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Posted by: alila, Friday, June 5, 2009, 6:36am
Hi everyone,

I was wondering if anyone has experienced trigger finger pain. I searched the forum but haven't come across any correspondence regarding this. :-/

Thank you.
alila
Posted by: Amazone I., Friday, June 5, 2009, 10:52am; Reply: 1
how does its manifesting??) Itching, or pain and if painful where exactly in what finger??).....can be related to arthritis or justamente some ligaments which are distored ??).... :-/ :o please explain and let us know a bit more about that issue....thanx in advance.....
Posted by: alila, Friday, June 5, 2009, 12:33pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from Amazone I.
how does its manifesting??) Itching, or pain and if painful where exactly in what finger??).....can be related to arthritis or justamente some ligaments which are distored ??).... :-/ :o please explain and let us know a bit more about that issue...


With pleasure... The truth is I tell my friends about you guys and how wonderful it is to be able to reach you all whenever I have a problem.

One of my very old-standing friends, aged 60, has been to the doc with severe pain on her left thumb. It's diagnosed as "trigger finger".

She has pain at the bottom of her left thumb where the finger is connected to the hand. The pain sometimes is hard to endure, especially in the morning. No itching! She really wants to avoid having an operation if possible (being a total believer in mental strength and/or any other solution like exercise, diet, etc.)

Thank you again, and thanks from her, too.

alila
Posted by: Vicki, Friday, June 5, 2009, 1:07pm; Reply: 3
I hope your friend finds relief.  

The Live Right or Genotype diet would be very helpful to her.  Does she know her blood type?  To reduce inflammation, include pineapple juice in the diet and consider using these supplements: quercetin and bromelain.  

I had this condition (link below) which lasted for perhaps a year:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4176/is_20030413/ai_n14545859/


I attribute my problem to thyroid issues due to being a new mother/breastfeeding/sleep depravation.  
Posted by: alila, Saturday, June 6, 2009, 10:11am; Reply: 4
Quoted from Vicki
I had this condition (link below) which lasted for perhaps a year:


Thank you Vicki. I sent the link and your diet recommendation to her.

One think struck me, though. Her doc told her to put her hand in hot/warm water whereas in the link icing is suggested.

Anyway, has the pain totally disappeared in your case?

Cheers,
alila
Posted by: Vicki, Saturday, June 6, 2009, 12:49pm; Reply: 5
Yes.  One day it finally disappeared.  Two times, when I had a long standing pain disappear, I immediately forgot about it - as if I never had it - such a wonderful thing!

From your description, I don't think she has what I had, but I'd look to thyroid and other outside causes.

She should probably avoid all gluten.
Posted by: Amazone I., Saturday, June 6, 2009, 1:26pm; Reply: 6
ahhasaa...a sort of tendovaginitis of the thumb,...ok...classic meds are using cortisone ...yikes... :-/ I'd go or for MSM or Chondoitin& Glucosaminsulphat...or even a mix of all three products...but in largest amounts....dito may help some phenylalanine against the pain,
warm water with seasalt for baths, or if she preferes some cold water against pain??), physiotherapy .....some arnica globuli as well and arnica as a sort of wrap.....
Posted by: alila, Sunday, June 7, 2009, 3:38pm; Reply: 7
Thanks a million to you both.

My friend (A) is determined to follow your advice and see what happens before having anything medical done...

Will keep you informed.

Cheers,
alila
Posted by: Vicki, Sunday, June 7, 2009, 4:19pm; Reply: 8
Wonderful!
Posted by: Amazone I., Monday, June 8, 2009, 5:20am; Reply: 9
alila,  always welcomed here ;) :D ;D
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, November 25, 2011, 2:57pm; Reply: 10
Hi!

I must resurrect this thread...got a trigger finger myself which started 'jumping' about 6 weeks ago.

Just read on the home page that Dr.D started to supervise a shift program and Andrea Cayea went to it with her husband who has a trigger finger. Dr.D recommended some supplements to fix it and I am very interested to find out what he had to say about it!

Also on the same line....what should I eat to make more synovial fluid to lubricate my joints, surely that will help my finger as well?
Posted by: 18579 (Guest), Wednesday, June 6, 2012, 2:15pm; Reply: 11
I would also like to resurrect this thread... someone above mentioned that the affected joint was the basal thumb joint. Both mine are painful. It's inherited from my Grandmother on Father's side. My Uncle has the problem too. He just calls it arthritis, so I'm not sure precisely the problem, whether it's arthritis or trigger finger?
I'm new here, don't know if an old thread will be read... I've tried the Glucosomine, Condroitin & MSM with some success, but wondered if I was more strict with diet if I could get rid of the supplements. Also wish to know if there are foods that help keep joints lubricated.
I am a B blood type.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, June 6, 2012, 2:51pm; Reply: 12
Quoted Text
I've tried the Glucosomine, Condroitin & MSM


Condroitin is A specific
try to avoid that

Dr D has written a whole health series
http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=ED063S

list of avoids for your type is listed

also
Read about the non secretor issue
http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/newbie/a.htm
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, June 6, 2012, 3:38pm; Reply: 13
KathrynIT and others.. for pain I might try a glass of pure cherry juice.. if it works .. it is a gout like inflammation.. diet will fix that.. better than all else..

IF it is already to disfigured bone then I would look into Prolo therapy.. show this video to your doctors.. they have new ways of doing the same by taking your blood.. spinning it and injecting it.. == results== it strengthens any joint to prevent further damage..

IT is not as gruesome as the video makes it out to be.. relatively no pain ..

read here :
Prolotherapy
Dr. C. Everett Koop's Story
Prolotherapy is the name some people use for a type of medical intervention in musculoskeletal pain that causes a proliferation of collagen fibers such as those found in ligaments and tendons, as well as a shortening of those fibers. The "prolo" in Prolotherapy, therefore, comes from proliferative.

Other therapists have referred to this type of treatment as Sclerotherapy. "Sclera" comes from the Greek word "sklera", which means hard. Sclerotherapy, therefore, refers to the same type of medical intervention which produces a hardening of the tissues treated - just as described above in the proliferation of collagen fibers.

Not many physicians are aware of Prolotherapy, and even fewer are adept at this form of treatment. One wonders why that is so. In my opinion, it is because medical folks are skeptical and Prolotherapy, unless you have tried it and proven its worth, seems to be too easy a solution to a series of complicated problems that afflict the human body and have been notoriously difficult to treat by any other method. Another reason is the simplicity of the therapy: Injecting an irritant solution, which may be something as simple as glucose, at the junction of a ligament with a bone to produce the rather dramatic therapeutic benefits that follow.

Another very practical reason is that many insurance companies do not pay for Prolotherapy, largely because their medical advisors do not understand it, have not practiced it, and therefore do not recommend it. Finally, Prolotherapy seems too simple a procedure for a very complicated series of musculoskeletal problems which affect huge numbers of patients. The reason why I consented to write the preface to this book is because I have been a patient who has benefitted from Prolotherapy. Having been so remarkably relieved of my chronic disabling pain, I began to use it on some of my patients - but more on that later.

When I was 40 years old, I was diagnosed in two separate neurological clinics as having intractable (incurable) pain. My comment was that I was too young to have intractable pain. It was by chance that I learned that Gustav A. Hemwall, M.D., a practitioner in the suburbs of Chicago, was an expert in Prolotherapy. When I asked him if he could cure my pain, he asked me to describe it. When I had done the best that I could, he replied., "There is no such pain. Do you mean a pain?" And then he continued to describe my pain much better than I could. When I said, "That's it exactly," he said, "I can fix you." To make a long story short, my intractable pain was not intractable and I was remarkably improved to the point where my pain ceased to be a problem. Much milder recurrences of that pain over the next 20 years were retreated the same way with equally beneficial results.

I was so impressed with what Dr. Hemwall had done for me that on several occasions, just to satisfy my curiosity, I watched him work in his clinic and witnessed the unbelievable variety of musculoskeletal problems he was able to treat successfully. Many of his patients were people who had been treated for years by all sorts of methods, including major surgery, some of which had left them worse off than they were before. Many of his patients had the lack of confidence in further treatment and the low expectations that folks inflicted with chronic pain frequently exhibit. Yet I saw so many of them cured that I could not help but become a "believer" in Prolotherapy.

I was a pediatric surgeon, and there are not many times when Prolotherapy is needed in children because they just don't suffer from the same relaxation of musculoskeletal connections that are so amenable to treatment by Prolotherapy. But I noticed frequently that the parents of my patients were having difficulty getting into their coats, or they walked with a limp, or they favored an arm. I would ask what the problem was and then, if it seemed suitable, offer my services in Prolotherapy at no expense, feeling that I was a pediatric surgeon and this was really not my line of work. The results I saw in those many patients were just as remarkable as was the relief I had received in the hands of Dr. Hemwall. I was so impressed with what Prolotherapy could do for musculoskeletal disease that I, at one time, thought that might be the way I would spend my years after formal retirement from the University of Pennsylvania. But the call of President Reagan to be Surgeon General of the United States interrupted any such plans.

The reader may wonder why, in spite of what I have said and what this book contains, there are still so many skeptics about Prolotherapy. I think it has to be admitted that those in the medical profession, once they have departed from their formal training and have established themselves in practice, are not the most open to innovative and new ideas.

Prolotherapy is not a cure-all for all pain. Therefore, the diagnosis must be made accurately and the therapy must be done by someone who knows what he or she is doing. The nice thing about prolotherapy, if properly done, is that it cannot do any harm. How could placing a little sugar-water at the junction of a ligament with a bone be harmful to a patient?

C. Everett Koop, M.D., ScD
Former United States Surgeon General

Reprinted Excerpts from Prolo Your Pain Away
by Dr. Ross Hauser

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBWGxeB2JhY

or

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzLj5t4M8cQ&feature=related


  
Posted by: Cristina, Wednesday, June 6, 2012, 7:05pm; Reply: 14
trigger finger  ... I recently had an A type friend suffering this .. recommended compliance to the A type and TC complex ... it has something to do with the nerve shaft weakening I think ... also, visits to chiro to loosen up the spine for any touchy points there that may be pressing on some nerves and compounding the issue.  Flexibility, stretching exercises, massages on the hands and arm following the nerve path connecting to it, all along the arm to the back ... All this worked in my friend's case ... and, due to TC I say, he is experiencing some very positive side effects ... focus, alertness improvement ... stamina ... and now able to move finger without pain ... all in a matter of days ...
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, June 7, 2012, 7:35pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Cristina
trigger finger  ... I recently had an A type friend suffering this .. recommended compliance to the A type and TC complex ... it has something to do with the nerve shaft weakening I think ... also, visits to chiro to loosen up the spine for any touchy points there that may be pressing on some nerves and compounding the issue.  Flexibility, stretching exercises, massages on the hands and arm following the nerve path connecting to it, all along the arm to the back ... All this worked in my friend's case ... and, due to TC I say, he is experiencing some very positive side effects ... focus, alertness improvement ... stamina ... and now able to move finger without pain ... all in a matter of days ...

Cristina, doesn't it make you feel good to help another person so that it makes their life happier??!! I just love it!!
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