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BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  Millet and/or Rice Flour Pancakes??
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Monday, March 31, 2008, 4:17pm
Anybody have a recipe for these?

We have a great Spelt flour pancake/waffle mix from Whole Foods but I absolutely cannot eat it or the old gluten attack comes on...

But I sure would like to have some pancakes every so often... :-/
Posted by: Melissa_J, Monday, March 31, 2008, 4:25pm; Reply: 1
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/4/archives/00000239.htm

This (2nd recipe down) makes great waffles, I haven't tried it for pancakes yet, so if you do, let me know how they turn out.  (My son can no longer have eggs, and I can no longer have rice flour on GTD, so it's been far too long since I made these)  As with most GF pancakes, much oil is probably required to keep them from sticking, and it's the one thing that I used to sometimes use a nonstick pan for.
Posted by: cindyt, Monday, March 31, 2008, 5:22pm; Reply: 2
Does anyone have an affordable Internet source for organic millet flour? It isn't available anywhere here.
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Monday, March 31, 2008, 5:27pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Melissa_J
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/4/archives/00000239.htm

This (2nd recipe down) makes great waffles, I haven't tried it for pancakes yet, so if you do, let me know how they turn out.  (My son can no longer have eggs, and I can no longer have rice flour on GTD, so it's been far too long since I made these)  As with most GF pancakes, much oil is probably required to keep them from sticking, and it's the one thing that I used to sometimes use a nonstick pan for.


Sounds really good.  Thank you!  I'll give it a try and report back!  
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, March 31, 2008, 9:09pm; Reply: 4
http://www.breadbeckers.com/retail_price.htm

Breadbeckers has bulk grain.  Looks like the site also has some really nice "alternative" recipes.  I'll start an infothread to let everybody else know.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Monday, March 31, 2008, 10:54pm; Reply: 5
Cool.  I'll have to research that as I'm planning to get some food storage put together this month.

Azure standard is also good, their 5 pound millet flour is 3.45, and they have larger sizes.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Monday, March 31, 2008, 11:10pm; Reply: 6
Almond meal makes the best pancakes ever! ;D
Posted by: yvonneb, Monday, March 31, 2008, 11:15pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from cindyt
Does anyone have an affordable Internet source for organic millet flour? It isn't available anywhere here.

Can you guys get domestic size grain mills in the states to mill your own flour? I got a german one (manufacturer: 'Messerschmidt' ) from my mum, so fresh flour is never a problem. Before I got it, I found shop bought millet flour to be stale- ruined every recipe. Just tasted aweful!

Re. funkymuses recipe- Have tried own milled rice flour and it does not work at all. It's too grainy and even adding an egg or ground linseed/ flaxseed will not keep it together in the pan. Millet is fine.

I use I cup of flour and one egg per person. Add milk until right consistency is reached.
Makes 5  thinnish pancakes per person- fry for 1 min each side until golden brown.

And you must flip them- they taste better  ;D
( I use an 11"diameter frying pan with slanted rim, a runny batter which you swirl around until the bottom of the pan is just covered, appx 3/4 of a big ladle full)

Tip: Make the batter a bit in advance to baking, as it will thicken and you have to add more milk.
You can substitute I tablespoon of ground flaxseed for the egg to bind the batter.
You can substitute soy/ rice/ almond milk/ water for the regular milk.

Only rule- the first one never turns out- that's the doggie's pancake ;)

I like mine with two tablespoons of ground seeds added, fried in ghee. Eat warm spread with compliant jam rolled up like a sausage and a dollop of whipped cream on the end just before biting it off (to stop the cream melting)- a bit messy but SINFUL!!

I am sure Dr.D forgot to include cream in his avoid/ toxin lists- so while it's unlisted, it's a neutral- Hurray! :D :D


Posted by: Lola, Monday, March 31, 2008, 11:28pm; Reply: 8
millet and quinoa flour from Baldwins in the UK!
Posted by: Melissa_J, Monday, March 31, 2008, 11:28pm; Reply: 9
I have noticed that about millet flour myself, and am looking into getting a grain mill along with the food storage plan.  I have a manual one, but need an electric one in order to actually use it and rotate the food.  I also have a manual flaker, that I've never tried, but oats don't agree with me so I need to try it...maybe make some flakes brown basmati, that might really be good.
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 12:07am; Reply: 10
Quoted from yvonneb

Can you guys get domestic size grain mills in the states to mill your own flour?


Only rule- the first one never turns out- that's the doggie's pancake ;)



I use a Vita-Mix to grind my grains.  

So true about the first pancake!  I don't know why, but it's true!
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 12:29am; Reply: 11
Quoted from yvonneb


I am sure Dr.D forgot to include cream in his avoid/ toxin lists- so while it's unlisted, it's a neutral- Hurray! :D :D




oh boy... i just don't know about that... cream is a dairy and all dairy is a strict avoid for me.  He doesn't say 'dairy' but he does say milk... and half and half and cream are definitely from the cow's utter.  Am I not correct?  

And man... I'm going to get some almond meal!  Do I just replace say the rice flour?  Or just make the entire recipe with Almond Meal?

Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 12:32am; Reply: 12
half and half has a rating, so I use that value for cream....
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 12:41am; Reply: 13
I used millet flour for pancakes..It has a bitter aftertaste. :P

Either soy flour or almond flour or hazelnut flour. Last week I made pancakes from macadamia nut flour, ground in my vitamix.
Posted by: eh, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 1:45am; Reply: 14
I agree with Mayflowers about using millet flour :P

People, do not give up on rice flour in making pancakes. Vietnamese cuisine includes two types of rice pancake - the small delicate steamed and the fried golden crispy savoury filled ones! The latter may be made simply with rice flour, water, salt or you may add coconut milk (at least it doesn't contain dairy milk's growth factors). There are many websites for these. Banh xeo are the crispy ones. Don't be intimidated in making them, if you've never tried Vietnamese food. They really are as simple to make as they sound in the recipes you come across. In Australia we are spoiled for choice in South East Asian Cuisines - so forgive me for sounding so blithely confident in recommending the pancakes as I'm probably more familiar with the 'authentic' flavours and aromas than you would be in the colder parts of the northern hemisphere where SEA cuisines do suffer from the cold. (Am speaking from experience here.)
Posted by: Melissa_J, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 3:34am; Reply: 15
The soaked millet in my recipe doesn't seem to have the bitter aftertaste, it may have just been a very fresh batch of millet flour, but I made them many times, so perhaps soaking it helps with the bitterness.

Unfortunately I can only have basmati rice currently, and haven't made or found basmati rice flour.  Once I can start into gatherer black dots I'll have to try those with regular rice flour.  Rice pancakes are great with some sweet potato flour in them too.
Posted by: eh, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 5:55am; Reply: 16
Quoted from Melissa_J
  Rice pancakes are great with some sweet potato flour in them too.


I'll give that a go. Sounds good!

Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 1:37pm; Reply: 17
I don't know why everybody's having such a hard time making rice flour pancakes.  We make them all the time.  I don't use a hard-and-fast recipe, I just kind of throw them together, but they always turn out fine.  Now, given, you can't expect them to be like wheat pancakes, but they're good if you don't compare them.  I'll put a recipe together and post it.  I use up to half the flour amount with ground almonds.  But don't go out and buy ground almonds---it's terribly expensive.  Grind them yourself if you have a way, or use a food chopper or food processor.  Just get it as fine as you can.  Even if  it's small chunks, it helps the batter.
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, April 2, 2008, 2:00am; Reply: 18
Millet Pancakes
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1 c. millet flour
1/4 c. almond meal
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. molasses
2 Tbsp. agave, optional
1 egg (or 1 Tbsp. flax meal + 1/4 c. boiling water)
1 Tbsp. oil
1/2 water or compliant milk

Drop by 1/4 cup in hot ghee.  Makes 6-8.

Use rice flour instead of millet flour for a different flavor.  We use these for hamburger buns too.
Posted by: yvonneb, Wednesday, April 2, 2008, 7:00am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Lola
half and half has a rating, so I use that value for cream....

I don't agree. Half and half is still half milk and milk is an avoid- so far so good.

Now, whipping cream is all fat.
In the old days when your grannies mammy made butter herself, instead of buying it, she would spoon the cream of the top of the milk and whip it in a butterchurn until it became, well butter.
And if you can get organic cream and whip it for too long, that's exactly what you would get!

So I think the rating for whipping cream should be the same as for butter.

In the typebase it is also especially mentioned that half and half cannot be whipped- that makes me think that Dr.D is quite aware that cream exists and its unlisted as a neutral!
Hip hip Hurray ;D ;D
Posted by: 2330 (Guest), Wednesday, April 2, 2008, 5:20pm; Reply: 20
Well, I guess I could buy some cream and eat a little to see if this stuff is indeed a "neutral" for a Warrior whose gut hates uncultured dairy! My stomach "knows!"
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, April 4, 2008, 2:28am; Reply: 21
If whipping cream is all fat, wouldn't it be the same status as ghee, not butter?  Isn't ghee 100% milkfat?  Or maybe whipping cream has some casein in it too (or whatever it is that we strain off when we make ghee) which makes it a problem for some of us?
Posted by: Lola, Friday, April 4, 2008, 5:13am; Reply: 22
whipping cream does have milk solids I believe.
Posted by: 2330 (Guest), Friday, April 4, 2008, 3:47pm; Reply: 23
Even heavy cream has to be reduced by churning (or whatever method they use these days).
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, April 4, 2008, 5:40pm; Reply: 24
Cream would be somewhere between butter and half and half, but I'm not sure where.  Ghee is pure fat, no milk solids, butter has some milk solids, but some of them are left behind in the butter making process, so cream has more milk in it than butter does, and less than half and half.

I don't think it agrees with me, and gatherers should choose lower fat dairy, so I'm going to guess gatherers should avoid it.  It's in the cottage cheese I buy without other toxins (which is hard to find), but otherwise, I won't seek cream out.  

It doesn't show up in any of the listings for any genotype, or else I would agree that it's neutral.  Until I hear it from the top, I'll treat it as a toxin (except in cottage cheese, and on my otherwise compliant Thanksgiving pie).
Posted by: carnivsrus, Saturday, April 5, 2008, 10:08pm; Reply: 25
I have had great success grinding things like rice, millet and quinoa in my now seldom used coffee grinder. I don't know if this will hold up day after day but so far it makes really fine powder out of most of the grains I've tried it with. The volume is small for each grinding but when multi-graining it works out great. I have not tried nuts yet. I would expect the oils might grease things up just like coffee does in a way, just perhaps a little more but it's like the other grains sort of help to clean it up in the end so when doing it I might try to figure on a greasiest to driest grind sequence. My own waffle day has things like soy powder, oatmeal, spelt, quinoa millet, and rice in the mix. I do use either baking powder or baking soda and arrow root powder. Lately I've been saving the boiling water from making rice pasta as the main liquid. I still use eggs,honey and olive oil. I think the ahead of time advice is a good idea for the batter but I think the baking soda might have to be added again along with the water. Finally adding water in the end and during the cooking can help bring the heaviness away and if one can go through the most helpful step of separating the eggs whites and whipping these to be "folded" in to the batter you can have the most light and fluffy anything! The griddle must be well up to the right temperature to have a drop of water "dance" across the top and vaporize. It's hard to wait to pour the first one till the griddle is really ready but it just must be.
iemnli
Posted by: geminisue, Sunday, April 6, 2008, 12:30am; Reply: 26
Cottage Cheese Pancakes
whisk-1 egg
      1/2 cup low fat cottage cheese, squeezed through a wire strainer
                                      combine with egg
      1 T canola Oil
      3 T whole wheat flour (or compliant)add these two to other two and this makes four pancakes which you fry in a little oil about 3 minutes each side til golden brown, service with fruit, jelly or topping of choice.
Pancakes 272 calories
          20 carbohydrates
           3 fiber
          23 protein

I received this in an e-mail this morning, but remember it from many years ago, and liked it quite well, then.
Posted by: 2330 (Guest), Sunday, April 6, 2008, 1:30am; Reply: 27
I had forgotten about making cottage cheese pancakes decades ago! Thanks for reminding us, geminisue!
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, April 6, 2008, 2:09am; Reply: 28
Quoted Text
It's hard to wait to pour the first one till the griddle is really ready but it just must be.

either that or make the house pet very very happy!! lol ;)
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, April 6, 2008, 6:25am; Reply: 29
Quoted Text
I do use either baking powder or baking soda and arrow root powder.

some baking powder recipes without the aluminum
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?426
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