makes it easily digestible. It also contains up to 27% monounsaturated fatty acids and only 4-5% polyunsaturated fatty acids. Since our body needs both saturated and unsaturated fats this combination is close to ideal. Ghee's rate of absorption is 96%, the highest of all oils and fats.
Posted by: HJ, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 12:54am; Reply: 5
O.k. i see what i did wrong and that was i misread as i saw coconut meat as an avoid as i thought that was also for the oil also but lola pointed that out for me and so i can have ghee and also coconut oil but not coconut meat.

Thanks for your answers and helping me out here  :)

P.S. Chloe, thanks so much for taking the time to type out all the differences of the fatty acids as that was really informative  :)
Posted by: 11227 (Guest), Monday, February 14, 2011, 6:53pm; Reply: 6
The book also says avoid cocoanut oil.  Are there other sources for MCT"s?
Posted by: Lola, Monday, February 14, 2011, 8:19pm; Reply: 7
welcome! ;)

try googling sources of MCT, and compare to your list

which book are you referring to?
different issues, different variables, different GTs different Bts, all need to be computed in order to get an individualized value for food.

swami does all this for you
all you need to do is input the data asked of you, and you re off to a good start
http://www.dadamo.com/clinic/swamigenotype.htm
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 8:58pm; Reply: 8
I think I may start making my own ghee, have accepted I will never be able to use coconut oil.  There are actually CO/nausea threads on forums all over the net.  
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 10:07pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from 14442
I think I may start making my own ghee, have accepted I will never be able to use coconut oil.

Sahara, have you ever tried this company's organic ghee from grass-fed cows?


They also have some very tasty spiced ghees.

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 5:08pm; Reply: 10
In BTD (blood type diet) coconut oil is neutral for O non-secretors (nonnies) and "avoid" for everybody else. In GTD (gentoype diet) coconut oil is neutral for Hunters, a diamond superfood for Nomads and Teachers, and is a black dot (eat occasionally in tiny amounts) for Gatherers. It's an avoid for Warriors and Explorers. This means that, on GTD, O nonnies might not be able to eat coconut oil, and other blood types might be able to do so.

SWAMI is a computer program that computes an individualized food list that  blends GTD and BTD values, along with your health history. Coconut oil can wind up being any rating (diamond superfood, superfood, neutral, black dot, or avoid) for just about any blood type.

If you're truly missing coconut oil, you may want to look into GTD or SWAMI. OTOH, if you feel that you want to stick with BTD for now and keep things simpler, then coconut oil needs to be avoided for the time being (except for O nonnies.)
Posted by: 14442 (Guest), Thursday, May 24, 2012, 2:47pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Conor

Sahara, have you ever tried this company's organic ghee from grass-fed cows?


They also have some very tasty spiced ghees.



I use grass fed butter and buy my ghee at the co-op in the jar.  Pretty sure it's high quality.  I think I need to start making my own, it's not that hard to do.
Had ghee yesterday in my tea, totally recommend.
http://en.17u.com/article/show_237.html
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, May 24, 2012, 6:49pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from 14442

Had ghee yesterday in my tea, totally recommend.
http://en.17u.com/article/show_237.html


This reminds me of Tsampa - tea with yak butter (or ghee) and roasted barley.  Quite a staple in parts of Tibet.
Posted by: arinehartdc, Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 4:58pm; Reply: 13
Both are great for cooking, coconut oil is going to offer more benefit of the medium chain saturated triglycerides which as most seem to know has distinct metabolic properties than other fats, particularly the immune supportive benefits when converted to the medium chain monoglycerides. Ccoonut oil may also have a little bit of an edge when it comes to cooking. Ghee is actually pretty high in oleic acid, which although has healthy properties, is not as stable under heat as the fats found in coconut. I don't like to make statements of one being 'better' than the other...they both play awesome roles in health so my answer would be to find ways to appreciate both in your lifestyle.
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 5:36pm; Reply: 14
I go by my SWAMI.  Ghee rates as a diamond....Coconut oil, neutral.  EVOO, diamond.  I cook eggs in
a mixture of EVOO/ghee and sometimes EVOO/coconut oil.  To get a good mix of essential fatty acids, I always rotate all my SWAMI fats and oils.  They all serve different purposes in our bodies. One is only better than another if you're deficient.
Posted by: santina, Sunday, May 11, 2014, 4:42pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Chloe
coconut oil and ghee are slightly different in their fatty acid profile.

Coconut oil contains medium chain fatty acids such as lauric (C-12), caprylic (C-10) and myristic (C-14) acids. Of these three, coconut oil contains 40% lauric acid, which has the greater anti-viral activity of these three fatty acids. Lauric acid is so disease fighting that it is present in breast milk. The body converts lauric acid to a fatty acid derivative (monolaurin), which is the substance that protects infants from viral, bacterial or protozoal infections. This was recognized and reported in 1966 (Jon Kabara). Work by Hierholzer and Kabara (1982) showed that monolaurin has virucidal effects on RNA and DNA viruses, which are surrounded by a lipid membrane. In addition to these RNA and DNA viruses, in 1978, Kabara and others reported that certain medium chain fatty acids, such as lauric acid have adverse effects on other pathogenic microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast and fungi. These fatty acids and their derivatives actually disrupt the lipid membranes of the organisms and thus inactivate them (Isaacs and Thormar 1991; Isaacs et al. 1992). This deactivation process also occurs in human and bovine milk when fatty acids are added to them (Isaacs et al. 1991).

Fats can be sorted into two major categories: saturated and unsaturated. Saturated fats can further be divided into long-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Long-chain fatty acids (most animal fats) cannot be completely metabolized by the body and can lead to cancer and blood clots. Short-chain fatty acids, on the other hand, are assimilated and metabolized so that they release energy.

Unsaturated fats can be further categorized into two kinds: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Monounsaturated fats, like olive oil, are healthy, while polyunsaturated fats are not. The latter become oxidized and create free radicals, which damage the cells of the body. Most vegetable oils such as sunflower, safflower, corn and soy belong to this category.

To these four naturally occurring fats, modern technology added hydrogenated fats e.g. margarine, which contains trans-fatty acids that also increase free radical production and LDL cholesterol.

So where does ghee stand in the battle of good versus bad fats? Most of ghee's saturated fats are short-chain fatty acids, which makes it easily digestible. It also contains up to 27% monounsaturated fatty acids and only 4-5% polyunsaturated fatty acids. Since our body needs both saturated and unsaturated fats this combination is close to ideal. Ghee's rate of absorption is 96%, the highest of all oils and fats.


are these infos meant to be the same as far as i use these oils "raw" or are related also to the "cooking version"?
anyway thank you so much, very interesting post
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, May 11, 2014, 5:32pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from santina


are these infos meant to be the same as far as i use these oils "raw" or are related also to the "cooking version"?
anyway thank you so much, very interesting post


Not sure I understand your question....It's basically stating the fatty acid profile differences between ghee and coconut oil....There is no such thing as a cooking version of ghee or coconut oil.  Ghee cannot be raw even if it came from a raw source of milk which was churned into
raw butter butter because the process in creating ghee is cooking the butter so butter oil remains while milk solids are removed. So all ghee has been cooked.  Coconut oil can be raw but the fatty acid profile wouldn't change if you cooked with it. These are just two different foods with different fatty acid profiles and if SWAMI lists them as beneficial for you, best is to rotate them so you get the benefits of both.

Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, May 11, 2014, 8:15pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from arinehartdc
Both are great for cooking, coconut oil is going to offer more benefit of the medium chain saturated triglycerides which as most seem to know has distinct metabolic properties than other fats, particularly the immune supportive benefits when converted to the medium chain monoglycerides. Ccoonut oil may also have a little bit of an edge when it comes to cooking. Ghee is actually pretty high in oleic acid, which although has healthy properties, is not as stable under heat as the fats found in coconut. I don't like to make statements of one being 'better' than the other...they both play awesome roles in health so my answer would be to find ways to appreciate both in your lifestyle.

The major difference between coconut oil and ghee from a blood type perspective is that ghee assists intestinal healing in all types, while some individuals do not handle the "soapy" component of coconut oil in the bile duct (liver)...
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Monday, May 12, 2014, 12:20am; Reply: 18
Ghee is so much more than most people realise.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, May 12, 2014, 4:38am; Reply: 19
welcome arinehartdc :)
Posted by: santina, Monday, May 12, 2014, 12:02pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Chloe


Not sure I understand your question....It's basically stating the fatty acid profile differences between ghee and coconut oil....There is no such thing as a cooking version of ghee or coconut oil.  Ghee cannot be raw even if it came from a raw source of milk which was churned into
raw butter butter because the process in creating ghee is cooking the butter so butter oil remains while milk solids are removed. So all ghee has been cooked.  Coconut oil can be raw but the fatty acid profile wouldn't change if you cooked with it. These are just two different foods with different fatty acid profiles and if SWAMI lists them as beneficial for you, best is to rotate them so you get the benefits of both.



thank you so much.
i didn't even thing that cannot be "raw ghee" as such because it is already cooked as well!! :o :osorry, sometimes i'm so much "in tune" only with olive oil...... every  other fat or oil for me is almost new----a new challenge to cope with ;D ;D ;D---but i love it, thanks swami i'm now using a lot of new foods that i've never even bought before :)
Posted by: susanC, Monday, May 12, 2014, 3:45pm; Reply: 21
That too Santina is what I love about SWAMI.  I am eating such a greater variety of food now--especially with the geno-harmonic.
Posted by: santina, Monday, May 12, 2014, 4:23pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from susanC
That too Santina is what I love about SWAMI.  I am eating such a greater variety of food now--especially with the geno-harmonic.


i use the geno-harmonic pretty much every day, Susan!!it's a great teacher
Posted by: misspudding, Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 1:37am; Reply: 23
Is ghee still okay if someone has a documented food sensitivity to dairy and has an autoimmune condition? My son has a IgG reaction to dairy and nothing else. He has always tolerated butter, but was just diagnosed with IBD, and I am hoping to avoid provoking his condition. I know ghee would be helpful, but have a bit of food PTSD related to his situation... ??)
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 6:25am; Reply: 24
Quoted from misspudding
Is ghee still okay if someone has a documented food sensitivity to dairy and has an autoimmune condition? My son has a IgG reaction to dairy and nothing else. He has always tolerated butter, but was just diagnosed with IBD, and I am hoping to avoid provoking his condition. I know ghee would be helpful, but have a bit of food PTSD related to his situation... ??)


This was answered to the best of my knowledge in the other thread where you asked it:
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1399931155/s-10/#num10
Posted by: misspudding, Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 6:24pm; Reply: 25
Yup. Still going to try it and see if it helps! Thanks!
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