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Posted by: Sharon, Thursday, July 23, 2009, 6:04pm
I recently saw a quote here that said something like, "It takes Non-secretors twice as long to get half as much done." I'm a non-secretor who has issues with time.  I'm curious if any one has any insights. Sometimes I feel like there is not enough time in the day even if I have nothing to do.  Then there are other times when there is too much time in the day.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, July 23, 2009, 6:45pm; Reply: 1
I'm not sure how to answer that (besides not knowing my secretor status.)

Time doesn't always "fly" and it doesn't always "drag" either. It depends so much on what's happening, my general energy level, etc.

When I'm feeling good, time tends to fly. When I'm exhausted, it tends to drag.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, July 23, 2009, 7:19pm; Reply: 2
Time flies!  And I try and always stay conscious so that I am not wasting a moment of it.  For this reason, I have never liked to nap during the day.  :-)
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Thursday, July 23, 2009, 7:40pm; Reply: 3
Time flies and its waste is a sad event some times we cannot avoid, I always want to do more than I can really, but I adapt that this is inherent to life. I am an A secretor Teacher.
Posted by: jeanb, Thursday, July 23, 2009, 9:44pm; Reply: 4
I think some of what you are asking is a Myers Briggs question for J's and P's.  I am an ENTJ nonnie, and I think I control time in a weird way. (yes, the Fieldmarshall is coming out of me on this one)   In other words, I generally can pack a lot in one day and follow my schedule relentlessly.  When I look up and it is time to go home, I am usually very surprised, but I know I have put in a productive day and not allowed it to be wasted.

In the big scheme of things, I can't believe I am 49.  I have so much left to do, so I sure hope I have at least 40 more productive years left!!!!
Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, July 24, 2009, 3:00am; Reply: 5
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I'm not sure how to answer that (besides not knowing my secretor status.)

Time doesn't always "fly" and it doesn't always "drag" either. It depends so much on what's happening, my general energy level, etc.

When I'm feeling good, time tends to fly. When I'm exhausted, it tends to drag.

I agree completely.  I would add that mindfulness plays a key role in how we perceive time.  If we're spacing out (as i used to do after a bowl of pasta) then time will seem to fly.  But if we focus on the here and now, there is plenty of time in which to live.
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, July 24, 2009, 12:47pm; Reply: 6
I have no concept of time and it's always driven those around me (especially my mom and teachers) nuts.  It takes a tremendous amount of concentration to take into consideration time when I'm doing something.  I used to wear a watch so I could make people happy by being on time, but as I've gotten older I've realized all it's really done is stressed me out so much it's all I could think about.  I don't wear a watch anymore.  I'm on time to things like appointments, but anything past that, I don't much care anymore.  If we eat dinner at 5:30 one night and 7 the next, nobody cares except my super-scheduled friends who think I'm doing myself and my family a disservice by being "inconsistent."  Oh, for goodness' sakes.  Get a life.  Being a mommy has helped me relax and realize that, unlike when I was in school, my life does not--and cannot--revolve around the clock.  I'm so clueless.  And it doesn't really bother me much anymore.

I think if there were such thing as a double nonnie, I'd be one.

Time and time again, I have had well-meaning people try to "help" me by making a daily/weekly schedule.  At this time, you do this.  On this day, you do this.  It drove me insane!  I could never stay on top of it all, and I felt like I was back in school:  "Hurry up, Leanne.  You're late.  Faster, Leanne, you're falling behind.  Come on, Leanne, you're slowing down everybody else."  It's all I ever heard in school because I really was the slow one.  I walked slowly, I talked slowly, I thought slowly (thanks, in part, to wheat-brain fog), and I was always behind.  By 6th grade I was so slow that every Friday when we took our 20-question math test, I was given a special assignment of doing only every other problem.  By the end of the hour, I might have finished 4 or 5.  I'd have to come back after school and finish the rest.  I could usually concentrate better when I was the only one sitting there, but even then, it might take me two more hours to finish my 10 problems.

At least I type fast.  lol

I have to say that my hatred of time has dissipated somewhat since being on the BTD because my brain has cleared up considerably.  The spinning fogginess is more under control.  I know it sounds inconsistent to say my brain would spin, and then say my thoughts were slow.  But that's the way it was.  It would take me a long time to pull something out of the fog because it took a lot of concentration to slow down the spinning enough to verbalize it coherently.

I think quickly now, thanks to my diet, but I still don't do well under pressure.  If somebody tells me to hurry up, I get very flustered as if I were back in school.  When I try to follow somebody's schedule suggestion, I get weepy and sweaty and frantic as if I were back in school.  I do much better doing things when I get to them (or when they need doing) rather than "because the clock said it was time."  That's one of the dumbest reasons I've ever heard of.  Just being entirely honest here, from the viewpoint of an Extreme Nonnie.  I think moving to the country will help even more.  Moving day is this coming Wednesday!!!  Being in the middle of the city, all I see around me is hurry, hurry, drive faster, move out of the way, quick, quick, gotta run, swirling, frantic, speeding crazies on too much caffeine and sugar, wondering if their car clock is ahead of their work/home clock, mad people waiting in line.....and I need to get away from it all.  I need the peace of the woods.  I need the quiet of my own thoughts and the breeze through my okra patch.  I need to be able to send my children outside by themselves...."Here, you go catch a lizard, and you go catch a dragonfly.  Don't come back till you've finished your assignment.  Oh, and here's a tent."  Ha.  Just kidding.

And there's your bit of insight today into the brain of a learning disabled, dyslexic, ADD adult.  
Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, July 24, 2009, 7:09pm; Reply: 7
Well written, Ribbit.  You don't have a blog, do you?
Posted by: Plucky, Friday, July 24, 2009, 8:43pm; Reply: 8
For me, the passage of time seems to be relative to the activity level of what's going on around me.  If there's a lot of activity going on, I'm like the energizer bunny on steroids, seemingly able to manufacture time to get enormous amounts of things done, and the time passes quickly.  With no movement or noise, I turn into a slug and time drags and just gets frittered away, with me accomplishing absolutely nothing.  Amazingly enough, I'm most efficient when I'm chasing 6 to 10 kids around all day; time flies and everything gets done.  But when all is quiet in the house I can't seems to get myself moving and the day drags on and on.  And while I function best with a lot of activity going on around me, I get flustered and drained when I'm around a large amount of people, like going grocery shopping on a Saturday afternoon.  

I'm not sure if it's an ADD thing or that I'm just hard-wired for multi-tasking, but I have a really hard time sticking to one task at a time.  I hop from thing to thing to thing, wondering if I'm ever going to get anything finished, but then it all comes together in the end.  The more things I have going at once the more time I seem to have, but the faster it seems to go.  I've been told I'd be more efficient if I'd slow down and finish one thing at a time, but I just can't seem to do it.

I've tried making lists and schedules to try and be organized, but it just never works.  I can't even make a grocery list, because if I do I only buy the things on the list and I don't think to put half the things I need on it in the first place.  I have to shop early on a Sunday morning, the only time I have available when there's hardly anyone in the store, and go up and down the aisles to come home with what I need.  Laundry, general housework, yardwork, etc, get done when they need it, but I really need to put certain things on a calendar or time gets so far away from me that I forget they need doing, like cleaning the furnace filters, fertilizing the grass, or putting chemicals in the hot tub.  

I'm a person who thrives on routines, but hates to have her time scheduled. I'm always on time for things, but hate to have appointments in the first place, especially things like dentist appointments that have to be scheduled months in advance.  I work best under pressure, when I'm not given time to think about things or stress out over them, and if I don't have a bunch of kiddos running around I'd better have some lively music playing.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, July 25, 2009, 1:36am; Reply: 9
Quoted Text
I think if there were such thing as a double nonnie, I'd be one.


;)you ve found yourself such a club here among us, the LDNs!!
Posted by: Amazone I., Saturday, July 25, 2009, 7:34am; Reply: 10
royals...yep...time flies.....lurking around and I have to acknowledge...I'll be 52 soon ... :P :o :B :P >:(......
Posted by: jeanb, Saturday, July 25, 2009, 1:14pm; Reply: 11
Hey Ribbit:

I saw that your MBTI is ISTJ, after reading your comments for a couple of years now, I think you should definitely retest.

I have the feeling you are more of an ISTP or ISFP, you are definitely not a classic J (thank your stars on this, I see time as an inventory unit, my P kids see it as a vast expanse to be filled with exploration)

I had my youngest son tested for learning disabilities earlier this year.  For 8 years I have been hearing from teachers about his lack of focus, lack of attention etc. He had real issues with writing in school, but when the assignment was on computer his marks would go up by 20% (teachers would accuse me of writing for him, as I told them numerous times I already passed his grade level and I do not need to repeat for self esteem issues)

When the testing came back, he didn't lack on the intelligence side, he had issues with processing speed and get the idea from his head into his small motor functions (think writing).  So his reading comprehension and math skills were at 80 percentile, while his processing speed and visual spatial were between 13 and 20 percentile.

The down on dirty on this was, I gave him one of my old laptops for school use as keyboarding seems to help his brain connect.  He can type like a madman but when he hand writes, it looks like he has a death grip on his pen.  His school posts all of the assignments online, so he is able to do the assignment on computer and print it out. He is able to do all the assignments in class in a timely manner without extra time.   (Now he just needs to physically do the assignment, he has this notion he can cherry pick what he wants to do...)

His final exams came back a full 20% higher on the written than in previous assignments.  The teachers were very thrilled that the fix helped so quickly.  

Posted by: Gale D., Saturday, July 25, 2009, 7:00pm; Reply: 12
When I took Buspar for PTSD for 3 months, it seriously altered my sense of time. Things seemed in slow motion.
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, July 26, 2009, 3:32pm; Reply: 13
Time flies more the older I get.  There is never enough time in the day to get all that I want done.  Then I look at the time and shake my head.
Posted by: Plucky, Sunday, July 26, 2009, 3:58pm; Reply: 14
Is this just a nonnies thing, or is this common to the general population, given our over-scheduled, hurry up and get it done, rush, rush lives?
Posted by: Memento Mori, Monday, July 27, 2009, 4:49am; Reply: 15
Well Plucky I just looked at the results so far and 10 out of 11 non-secretor responders said that time flies for them. It's a small survey but totally one-sided, we need some secretor responses for comparison but I'd say they'd be closer to split down the middle votes. I think that many people have a poor concept of time, but I'd say that non-secretors would have a worse concept perhaps largely because they carry older genes and the concept of time is actually a relatively new concept.

When I think of a typical non-secretor I think of a Native American, as I'm part Cherokee and feel that they represent the hunter-gatherer lifestyle quite well but when did their culture flourish? Certainly long before the Spanish and British cultures, which were likely made-up largely of secretors, began dominating the World with their technological and scientific prowess-these people were chained to the arms of the clock.

Matt
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, July 27, 2009, 3:38pm; Reply: 16
Interesting point, MM.  I'm never happier than when I'm camping in the woods, squatting in front of the fire, poking it with a stick and smelling the sweet potatoes baking in the coals.  Time doesn't exist, and who cares about the rest of the world?  When we go camping, we go to bed earlier, get up earlier, and eat when we're hungry, not when the clock tells us to.  My oldest brother and I used to go on long hiking trips.  He always said, "Leave your watch at home.  We don't care what time it is."  And it was amazing to feel so free from the Holy Clock that so many people seem to worship.

I shall do a re-test (MBTI) when I get a chance, Jean.  It's interesting that by reading my posts it would cause you to call into question the T and the J.  I believe I am more perceptive than I used to be, but I don't know if that's diet-related or just from being a mommy!  Being a mommy  has made me a much more compassionate person.  Ahhhhhh, hormones. ;)
Posted by: Memento Mori, Monday, July 27, 2009, 5:36pm; Reply: 17
Plucky:

"I'm not sure if it's an ADD thing or that I'm just hard-wired for multi-tasking, but I have a really hard time sticking to one task at a time.  I hop from thing to thing to thing, wondering if I'm ever going to get anything finished, but then it all comes together in the end.  The more things I have going at once the more time I seem to have, but the faster it seems to go.  I've been told I'd be more efficient if I'd slow down and finish one thing at a time, but I just can't seem to do it."

Hey Plucky, how are you doing? You sound similar to me, I had a strange realization last Summer when I was working for Coca Cola. There was this female truck driver that seemed really similar to us, I have ADD-Inattentive type, but she would almost always take much longer to get deliveries to stores. I never understood why, until one day I was at a Target and the receiver was checking in someone else and she drove right by. The receiver said that anytime the driver was going to have to wait a few minutes she just went on to her next stop, this way the driver was always busy so it seemed like she was getting more done to her. But, in reality she spent 10-15 minutes going to the next stop on her list, and the trucks are loaded stop by stop so she would have to pull all of the soda pallets out for Target with an electric pallet truck, then unload the truck, and finally she'd have to put all of the Target freight back on the truck and make the drive back to the store.

Since she was always working it must have seemed like she was getting more done, but with the 30 minutes of extra driving and the 15-20 minutes of rearranging the truck she was taking much longer to get to stores. This was one of those lightbulb moments for me, I realized that people with ADD tend to get in the habit of doing things a certain way and they may grow to be very efficient in this way, but at the same time they may also be overlooking obvious factors- like time.
Posted by: Plucky, Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 4:07am; Reply: 18
Hey, MM.  That sounds like me.  I'd rather drive five miles out of my way to keep moving than to sit for five minutes in traffic at a standstill.  "Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming"... my favorite line from "Finding Nemo"  ;D   On the way home from taking my son down to university one day there was a back up on the freeway AND my stereo in my pick-up quit working AND I was stuck in the inside lane so I couldn't make my way out to an exit to take an alternate route.  I was pounding the dashboard, hoping a nice jolt would restart the stereo, and bawling my eyes out.  I don't think I've ever been so frustrated from sitting still in quietness for so long in my life!  An hour and forty minute trip took two and a half hours.  Since then I've been taking a different route, one that only allows me to go 55mph (instead of 65) but never has traffic back-ups.
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 6:37pm; Reply: 19
Hi Ribbit:

I am more convinced of you being a P rather than a J.  I am not so sure on the T vs F difference though.

I used to be a much tougher T until I had kids, then I thought I became nicer and more feeling.  I got a rude awakening however the other day when my kids asked why I am so much tougher on them than other mothers with their children.  I replied I thought I was less tough these days than before I had kids.  My husband cleared his throat and suggested I rethink that, I was still as tough as ever.....
Posted by: Sharon, Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 9:11pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Memento Mori
but I'd say that non-secretors would have a worse concept perhaps largely because they carry older genes and the concept of time is actually a relatively new concept.


Matt


Memento, that is a fascinating idea.  I never knew that non-secretors carried the older genes.  So the gene for non-secretors came first in our evolution?  I keep learning more and more everyday on these forums.  I love it!
Posted by: Memento Mori, Thursday, July 30, 2009, 1:12am; Reply: 21
In Live Right For Your Type pg 7-8

"There is some evidence that the non-secretor state is genetically older than the secretor state and may have been more compatible with the digestive needs of hunter-gathers."

I just received my copy of The Genotype Diet and took a quick look at 4 or 5 questions about determining your genotype and they seemed to confirm my suspicion that I carry many genes which were adaptations to hunting.
Posted by: RedLilac, Friday, July 31, 2009, 2:41pm; Reply: 22
In my town there is a RR station that has a viaduct to the East which you can drive under and a gate crossing to the West.  I shop on the street to the west and I live SW of there.  But when there is a freight train, instead of waiting, I go out of my way to take the road to the east.  If I just patiently waited, it actually would be faster, but I hate to sit and do nothing.
Posted by: Memento Mori, Friday, July 31, 2009, 10:35pm; Reply: 23
Hey RedLilac, how are you? Since your mother is a type O that means that you must carry a recessive O, do you have problems concentrating? Tyrosine has worked wonders for me, I used to be on a high dose of Adderall until I began a wheat-free diet. Actually virtually a grain free diet to be more precise, rice and fresh, organic corn once or twice a month is the only grains I ever eat.

How I long for a blue belt, I'm gonna judo chop the next person that talks smack about the blood type diet without knowing any of the science behind it.
Posted by: LauraT, Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 1:28am; Reply: 24
I agree that this relates - at least in part - to the J vs. P.  For me, days, months, and years seem eternal... in a good way.  I've never had that experience of:  "Wow, it's Thanksgiving again already?" or, "I can't believe it's been 10 years since I graduated!"  People always told me time would speed up when I got older, but that hasn't been the case.

My theory as to why time moves slowly for me is that my thoughts move so quickly.  10 minutes of chatter in my own mind feels like an hour-long conversation.  I'm also an avid journaler, daytimer, and calendar-tracker.  Yup, definitely a 'J'.  

However, I don't necessarily get a lot done each day.  I had a boyfriend who was a B bloodtype and an INFP who was always remarking on how many hours are in each day.  He worked two jobs, had a zillion hobbies, and still had time for trips and things.  However, he had no rituals.  It only took him 10 minutes to get ready each morning, and he never cooked or engaged in any 'night-time' rituals.  For me on the other hand, it takes about 2 hours to set up for the next day, clean up, calm down, get in bed, and actually fall asleep.

Sundays do seem to speed by.    
Posted by: newtypeA, Sunday, February 21, 2010, 5:03pm; Reply: 25
I've always been a slow mover. Working has forced me to learn to move a little faster, but I'm still slow compared to some of my coworkers. At home and at work I take too long to do things. (Not sure if this stems from a need to be thorough, or I'm just inefficient and clueless about working with time). I have a dayplanner, but never write in it--basically I just use the pockets for my cards and the ziploc bag for my stamps. (My calendar at home seems to keep me on track well enough.)

My birth dad told me I get this from him. He would tell me that he always moved slow too, and not to worry about it.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Sunday, February 21, 2010, 5:48pm; Reply: 26
I'm very organised and good at forward planning (thus, I'm a freelance Planning Consultant) ;D

I don't ever really stop and am constantly doing something (ants in my pants friends say) - I'm always seeing something else to be done.  Thus, time really seems to move quickly for me.

Andy (smarty)
Posted by: nwiser, Sunday, February 21, 2010, 7:04pm; Reply: 27
I am very organized as well, and feel like I am very productive, but it does come slowly....
I am very thorough and agree that it's probably the reason for the turtle pace. I'll start to work on a project and then switch over to another right in the middle. Then I have 2 projects that need finishing, which takes up more time. NOw, having a two year old, it's even worse because I only get increments of time to think about things
(which is hard if you're a perfectionist).

It could be (for me) that there is so much on my mind that I can't
just focus on the one thing. Also, when I do work on something, I always tell
people how I'm sure I do it the longest and hardest way there is.....maybe so
I don't have to think so much??? I don't know. It's just slow and steady and
works better for me to do things the more manual way.

So some days time flies, but other drag along. I do have OCD too (my house has to be clean and organized), and so that leads to plenty of thinking with less action. Hope this helps.
Posted by: DoS, Monday, February 22, 2010, 4:31am; Reply: 28
I prefer to move at my own comfortable pace and tend towards making things quality oriented. This rarely fits what others want.
Posted by: Golfzilla, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:10pm; Reply: 29
Here is a question to ask oneself at the end of each day:

Am I pleased enough with what I accomplished today that I am at peace with exchanging a day of my life for it? (think)
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:29pm; Reply: 30
Oh no.  Somebody who's trying to get us to think.(mad)
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:32pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from LauraT


However, I don't necessarily get a lot done each day.  I had a boyfriend who was a B bloodtype and an INFP who was always remarking on how many hours are in each day.  He worked two jobs, had a zillion hobbies, and still had time for trips and things.  However, he had no rituals.  It only took him 10 minutes to get ready each morning, and he never cooked or engaged in any 'night-time' rituals.  For me on the other hand, it takes about 2 hours to set up for the next day, clean up, calm down, get in bed, and actually fall asleep.



This sounds like DH (B Nomad).
Posted by: paul clucas, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:43pm; Reply: 32
Time flying is what people experience when their get lost in their thinking.

This can come from drugs, hypnotically altered states of mind, or over loading a gut with avoid starches.  If it is a constant issue the likely cause is inefficient neurological pathways.  Choose your own label, but our sense of time is not as firmly connected as it is for our more normal brothers and sisters.

An overlap of Explorers/Non-secretors seem be the carriers of this, but more study may help distinguish specific causes and categories.

Impaired Sensory Processing is at root a developmental problem with the ears.  All the other senses in a normally developed person tie into the neurological paths that were first made and connected by the ears.  When the ears go wrong, neurologically, the rest of the senses, and indeed your spontaneous thinking, lack a central integrating function.

We all develop little idiosyncratic ways of dealing with what we can't tolerate, like that delivery driver.  This propels us out of highly time-constrained situations.

Some of my high school level math students have issues in this direction.  When I told one of them about the frustration of my childhood experience, that person broke down and cried.  The recognition and validation of all the frustration they have experienced is not easy going.  Coming from a stranger, who quickly recognises in them what they cannot adequately put into words, is a powerful and shocking experience.

There is a gigantic deficit of quantity and quality of help that is available for people who have these issues.  This is a deeply disturbing subject to me.  I try not to think about the quantity of suffering as this can emotionally overwhelm me.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:51pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from nwiser
I'll start to work on a project and then switch over to another right in the middle. Then I have 2 projects that need finishing, which takes up more time. NOw, having a two year old, it's even worse because I only get increments of time to think about things
(which is hard if you're a perfectionist).

It could be (for me) that there is so much on my mind that I can't
just focus on the one thing. Also, when I do work on something, I always tell
people how I'm sure I do it the longest and hardest way there is.....maybe so
I don't have to think so much??? I don't know. It's just slow and steady and
works better for me to do things the more manual way.

So some days time flies, but other drag along. I do have OCD too (my house has to be clean and organized), and so that leads to plenty of thinking with less action. Hope this helps.


I feel like I can't get things done without doing other things first.  For example, I will think, "I should really put my exercise video on."  So I look at the living room floor and go, "Oh, well, I can't exercise because there's stuff on the floor.  Alright kids, let's clean up.  So we put away the toys, fold all the laundry, put it away, vacuum the floor, and by that time it's past lunch and everybody's hungry.  Then it's nap time and outside time and then time to start supper and I never get around to what I really wanted to do because it took so long to do the "first" stuff first.  And it's not that I was putting off the exercise.  I love it and it helps my severe back pain. So I have reason to do it.  I just struggle with actually doing what I want to do because I see everything else that has to be done first.  Same with school work.  We sit down to do it, but all I see is the scraps of paper they left on the floor, the markers without tops, the bookshelf that somehow got all mixed up and now the books are stacked vertically.  It's a conscious effort to ignore all the little things and actually get to what I want to do.

This may come from having a mother who was ultra-organized and I rarely had the opportunity to organize something myself.  She told me what to do.  She told all of us exactly what to do, and if we tried to do it a different way, that worked better for us, she'd fly off the handle.  Although she did know that if she gave me a project to do and just left me alone to do it, I would most certainly get it done, to the extreme, even if it took me all day.  But it was something I proved I could do over many years, and it's something she eventually learned.  "Clean out this pantry" was just what appealed to me.  I'd empty the entire thing, wipe it out, scrub it down, reorganize the whole thing, and put it all back perfectly.  If she wanted a job done well, she knew she could ask me to do it.  If she wanted something done fast, with just a once-over, she knew not to ask me to do it.  I couldn't.  So I don't know if that's temperament or upbringing.  But I still struggle with it.

Here's something funny that DH and I differ on.  He has a method for the dishwasher.  If a spoon doesn't come clean, he'll put it in the sink to be "worked on" later.  I'll see it in the sink and stick it back in the dishwasher.  The dishwasher deserves another try, right?  But he says, "If it didn't get clean in the dishwasher once, another trip through isn't going to help it any.  It needs to be done by hand."  But I don't much care---I'll just let it keep going through the dishwasher over and over.  :D
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:53pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from paul clucas
  When I told one of them about the frustration of my childhood experience, that person broke down and cried.  The recognition and validation of all the frustration they have experienced is not easy going.  Coming from a stranger, who quickly recognises in them what they cannot adequately put into words, is a powerful and shocking experience.


Yes, it is.  You have put me in tears more than once.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:55pm; Reply: 35
Quoted from paul clucas


There is a gigantic deficit of quantity and quality of help that is available for people who have these issues.  This is a deeply disturbing subject to me.  I try not to think about the quantity of suffering as this can emotionally overwhelm me.


You write a book and I'll edit it.

Or I'll write it.  Give me a few years while my children grow up.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, February 22, 2010, 9:12pm; Reply: 36
I just realized (while I was sitting there folding laundry and thinking about this thread) that it might be an issue of priorities.  If I make the working-out and the outside time and all those other things I want to do priorities, then I can let other things slip away.  I did that this morning.  I cleared just enough space on the floor to do the routine.  It was all I could do to relax and concentrate on stretching rather than looking at DD#1's scraps of fabric she forgot to put back after sewing some clothes for her bear.
Posted by: newtypeA, Monday, February 22, 2010, 10:03pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from DoS
I prefer to move at my own comfortable pace and tend towards making things quality oriented. This rarely fits what others want.


I hear you! (clap) (woot)
Posted by: Kumar, Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:14am; Reply: 38
NewtypeA,

What you experience could be well related to our Personality Types and blood type has been  found to have its bearings on personality type. One personality dimension, "Judger Vs Perceiver," is related to what you (and others) have shared here. Someone who is more "perceiver" than a "judger" tends to have all the work styles (preferences) that you have described. I too am a perceiver than a judger. This dimension has to do with time too. Judgers tend to have relatively rigid schedule (calendar based, detail planning, regular updating and so on) whereas perceivers do not adhere to calendars (even if they try to keep one). Please not that perceivers have different ways of doing things and succeeding. Do not think that perceivers cannot succeed but simply they have different preference as to working style. My hunch is that there are more perceivers (and introverts) among A's and more judgers among O's. Welcome to the world of P's! (for perceiver)
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:23am; Reply: 39
Quoted from Ribbit
I just realized (while I was sitting there folding laundry and thinking about this thread) that it might be an issue of priorities.  If I make the working-out and the outside time and all those other things I want to do priorities, then I can let other things slip away.  I did that this morning.  I cleared just enough space on the floor to do the routine.  It was all I could do to relax and concentrate on stretching rather than looking at DD#1's scraps of fabric she forgot to put back after sewing some clothes for her bear.
I'm glad you got them done - seeing as you said they help your back... Shouldn't that be your priority if you can make it that!!?? :-/
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:28am; Reply: 40
Yeah, but I see so much stuff I need to get done first.  Like moving things out of the way.  And I don't know when to stop (like moving just enough stuff to be able to do my job) and I just keep cleaning and cleaning and cleaning.  It's like I can reign myself in and do just the bare minimum.  Maybe OCD.
Posted by: nwiser, Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:35am; Reply: 41
Ribbit - you said it pretty well. I understand what you're saying exactly, and I'll add a little:
The things I get done in a day are the same things, day by day.
Yes, I folded laundry and cleaned the kitchen, but tomorrow the same
things have to be done. So I feel productive, but in the end I look back
and think I'm just in machine mode. Now getting something EXTRA done,
like hanging a shelf or dusting the fans, or organizing a closet is
the best feeling and then I can truly justify  scratching something off my list.
Even if it's phone calls to setup appointments and such.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 10:36am; Reply: 42
Quoted from Ribbit
Yeah, but I see so much stuff I need to get done first.  Like moving things out of the way.  And I don't know when to stop (like moving just enough stuff to be able to do my job) and I just keep cleaning and cleaning and cleaning.  It's like I can reign myself in and do just the bare minimum.  Maybe OCD.


OMG, Leanne I'm so with you on this!!

This is exactly what happens to me - I get an awful lot done, but it takes me time because I see everything else that needs doing.  I can take most of the day to clean house because I'm so thorough (your childhood pantry clean comes to mind).  I have to take everything off the shelves and dust and wipe etc and it does take time to be thorough.  My partner would happily do a superficial tidy and run the floor duster over the floors (as opposed to vacuuming and mopping) - I just see the things that aren't done and cringe.  Having said that, I have got better at just letting it go and relaxing when the standards of other’s aren't the same as mine (shrug).

OCD, perhaps or maybe we're just detail conscious?  Nonnie connection  ??)

Kumar, interesting what you said about the MBTI (judger vs. perceiver) types.  I was always moving between I/E NFP, whereas now I come up as an ENFJ.  This is probably because of my work - I'm a planning consultant and managed projects like the Channel Tunnel Rail Link etc.  It's all tight schedules, deadlines, logistics, costs, performance etc....

This thread is really thought provoking (think)

Andy
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 1:37pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from Ribbit
It's like I can reign myself in and do just the bare minimum.  Maybe OCD.


That should read can't.

I'm learning to relax too, Andy.  It's impossible to do what I feel like needs to be done.  If I didn't have children I would be much more obsessive-compulsive.  Having them around requires me to relax and just take life as it comes (actually, I probably learned that most from my first baby who wasn't just colicky--she was extremely colicky and hardly ever slept).  If I didn't allow myself to be remoulded by them, all of us would be constantly angry at each other.  
Posted by: paul clucas, Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 3:04pm; Reply: 44
Ribbit, what you are talking about in post 33 is what I call Narrow Focus.  

The “peripheral vision” of your thoughts are limited; you can see trees, but not the woods.  It is a defence against too much data coming in at one time.  This copies the coping mechanism of the ears.  When the neurological focusing function of the ears is not working there are two options.  The ears are totally open to all sound is the normal or default setting.  This makes you tired, nervous, and frustrated.  The other option that is used to get a break from the default is closing the ear to one narrow region of control, which has to be managed on a more-or-less conscious level.  This just changes the quantity and quality of the negative effects, but allows some limited useful interaction with the world.

Normally people have a flexible control over what they are paying attention to.  Normally the Focus is a big as the person wants.  Some are capable of two or more separate focuses and this is most useful in the housework/childcare combination.  I took a lot of the care of my daughter for the first three years of her life, so this is not unfamiliar to me.   ;D

There is something psychologically cleansing about taking one part of the house and making it totally clean.  

Quoted from Ribbit
Yes, it is.  You have put me in tears more than once.
Am not wanting/meaning to hurt you.  :( :B

I'm clumsy with emotions at the best of times.  Had to hide behind British stiff upper lip when student started shedding, but did not use the brisk manly insensitivity.


Quoted from newtypeA
Quoted from DoS
I prefer to move at my own comfortable pace and tend towards making things quality oriented. This rarely fits what others want.
I hear you! (clap)(woot)
I urge you to both think about the implicaions of what you are choosing.

In order to have control of what concerns you, there are two choices you can make.

Acquire more power to affect your environment and the environment of others so that you can make things happen according to your will.  The extreme of this is megalomania.
~ or ~
Grow less concerned with others, so that you can be happier without controlling more of the environment.  The extreme of this is an almost autistic existence.

Neither direction allows for the maturation of the personality.

This, thankfully, is a false dilemma.  You can find another ways to deal with the compromises necessary to a productive and sociable life.  They usually involve recognising that there is an Authority in life to which you must be held accountable.  I am being vague here because so many people on this board have so many different ideas as to what this should entail.  Despite the difference of opinion as to what the Authority is, there is a commonality as to the need for one.


Quoted from Munchkin76
Kumar, interesting what you said about the MBTI (judger vs. perceiver) types.  I was always moving between I/E NFP, whereas now I come up as an ENFJ.  This is probably because of my work - I'm a planning consultant and managed projects like the Channel Tunnel Rail Link etc.  It's all tight schedules, deadlines, logistics, costs, performance etc....
Andy you should look at all the times Isa has talked about introverts extroverting as their opposites in public.  

An INFP will appear to be a E_TJ (where N/S factor is not clear.)  The last two letters become the opposite of what they truly are.  It is a development necessary for future growth and individuation, and releases part of the shadow (ESTJ) to do useful work.  Assuming that INFP is correct, your shadow is the typical type that works best with large corporations.  Read up about types and you will arm yourself to deal with others in a greater variety of ways.  It is a wonderful tool that can open new views of life to you!   ;D
Posted by: newtypeA, Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 9:12pm; Reply: 45
Believe me, I have had to do a LOT OF ADJUSTING to accomodate the wills of others at work. Every job I've ever held has required me to learn to move faster to keep up with others. I certainly don't expect the world to adjust to me, and I rarely get my way on any given day. That's just the way it is.
Posted by: battle dwarf, Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 9:22pm; Reply: 46
time depends on what i am doing. if i have something to do it can fly very fast. if i am wating for something (ie. midnight so i can close store and go home) it can crawl. sometimes i drive the boss nut "is it tomarrow yet?" today i had off and despite all the things i want to do i am talking on the net, mostly becuse i want to go outside and it is just plain too cold to play in the dirt. fling buy becuse i am doing something not just waiting for the right time to do something.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 9:35pm; Reply: 47
Paul

Thanks for your brilliant (as always) insights (woot)!

I will indeed do some revision on the types.  I did a lot of study of typology theory (including MBTI) many moons ago at uni (Psych grad plus post-grad).

Now where are all those books again......

Andy (book2)
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 10:20pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from paul clucas


Am not wanting/meaning to hurt you.  :( :B



No, no, noooooo!  Not at all.  Tears because somebody understands!  You know what it's like.  Every non-secretor knows what it's like.
Posted by: Robyn Mc, Friday, February 26, 2010, 5:35pm; Reply: 49
GolfZ, sounds like we need to think about that one before we start our day, so it is spent well!  :D  Thanks for the really deep thought!

For me, it is easy to get caught up in new projects and things that pop up throughout the day.  I have many projects going at one time...it's a family joke that I am all about "getting stuff done".  I'm always moving.  I prefer to be very thorough, but have learned to let some of details go, when necessary.  Sometimes, you need a once-over kind of job because there are other priorities and at other times, a thorough job is desired. I guess that's just part of the maturing process for us all and it's a continuous process.  

Like Ribbit, I often suffer from the, "I really want/need to do "this", but I need to get THAT done first along with THAT and another THAT"...  So I have to ask myself, how important is THIS or THAT in the long term?  Is it more important that I exercise today, or do my floors really need to be clean?  Of course, it's easy for us all to come to the conclusion that the "exercise" is the most important for the long-term.  So it should be an easy decision.  However, some days...the floor seems of paramount importance to my sense of well-being and inner peace of mind!   :o  On those days, I just go with it and focus on the fact that I am getting some exercise with the floor cleaning and the next time I lay down my exercise mat, I will feel much better!  :D  

While I tend to be very efficient and all about getting things done, I also side-track fairly easily and something else becomes a priority.  However, when pressure is on, I get the job done.  But when there is no pressure, I side-track.  Come to think of it, I do my best work in a pressure cooker.  Sometimes, I even put things off until it becomes a pressure situation.  I operate really well under stress--but for short periods of time.  It's been a process to learn to pace myself.  Not 100 percent there yet, but I get better all the time.  We could go into all the whys of why I operate that way...is it my nonnie O temperament?  Did diet play a role?  Was it learned?  I will say that I can tell that diet affects my mood, my focus, my sense of well-being.  

I once had a very wise woman who taught me to live in the moment...if you are doing the dishes, enjoy that moment.  When she first told me that (I was a mother of two in my late twenties) I thought she was totally crazy.  I was taught and always tended to think about just getting the next thing done and not enjoying the moment I was in.  I didn't enjoy my children nearly as much as I could have because I was often thinking about stuff that needed to get done, rather than just sitting on the floor and playing with them...Ribbit, you sound like an AWESOME mom and I love your posts!  Anyway, she planted the seed and I continue to reflect on it and eventually made it a priority to live in the moment.  

It's taken years of practice, but I am finally getting there with the enjoying of the moment...Good Lord, did I just sidetrack?  What was I supposed to be doing today?  :o

Enjoy the day, all!  :D  
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, February 26, 2010, 10:22pm; Reply: 50
Wow, Robyn.  Great post.  

It's easy to sound wonderful on paper.  The truth is I'm very overwhelmed and struggle daily to keep the right focus and see the forest while helping my little trees grow. ;)

I constantly have to ask myself:  Do I really see my children, or just the messes they make? :o  It's not about me and my clean home---it's about their well-being. (Again, it's real easy to put that on paper.  Now I have to go take dinner out of the oven---salmon loaf and an experimental Explorer bread---and try not to gnaw anybody's head off between here and the kitchen. ;) )  I am inexpressibly thankful to have a husband who not only doesn't mind a few things on the floor, but also doesn't mind helping me organize the children cleaning up.  It hasn't always been this way, but it is now.
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 9:46am; Reply: 51
Quoted from Ribbit
Wow, Robyn.  Great post.  

It's easy to sound wonderful on paper.  The truth is I'm very overwhelmed and struggle daily to keep the right focus and see the forest while helping my little trees grow. ;)

I constantly have to ask myself:  Do I really see my children, or just the messes they make? :o  It's not about me and my clean home---it's about their well-being. (Again, it's real easy to put that on paper.  Now I have to go take dinner out of the oven---salmon loaf and an experimental Explorer bread---and try not to gnaw anybody's head off between here and the kitchen. ;) )  I am inexpressibly thankful to have a husband who not only doesn't mind a few things on the floor, but also doesn't mind helping me organize the children cleaning up.  It hasn't always been this way, but it is now.
Love the way you express yourself Ribbit ;) That's beautiful!! & I am so glad that your husband is understanding & doing more

Posted by: jeanb, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 3:39pm; Reply: 52
I think Paul's comment about authority is truly genius.  I went to a talk by Paul Schutz (sp???) former NA CEO of Porsche.  He spoke about the the difference in power and authority.  

I have the authority to tell my kids to eat their broccoli but they have the power to spit it out.  I am always mindful at work that I have the authority to tell my coworkers what to do, the timeliness, and the quality, but my coworkers have power over the method.

My "n" ness always wants to find the most best method(s), but it drives my coworkers "coo-coo for Cocoa Puffs."  I am the only N in a sea of SJness at work.  They like having very exact parameters to work within, but I refuse to set only 1 best method, my brain absolutely rebels against it, it always wants to find a better way of doing things.  

That is where my husband and I can't fill a dishwasher do laundry together.  We decided long ago that was his domain (overwhelming ESTJ) and I would do the family finances, kid stuff, food, family calendar, general organization of who has to be where and when, homework etc, family events, more of the free flowing things.  

DH likes laundry, cleaning, and dishwasher organization. Set times and set methods (laundry is done on Sat afternoon when everyone is out of the house and he has numerous TV's on sports channels)  Kids and I empty the dishwasher and put the laundry away.

Ribbit, clean house gets so much easier as they get older, eventually they will start putting things away (not grudgingly), just don't obsess about how they do it (my husband wants things done exactly his way and no other way, huge fights between teenagers and him over method).  I just want the end result in a timely manner, I am not interested in the method.....

On another note, I have a person at work who I think has Asperger's or full blown Autism.  His supervisor and co-workers were ready to throw him out of the factory because of his overwhelmingly single mindedness.  I found a test on the internet to see where one is on the spectrum.  I am so not on the scale, it is funny, sound doesn't bother me, I work the absolute best when I have lots of action and noise around me, and I absolutely detest doing the same thing over and over again in a quiet environment.  

http://www.piepalace.ca/blog/asperger-test-aq-test/
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:11pm; Reply: 53
Before I divulge my score, I'd love to hear others'.  I wonder how Meghan would test, since she's been officially diagnosed.
Posted by: Munchkin76, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:13pm; Reply: 54
I came out at 15 (typical female, biologist) (funny)

Andy  ;D
Posted by: jeanb, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 8:29pm; Reply: 55
I have taken it 4 times (I was curious about the reliability) and each time I scored 4.
Posted by: battle dwarf, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 8:56pm; Reply: 56
the floor..........my house is still under contruction and being built with pocket money, don't get me thinking about the uggly concreat floor! funny if i am pushed by some one to do something the more i tend to put it off. it is learned from all those time i was told "you should be doing ____ instead of (what ever i was doing at the time)" as if anything i was doing was a waist of time. i am a maker of beutiful things and this is never apreceated untill the pretty thing is done. before that there are bits of it every were and they will stay there till i'm done. done with it, and the other project, and the house work, and taking care of animals, and going to work to pay for it all, and making something to eat and...and.....and............................ :-/ :o :B
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 9:06pm; Reply: 57
watch this all :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YU0aNAHXP0
Posted by: Vista, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 9:12pm; Reply: 58
I scored 42 and I am diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome.
Posted by: Robyn Mc, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 11:20pm; Reply: 59
Eeek!  I scored a 28 which means...I am almost a Geek!   :o ;D  sigh... ::)

Posted by: newtypeA, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 11:41pm; Reply: 60
Vista, I also scored a 42.  :o (whistle)

Posted by: newtypeA, Saturday, February 27, 2010, 11:50pm; Reply: 61
Quoted from Lola


Thanks for sharing this video, Lola. I can totally relate to the Invisible Woman.
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 1:48am; Reply: 62
Well, I scored a 33.  But I sort of take exception to the quiz.  I really think a good many ISTJs would score similarly.
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 2:15am; Reply: 63
Hmmm I scored 22????!!!!
1 above an average scientist & 2 below an average mathematician...soooo not me... ::)
I am a daydreamer who is for ever thankful she married an maths/finance & statistics whiz!! Sheesh I sometimes don't even remember what day of the week it is!!! It doesn't help that my week starts on a Wednesday :D ::)
Posted by: nwiser, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 3:38am; Reply: 64
I scored 32.
Ribbit - I am an ESTJ, but most people would categorize me as an introvert (ISTJ).
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 4:06am; Reply: 65
Possum, I usually have no clue what day of the week it is either.  Yesterday I asked DH if he was going to the office tomorrow (today) and he looked at me funny.  I said, "But you usually go on Thursdays."  He said, "Tomorrow is Saturday."

Oops, no biggie--two days lost somewhere in time.  Who cares? ::) :X

Posted by: Possum, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 4:20am; Reply: 66
;) ;D As long as you & the family enjoyed them no matter...;)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 5:44am; Reply: 67
I scored 43, I have not been previously diagnosed with Aspergers or Autism.
Posted by: jeanb, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 1:22pm; Reply: 68
FYIm a bunch of the people took it at work.  The one I thought had Aspergers/Autistic spectrum was 30+, everyone else in the office was under 10.  (Yes a very noisy, energetic office).
Posted by: Vista, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 8:44pm; Reply: 69
People in my age and older might not have been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome as young because the diagnose wasn't known when I grew up since AS became a standard diagnosis first in 1992. I have been diagnosed recently.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Sunday, February 28, 2010, 9:25pm; Reply: 70
28 for me and sort of a geek.
Posted by: paul clucas, Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 4:12pm; Reply: 71
Scrore 34:  "Geekness Authenticated!"  -  Dyslexia Authenticated  

The test seems to evaluate the level of social withdrawal.  You would have to show me the data to convince me that a small score will not be able to capture some normal variance in personality.  The ratings for Biologist, Mathematician, Scientist (one of the physical sciences, I would assume) are indications of normal people who are able to function well in the fields of creative (but not in a social way) and abstract thought.  Small scores being an indication of a normal person with an NT intuitive (and therefore detached from immediate physical reality) and thinking (and therefore detached from immediate social reality) MBTI preference.

My favorite NT joke page is embedded in the first post: http://personalitycafe.com/nts-temperament-forum-intellects/740-explaining-nts-normal-people.html

The material on the page may offend - read with caution.   :P

Possum, your NT does not come out in a mathematical way, that is all.

Typically, from what I have learned, the longer someone with learning disabilities has been able to function in society with out a diagnosis or some other kind of special accommodation, the more intelligent the person is.  So I would really have to get to know a person socially before I could understand their score.

Before my therapy I would have expected to score in the fifties, at least.  A completely introverted geek!  (geek)

PS  Lola, Excellent spiritual lesson!  Very resonant for ES types.
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 5:51pm; Reply: 72
I"ve been giving this some thought.

DH was pointing out that when I decide I'm going to the grocery store, it'll take me a couple of hours to get out the door.  (unhappy)(mad)  I have learned to be dosed up on caffeine and/or yerba mate before I attempt to go shopping.  I cannot do it otherwise.  (Actually, if I go out of the house now I down a cup of coffee first.  Otherwise I can't even hardly carry on a conversation and people look at me funny.)  There have been times that I came back home and DH is pulling his hair out wondering where I've been and if I've eaten anything in the last several hours.  Oops--lunch? What lunch?  It would take me that long just to buy groceries.  Of course it doesn't help when the children are with me.

Paul, I kind of felt like any introvert would score higher than an extrovert on that test.

Another thing I've been rolling over in my mind:  the questions about reading people's intentions (whether in real life, in a book or in a movie).  I disect people's words, but I have a hard time with body language.  In a book, I can tell what they mean and what they're thinking, and in a movie it's the same.  I always know who dunnit before DH does (even with him being intuitive) because I can read the actors' faces.  But in real life?  It's a lot harder.  

I remember when I lived at home and I'd be talking to my sister.  She'd just turn and walk away.  I thought it meant that she was still listening but had something else to do, so I'd follow her, still talking. Eventually she'd say, "That's enough!  I don't want to hear it anymore!"  And then I'd get my feelings hurt and think that everybody misunderstood me.  Which was true.  DH does the same.  He'll just walk off when I'm talking.  I'll ask him if he'll please hear me out, because I'm explaining something or telling him a story, and he's like, "I've been listening for a looooong time.  I'm done.  I can't concentrate anymore on what you're saying."  I used to think it was rude, but now, after reading on this thread and doing all the reading about Tomatis therapy, I'm beginning to wonder if it's my persception of time that's the problem.  I don't know how long I've been talking.  I can't read their body language saying, "I'm not listening anymore.  I'm bored. Go away."  And so I keep going until they tell me, usually non-too-sweetly, to stop.  Maybe it really is my fault after all.  DH is better now because he understands the problem.  Bless his heart.  Maybe one day I can explain it to my sister who thinks I'm nuts.  Maybe one day I can explain it to my brothers who also think I'm nuts.

I remember once riding with my siblings in my youngest brother's car.  (I think DH was there too, before we were married.)  It was at Thanksgiving.  My brother had this dark purple '72 Dodge Charger.  Great car (to look at).  It had delightful character.  He was always tinkering under the hood.  I guess that was the only time I rode in it, but there we were, all 6 of us packed in, coasting down a hill, when suddenly the engine hit an RPM that nearly sent me through the roof.  I felt like my teeth were going to fall out.  I clenched them to stop the sound.  My head felt like it was going to explode.  I crunched down and covered my ears with my hands and tried to stop my head from vibrating.  Then I hollered out above the noise (there was no muffler--welcome to the South--plus all the windows were rolled down which was a whole 'nother problem), "Would you either speed up or slow down?"  He looked at me funny, then cracked up.  No, he wasn't going to accomodate me.  He thought it was funny.  By the time we got home I was a mess.  I flew out of the car and ran inside and had to sit on the couch for a long time with my eyes shut, recovering.  I felt like I'd run a marathon.  My brother came up and said, "What's with you?"  I tried to explain what I thought was happening, with the RPMs being the same frequency as my brain or something and he rolled his eyes and walked away.  I don't know what was going on, but I never rode in that car again.
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 7:07pm; Reply: 73
Did anyone get a chance to watch Temple Grandin on HBO?  It is a fascinating true story about Temple Grandin (who is a Ag Prof) and how she learned to live with Autism.  Great movie.
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 7:35pm; Reply: 74
Saved it on Netflix. Thanks, Jean.
Posted by: newtypeA, Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 10:58pm; Reply: 75
Was wondering...

Do any of you struggle with keeping on task at work? I've noticed that it's hard for me to adequately gauge the amount of time it takes to do anything.
Another thing I've noticed if that if someone is giving me a lot of information verbally it's very hard to process. Unless I write it down I lose at least half of it. I have a boss who expects us to multitask and keep on top of a lot of details, and it's a real struggle to keep up.
If I have to monitor several things at once, that's where my weaknesses start to show up, and it makes me look incompetent or lazy. (mad)
Posted by: Possum, Thursday, March 4, 2010, 5:41am; Reply: 76
I find if I am processing large orders at work, - sometimes up to 5 large boxes at a time - (which involves unpacking & checking off stock, pricing & shelving it & recording & faxing invoices) I have to do it at a careful pace or I will get in a muddle, whereas my co-worker (who I am sure is a Hunter) will literally hunt it down, kill it & be done with it in half the time... I remember to take into a/c that she has been there a lot longer but I'm sure its more than that... :-/ ??)

Wow Ribbit - some journey eh??
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, March 5, 2010, 3:58pm; Reply: 77
Quoted from Possum


Wow Ribbit - some journey eh??


(mad)(mad)(mad)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Tuesday, August 9, 2011, 1:20am; Reply: 78
Quoted from newtypeA
Was wondering...

Do any of you struggle with keeping on task at work?

Yes!

Quoted from newtypeA
I've noticed that it's hard for me to adequately gauge the amount of time it takes to do anything.

I always under-estimate.  Seems like I used to be able to complete tasks more quickly, but my concentration is not as good as it once was.

Quoted from newtypeA
Another thing I've noticed if that if someone is giving me a lot of information verbally it's very hard to process. Unless I write it down I lose at least half of it. I have a boss who expects us to multitask and keep on top of a lot of details, and it's a real struggle to keep up.
If I have to monitor several things at once, that's where my weaknesses start to show up, and it makes me look incompetent or lazy. (mad)

I have a hard time concentrating and have become very absent-minded.  I will go to do something and then stand there (in front of the closet, or pantry, or wherever), saying to myself..."what am I doing here again?"

#1)  I believe this is partially due to my hormone situation.

#2)  I also believe it is because of so much time spent on the internet.  It has corroded my ability to keep my train of thought.  DH swears that working on a computer for so many years (he is in IT) has given him ADD.  There may really be something to that.

I don't know what inability to concentrate has to do with being a non-secretor, though.   :-/  I notice not many secretors have responded to your poll, but of those who have all say "time flies".  :)
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, August 16, 2011, 8:57am; Reply: 79
Quoted from Possum
I find if I am processing large orders at work, - sometimes up to 5 large boxes at a time - (which involves unpacking & checking off stock, pricing & shelving it & recording & faxing invoices) I have to do it at a careful pace or I will get in a muddle, whereas my co-worker (who I am sure is a Hunter) will literally hunt it down, kill it & be done with it in half the time... I remember to take into a/c that she has been there a lot longer but I'm sure its more than that... :-/ ??)

Looking back on what I shared on this thread, I am relieved & delighted to reflect, that my ability to concentrate has increased dramatically & the lack of brain fog is comparatively remarkable!! Maybe it was less than from just being a nonnie?
In addition to avoiding black dots & avoids, I think for me being aware of & avoiding exposure to sulphites, any exposure to scents/fumes from petrol, perfumes & oil burners etc has helped enormously ::)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 5:13pm; Reply: 80
Quoted from Possum

Looking back on what I shared on this thread, I am relieved & delighted to reflect, that my ability to concentrate has increased dramatically & the lack of brain fog is comparatively remarkable!! Maybe it was less than from just being a nonnie?
In addition to avoiding black dots & avoids, I think for me being aware of & avoiding exposure to sulphites, any exposure to scents/fumes from petrol, perfumes & oil burners etc has helped enormously ::)


That's great, Possum!  :)
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, June 24, 2012, 4:33am; Reply: 81
I was wondering....is it possible to put an entry like "and time flies while you move slowly???"

This always happens during research. Suddenly, I've been in the house ALL DAY without leaving. (But trying to make myself feel guilty enough to get up and go.)
Posted by: Poppy, Sunday, June 24, 2012, 12:58pm; Reply: 82
I must keep busy to have time fly. So, even if I don't feel like it, I tell myself to get, up, to commit to complete something, and then before I know it, the time has flown by!I'm not sure I believe it's a nonny thing, It's how I have learned from past experience.
Posted by: 19000 (Guest), Monday, June 25, 2012, 5:50pm; Reply: 83
I think time flies for almost everyone unless you're depressed or something.
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