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Posted by: BohemianChris, Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 2:54pm
I've been finding ancestors on other ancestry.com member trees and building a family tree that goes back to all the old countries. It wasn't hard to link my grandma's Mom's grandparents back to Ireland, but her Dad's family led me way back into Canadian and American history. I even found a few relatives who had to flee Salem, Massachusettes after being accused of witchcraft.

I suppose most of these ancestors passed on traits like my hair color, eye color, build, etc., but the origin of my B blood type is more mysterious. Its a thin genetic thread from a single Bohemian ancestor on my Mom's Dad's side undiluted by the sea of O's and A's in my European family's blood.

And according to Dr. D'Adamo's Blood Type Encyclopedia, that B blood type is essentially an Asian blood type that migrated through Semitic groups into Eastern Europe. That is a piece of history that my overwhelmingly Catholic family is oblivious to.

I hope DNA can help me understand the migration from Asia to Bohemia in the Czech Republic and eventually to America intact of this key piece of info. A thread links me to the distant past and guides my body's inflammatory survival strategy, my risks for diseases, even personality traits. Call it thread theory. One seemingly trivial family heirloom can shape my entire life and self-knowledge is the key to reaching my genetic potential.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 3:02pm; Reply: 1
if you get a chance, national geographic makes great dna tests
https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/atlas.html

http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2007/01/06/internal-archeology?blog=24
Posted by: BohemianChris, Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 3:14pm; Reply: 2
Thanks Lola. The Genographic Project is the DNA test I was thinking about. First because its the least expensive ;D and second because it contributes to overall scientific knowledge.
Posted by: Maldo, Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 3:24pm; Reply: 3
I did the genographic test with national geographic - its so interesting and I highly recommend it.   (Although, I cant make the connection to genotype - I guess it doesnt make sense to make such a connection)

I also found out that one of my ancestors got put to death around 1150 in england for certain misdemeanors...
Posted by: BohemianChris, Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 4:35pm; Reply: 4
There's a passage in Deep Ancestry by Spencer Wells which is the official book for the National Geographic Genographic Study that describes how Lewontin turned preexisting ideas of genetic variation on its head by discovering, using DNA, that 85% of genetic variation occurs within groups of people, not among different nationalities of races. Also in Seven Daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes describes his controversial mitochondrial DNA finding that 80% of modern European DNA is hunter-gatherer and 20% is more recent farmer genetics.

What this means is that the diversity of survival strategis that seperates, say, a Hunter from a Teacher is very much intact and well distributed among populations. Type O is interesting for its resilience. Because its recessive, it can lay dormant for generations and then just pop up! My hope is that these unique people don't have problems fitting in.
Posted by: BohemianChris, Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 4:56pm; Reply: 5
To clarify the last point. My Dad is type A and he's lost a lot of weight by mostly eating bread. I'm Type B and I thrive on a diet much lower in carbs. Of course, I grew up eating plenty of wheat and it didn't seem to hit me until I was 20 and I lost weight and had digestive problems. The gastoenterologist I went to was a nice man, but he actually said to my parents "Diet doesn't matter in Crohn's Disease." He couldn't be more wrong. But I guess from his perspective, he can't control what people eat and he doesn't know specifically what any individual patient should eat. This, one has to find out for oneself (with a little help from this site ;)
Posted by: 4055 (Guest), Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 9:58pm; Reply: 6
I am B+ and my mother's side of the family is from Ireland (pretty darn close to 100% heritage) and my father's side is from Bohemia (i am third generation on his side so they came right off the boat) I can't figure out how I got mine either.
Posted by: RedLilac, Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 12:43am; Reply: 7
I waffled between Yes and I want to know more.  I decided that I want to know more.  My O+ Mother is Polish.  She had dark brown hair and brown eyes.  I have light brown hair and green eyes.  Some of her siblings had hazel eyes and blond hair from picture of her parents it looks like my grandfather was the light eyed light haired one and my Grandmother was the dark haired beauty.  Grandfather’s side has been linked to Bella Russia and Lithuania.  My Grandfather was born in Warsaw Poland.  My Grandmother was born in Michigan, USA.  I’m curious where her ancestors came from.  They both died when my mother was growing up.

My AB- Father is ½ WASP & ½ Jew.  He had light brown hair and blue eyes. Both sides of the family disinherited them when they married.  My Grandfather’s family can be traced to 1635 in America from both my Father’s Grandfather’s family and his Grandmother’s family.  That side of him is Dutch, English and Welsh.  The Jewish side is English &German.  They came to America in the 1800’s.  My uncles went to the Mormon Tabernacle in Utah to trace part of that side of the family’s ancestry because a relative stopped off there for supplies during the gold rush and everyone was required to give their history.

So some I know, but I’d like to more about the different paths backward in my ancestry.  I suspect the B in me comes from my Jewish side.

My B+ son is even more of a mutt than I am.  His Father was ½ Swedish and ½ Arian German.  My son’s hair is brown but when he gets out in the sun it turns almost blond.  He had blond hair when he was a child.  His eyes are blue.  His father was blond haired & blue eyed.  We know nothing of his ancestry.  His Father’s dead, so unless he decides to do some research later on in life, we won’t know.
Posted by: TJ, Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 2:25am; Reply: 8
I haven't gotten into family history myself, but my mother and her father were big into it.  Grampa did genealogical research for other people (for hire).  My B gene comes from dad's side, and there isn't nearly as much of the family history work done on his side.  One of these days I want to get into it myself, but I just can't get motivated right now.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 7:52am; Reply: 9
B´s are pretty common in  Eastern Europe......

My grandmother( Type B) on my dad side -had Ukraine/ East German ancestors (Great Great grandparents - and we always joked that my dad ( AB) looked like a real Cossack ( Dark hair -very blue eyes- the way he walked ;))
while my Mothers family( all O´s)  are mainly Danish; Norwegian, and something else that I forgot.

I haven´t used much time with my own family- but I have used a lot of time on my step dads family
He is born in USA - and there was so many tales about his past that I decided to use my Historian background - and it was really interesting what we found out.

His mother had always told him that is fathers family was jewish and came from Prussia ( the Eastern part of Germany- well the actually came from Rhineland - and was not jewish at least not in 1670  ;) - so sometimes a little thing gets completely messed up- it I always wise to find to independent sources that tells the same story  :D
Posted by: Maldo, Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 9:07pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from BohemianChris
There's a passage in Deep Ancestry by Spencer Wells which is the official book for the National Geographic Genographic Study that describes how Lewontin turned preexisting ideas of genetic variation on its head by discovering, using DNA, that 85% of genetic variation occurs within groups of people, not among different nationalities of races. Also in Seven Daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes describes his controversial mitochondrial DNA finding that 80% of modern European DNA is hunter-gatherer and 20% is more recent farmer genetics.


I found Sykes Seven Daughters a great book.   Im from the South Pacific and there was some amazing insights into how the human race moved into that region and evolved...
Posted by: Sky, Sunday, October 5, 2008, 5:13pm; Reply: 11
My dad's family is of Scandanavian descent (Knudsen/Jensen so Norway); my mom Russian (Molokon Christians, kicked out by the last Czar of Russia, Alexander). Both A's.

Growing up, I joked that I look German since that was the middle-ground people.

Now I live in the land of Mestizos (Spanish slang term for people of Mexican heritage who are a mix of European and Native American ancestries).

In college, my dorm roommate was "Black Irish," since he could tan darkly and when his brown hair grew out, would get real curly and thick. His explanation was some of the survivors of the Spanish Armada that tried to invade England included Moorish slaves, and some people had to land on Catholic Ireland to survive.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, October 6, 2008, 1:29am; Reply: 12
Knudsen?  Like the organic juice brand?
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, October 6, 2008, 8:24am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Maldo


I found Sykes Seven Daughters a great book.   Im from the South Pacific and there was some amazing insights into how the human race moved into that region and evolved...


me too - facinating read  :D

BTW Knudsen and especially JENSEN is much more common in Denmark than in Norway  ;)
Posted by: Sky, Wednesday, October 8, 2008, 3:47pm; Reply: 14
Yes, you are correct. I keep forgetting the Danish background.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, October 8, 2008, 5:38pm; Reply: 15
;D
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, October 23, 2008, 2:51am; Reply: 16
DH just told me about another circle in my family tree.  My great-grandmother married my great-grandfather on opposite sides of the family, in their old age.  It would be like if my father died and my husband's mother died, my mother marrying his father.  In a way it's sort of sweet, them having known each other for many years, but then again....."They probably weren't allowed to marry outside the church," I told DH.  DH said, "They probably weren't allowed to marry outside the family."  LOL  Now that's redneck.  Small town, podunk Alabama with a population made up of....family.  Woo-hoo!
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, November 23, 2008, 4:10pm; Reply: 17
My Grandfather and his 1st cousin married sisters.  If you looked at my uncle and his cousin side by side you would have thought they were brothers.  They were always very close throughout their life too.  
Posted by: apositive, Monday, November 24, 2008, 10:17pm; Reply: 18
BohemianChris,  Let me get this straight . . . your father is type A and the Bohemian ancestor comes on your mother's side of the family?

I hate to break the news, but I am afraid that the current state of DNA testing will not help with the migration from Asia to Eastern Europe, etc.  But DNA studies become more and more refined and precise as time goes on.

When DNA testing was first starting up I heard a lecture about it by someone how was using mitochondrial DNA (which comes down through females only) to confirm genealogies.  The lecturer was working with New England families but he spoke about a researcher in Great Britain (I don't know whether it was Skyes or someone else) who had found one woman who had Great Britain ancestry confirmed centuries back (most can go back to about 1600, provided the church or town hall holding their records was not bombed in WWII) - well, the woman's her mitochondrial DNA was completely atypical of Great Britain but was completely typical of women in the Near East.  So, that blood type B just might have travelled back from the Crusades to England and was passed down to you.  Who knows?
Posted by: BohemianChris, Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 6:32pm; Reply: 19
The B blood type comes from my maternal grandpa John Sykora. His parents came directly from Bohemia, though I do have some English blood on the paternal side of my maternal grandma Annabelle's side (Prince). Ultimately, the mitochodrial DNA testing would trace the French-Canadian side of her family. Two questions I have are "Were there any native American women in this maternal line since my ancestors were in Canada since the 1700's?" and "If my French ancestors are from Normandy, do they have Celtic blood?"

I think there's inbreeding in every family. Like my maternal great great grandma married her uncle. Life on the frontier may have really limited the gene pool 8)
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 1:00am; Reply: 20
I just found out I have Cherokee Indian blood on my mom's mom's mom's (I'm not sure how many yet) side.  So I carry Cherokee mitochondria.  We overheard my mom's cousin mention it at my grandmother's funeral yesterday and nobody (not my mom or her siblings) knew it.  So my husband, who is the family historian, got in touch with that cousin for specifics.  Pretty cool, huh?  And nobody knew!
Posted by: BohemianChris, Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 1:28am; Reply: 21
That's very cool, Ribbit. I think most Americans have a story or two about native American blood in their family, but aren't necessarily able to prove it. Maybe some of the stories are true and others are mythologies created to help connect us to this country on a spiritual level. Perhaps the mitochondrial DNA is the ultimate authority, but there are also some pretty good written records in archives and churches. I've been surprised by some of my family heritage, but never disappointed.

-Chris
Posted by: Judy, Friday, April 3, 2009, 1:30pm; Reply: 22
Yes, I've researched my genealogy, and I'm still researching.  I'm about as much of a mutt as a person can be.  Besides having Native American ancestry (both Creek and Cherokee), I have ancestors from all over Europe and the Middle East.  However, it seems that all of my ancestors came into the US quite early.  I haven't yet found any that got here after the 1700s, and many were here before that.
Posted by: Judy, Friday, April 3, 2009, 1:34pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Ribbit
I just found out I have Cherokee Indian blood on my mom's mom's mom's (I'm not sure how many yet) side.  So I carry Cherokee mitochondria.  We overheard my mom's cousin mention it at my grandmother's funeral yesterday and nobody (not my mom or her siblings) knew it.  So my husband, who is the family historian, got in touch with that cousin for specifics.  Pretty cool, huh?  And nobody knew!

That is cool. :)  I already knew that I had Cherokee ancestry, but I had no idea that I had Creek until I started working on my family tree.  Based on the looks of my family, I suspect there's still more to find.

Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, April 4, 2009, 3:10am; Reply: 24
Ha.  Based on my looks you'd think purely northern European. ;)
Posted by: Jenny, Saturday, April 4, 2009, 10:07pm; Reply: 25
Hi Ribbit, that is great. I would love to find such an interesting precursor for myself, and the most likely is that an Irishman got into the Scottish mix at some point  ;) (shows up in my brother's Y  chromosome typing on our paternal surname).
But in your case, if it is 3 or 4 generations back that's only 1 in 32 or even 1 in 64, so no wonder you show up as what you mostly are!
Posted by: angel, Thursday, May 7, 2009, 11:56pm; Reply: 26
Been doing genealogy since I was 13, got hooked after a young womens activity. My mother's side is Scot-Irish and I have relatives who participated in the revolutionary and civil war on both sides. I have Cherokee way back in those lines too. Also my line criss crosses the way they do in the hills of tennesse. On my Dads side we are immigrants naturalized in 1905?? I have to look at the certificate again from my father's GGGrandfather. I am Finnish or Scandinavian-suspect Lappland -I get great tan each year and look like I ahve one even when I don't, I have dark skin compared to my husband. I love the way I can access info online from home instead of having to drive to salt lake city to the family history library. It's is fun.

I have also done extractions to put information online from both death and birth certificates, that is neat. Alot of the people who are my age think genealogy is for old people not for young people, kinda like crochet and knitting.  
Posted by: AggieAllie, Friday, May 8, 2009, 12:38am; Reply: 27
BohemianChris,

Fascinating story- it makes you wonder- one of my best friends has a son- dark skin dark hair and the rest of the family is red, blonde and green eyes, and I'm 100% sure there's not another father.  Sometimes, genes like this just pop up, and most Americans think that everyone should be eating the same.  But your situation (your B blood) is so exciting- you've turned into a little geneology detective, if you will.

Found out from my grandmother before she died that we are Choctaw (which cracks me up b/c I have red hair and green eyes), but so many other nationalities as well- Irish, German, English, Choctaw, and on my husbands side (everything that I am not) Chezch and Italian.  So, good luck on your journey.  You have come sooooo far.

I think geneology and the blood type diet are in a way related b/c you are learning about yourself and even though you can't eat like your mother or how you were raised, you have learned that you are "special" and have to eat like your blood type- which right now is a mystery, but maybe someday you'll find that link.  If not, it's all good- at least you know how to eat to be healthy.  Good luck!

Posted by: md, Friday, May 8, 2009, 1:49am; Reply: 28
Some of you may be interested in one of the following books by Chris M. Reading, M.D.

1. Your Family Tree Connection
2. Trace Your Genes To Health

They explain how to draw up a family tree with known, diagnosed illnesses marked on it, along with symptoms and signs that  family members have experienced.
Posted by: md, Saturday, May 9, 2009, 1:30am; Reply: 29
Quoted from md
Some of you may be interested in one of the following books by Chris M. Reading, M.D.

1. Your Family Tree Connection
2. Trace Your Genes To Health

They explain how to draw up a family tree with known, diagnosed illnesses marked on it, along with symptoms and signs that  family members have experienced.



You can also find information online to help you draw up your medical family tree.
http://www.nsgc.org/consumer/familytree

Posted by: Lola, Saturday, May 9, 2009, 1:43am; Reply: 30
all this past and present family history needs to be filled out for swami....
Posted by: Bekki Shining Bearheart, Sunday, May 10, 2009, 6:50pm; Reply: 31
Great Grandparents on Dad's side all from Denmark

Kuhre (my paternal grandfather)(from Bornholme- an island between Sweden and Denmark) there are still lots of Kuhres there. hey must have been upper class because the earliest reference for the surname I could find is 1600s. The working class folks kept the tradition of naming that used the father's first name= Jens+sen = Jensen, Rasmus+sen = Rasmussen (or Rasmusdatter). Grampa's mother was a Fredricksen.

My paternal gramdmother was a Rasmussen (by then it had become a surname) and her mother was a Jensen. They were from Odense.

I think most of my genes come from that side-- more specifically from my maternal grandmother.

A few years ago the Danish relatives on her side got in touch with us and that's how I learned a lot of our family tree. Despite all of my searching and asking questions all my life I was never able to find out much.

Great Grandparents on Mom's side all from Hungary.

My two sisters are both Bs like my mom. As far as we can find out they all came from NE Hungary, in the mountains, but no one knows how far back. I was able to travel there in 2007, and met my mother's mother's people. Most did not speak English, which was frustrating, but they were very welcoming, salt of the earth kinds of people.

I have been wanting to do the National Geographic thing for a long time, but never had the $$.

Great thread... This kind of thing fascinates me.
Posted by: cozzete, Monday, May 11, 2009, 7:31am; Reply: 32
My Polish great grandfather who was a count married an Armenian woman and had two children. Then the great grandfather who was a consort of Edward the vii ran away with another woman to South America. The wife returned to Turkey to live with her sister. The son fell in love with his cousin and they married and gave birth to my mother. So my mother was 1/4 Polish and 3/4 Armenian. My father was 3/4 Scotch-Irish. He taught English to Syrian soldiers as his service in the second war and met my mother while teaching at an English college in Istanbul. I was conceived in the seat of civilization but was born in a town of 500 in the Ozark mountains. I'm confused.

My mother was a "vi-countess". A couple of years ago i found out that as a child of a vi-countess i also have a title;  "the honorable....." So i started using that title when i joined aarp. They thought i was a judge.

I'd like to know where the rh neg factor came in...from the polish side or the amenian side. My mother is o neg as i am. Her brother is ab neg. Is there a way to figure that out?
Posted by: Lola, Monday, May 11, 2009, 1:41pm; Reply: 33
what a story!!! :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, May 11, 2009, 7:41pm; Reply: 34
Interesting stories

Bekki Shining Bearheart
It is Bornholm ( without an e ) - lovely place

Interesting name Kuhre- very unusual.
It is a bit complex this thing about names ( family names) in Denmark
Until 1828 all got names after their father- like I would have been named Ivars-datter or Ivar-sen ( if I was a boy)- but in 1828 the law about fixed names came- however especially the farmers would´nt follow it so they contineud to give their children family names after the father,
However after 1856 it did become the law to keep the new fixed name.

so we did intil the 1980´s when stuff got mixed up again- people started to take new family names- mybe their grandparents or the womans maiden name- a bit confusing .
In my family;
my mum is a Nielsen
I am a Olsen
My daughter is a Redmond
and my step dad a Weisbrod.  :D

Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, May 11, 2009, 9:35pm; Reply: 35
I haven't researched it myself but a busybody aunt who married into the family has a graduate degree insomething like that. She said that on my Dad's side the family originally was from the scottish lowlands. Since then english and some others married into the family including a Choctaw woman named Running Deer in the early 1800's. On my mother's side all I know is that she said we have french, irish, and possibly english on that side.  P.S my family name ,though a scottish clan name, indicates to me that prior to scotland we probably were from Denmark but there is no data to support that conclusion other than the name.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, May 12, 2009, 7:54am; Reply: 36
Well Danish and Norwegian ( almost the same at that time and really now as well ;)) did put a lot of words  and blood and dna into the English  when they occupied Danelaget /Danelaw in North and East England - and on the Shetland isles and Orkney Isles lots of Norwegian as well. so who knows? GCG we might be related  ;D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, May 12, 2009, 11:11am; Reply: 37
Probably where the B gene came from.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, May 12, 2009, 1:39pm; Reply: 38
;) not that many B´s in this part of the world
Posted by: Bekki Shining Bearheart, Tuesday, May 12, 2009, 5:12pm; Reply: 39
Henriette-- thanks for correction and additional info.

Sometimes I get carried away when I get to typing, also Danish isn't my first language!! (or even my second one).

Does anyone know what the major blood type of the Sami people is? maybe the B came from there. I know that there has been intermarrying of Sami with Scandinavians in Norway and Sweden at least.

But my anthropologist husband say that we often assume that racial gorups are pretty pure in their homeland.

We forget that since even before medieval times, there was a lot of movement of people... You could walk across Europe in a year, quite easily. What with trading and so on, people traveled a lot.

And there is this:
URUMQI, China - After years of controversy and political intrigue, archaeologists using genetic testing have proven that Caucasians roamed China’s Tarim Basin 1,000 years before East Asian people arrived.

The research, which the Chinese government has appeared to have delayed making public out of concerns of fueling Uighur Muslim separatism in its western-most Xinjiang region, is based on a cache of ancient dried-out corpses that have been found around the Tarim Basin in recent decades.

“It is unfortunate that the issue has been so politicized because it has created a lot of difficulties,” Victor Mair, a specialist in the ancient corpses and co-author of “Mummies of the Tarim Basin”, told AFP.

“It would be better for everyone to approach this from a purely scientific and historical perspective.”

The discoveries in the 1980s of the undisturbed 4,000-year-old ”Beauty of Loulan” and the younger 3,000-year-old body of the ”Charchan Man” are legendary in world archaeological circles for the fine state of their preservation and for the wealth of knowledge they bring to modern research.

East Asian peoples only began showing up in the eastern portions of the Tarim Basin about 3,000 years ago, Mair said, while the Uighur peoples arrived after the collapse of the Orkon Uighur Kingdom, largely based in modern day Mongolia, around the year 842.

“Modern DNA and ancient DNA show that Uighurs, Kazaks, Krygyzs, the peoples of Central Asia are all mixed Caucasian and East Asian. The modern and ancient DNA tell the same story,” he said.

...The Yingpan Man, discovered in 1995 in the region that bears his name, has been seen as the best preserved of all the undisturbed mummies that have so far been found.

Yingpan Man not only had a gold foil death mask -- a Greek tradition -- covering his blonde bearded face, but also wore elaborate golden embroidered red and maroon garments with seemingly Western European designs.

His nearly 2.00 meter (six-foot, six-inch) long body is the tallest of all the mummies found so far and the clothes and artifacts discovered in the surrounding tombs suggest the highest level of Caucasoid civilization in the ancient Tarim Basin region.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 1:45am; Reply: 40
if you want more on ancestry and GT and how they all came to be, read Dr D s monographs of each GT up at the NAP store website.

beginning with yours! :)
http://www.4yourtype.com/explorer.asp

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 7:21am; Reply: 41
Sami /Lapps:     29% O type     63% A type     4% B type     4% AB
( Quite interesting considering their diet of few vegetables- but lots of cheese, yoghurt etc made from reindeer milk, fish and some reindeer meat.


so I don´t think it is from there ;)

In Europe groups with high levels of B types are ;

Gypsies, Baltic countries; Russia and Poland, Tatars
In my family the B come from my paternal grandmother who has roots in in Eastern Europe so no surprise there  :D

YEP it is sooooo interesting with the caucasian finds in China  :o I did read about them and that type of finds makes me want to use my BA in pre historic archeology again.
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 2:34pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from Henriette Bsec
Sami /Lapps:     29% O type     63% A type     4% B type     4% AB
( Quite interesting considering their diet of few vegetables- but lots of cheese, yoghurt etc made from reindeer milk, fish and some reindeer meat.


so I don´t think it is from there ;)


Most of the A's are probably A2. If I remember correctly double the number in the USA. About 20% of A's are A2 in North America.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 2:37pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


Most of the A's are probably A2. If I remember correctly double the number in the USA. About 20% of A's are A2 in North America.


Thanks - I think you are right  :D
and then reindeer milk ( unpasturized )
is something completely different than "dead" koneventional pasteurized cow milk
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 2:40pm; Reply: 44
Hey one ought to check dr d first  ;D
The Lapps

The Lapps are an ethnic group living in northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, and north-western Russia. Some are reindeer herders and some are fishermen. They are on the whole of caucasoid appearance but with a very slight mongoloid tendency. They speak a Finno-Ugric language closely related to Finnish, but regarding this there are two points of view. One is that they formerly spoke a non-Finno-Ugric language now lost, and adopted Finnish which in the course of time became modified. The other is that their original language was a Finno-Ugric one, but belonging to the Ugric sub-family; this however became modified by the very large-scale adoption of words from the language of their neighbours, the Finns. This distinction is an important one with regard to their possible relationship to the Samoyeds.

The Lapps have been very thoroughly studied from the point of view of blood groups. They are almost unique in their high frequency of A and totally so in having the highest A2 gene frequency known, reaching 42 per cent in one group tested. In this respect they are super-Caucasoids, for the A2 gene is almost entirely confined to caucasoid and negroid populations in whom it is however mostly below 5 per cent and only extremely rarely exceeds 10 per cent. (15)


http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Subgroups_of_Type_A
Posted by: angel, Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 7:37pm; Reply: 45
I am half finnish with some Sami or Lapp ancestry. I have tan (as compared to my husband, the great white wall) most year round. I tan very dark and easily in the spring and summer. My Father and his uncle are and were very much like me, dark skinned.

BTW We are all O+ on My father's side. There may be some other variance, but I don't know about it. My mother was a A.
Posted by: Katsy, Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 12:00am; Reply: 46
This is a curious thread to me -- my father was 100% Dutch ancestry (all his ancestors emigrated from the Netherlands in the 1860s, to a heavily Dutch populated part of Michigan); and my mother... well... a mix of a lot of stuff, and we can't go back very far. We know more of her paternal background (more German) than maternal.

A former co-worker was an immigrant from Russia, and she looked like a white Asian -- like one of the above comments, talking about the Lapps, I think. She had straight, black hair, very Asian facial features, face shape, etc., but her skin tone was whiter than me. I didn't ask about her ancestry, but assumed she must have lived in a part of Russia that had gotten to mix with more with Chinese than Europeans.
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