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BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  Explorers where are you?
Posted by: Rosamunde, Monday, July 6, 2009, 1:24pm
I thought it might be good to start a thread specifically for Explorers. Although have  come across comments elsewhere there doesn't seem to be that much specific for us.  Or are Explorers by nature solitary and non 'joiners'.  What characteristics do you feel make you an explorer?

Posted by: Lola, Monday, July 6, 2009, 1:50pm; Reply: 1
tell us all about your characteristics...... ;)
Posted by: paul clucas, Monday, July 6, 2009, 2:16pm; Reply: 2
Has anyone tried to correlate GT and Myers-Briggs or RIASEC (Holland Codes)?

I would expect Enterprising, Investigative, Artistic to be stronger for Explorers.

For MBTI a de-emphasis on Judging and Feeling?

A muliple choice poll would give us an inital take to construct a hypothesis.  
Posted by: LauraT, Monday, July 6, 2009, 5:25pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from paul clucas
Has anyone tried to correlate GT and Myers-Briggs or RIASEC (Holland Codes)?

I would expect Enterprising, Investigative, Artistic to be stronger for Explorers.

For MBTI a de-emphasis on Judging and Feeling?

A muliple choice poll would give us an inital take to construct a hypothesis.  


I'm INFJ, which is the 'mystical writer'.  I want to do a poll on enneagram types!  That's my favorite theory of personalities.  I'm a 1 with a 9 wing, which is called the 'idealist'.  Driven and energetic but spacey.  Attuned to the big picture, a natural synthesizer of multiple perspectives.  That matches the Explorer type, right?  I also did some searches for the 'skull types' Dr. D mentions when he describes how Explorers look, and they totally resemble me (& ancestors):  narrow face, squarish jaw, and often with 1 eye squintier than the other.  
Posted by: nowishow, Monday, July 6, 2009, 5:48pm; Reply: 4
I'm INFP (Meyers-Brigg)
Enneagram 1 with a 9 wing
Driver

I image we would have a lot of personality diversity because we include so many different kinds of blood types. But maybe not!  :)
Posted by: Melissa_J, Monday, July 6, 2009, 6:56pm; Reply: 5
INFJ Here too, just like Laura: Driven and energetic, but spacey...that's so me.
Posted by: Rosamunde, Monday, July 6, 2009, 7:27pm; Reply: 6
I can see that there would be a lot of diversity, may be as long as a piece of string but I wondered where people found a comfortable match with the explorer type and where there was difficulty in marrying up the profile.  
At the moment I am trying explorer on for size.  I'm A- and very reactive to caffiene or stimulants such as green tea, chocolate, red wine etc, especially when I have been steered clear for a while.  Definately liver needs care, have been into cleanses for a while.  Really like the addition of the caster oil pack. Sensitive to fragrances.  Am known for rubbing nose because irritated by sitting next to or near someone who is wearing a fragrance that I react to. Fragrance need not be overt, very strong.
body system is also asymetric. at college tested several seconds slower reaction between left and right sides and more recently tendency towards scoliosis that accentuates this difference. but not sure about the memory retention and body type doesn't match more apple and not sure about growing older gracefully or being accident prone. Never been anaemic was once asked if I ate iron bars, thick blood. Also hypoglaecimic.

The other option was warrior where touch points with flushing; all my life and can be like a terrier when it comes to sorting things out. Plus body shape.

However find the explorer diet seems to fit well.  Enjoying trying new things and look at the recipes on the blood type.  spelt bread is really good. Could live mainly on vegetables and lentils but every now and again have yen for red meat, usually lamb and love calves liver. Don't see emu, etc coming to the west coast of ireland that soon.  
Previously tried the eat right 4 your type but didn't stick with it, this time though find this genotype seems easier.  Only problem is marrying with hunter husband who is totally cynical about the whole thing but is doing very well on the regime. Probably better than I am, gradually easing out the lapses.  so easy to trip up.

Sorry to go on but am genuinely interested in hearing about other explorers and how they see their profile and diversities.

PS not familiar with INFJ but do identify with many of hte characteristics of an aquarian interested in just causes, innovative ideas, new ways of working (life long interest) etc
Posted by: nowishow, Monday, July 6, 2009, 8:11pm; Reply: 7
I'm married to a Hunter as well!

I'm not accident prone. I've never been slim, but not really fat either. But in the last five years I put on about 15 - 20 lbs! (menopause? liver trouble? candida?) Anyway the weight came on mostly around my middle (stomach and hips). In the last 5 months since starting the diet I've lost 10 lbs! It's coming off really slowly as my body heals. Which I consider a really solid weight loss. I'm not worried about it coming back!

I don't think the Dr. means us to all fit the profile perfectly. Very few of us fit into the profile 100%. Did your measurements come out as Explorer? Or are you just looking at the personality traits? You need to make sure most of the measurements and personality traits add up to your type. But you should start with the measurements.

Posted by: LauraT, Monday, July 6, 2009, 9:22pm; Reply: 8
Nowishow, congratulations on your health improvements!  My step-mom was always slim until menopause, and now she struggles with a growing waistline even though she eats well and exercises.  But, she eats a lot of processed, diet foods, and I think those things just accumulate once you reach a certain age (say, 25).  

My measurements all fit the explorer, although I'm a bit more of an ectomorph than mesomorph.  I have little legs and wrists, but I have a long torso and upper legs.  My ring fingers are longer than index, and my thumb fingerprints don't match.  

From what I can tell, the main thing explorers have in common is slow detoxicity.    
Posted by: nowishow, Monday, July 6, 2009, 10:00pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from LauraT


From what I can tell, the main thing explorers have in common is slow detoxicity.    


That's for sure  :(
Posted by: Melissa_J, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 12:11am; Reply: 10
I totally fit the chemically sensitive part too.  Bounce fabric softener is my nemesis, and it seems I can smell it from a block away.  Scented candles too.  I have a long list of scented pet peeves, but those are the top two and I'll stop there before the rant begins.

I am fairly accident prone, though usually when I'm in spacey mode (or having PMS or pregnant).  When I'm focused and in the zone, like at taekwondo, then I do pretty well.  I'm no thrill seeker, but rather risk tolerant in non-physical risks, and able to roll with the punches pretty well.

Does anybody else require complete control over their morning routine?  If I get startled or upset in the morning, then I'm totally out of sorts and agitated for the rest of the day, sometimes the next day as well.  No bad news until after I've had my breakfast please!  
Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 2:00am; Reply: 11
iNfP, Cancer, Rabbit.  Not sure about my Enneagram, though.  Is there a good, free, online test I can try for that?

I measure as an Explorer and fit that profile, but I also identify with the Hunter.  My wife and daughter also measure as Explorers, but my daughter's not done growing.
Posted by: LauraT, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 2:34am; Reply: 12
Quoted from SquarePeg
iNfP, Cancer, Rabbit.  Not sure about my Enneagram, though.  Is there a good, free, online test I can try for that?


Scroll down below the instructions and you'll see the first question.  INFP's are usually 9's, 4's, or 6's.  Sometimes 1's or 5's.  But you could be any of the 9 numbers.


http://www.enneagraminstitute.com/dis_sample_36.asp
Posted by: proto, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 5:32pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Melissa_J


Does anybody else require complete control over their morning routine?  If I get startled or upset in the morning, then I'm totally out of sorts and agitated for the rest of the day, sometimes the next day as well.  No bad news until after I've had my breakfast please!  

I have to get up early to have some proper breakfast as I can't eat anything substantial in the evening. Those days I have to rush out without eating properly I spend the rest of the day trying to catch up and yes I can lose my nerve easily. My lunch seems laughably light when you compare to the rest at my workshop but it's really ok. I have no reason to live like this like obesity it's just that this works best. Explorer manifestations? Yellow skin, autistic traits, I have to do things my way even though it doesn't always make any sense. For example cycling to work the very short distance in a complete cycling outfit riding a bike capable of expedition.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 5:41pm; Reply: 14
I've had yellow skin twice as well.  I wonder if Gilbert's Syndrome is an explorer trait.  

I have a few autistic traits as well, as does my youngest son who is probably an explorer (but could turn out hunter).  It's especially pronounced when we eat toxins or get stomach bugs.  He's such a smart and funny boy, I'm so glad my diet was enlightened in time to benefit him...he's really got a spiritual side, intelligence, and a grasp for abstract thinking, even at age 3.  
Posted by: nowishow, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 5:43pm; Reply: 15
I'm always more comfortable working for myself than for someone else. I love having my own business which I was able to do for about 8 years. Not now though, but I'm getting used to it.

I guess I don't mind my morning routine getting messed up. I tend to go with the flow. But, I know I was a lot more stressed and "anal"  through my 20's and 30's.

Autistic traits especially under the age of 30
Very spiritual but not religious (never been much of a joiner)

Virgo
Born in the year of the Dog
Posted by: Rosamunde, Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 9:37pm; Reply: 16
Took me years to realise that if not careful I can get caught up in a routine that I have to complete or do before starting my day.  If it has developed it could be an hour or more, usually yoga. Result don't do anything until routine completed or end up doing nothing all day.  Have really worked with this and much more laid back but it is all too easy to fall back into such habits.  

Empathise with the spiritual not religious.

Often find that walking through the detergent section or past the freezers in supermarkets gets my nose going

Ps don't know about secretor status but did do all the measurements.  Finger lengths difficult millimetres in it but finger prints of index fingers didn't match, others it was very difficult to read (housework hands?) also left and right palms don't look the same either.
Posted by: LauraT, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 5:13am; Reply: 17
I adore morning and evening routines.  My problem is that since I started grad school and have been a commuter, I don't have much time for routines.  It doesn't stop me from doing them, but it means my work and sleep have suffered!  I basically need 3 hours in the morning and 90 minutes in the evening to transition from sleep to wake and back to sleep again.  Add this with 7 hours sleep, 2 hours commuting, 30 minutes for lunch and 30 minutes for dinner, and I'm only left with 9.5 hours total for work, errands, socializing, and hobbies.  I average about 7 hours of work a day, if I keep email to a minimum.  

Anyway, here are my rituals:

Morning ritual:

brief meditation, prepare fruit smoothies, quick cardio at the gym, shower, breakfast (cook a week's worth of quinoa and pecans and heat up a bowl), listen to audios on meditation or motivation on the way to work (60 minute commute).  

Evening ritual

plan my next day, pack my lunch, pack my bags, set out my clothes, wash face and brush teeth, do a little bit of house clean-up, get into bed, update my budget, journal or read a little bit.

Luckily, I tend to find boyfriends who also thrive on rituals, but how will I ever manage once I have a child???
Posted by: Amazone I., Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 5:52am; Reply: 18
ouch I think also here are some misunderstandings... I work with the enneagram officially in my praxis and sorry or you are an 9/1 or and 4/5 ...you can't be both...but both often are confounded....(hehe)(hehe)(hehe)dito Briggs-Myers and vice-versa ;)....& Keirseys as well  ;D

9/1 is an ifsj....1/9 is an ENTP...... I once wrote an entire article about that thema....but it has vanished ... :'( :'( :'(

paul you are like me too, a 5/4....;) :D.....
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 1:53pm; Reply: 19
I have something to say about the Explorer diet.

I have been pretty strict with Elizabeth's diet (she's 6 1/2) except in the area of fruit.  I mean, really.  What good mother deprives her small children of peaches and blackberries?  She used to have nearly chronic UTIs or yeast infections since she was a toddler, perhaps before.  She continued to have them on the BTD.  When I switched her to the Explorer diet the infections improved, but I realized recently that they come back (usually the UTI) if she has too much fruit that she's supposed to avoid.  Interesting, huh?  Maybe the "good mother" deprives her small children of peaches and blackberries in abundance on a regular basis.   :)
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 1:56pm; Reply: 20
Re: autism/Asperger's, perhaps these are more likely to be nonnie traits.  We know the nonnies are generally more physically sensitive.  I know I have always had Sensory Integration Disorder* and it plagues me to this day, although the diet has certainly helped.  Proto and Melissa, would y'all be interested in starting a thread just on this subject?  I need tips on how to handle multiple small children without hunching in a corner with my ears covered, feeling like I want to scream.  (I know, every mother feels like that some days, but this is not because of normal every-day stress, it's because of the sensory issues).

*It's often worse first thing in the morning.  Seems like my ears are particularly sensitive then.
Posted by: LauraT, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 5:07pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Amazone I.
ouch I think also here are some misunderstandings... I work with the enneagram officially in my praxis and sorry or you are an 9/1 or and 4/5 ...you can't be both...but both often are confounded....(hehe)(hehe)(hehe)dito Briggs-Myers and vice-versa ;)....& Keirseys as well  ;D

9/1 is an ifsj....1/9 is an ENTP


Hi!  

I do enneagram typing and consulting, and there have been a bunch of studies on how and whether the enneagram and MB overlap... infj's are usually 4's but lots of 5's, 6's, and 1's have been tested as infj.

http://www.geocities.com/lifexplore/typecorr.htm


Posted by: Melissa_J, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 7:43pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Ribbit
Re: autism/Asperger's, perhaps these are more likely to be nonnie traits.  We know the nonnies are generally more physically sensitive.  I know I have always had Sensory Integration Disorder* and it plagues me to this day, although the diet has certainly helped.  Proto and Melissa, would y'all be interested in starting a thread just on this subject?  I need tips on how to handle multiple small children without hunching in a corner with my ears covered, feeling like I want to scream.  (I know, every mother feels like that some days, but this is not because of normal every-day stress, it's because of the sensory issues).

*It's often worse first thing in the morning.  Seems like my ears are particularly sensitive then.


Explorers are very non-secretory, so many non-secretor traits are strong in explorers.  

Do distant buzzing noises drive you crazy, like they do me?  

Sunlight in the spring makes me nuts too, I sometimes go into the bathroom and turn off the light so it's totally dark, and just breath for a few minutes, to calm down.  It's partially my bipolar SAD, and possibly a bit of a migraine.  As a kid I remember feeling real funky in the spring and saying things like "the clouds are breathing" because it looked like they work moving up and down like they were breathing.  I'm also often the only one to feel or notice distant earthquakes.  I get nauseated in buildings that have elevators (whether or not I ride the elevator).  ... Haha, I'll stop now... is that kind of what you're talking about?

Have you tried alternate nostril breathing?  
Posted by: nowishow, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 8:59pm; Reply: 23
I always had problems with the light in the Autumn.
I would get so overwhelmingly sad. I would go outside and it would feel like a wave washing over my body. I would cry and cry.

This has lessened over the last year or two. Thank Goodness
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 9:08pm; Reply: 24
Yes, Melissa, things like that.  I hate fluorescent lights with a passion, yet that's all I've ever been around.  I hear them buzz and the flickering makes me cringe---yet nobody else (except my husband) notices.  I've tried the alternate nostril breathing a couple of times, but it made me feel so weird I decided not to do it anymore.
Posted by: LauraT, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 11:12pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Melissa_J



Do distant buzzing noises drive you crazy, like they do me?  

Sunlight in the spring makes me nuts too, I sometimes go into the bathroom and turn off the light so it's totally dark, and just breath for a few minutes, to calm down.  It's partially my bipolar SAD, and possibly a bit of a migraine.  As a kid I remember feeling real funky in the spring and saying things like "the clouds are breathing" because it looked like they work moving up and down like they were breathing.  


I think we share the same great-grandparents or something!  I have severe SAD.  I visit my parents in Arizona every December and again in March, and that helps.  Heavy winds make me irritable beyond belief.

I had strange childhood sensory stuff, too.  I remember asking my mom, "Why are the lights screaming at me?"  She couldn't figure it out.  She thought I meant they were too bright or I was hearing a buzzing noise. But (as I now realize) it was due to this 'raw nerves' thing that I believe I was born with.  I also experienced this 'black hole' feeling that was like extreme thirst and nausea mixed with a sinking feeling.  I had a therapist who was convinced these were all products of an unhappy childhood, but I doubt it.

No autism or asperger-related traits here, but I'm obsessive in the classic sense, not to be confused with being a worrier, which I'm not... I have spinning thoughts that are so fast I can't discern their content.

My lifesavers have been diet interventions and meditation.  I've tried the nostril breathing formally on meditation and yoga retreats, but I and haven't experienced much benefit.  Old-fashioned meditation is best for me.
Posted by: nowishow, Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 11:20pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from Ribbit
I hate fluorescent lights with a passion, yet that's all I've ever been around.  I hear them buzz and the flickering makes me cringe---yet nobody else (except my husband) notices.  I've tried the alternate nostril breathing a couple of times, but it made me feel so weird I decided not to do it anymore.


I used to hear flourescent lights, but no one believed me! When I was little I would cry everytime we went to Macy's because the sound was horrible. I don't know what was causing the sound, but my mom was pretty sweet about it and hurried to get us out of there. And then she would take me to a candy store and buy me Carmel Korn!  :o  I still can't stand the light they put out. Luckily I have an office with a switch so I turned mine off. I brought in a desk lamp and a floor lamp.
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 1:16am; Reply: 27
Laura, I bet you're a non-secretor.  If not, you play one in real life. ;)
Posted by: SquarePeg, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 5:32pm; Reply: 28
As a boy I was "tormented" by noise from fluorescent lights and household appliances, especially refrigerators.  And our daughter would react strongly to the rooftop air conditioning unit at her pre-school, as well as those stainless steel drinking fountains that have the cooling condenser in them.  I don't like them either, but I don't run away from them.

Incidentally, our daughter had Auditory Integration Training, and it seemed to lessen the effects of these noises.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 5:56pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from LauraT

Scroll down below the instructions and you'll see the first question.  INFP's are usually 9's, 4's, or 6's.  Sometimes 1's or 5's.  But you could be any of the 9 numbers.
http://www.enneagraminstitute.com/dis_sample_36.asp
Thanks. I got 6's on Types 4, 5 & 9.  I can identify with 4 & 5, but only a little bit with 9.

I had trouble with a few questions in which neither choice fit at all.

Posted by: Rosamunde, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 7:11pm; Reply: 30
I never appreciated how sensitive some people are to the world around them, such everyday things as flourescent lighting.  I wanted to ask how you get on with the 'diet'.  I have led a relatively ok regime lifestyle.  Aware of eating things that probably shouldn't.  
However have now been following the explorer advisory for a few weeks. Gradually moving towards the recommended to eat and easing out even the black spots.
  
I have found though that I seem to have become more sensitive and foods that I would have eaten with no reaction but are on the avoid list I now find affect me, make me feel a bit sick or aware of slight itching.  Is this to be expected?  Would it suggest that I am on the right track?  
The only think I am finding really hard to eliminate is the chocolate.  Can now eat a mere piece or 4 as opposed to a bar but difficult to totally let go.  Feel diet is fairly balanced but am I missing something in my regime?
Posted by: proto, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 8:38pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Ribbit
I hate fluorescent lights with a passion, yet that's all I've ever been around.  I hear them buzz and the flickering makes me cringe---yet nobody else (except my husband) notices.
Not all fluorescent lighting is like that. That's the cheapo kind with plain electric interface with low frequency ballast. But I can relate to the problem hardly anyone else finds bothersome. My wife gets nauseated from watching old CRT displays with low frequency refresh rate. I sometimes get motion sickness from entering a shop with poor quality lighting.

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 9:57pm; Reply: 32
Quoted Text
foods that I would have eaten with no reaction but are on the avoid list I now find affect me,


I should expect a reaction if I were eating avoids! :)
sounds like you re doing it right!
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 10:55pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from SquarePeg


Incidentally, our daughter had Auditory Integration Training, and it seemed to lessen the effects of these noises.

One of the little girls with autism I used to work with had AIT done several times.  Fascinating stuff.  I actually called and talked with them about having it done myself, but I didn't have that much money sitting around to spend on my ears. ;)
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, July 9, 2009, 11:00pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from proto
I sometimes get motion sickness from entering a shop with poor quality lighting.



Oh!  I never thought of it being motion sickness.  There are times I get unreasonably dizzy for a second for no apparent reason (when I'm in crowds, for example), (and it's not related to the low blood pressure).  My inner ear equilibrium is very easy to knock off.  I don't have a good sense of my place in space, so to speak, and I'm klutzy because of it.  Sometimes I look down and see a hand sitting there and go, "Oh. Wait. That's my hand."  I didn't feel myself touching my knee.  Other times I'm super-sensitive to touch and the tag in my shirt drives me nuts.  Does that sound insane?
Posted by: LauraT, Friday, July 10, 2009, 12:56am; Reply: 35
Quoted from SquarePeg
Thanks. I got 6's on Types 4, 5 & 9.  I can identify with 4 & 5, but only a little bit with 9.

I had trouble with a few questions in which neither choice fit at all.



Sounds like you're either the 5w4 (iconclast) or 4w5 (bohemian).  The first would apply if you are more analytical and attached... the latter, if you tend towards emotionality and are conscious of the image you present.  Of course, it's more complicated than that, but that's a start.

The 9 makes sense, since 9, 4, and 5 are the three enneagram types in the 'withdrawn' triad.  Would you say you're more introverted than an average introvert?  :)

Truthfully, I don't think it has much bearing on the explorer status, though.

Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, July 10, 2009, 6:41am; Reply: 36
I hate flourescent lights too, very much.

Ever watch Joe vs. The Volcano?  I am Joe Banks.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, July 10, 2009, 7:06am; Reply: 37
Quoted from LauraT


I think we share the same great-grandparents or something!  I have severe SAD.  I visit my parents in Arizona every December and again in March, and that helps.  Heavy winds make me irritable beyond belief.

I had strange childhood sensory stuff, too.  I remember asking my mom, "Why are the lights screaming at me?"  She couldn't figure it out.  She thought I meant they were too bright or I was hearing a buzzing noise. But (as I now realize) it was due to this 'raw nerves' thing that I believe I was born with.  I also experienced this 'black hole' feeling that was like extreme thirst and nausea mixed with a sinking feeling.  I had a therapist who was convinced these were all products of an unhappy childhood, but I doubt it.
...
My lifesavers have been diet interventions and meditation.  I've tried the nostril breathing formally on meditation and yoga retreats, but I and haven't experienced much benefit.  Old-fashioned meditation is best for me.


I think I know that black hole feeling.  The diet has really helped me as well, I think the improvement in my moods has been the biggest deal of all the improvements it's given me.  I suspect the explorer diet taking that a step further.

I just took the little free enneagram test and turned out as a 5,4.  Does that fit an InfJ?
Posted by: nowishow, Friday, July 10, 2009, 4:26pm; Reply: 38
Quoted from Melissa_J
I hate flourescent lights too, very much.

Ever watch Joe vs. The Volcano?  I am Joe Banks.


I love that movie!

I know the bit about the flourescent lights sucking the life out of him. Too funny!
"Brain Cloud" Ha!!!  ;D
Posted by: paul clucas, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 2:44am; Reply: 39
Well, Isa, I believe that I am a 5 with a 4 wing. The enneagram-thought is a little rusty.  My analytical is dominant over my creative/intuitive.  I feel we communicate across many levels in a way that is beyond me.  

Keirsey is perched on top of MTBI - which is too self-constricted.  MTBI II is the blind wandering in the desert.  If enneagram and Keirsey/MTBI were tied together through RIASEC - there would flower such phenomenal (self/mutual) understanding!

We Explorers do seem to concentrate on Discontinual Cerebral Events.

Going through a perfume department is as nails on a chalkboard for me. Seasonal light sensitivity (worse when in the UK), and unusual sound sensitivity also occur.  I can hear a mechanical pressure wave (I assume from the local auto parts plant), that my wife, who is also a highly functioning amateur chorister, cannot.  It is loud enough to keep me awake at night.

Ribbit, your posts make total sense to me.  The ear gives time, timing, and a sense of location.  The therapy for my dyslexia was based on developing neuro-sensory integration through retraining the conscious and unconscious functions of the ear.  Some of the other children in the centre were diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome or autism.  Poor ear function leads to abnormal muscle tension (and general stress) and poor digestion.  Poor digestion leads to specific nutrient deficiencies, which reinforce poor ear function. It forms a negatively reinforcing cycle.  Have you ever heard of a spontaneous remission of Asperger's?  I cannot imagine it.

The therapy totaly changed my school experience.  The vice-principal at St Andrew's College told my parents that he had never seen such a turnaround in a student's achievement record in his forty year long career.  He was a wee hale Scottish gentleman, who would remind one of a border terrier.

Btw regarding the "animal charisma" section of the Explorer monograph, does anyone experience this in some way?
Posted by: LauraT, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 2:55am; Reply: 40
Quoted from Melissa_J


I think I know that black hole feeling.  The diet has really helped me as well, I think the improvement in my moods has been the biggest deal of all the improvements it's given me.  I suspect the explorer diet taking that a step further.

I just took the little free enneagram test and turned out as a 5,4.  Does that fit an InfJ?


5w4 and 4w5 are very common for infj's

Posted by: Melissa_J, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 5:47am; Reply: 41
What is a mechanical pressure wave?  

It's interesting how heightened senses and sensitivity to every aspect of the environment seems to come along with explorers (and some other non-secretors).  It reminds me of how Dr. D. described our relationship with toxins, that sometimes our bodies spend so much attention on the little toxins that the big ones go totally unnoticed.  I seem to pay attention to little annoyances, and am sometimes unaware of bigger things.

It's kind of nice being tied up with the environment, seasons, moons, and worldwide psychic currents...but it's also kind of not.  I have learned to trust my instinct, even though I am analytical, because there is some part of me that remembers details and senses various parts of the environment that I consciously do not, and when that part speaks, even though it doesn't seem logical at the time, it's usually right.  Now, if only I could get my husband to listen to my instincts.
Posted by: DoS, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 7:22am; Reply: 42
The word everyone has been looking for is neurotic. Hunters and Explorers are neurotic by nature. Dr. D calls it a reactive world view... We like to plan ahead, but we also want it to go our way.

Are we just genetic mistakes? I feel like I am good at nothing and naturally out classed at everything by everyone.
Posted by: proto, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 11:42am; Reply: 43
Quoted from Ribbit
-- There are times I get unreasonably dizzy for a second for no apparent reason (when I'm in crowds, for example), (and it's not related to the low blood pressure).  My inner ear equilibrium is very easy to knock off.  I don't have a good sense of my place in space, so to speak, and I'm klutzy because of it.  Sometimes I look down and see a hand sitting there and go, "Oh. Wait. That's my hand."  I didn't feel myself touching my knee.  Other times I'm super-sensitive to touch and the tag in my shirt drives me nuts.  Does that sound insane?
Doesn't sound insane to me, crowd experience tends to make me tired and numb
Posted by: paul clucas, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 6:57pm; Reply: 44
Quoted from Melissa_J
What is a mechanical pressure wave?


I can feel pressure changes on skin in sync with the sound.  I am assuming that it is from a large industrial machine (about 200 yards from our house) and conveyed through the sewers.

When I have been doing my listening therapy I can speak at a soft conversational level and feel the vibration of my voice resonating my elbow bone.  An opera singer or person with a professionally developed, resonant voice (Sir Anthony Hopkins springs to mind) would be able to speak softly and have their toe bones vibrating.

Dr. Tomatis, who developed the Listening Therapy, restored the voice of Maria Callas by restoring her listening ability.

In the UK I went to Wembley stadium for a religious meeting and I remember feeling buoyed by the euphoria around me.  I tried to fight the feeling, asserting a different emotion, but it was like trying to fight a current. Since then I avoid large crowds.

Most dogs and horses that I have met trust me, unless the dog has been abused or is on guard.  Both the crowds and animals thing seem to click with the empathic ability outlined with Dr. D's Explorer monograph, but I would feel more comfortable about it if someone else has experienced the animal empathy thing.  

I feel as weird as Kevin Bacon in a leather loincloth right about now.
Posted by: RedLilac, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 7:38pm; Reply: 45
I am more sensitive to smells than sounds.  Sometimes my throat will tighten up and I have to take a Benadryl.  I dread having to sit next to someone on the plane who is wearing a perfume that makes me nauseous.  I am also very sensitive to changes in the weather.  I know when the pressure drops outside even though I’m inside.  I seem to be getting more sensitive to food the longer I am on this diet.  I guess my body had just given up sending me the signals before.   Without the signals, by the time you get so sick from the bad habits, it may be too late to turn things around.
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 11:32pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from DoS


Are we just genetic mistakes? I feel like I am good at nothing and naturally out classed at everything by everyone.


No, that's not true---you just haven't found out what you're good at yet.  Don't you dance?  Aren't you good at that?

A couple of weeks ago I was at a thrift store and I got my kids out of the van and found myself standing there in the parking lot, kids in the cart, feeling like I wanted to cry for some reason.  I felt pressure in my head and I wanted to run away.  I started looking around for a reason and realized just through the woods was a gigantic electrical plant with tubes and wires and tanks and "Danger: High Power Voltage" signs everywhere.  Once I was inside the store it went away.  Maybe the store created a Faraday cage.   ;)  Of course, the store itself created its own problems--I don't like to shop because there's people everywhere and noise and chaos and too-loud, annoying music and buzzing lights and crying babies.  Crying babies.  Everywhere.  If there's one, there's a million.  I've been known to leave a store because there was a crying baby that wouldn't stop, being ignored by the mama, and I just had to get out.
Posted by: LauraT, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 11:37pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from DoS
The word everyone has been looking for is neurotic. Hunters and Explorers are neurotic by nature. Dr. D calls it a reactive world view... We like to plan ahead, but we also want it to go our way.

Are we just genetic mistakes? I feel like I am good at nothing and naturally out classed at everything by everyone.


Sure, but other types are neurotic, too, they're just spaz on the inside instead of behaviorally.  :)

I see you're only 23.  I remember feeling really held back and restrained up until my late 20's, because I hadn't yet figured out how to get out of my own way.  Once I saw things getting better and realized I could change my life on my terms and ignore what other people thought I should do, my outlook changed immensely.  I still feel like I'm not where I want to be, but I see the improvements and I'm optimistic.  

Maybe try to find friends who inspire you and help you move the direction you want to go.  Get rid of people who contribute to your 'stuckness'.  
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, July 11, 2009, 11:39pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from LauraT


  Get rid of people who contribute to your 'stuckness'.  


Yes, very good advice.  People like that are junk in your life.  They're clutter.
Posted by: shells, Sunday, July 12, 2009, 2:07am; Reply: 49
I have laughed out loud saying yes so many times throughout this thread.  Maybe being weird is slowly becoming normal   :D

The Foxtel box really annoys me if not turned off at the wall, as a high spinning noise that nobody else in the family can hear!  Crowds with noise and lights will end up irritating me and now even large parties where I know everyone exhaust me...the washing powder aisle in the supermarket affects me in a way that I feel I have to hurry and get out before my eyes glaze over   :o

My DH had some expensive aftershave which he kept for going out but it would make me continually sneeze till my eyes would not stop tearing...to the point that my makeup was ruined and we would leave with a wife with swollen red blotchy eyes!  Needless to say it is now banned.  Cannot handle wool next to my skin...itches terribly. The sensitivity  with the Explorers in my family seems to be with all five senses and when you get multi-sensory input...watch out!!   :-/  
Posted by: shells, Sunday, July 12, 2009, 2:44am; Reply: 50
Although I don't know much about the Myer-Briggs system I thought I read somewhere that Dr. D. had mentioned that Explorers were more likely to be an S in the lettering, being very aware of their surroundings  and therefore sensory...I could be wrong.  

Having said that I think I am an INTP or some days an INFP.  Can you be two??  And if so what enneagram would be a blend.  I maybe too analytical for myself.  I can see very clearly my children and those around me but find it hard to box myself.   8)  
Posted by: proto, Sunday, July 12, 2009, 8:07am; Reply: 51
Quoted from shells

The Foxtel box really annoys me if not turned off at the wall, as a high spinning noise that nobody else in the family can hear!
Probably needs a new hard drive. Try to get one with a fluid bearing.

Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, July 12, 2009, 2:55pm; Reply: 52
Shells, you mentioned wool.  Me too.  I have not bought wool sweaters in years, so I guess I never mentioned it to my son.  A couple of years ago, he bought me a beautiful red wool sweater for Winter Solstice.  So the only time I can wear it is if I put on this black lightweight turtle neck sweater with long sleeves underneath.

Anybody allergic to metals?  I am.
Posted by: Chandon, Sunday, July 12, 2009, 4:01pm; Reply: 53
I think my husband is an Explorer, although I don't know his secretor or rhesus status (one option for him does lead to Explorer). He doesn't have much interest in individualizing his diet, but I might try to guide him the right direction. While I had thought I had a lot of Explorer qualities, it turned out that in fact I'm a teacher. And in the end, he probably has more Explorer issues--caffeine sensitivity (plus not dealing well with coffee in terms of digestion), sensitivity to wool, and sensitivity to fragrance to the point of having to go to the hospital once when his face swelled up. And, while I'm not sure "having his own way" is such an obvious thing with him, he has a certain defiant nonconformity, where, for example, he doesn't care if people don't like the way he dresses or if they find his opinions obnoxious sometimes! He's the kind of person that can really attract someone, but also the kind of person who can have a few enemies. But maybe they are jealous of his strong character, great sense of humor, and charisma.
Posted by: Amazone I., Sunday, July 12, 2009, 4:30pm; Reply: 54
@ paul c..... please remember the issues of Briggs-Myers book *gifts differing* here she explains  how sweet we do react..as being i's & introverts...we react exaclty the oposite way of our endings....so far it doesn't astonish me that intp's act likewise intj's...and what's up here as an edge...= istp....;)... (hehe)(hehe)(hehe)
istj= 6/7.......shells..I feel here you might to be found ;) ;D....
Posted by: 6053 (Guest), Monday, July 13, 2009, 6:30pm; Reply: 55
My Mother is an Explorer and was wondering if there are any other Explorers out there that would be interested in corresponding with her? Expolorers seems to be a tricky one...some things on her do not eat list do not bother her at all. I know fragrances that are too strong make her pretty sick. My sister and I have always joked about her amazing sense of smell and how she is always so scent oriented....Elizabeth
Posted by: nowishow, Monday, July 13, 2009, 7:00pm; Reply: 56
Quoted from RedLilac
Shells, you mentioned wool.  Me too.  I have not bought wool sweaters in years, so I guess I never mentioned it to my son.  A couple of years ago, he bought me a beautiful red wool sweater for Winter Solstice.  So the only time I can wear it is if I put on this black lightweight turtle neck sweater with long sleeves underneath.

Anybody allergic to metals?  I am.


Allegic to wool ever since I was young. Some polyster sweaters that are made to look like wool bother me as well.

I used to have a problem with ear rings (metals) but not since I started the BTD. But, I don't wear a watch, bracelet or necklace. I just don't like the way they feel. I wear ear rings most days, but take them out at night.
Posted by: paul clucas, Monday, July 13, 2009, 9:18pm; Reply: 57
Quoted from RedLilac
Anybody allergic to metals?  I am.


My maternal Grandmother was allergic to gold - she had a platinum wedding ring.

She fit the "Physique" description for explorers to a T.  She had short lower legs wide shoulders, wide pelvis.  Her face was not symmetrical, but with wide cheek bones, and a wide forehead.

Queen of the roost she was, but I never saw that myself since she was in awe of my Dad.

Quoted from Amazone I.
as being i's & introverts...we react exaclty the oposite way of our endings....so far it doesn't astonish me that intp's act likewise intj's


Yes Isa, I do remember i's extrovert as their opposites.  

If you happen to find that Emmegram-MBTI article I would like to get a copy.  My sister can translate it if it is in Deutsch or Française.

:)
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 1:04am; Reply: 58
Quoted from 6053
some things on her do not eat list do not bother her at all.


It doesn't mean it's not doing damage though.  As we joke on these forums, there are avoids....and then there are AVOIDS.  The avoids are the foods you stay away from (generally) simply because they're on that list.  The AVOIDS are the ones you don't eat under any circumstance because you'll regret it if you do!!! ;)
Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 1:33am; Reply: 59
Quoted from shells
-snip-
Having said that I think I am an INTP or some days an INFP.  Can you be two??  And if so what enneagram would be a blend.  I maybe too analytical for myself.  I can see very clearly my children and those around me but find it hard to box myself.   8)  
Yes, I'm like that.  That's why I use a lowercase f.

Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 1:39am; Reply: 60
Quoted from LauraT


Sounds like you're either the 5w4 (iconclast) or 4w5 (bohemian).  The first would apply if you are more analytical and attached... the latter, if you tend towards emotionality and are conscious of the image you present.  Of course, it's more complicated than that, but that's a start.

The 9 makes sense, since 9, 4, and 5 are the three enneagram types in the 'withdrawn' triad.  Would you say you're more introverted than an average introvert?  :)

Truthfully, I don't think it has much bearing on the explorer status, though.

I suppose 4w5.  But I don't consider myself very introverted anymore, which I why I use a lowercase "I".  I mean I used to avoid people all the time.  Now I don't mind mixing, and sometimes I become energized in certain group situations.  But I tend to be aloof / detached.
Posted by: Amazone I., Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 8:02am; Reply: 61
Paul please look here ;) ...www.enneagram.com  all is obtainable here :D
Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 5:12pm; Reply: 62
Quoted from SquarePeg
I suppose 4w5.  But I don't consider myself very introverted anymore, which I why I use a lowercase "I".  I mean I used to avoid people all the time.  Now I don't mind mixing, and sometimes I become energized in certain group situations.  But I tend to be aloof / detached.
On second thought, maybe I'm so introverted that I don't realize how introverted I am.  I'm more likely to listen to the music in my head than desire to turn on the stereo.  And I'll pay more attention to my thoughts than to someone talking to me, for example.

Posted by: bisnonna, Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 8:52pm; Reply: 63
I hadn't thought about the sensitivity to wool, but I really have it.  I absolutely have to wear something under anything wool. Actually, it doesn't even have to be wool.  I cut the tags out of all of my t-shirts, or any other article of clothing that is right next to my skin, especially anything with a tag that's sewn with that sparkly metal thread or the plastic thread.  Certain t-shirts also have itchy ribbed necks, too (don't ask me how that happens, I just know it does, and they itch).  Anybody else notice that?  Maybe I'm finally starting to understand all these sensitivities that I've had all my life, and that everyone wondered about....
Posted by: misspudding, Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 11:07pm; Reply: 64
Oh, I love this thread!

I have the squinty eye thing and my son, who is so much like me in explorer traits (he's only 4.5 but I can just feel it), has it, too!

Any kind of wool, even Merino wool, drives me completely F-ing mad.  And yes on the asperger's traits, too.  And hearing fluorescent lights an setting the refresh on my computer screen to one that's as fast as possible or I go crazy (I can see the flicker).  I can smell things a mile away and my sense of memory is inexplicably linked to smell.  It's amazing.  Perhaps that was one way explorers were so good at navigating and exploring...although, sometimes I think I have a built in GPS system.  I never get lost.  My husband always makes me the navigator!  (And I'm a geologist...talk about exploring!).

Exciting...:)  Off to go hide back in my cave...
Posted by: LauraT, Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 2:05am; Reply: 65
I have a squinty eye.  I buy firming/lifting eye gel and only use it on my right eye to make both eyes equally 'open'.  


Actually, do you want to hear a perfect example of asymmetry: My left eye has better than 20/20 vision and my right eye requires a contact lens.  I've never been cross-eyed, but I definitely have some strange right versus left sides of body stuff.

But, I'm still not sure I'm an explorer.  I could be a hunter.  I'm waiting for my secretor status and my swami.  
Posted by: Melissa_J, Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 6:37am; Reply: 66
I used to itch from wool, but not any more, although turtlenecks or collars of any kind that are high or snug at all drive me absolutely bats.

I can wear a scented oil sometimes, but can't get near perfume.  I can smell the layers of scents on other people (deodorant, perfume, fabric softener) and that can make me dizzy.  One scent, if it's more natural, I can handle, but not all those layers of different forms of fragrance.  I put a couple drops of essential oil in the liquid fabric softener dispenser, and use reusable fabric (chemical-free) dryer sheets.

I'm slightly less sensitive to fragrances over the last year or so.  It has been hard for me to do housecleaning, because I detest the chemicals involved.  Lately, with some guidance from flylady, I've learned that if I do little jobs more often then I don't have to use chemicals, soap is soap.  It's actually somewhat enjoyable now.

My wild-card reactions (that are random and probably not shared among explorers, only their randomness may be) are fermented corn derivatives (citric acid is the biggie, also corn alcohol in natural flavors, and some ascorbic acid), rosemary (itchy rash), and pistachios (anaphalactic type of reaction).

Does anybody out there react to parboiled rice (like Uncle Ben's)?  I used to and could never figure it out, now I don't, but my husband now does!  I wish I could figure out what its deal is.  I don't like it, so at least my husband never gets it from my kitchen. I think it's just rice, but how do they treat it when they parboil it, or what do they parboil it in, I know not.  Maybe it's something they enrich it with...
Posted by: misspudding, Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 7:18am; Reply: 67
I love flylady!  :)
Posted by: shells, Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 7:19am; Reply: 68
Maybe it has something to do with the fact that it is moist after cooking and a time lapse has occurred with warmth to let little microbes in...not to actually spoil but to affect sensitive digestions...before the packaging is completed to then go on to the suppliers.  I only say this because of my experience with trying to freeze cooked rice plus I tried to get away with rice milk in dandelion coffee but have had so many tummy troubles especially on day 3 or even 2 after opening that I had to stop.

Rice goes off so easily when cooked that it wouldn't surprise me if the conditions where it was packaged wasn't the best  ::)
Posted by: shells, Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 7:34am; Reply: 69
Explorers, do any of you react to cats?  

I remember bringing home to my kids a beautiful little grey kitten with big blue eyes...I had to pop him into the top of my t-shirt while driving only a suburb or two to our home.  The kids were waiting as I arrived and quickly took the tiny kitten and to my shock I was covered in welts.  Within a couple of hours my eyes were crying and nasal passages started to swell.   :'(

My eldest daughter (explorer) when first was flatting with friends who had a cat developed asthma for the first and only time in her life.  A doc suggested not to have cats or long haired dogs but to try having short haired dogs and for them to mostly live outside to challenge the immune system.

Can anyone relate to this?

Posted by: LauraT, Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 8:35am; Reply: 70
Quoted from shells
Explorers, do any of you react to cats?  

I remember bringing home to my kids a beautiful little grey kitten with big blue eyes...I had to pop him into the top of my t-shirt while driving only a suburb or two to our home.  The kids were waiting as I arrived and quickly took the tiny kitten and to my shock I was covered in welts.  Within a couple of hours my eyes were crying and nasal passages started to swell.   :'(




Extremely allergic to cats.  And I love them so much!  But I develop severe asthma, watery eyes, itchiness, redness, everything.

Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Thursday, July 16, 2009, 10:48am; Reply: 71
I had scratch tests done years ago and they confirmed a cat allergy. Oddly I have 2 cats that I don't react to, but for some reason I will react to my mom's kitties.
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, July 16, 2009, 12:10pm; Reply: 72
I wonder if the cats' diets have anything to do with how much dander they produce or whether it bothers you or not.
Posted by: shells, Friday, July 17, 2009, 7:29am; Reply: 73
Was listening to a health programme on the radio about animal allergies and the doc/naturopath stated that the animal dander, oils and saliva can all trigger the allergies.  This was a surprise to me as I always believed it to be just the dander.  It does make sense though as the kittens are always licked continuously by their mothers and hence we can react more to kittens   :P
Posted by: LauraT, Friday, July 17, 2009, 8:37am; Reply: 74
This makes me sound like a kitty-racist, but the only cats I'm not allergic to have been purely white with blue eyes.   :-/  I'm guessing they have different skin or something than other cats.  I'm extremely allergic to calico's, siamese are usually really rough to be around.   Tabby cats with really dry, fuzzy hair don't bother me but silky ones do.  I'm thinking of getting allergy shots & see if that works, because I really do love cats.

I became allergic at age 12, just like my mom.  When my mom went through menopause, her cat allergies went away.  Interesting how all these chemicals interact.
Posted by: Amazone I., Friday, July 17, 2009, 10:00am; Reply: 75
my sister also an AB but sechi react to cathairs with asthma too...I only react for rabbit-hairs ::)....but sorry I don't know what she might be. nor am I sure what I might be...something between explorer and nomade ;) ;D.....


:o :o :B wow, Laura T sorry I didn't realized your link to several other forms of testings.....hmmm can't see that...sorry... but if you read from Riso all he wrote about differences of the types... I feel merely that he is more correct to the *so called truth* than others...because of the problem of no:3...here in reality is no name---- and 1 can be confound with 3 yep...but the types in reality are completely different also how they act and what their purposes are....(wiseman)(smile)(ok) I saw it in the very first book of Don R. Riso...the nine personalities  and next the wisdom of the enneagram...here it becomes very clear how people might confound their own persoanlities....;)

btw...won't mix all together...if not I'll get lost .... ;D ;D


Paul C.....I only can agree with you, the differnce here is, I don't have any dyslexic things...but merely the need to point out when words are written wrongly in french or teutonic language...;)  :B :-/....
Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, July 17, 2009, 4:40pm; Reply: 76
Quoted from shells
Explorers, do any of you react to cats? -snip-


Yes, i had terrible asthma, watery eyes, running nose, welts (from direct contact).

But now on the BTD, my symptoms are minimal, and we live with 3 cats.  But I still get welts from claw marks.
Posted by: LauraT, Friday, July 17, 2009, 6:37pm; Reply: 77
Quoted from SquarePeg


Yes, i had terrible asthma, watery eyes, running nose, welts (from direct contact).

But now on the BTD, my symptoms are minimal, and we live with 3 cats.  But I still get welts from claw marks.


That's amazing!  I want to do what you do!  Can you tell me what you eat in a typical day and which supplements you take?  My skin and mood have improved, but I still have a lot of nasal/ear/head/lung congestion.  

Posted by: LauraT, Friday, July 17, 2009, 6:52pm; Reply: 78
Quoted from Amazone I.
.because of the problem of no:3...here in reality is no name---- and 1 can be confound with 3 yep...but the types in reality are completely different also how they act and what their purposes are....(wiseman)(smile)(ok).


I heard one teacher say that the MBTI is the 'true self' and the enneagram is the set of coping behaviors a person develops to protect this 'true self'.  Most infj's develop a '4' coping behavior; most ESTJ's develop a '3' coping behavior.

Anyway, the interesting thing to me is on this site, I see a lot of infj, infp, and intj

Posted by: RedLilac, Friday, July 17, 2009, 6:58pm; Reply: 79
Well this explorer has 3 cats and does fine with them.  We’re such a unique and diverse group.  We’re all sensitive to something but not necessarily the same things.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, July 17, 2009, 9:16pm; Reply: 80
Quoted from LauraT


That's amazing!  I want to do what you do!  Can you tell me what you eat in a typical day and which supplements you take?  My skin and mood have improved, but I still have a lot of nasal/ear/head/lung congestion.  

Giving up wheat and dairy is important.  As well, I've been supplementing with Isocort for two years.  The extra cortisol from Isocort may have an effect similar to prednisone.

Exercise is important.  If you can breathe well and have the energy, do some exercise every day.

Sometimes the combination of the cats, seasonal allergies, and giving in to ice cream and cookies gets me in trouble.  Dr. D's allergy protocol helps a lot.  That includes Quercetin, Stinging Nettle and especially Collinsonia for healthy sinuses.  As well, I use a neti pot every morning and run both HEPA and ionizing air purifiers in the home.  I was diagnosed with sleep apnea, so I also use a CPAP machine at night.

I have a bit more detail on my blog, but I think the above is what keeps me ticking.

Disclaimers: The product links I provided are "Affiliate Links."  Should you click on them and buy the products, I would receive some payment.  Also, I am not a doctor.  I'm only saying what works for me.  Whether it will work for you is unknown, so please check with your M.D or N.D.
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, July 18, 2009, 12:56pm; Reply: 81
Quoted from LauraT


I heard one teacher say that the MBTI is the 'true self' and the enneagram is the set of coping behaviors a person develops to protect this 'true self'.  Most infj's develop a '4' coping behavior; most ESTJ's develop a '3' coping behavior.

Anyway, the interesting thing to me is on this site, I see a lot of infj, infp, and intj



Perhaps the extroverts don't feel as much need to have online support.   ??)

Interesting about "coping behavior."  I would like to look into that a bit more.  Not to turn this into Ribbit Therapy, but I feel like I'm changing my coping behavior back to how I was when I was younger b/c my attempts at coping for the last 10 years hasn't worked as well as I'd hoped.   :-/  Is that allowed?
Posted by: LauraT, Saturday, July 18, 2009, 9:37pm; Reply: 82
Quoted from Ribbit


Perhaps the extroverts don't feel as much need to have online support.   ??)

Interesting about "coping behavior."  I would like to look into that a bit more.  Not to turn this into Ribbit Therapy, but I feel like I'm changing my coping behavior back to how I was when I was younger b/c my attempts at coping for the last 10 years hasn't worked as well as I'd hoped.   :-/  Is that allowed?


Well, so in the enneagram theory, people "integrate" to other numbers when they become healthier and more balanced.  If you're a 4 (the individualist) you would integrate to the 1 (perfectionist).  If you're a 5 (the observer) you integrate to 8 (the challenger).  Also, the "fixations" become less pronounced as you become healthier.  People who are totally enlightened don't have a visible enneagram type.  I've noticed this with many spiritual teachers... they obviously have coping mechanisms, because they're human, but it isn't clear which ones they rely on, because it's so subtle.  

Posted by: Amazone I., Sunday, July 19, 2009, 7:03am; Reply: 83
Laura T...I can agree here ;) :D...ESTJ is the 2/3 thingy here...no wonder a lot of O's developed such a behaviour.....a gatherer thing ??)
but well ther's always a way to see or give an approach to something....even to our *selfs* ;)...btw...here only our developemnt of our so called *persona* is described here...btw... I justamente love the work of C.G.Jung...which is in both aspects the underlinded workout  ;)(clap)(ok)(smarty)  I think C.G.Jung was pointed being an isfj...... 8).........(9/1) a psychological form to get us determinded..... but hasn't anything to do with our true *selfs*  ;)(smile)(wiseman).....
Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 2:23am; Reply: 84
Quoted from LauraT


Well, so in the enneagram theory, people "integrate" to other numbers when they become healthier and more balanced.  If you're a 4 (the individualist) you would integrate to the 1 (perfectionist).  If you're a 5 (the observer) you integrate to 8 (the challenger).  Also, the "fixations" become less pronounced as you become healthier.  People who are totally enlightened don't have a visible enneagram type.  I've noticed this with many spiritual teachers... they obviously have coping mechanisms, because they're human, but it isn't clear which ones they rely on, because it's so subtle.  

Interesting.  One of my first posts on this message board was asking about whether people noticed a personality change from diet.  I don't think I got much of a response, though.

Posted by: shells, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 8:10am; Reply: 85
Quoted from LauraT


Anyway, the interesting thing to me is on this site, I see a lot of infj, infp, and intj



I have found that I come out at intp on this site's test but my daughter pointed out that I work with people and enjoy it so have to be an entp or enfp   ??)  

Has anyone else had this problem?
Posted by: shells, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 8:18am; Reply: 86
I guess what I am trying to say is that I am right on the border.  I do need to have my alone time but not excessively.  One daughter is definitely an extrovert and one an introvert and I would probably be in between.  

Maybe square peg is right and BTD/GTD has levelled me right out!   :D
Posted by: cozzete, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 10:32am; Reply: 87
An introvert is someone who doesn't need the object or person around to be connected to it...their connection to others is from a connection to something within themselves. An extrovert needs the object or person around to feel connected to it. When an introvert is dragged to a party that they don't want to go to ..once they get there and get into the party they have to be dragged away from it(as a undeveloped extrovert..they have no boundaries)whereas the extrovert..once they get into an activity that doesn't involve others...they can get totally immersed in something to the exclusion of all other things and people...for a while. But thats how both learn to relate to the undeveloped side. Anyway, thats how i remember stuff from my jungian days.

When i was younger..it was all about being with people. But once i got into an artistic activity....i would spend 10 hours painting with no break.  I had no idea how to pace myself either way. I had taken the briggs/meyer test and it came out that i was equally introverted and extroverted(meaning i was enlighted in both areas or completely unconscious of both operating in me...of course..by my imersion in both...i was the latter.) Nowadays..i can do both without going too far. And i look forward to interacting with others. And i look forward to going into myself...in the same day.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 4:47pm; Reply: 88
Quoted from shells


I have found that I come out at intp on this site's test but my daughter pointed out that I work with people and enjoy it so have to be an entp or enfp   ??)  

Has anyone else had this problem?
It could be that you get into an introverted state as you take the test.
Posted by: Bekki Shining Bearheart, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 6:51pm; Reply: 89
Great thread.

I tried the Enneagram test but some of the questions really bothered me. In at least one case I didn't feel either question described me, in another both did. I tend to be very precise though with definitions (English prof father). So I don't know if I really answered the questions right. I think I need a longer more comprehensive test to get a good result.

Also I didn't really know how to interpret it, because I haven't had time to really study it. All that said, 3 was my strongest #, scoring 7 points; 2 was next with 6 points; 1 and 5 had 5 points each. I related to some aspects of all of the types. One thing that didn't seem to show up for the ones I scored highest on was my drive to creativity (music, art and writing) and my strong intuition and interest in healing (I tech and practice shamanic healing which is all about connecting with Spirit). Though I am a busy person and mostly always doing things my connection to Spirit is really important to me. I have to have time to be in Nature, to go within, and to use my connection with Spirit to help others. I also consider my creativity to be a way of linking the spiritual with the physical-- most of what I create comes from that spiritual connection.

Sensitivities: I can relate to a lot of what people said-- textures etc-- though it has never been so bad that I was allergic. I don't care much for the really scatchy wools but some of them are soft and those are ok. My brother hates wool next to his skin-- always thought he would be a Hunter but maybe not. He would say yes to a number of things folks have mentioned here.

I have always had lots of respiratory colds and things (until BTD)but never asthma and allergies. I currently have 5 cats and they sleep with me every night. But I also feed them a homemade diet, and I think that makes a huge difference.

Hate fluorescent lights!!! but they make me sleepy, not jumpy.

Smells: love essential oils and all kinds of flowers, but cannot abide synthetic smells of any kind. Have a very acute sense of smell.
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 7:39pm; Reply: 90
Most of the complaints we're listing, though, are simply non-secretor traits.  If you read through the Nonnie Clubhouse threads, you'll read the same things.  So the Explorers might be this way overall, but the non-secretors in general are the same way--super-sensitive to internal and external irritants.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 12:02am; Reply: 91
Some cats are more allergenic than others.  Diet has something to do with it, as does breed.  My husband's sister has a ragdoll cat and he is not allergic to it, but he's terribly allergic to most cats.

I'm slightly allergic to cats, but much improved after allergy drops (allergyeasy, my osteopath does these homeopathic allergy drops).  I haven't really tested my horse allergy after doing the drops, I'm scared to maybe get covered in welts!
Posted by: shells, Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 1:31am; Reply: 92
Hmmmm, maybe the non allergenic cats are in effect non-secretors.  As their saliva is highly allergic and especially cats lick themselves often.  What else could explain it?   ::)
Posted by: shells, Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 1:48am; Reply: 93
Quoted from cozzete
An introvert is someone who doesn't need the object or person around to be connected to it...their connection to others is from a connection to something within themselves...

When i was younger..it was all about being with people. But once i got into an artistic activity....i would spend 10 hours painting with no break.  I had no idea how to pace myself either way. I had taken the briggs/meyer test and it came out that i was equally introverted and extroverted(meaning i was enlighted in both areas or completely unconscious of both operating in me...of course..by my imersion in both...i was the latter.) Nowadays..i can do both without going too far. And i look forward to interacting with others. And i look forward to going into myself...in the same day.


Wow, this is so interesting.  It does explain a lot especially the more inner work we do   :)
Posted by: Bekki Shining Bearheart, Sunday, July 26, 2009, 10:14pm; Reply: 94
Maybe someone should start a thread about Explorers and spirituality! since that seems to be some kind of theme here.

I can really relate to the thing about spending 10 hours on a project-- I'm that way about creative projects but also about working in my garden, or building stuff.
Posted by: wag, Friday, August 7, 2009, 6:44pm; Reply: 95
Hey there,
I've got to say that the Explorer profile was dead on for me.  I was really happy to see that so many people on here hate fluorescent lights.  I can hear them, and sometimes I feel like they are not flickering fast enough to give the appearance of a steady light (see flicker fusion).  I get the same thing with monitors sometimes...way too focused on minor annoyances.  It has made me a pretty successful scientist, though. :)

I am a bit pissed that I've been feeling bad for not being able to tolerate tofu and coffee for the last 10 years on the BTD, but I guess that's the risk you run as a guinea pig.  Adamo's like some kind of mad scientist, making concrete recommendations on incomplete data, but maybe that's how progress is made.  It worked for the Nazi scientists.

Anyhow, great to see you all on here.  Let me know if you are able to find quail eggs, emu meat, and eye of newt (or whatever obscure foods we are supposed to be eating).  Peace! ;)
Posted by: nowishow, Friday, August 7, 2009, 7:34pm; Reply: 96
It seems people shy away from the Explorer (and Warrior) diet. But, I feel so much better that If eye of newt was on the list I'd probably eat it!  ;)
Posted by: Tea Rose, Friday, August 7, 2009, 9:53pm; Reply: 97
I just found out about 5 days ago that I am an Explorer after 1 1/2 years following the Hunter diet.   I am ISFJ, but I call myself a situational extrovert.  If I am in the mood then I love being around people, but I NEED to have alone time.  I hate the thought of going to a party, I will dread it for a week and then when I get there, I have a great time (usually), but I am usually the first one to leave also.

Allergic to wool and pine trees, and other things.  Wheat changes my personality and handwritting.  Perfume/Cologne makes me angry and mean, really mean. I can feel the cells in my body celebrating the music I hear.  I avoid malls because of everyone's energy.  I hate going to wakes and funerals because I can feel the sadness.  I am not an animal person, but they love me, they want to be near me.  I feel energy from trees.  One of the things that drove me nuts when I was working at my last job was that I didn't have a window and couldn't see outside.

This was a long thread and I am trying  to remember everything I wanted to respond to.  Reading everyone's remarks has brought me great comfort.  It is wonderful to know that others understand.

Tea Rose
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 12:23am; Reply: 98
wag,
You can help the other members of the forum help you by choosing a blood type shield to display beneath your name.

how to
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-ref/m-1219018887/

Welcome!
displaying messages under the avatar like Gt and other:
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-ref/m-1219018887/#num1

I reckon you are an A, but never thought of doing a whole serotype panel?
that test helps determine weather an A1 or 2.....secretor or not, and RH status.....
but maybe you already know all that.....
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 12:25am; Reply: 99
Quoted Text
eye of newt

(think)

how about....
....... toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder fork, and blind-worm sting,
Lizard leg, and howlet wing,
lol
Posted by: Mickey, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 2:52am; Reply: 100
Quoted Text
It seems people shy away from the Explorer (and Warrior) diet. But, I feel so much better that If eye of newt was on the list I'd probably eat it!  


I guess i'm one of the few who actually welcome the explorer diet.  Coming from the o-nonnie diet my food options have expanded quite a bit and i still have some of the same avoids that i did on the BTD (which makes it easier to transition).  I'm following a combo of both the BTD/GTD, but mostly sticking to the GTD.  ;)
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 3:33am; Reply: 101
count me in!! ;)
Posted by: SquarePeg, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 4:36am; Reply: 102
Quoted from wag
-snip-
Anyhow, great to see you all on here.  Let me know if you are able to find quail eggs, emu meat, and eye of newt (or whatever obscure foods we are supposed to be eating).  Peace! ;)

Welcome!  Japanese restaurants tend to have fresh quail eggs.  You can order it as a topping for sushi / sashimi, which I did once.  (It's served raw, and it's somewhat difficult to eat with chopsticks.)  But I've not found them in a grocery store.

Good luck!
Posted by: SquarePeg, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 4:42am; Reply: 103
Quoted from Mickey

I guess i'm one of the few who actually welcome the explorer diet.  Coming from the o-nonnie diet my food options have expanded quite a bit and i still have some of the same avoids that i did on the BTD (which makes it easier to transition).  I'm following a combo of both the BTD/GTD, but mostly sticking to the GTD.  ;)

I agree with you, Mickey.  (I presume myself to be a nonnie.)  I especially like all the sweets!  But I don't like the change on walnuts.

Oh well.

I tend to just try to avoid wheat, dairy, soy & corn (and derivatives.)  Nothing else bothers me all that much.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 6:57pm; Reply: 104
Quoted from wag
Let me know if you are able to find quail eggs, emu meat, and eye of newt


Quail eggs are no problem most of the asian markets here sell them.  Some whole foods and grocery stores with extensive gourmet food sections have them.

Emu is not quite as common. If you have difficulty finding it locally you can always order it online. http://www.emusingsecrets.com/meatorder.html

Here is a recipe for faux eye of newt:

12 eggs

Green food coloring as needed (or diet allows)
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish or appropriate substitute for diet
1 tablespoon compliant mayonnaise
1 pinch celery salt
1 Mustard powder

1 can pitted black olives

Fix like devil eggs. Food coloring is for making yolk mixture green.
After you refill the eggs with the green yolk mixture,
you should place one of the olives in the center of each "eye"

Posted by: Lola, Saturday, August 8, 2009, 9:35pm; Reply: 105
;D
Posted by: Ribbit, Sunday, August 9, 2009, 1:07am; Reply: 106
C#, can't you think of anything better to do? :D
Posted by: LauraT, Sunday, August 9, 2009, 9:04pm; Reply: 107
Quoted from Tea Rose
Wheat changes my personality and handwritting.  Perfume/Cologne makes me angry and mean, really mean. I can feel the cells in my body celebrating the music I hear.  I avoid malls because of everyone's energy.  I hate going to wakes and funerals because I can feel the sadness.  


That's fascinating, especially about the handwriting.

I've worked in the same building for 7 years and have dreaded going there every day.  It isn't the content of the work I resist, since I'm passionate about what I do.  I used to think my issue was the lack of windows and horrid cubicle space, and I'm sure that is part of it.  But just a year ago, I learned that our office is build on top of a cemetery!!!  Not only that, but it used to be a fire department before it was an administrative building.  Well, no wonder!  The land is teeming with grief and anxiety.  

I couldn't believe nobody had told me before.  It seems like something you should tell people before you hire them, but I guess a lot of people think "energy-sensitivity" is just superstition.  If they lived in my body, they would think differently!  
Posted by: Tea Rose, Sunday, August 9, 2009, 9:07pm; Reply: 108
I hear you there LauraT !
Posted by: 6283 (Guest), Monday, August 10, 2009, 4:40pm; Reply: 109
I am so glad this Explorer site is here.  I am a possible Explorer, (A+ blood type, supertaster, awaiting secretor status) and would appreciate the guidance of this thread.
Posted by: Bekki Shining Bearheart, Thursday, August 13, 2009, 8:55pm; Reply: 110
Quoted Text
If I am in the mood then I love being around people, but I NEED to have alone time.  I hate the thought of going to a party, I will dread it for a week and then when I get there, I have a great time (usually), but I am usually the first one to leave also.
I can feel the cells in my body celebrating the music I hear.
I feel energy from trees.  


T Rose I can definitely relate to this.

Laura T I can also relate to what you said about your work place.

One of the reasons that the Chinese developed feng shui is that they, like many of our ancestors, understood such things. HONOR the Ancestors, honor the energy of a place, because such things are real.

When I discovered shamanism it helped me to put into context my sensitivities to energy, and I found remedies for such problems.

The good news it that once you understand what's happening you can do something about it.

Like using the GTD to know what foods enhance our immune systems and which help protect us from environmental sensitivities and such.


Posted by: Tea Rose, Thursday, August 13, 2009, 9:14pm; Reply: 111
Hi Bekki,

Like I said, it is great to know there are others who understand!

Tea Rose
Posted by: Symbi, Sunday, September 6, 2009, 3:59am; Reply: 112
Quoted from LauraT

I also did some searches for the 'skull types' Dr. D mentions when he describes how Explorers look, and they totally resemble me (& ancestors):  narrow face, squarish jaw, and often with 1 eye squintier than the other.  


I'm an INFJ, used to be an INFP.  I think I'm Enneagram Type 6 - The Loyalist and 4 strongly too.  Can be paranoid, very sensitive, introverted and quiet but sometimes very bold and outrageous as well.  Reactive to others emotions and surroundings.

I love your description of how explorer's look.  It cemented my certainty that I'm an explorer.  

The squinty eye part got me thinking. If you were Clint Eastwood, how could one eye be more squinty than the other one!!  He's got the squintiest eyes ever and made a career out of it. :D With his height, he's could be a Hunter though, not sure. He's right into health could be reading this you never know! He's certainly creative and entrepreneurial, lateral thinking and different though.  Probably alot of explorer on his SWAMI.  Would love to find out!

cozzete - thanks for sharing your knowledge, very interesting about introverted/extraverted.  

Great thread everyone.  It would be good if there could be more sections under the boards for the different genotypes and one general section.  It's getting really busy.

Posted by: britney, Sunday, September 6, 2009, 4:33am; Reply: 113
Quoted from Ribbit


Oh!  I never thought of it being motion sickness.  There are times I get unreasonably dizzy for a second for no apparent reason (when I'm in crowds, for example), (and it's not related to the low blood pressure).  


No way, I thought I was the only one who got dizzy like that... it is really hard for me to go to wal-mart. I always thought it was because there was so much going on. The lighting, that makes so much sense!

Also, I've been sensitive to the weather for as long as I can remember and the warm temp during the summer has always bothered me until this summer, I've hardly noticed it. I'm four months on the diet... weird, huh?
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, September 6, 2009, 4:33am; Reply: 114
there is a gtd section and other sections already......
this thread is placed in the GTD section.
Posted by: LauraT, Sunday, September 6, 2009, 9:57am; Reply: 115
Quoted from Symbi


I'm an INFJ, used to be an INFP.  I think I'm Enneagram Type 6 - The Loyalist and 4 strongly too.  Can be paranoid, very sensitive, introverted and quiet but sometimes very bold and outrageous as well.  Reactive to others emotions and surroundings.

I love your description of how explorer's look.  It cemented my certainty that I'm an explorer.  

The squinty eye part got me thinking. If you were Clint Eastwood, how could one eye be more squinty than the other one!!  He's got the squintiest eyes ever and made a career out of it. :D With his height, he's could be a Hunter though, not sure. He's right into health could be reading this you never know! He's certainly creative and entrepreneurial, lateral thinking and different though.  Probably alot of explorer on his SWAMI.  Would love to find out!

cozzete - thanks for sharing your knowledge, very interesting about introverted/extraverted.  

Great thread everyone.  It would be good if there could be more sections under the boards for the different genotypes and one general section.  It's getting really busy.



This is too funny.  I was just watching a youtube video of Clint Eastwood singing (lip-synching?) "I talk to the trees" from Paint Your Wagon.  I giggled the whole way through but was totally transfixed.

I could see him as a Hunter, Explorer, or Warrior.  I'm not the best a typing GTD... the enneagram is definitely my specialty.  People who type as a 6 pretty much always are.  It's far more commong for 6's to type as other numbers than the converse.

Posted by: Symbi, Monday, September 14, 2009, 3:59am; Reply: 116
Quoted from LauraT


This is too funny.  I was just watching a youtube video of Clint Eastwood singing (lip-synching?) "I talk to the trees" from Paint Your Wagon.  I giggled the whole way through but was totally transfixed.

I could see him as a Hunter, Explorer, or Warrior.  I'm not the best a typing GTD... the enneagram is definitely my specialty.  People who type as a 6 pretty much always are.  It's far more commong for 6's to type as other numbers than the converse.


Laura T, coincidence or what? Both thinking of Clint Eastwood.  Well we both are women!

He really sung that song! ;D so funny! and he also wrote the theme for Unforgiven on piano.  Talent!

You're so right he could be a Warrior!  He's definately Type A after reading this: http://cms.ihrsa.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageId=15698&nodeID=15
He eats mainly vegan, soy but also every now and then only white meats, no cheese or red meat.  He works out alot too.  WARRIOR for sure!!!  Good pick Laura T.

Thanks for confirming I sound like a type 6.  Anymore you can tell me about those  ??)


Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, September 14, 2009, 2:41pm; Reply: 117
What's his jaw like?  You might be able to pin him down between Warrior and Teacher if you can see his jaw.  He does seem to have a narrow face, but he might still have a good jaw angle.  He's built like my dad, a Teacher (who I was SURE was a Warrior until I measured him).  But I'd have to get a good look at his jaw.
Posted by: Symbi, Monday, September 14, 2009, 11:49pm; Reply: 118
Good idea Ribbit!

Sorry we are highjacking this thread.  

He is long limbed and has tendon like a teacher, you're right.  Looks like a square jaw too in this picture: http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2007/feb/23/mychatandduetwithclintea

If we all were famous moviestars, it'd be easy to measure our finger length by our hand imprints!  Didn't think of it, googled Clints fingers (oh)(wiseman).  

This page has many of his hand imprints http://theclinteastwoodarchive.blogspot.com/2009/02/clint-eastwood-hand-prints.html.  Giving a quick measure (hard to tell though in some of them), looks like his D4 is longer in both hands.  

It fits, one of the most masculine actors would be andric!

That blows the warrior or explorer theory away.  Could he be a teacher?  but he doesn't eat cheese!  He's also 6' 2" (1.88 M).
What if he's an O and is actually a Hunter.  Hard to believe he'd be eating the wrong foods with his level of health and output!
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 15, 2009, 12:26am; Reply: 119
what s up with Clint and you? ;)
we know how to keep secrets no worries! lol
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, September 15, 2009, 12:31am; Reply: 120
Yeah, his jaw looks just like my dad's.  I bet he's a Teacher.  It's unlikely he feels so fantastic on his current diet if he was an O.  He would be on Atkins or South Beach or something.  LOL
Posted by: Symbi, Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 1:07am; Reply: 121
True Ribbit.
  
Lola - ROFL  ;D
you're a character!(woot)(bunny)(happy)
Posted by: Rosamunde, Monday, October 19, 2009, 4:57pm; Reply: 122
Is it just me or is it an explorer thing.  Like quite a number of people I can become engrossed in something.  So much so that I forget to eat.  someone mentioned in one of the threads that explorers once they are up and going are unstoppable (something like that).  My query is re energy.  I find I get going and the energy level is amazing and then suddenly wham, something floors me or there is  a change and I have no get up and go or interest in much except maybe to sit and read.  Does anyone else have that flattened battery time after feeling really good etc.

deeply allergic to cats, slightly to fluffy fur dogs.  Quite spiritual, more recently drawn to shamanism.  sounds as if am more introvert than extrovert from the various entries.  Him in doors says how can someone spend so much of their time being concerned about the way they feel react etc, especially to food.  Have attempted to explain that it runs in the background and is an awareness not an obssession?
Posted by: Symbi, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 12:00am; Reply: 123
Rosamunde, yes sometimes I clean the whole house, knowing that the day after I will be really tired and unmotivated.  But do I make that happen by doing manic cleaning or is it preconception?  It could also be prodomal before a migraine or a headache is coming.  Also to do with the pressure in the air.  With Low pressue weather, lack of energy, cold skin...  
Yeah I get engrossed in things and sometimes think eating will slow me down so I put it off.  And can get obsessive and change quickly!
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 10:20am; Reply: 124
Thanks for all your interesting posts.

Well here I am
B explorer 37 %
( swami- in book I am nomad)

I am mostly ENFP ( However at times I come out as INFP)
and I am a 7 with 6 wing but I used to (10 years ago or so) to be more 8 winged ::)

Things that doesn´t fit me in explorer;

I am not very allergic - apart from grass and dust mites ( but both are pretty much under control an doesn´t bother me much)
I am not very caffein sensitive- coffe late at night- bad idea- but fine the rest of the time.
I am Not a nonnie
or super taster ( just a normal taster)
I am not left handed.
I don´t have a problem with my liver

explorer features in me is;

I am asymmetrical - in fingerprints
(and boob( a nomad thing ;D))
I am Mesomorphic/with a little endomophic side
I am rh negative
I do do things my own way :D BIG time  :B
I seem to get well/heal fast
I can be accident prone ::)
I am very hard to diagnose
and I never know how I react to medication


More Nomad sides
My world view is receptor
I am sensitive to synthetic material like polyester
and prefers cotton, bamboo, linned silk and wool ;D
I  am very weather sensitive
just  as I am very visual
- and I tend to keep my real emotions hidden, but is raher plegmatic as well.
Optimistic
got small teeth and incisor front teeth.
White lines on 2 fingers
Proptaster

I even got a few Gatherer sides as well  ::)

My diet isn´t very explorerlike;
got chocolate as diamond  :D
red meat, full fat dairy and several cheeses as superfood
and lots of the normal diamonds for explorers are either neutral or diamond
so I have a truly Henriette diet ;D




Posted by: Symbi, Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 10:33pm; Reply: 125
The famous Henriettediet - how are you going on that Henriette?  
I like the way you put your traits according to Genotype, very organised!  Do you have incisor shovelling?  What kind of fingerprints?  How tall are you - Nomad types are normally short or tall?
I sympathise on being assymetrical, breasts and all, thought that was an Explorer thing?

One thing that totally amazed me about finding I was an explorer was how it fits with personality, I'm also INFP / INFJ (more J as I'm getting older).  I was stunned when the book said that Explorers in the womb, learnt that they would have to adapt to wildly changing conditions.  That was exactly what I needed for a very changable childhood, 5 hometowns, 12 schools, 5 different family situations.  Since then life's kept on changing alot.  I did alot of temp work and I was able to adapt and fit in to just about any workplace or situation.  Kind of like one of those changable morphs in Red Dwarf or Star Trek (wink)  Sometimes though it's like I change to fit everyone around me and forget about pleasing myself though  :-/
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 12:54am; Reply: 126
we do have things in common, specially the very changeable childhood
part!!! ;)
Posted by: paul clucas, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 1:16am; Reply: 127
I think Clint is a Teacher - remember the ropey tendons in those hand close-ups just before the draw?

If you are looking for a famous and tall explorer how about the Governator: Aaaarnold.  Asymmetrical face, low hips, mesomorph.  When I was slim in my mid twenties many people asked if I was related to Jim Carey, so maybe he is a tall but weedy Explorer instead of a Nomad.

Could Celebrity Genotyping be the reality game show for this board?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 1:57am; Reply: 128
Quoted Text
Could Celebrity Genotyping be the reality game show for this board?


look for older threads on this subject with links to celebrity photos and all
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 8:19am; Reply: 129
Quoted from Symbi
The famous Henriettediet - how are you going on that Henriette?

I am actually doing well- at times a few * dots sneak in- but my diamonds feels soo good. :D

I like the way you put your traits according to Genotype, very organised!
Do you have incisor shovelling?  

Yes

What kind of fingerprints?  

Mainly whorls 4 on left hand + 1 ulnar loop
3 on right hand+ 2 ulnar loops- and btw both my index fingers are longer


How tall are you 5,5- that is not very tall in Denmark where women are on average are 5.7 and th younger ones even taller  - Nomad types are normally short or tall?
I sympathise on being assymetrical, breasts and all, thought that was an Explorer thing?
Well it is also under nomads

One thing that totally amazed me about finding I was an explorer was how it fits with personality, I'm also INFP / INFJ (more J as I'm getting older).  I was stunned when the book said that Explorers in the womb, learnt that they would have to adapt to wildly changing conditions.
  
me too- my mum was quite stressed when she was pregnant- doing exams at the University and taking care of my dad

That was exactly what I needed for a very changable childhood, 5 hometowns, 12 schools, 5 different family situations.

wow that could be me; my parents came from very different lifes Mum upperclass and dad working class- they got divorced when I was 7 - and we moved to a commune- my mum fell in love with this crazy american greenpeace activist - and we started a totally different life - but I still had to be able to see my dads and mums family - so one thing Im VERY good at is adapting .

Since then life's kept on changing alot.  I did alot of temp work and I was able to adapt and fit in to just about any workplace or situation.  

me too- but it also makes it hard for me to figure out what I really want to do.

Kind of like one of those changable morphs in Red Dwarf or Star Trek (wink)  Sometimes though it's like I change to fit everyone around me and forget about pleasing myself though  :-/


:K)
Posted by: Symbi, Friday, October 23, 2009, 3:29am; Reply: 130
whoa freaky.  My parents broke up when I was 8 yo.

All that temp work certainly showed me what I don't want to do forever!  Glad I'm in good company and not the only one !  :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, October 24, 2009, 12:54pm; Reply: 131
;D
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